City Beat News Acknowledges Businesses with Outstanding Customer Satisfaction Ratings with Spectrum Awards

City Beat News Acknowledges Businesses with Outstanding Customer Satisfaction Ratings with Spectrum Awards

Receive press releases from City Beat News: By Email RSS Feeds: City Beat News Acknowledges Businesses with Outstanding Customer Satisfaction Ratings with Spectrum Awards City Beat News’ most recent group of Spectrum Award recipients are all consecutive-year winners. Lapeer, MI, May 25, 2019 –( PR.com )– City Beat News prides itself on honoring businesses and professionals that go above and beyond to provide their customers with an outstanding experience. Recently, it awarded three businesses that have all earned the highest ratings for consecutive years.Spectrum Award Winners are determined by City Beat News’ independent, proprietary research and evaluation system. The rating system combines data collected from nominations, online and other customer reviews, surveys, blogs, social networks, business-rating services, and other honors and accolades — all of which express the voice of the customer. Those that earn a 4-star or 5-star rating receive the Spectrum Award.Huey Enterprises (www.huey.com), headquartered in Ellisville, MO., is an executive search firm operating worldwide with a focus on executive and professional-level positions. The company’s main areas of specialization are the real estate, construction and retail industries. Additionally, the firm has a Career Advice Division to offer mid-career assistance for industry leaders faced with the task of finding new employment. Huey Enterprises has assisted numerous companies find top-level employees since it was founded in 1983. It has also earned four consecutive Spectrum Awards for customer service excellence. Visit its Award Page at https://awards.citybeatnews.com/Huey-Enterprises-Ellisville-MO.Paradise Biryani Pointe (www.dsmparadise.com) in West Des Moines, Iowa, serves Indian cuisine, specializing in Hyderabadi Biryani. The cuisine of the Hyderabadi region has evolved over centuries, incorporating the food and techniques of the foreign migrants to the area, creating “Hyderabadi Cuisine,” which has been elevated into a sublime art form with emphasis on choosing the right spices and cooking to the right degree and time. In addition to delicious food, Paradise Biryani Pointe also gives its customers excellent service. The restaurant has earned five consecutive Spectrum Awards; visit its Award Page at https://awards.citybeatnews.com/Paradise-Biryani-Pointe-West-Des-Moines-IA.Located in the heart of Savannah’s City Market, Belford’s (www.belfordssavannah.com) offers some of the South’s finest cuisine, including steaks, seafood and wine, in a casual atmosphere. Opened in 1996, the restaurant is located in a historic building originally constructed in 1902. Belford’s award-winning menu attracts locals and tourists alike, and the restaurant has earned a reputation as one of the city’s best due to its superb food and exceptional service. In addition to offering lunch and dinner daily, it is a perfect venue for private parties and events both large and small, with an experienced staff that will ensure your event runs smoothly. Belford’s has earned five consecutive Spectrum Awards; visit its Award Page at https://awards.citybeatnews.com/Belfords-Savannah-Seafood-Savannah-GA.“The Stirling Center is pleased to have City Beat News join it in the goal of researching, recognizing and promoting superior customer service,” says Frank Andrews, Executive Director of The Stirling Center for Excellence. “It is right in line with our mission of providing services and resources to companies that place an emphasis on providing an outstanding customer experience.”City Beat News provides the results of its research to both consumers and businesses at no charge, reporting on its findings on a rolling annual basis. “Each and every year, there is one rating posted just for you, the consumer, to help you find who has rated among the best,” says City Beat News Editor, Jamie Rawcliffe. “The Spectrum Award winners have earned our highest ratings and are posted on our website with their own Award Page.”About City Beat News and The Stirling CenterThe Stirling Center includes a learning and resource center with courses, team training and support, executive coaching, articles, and case studies focused on excellence. Its objective is to encourage and enable excellence across many fields, wherever it can. The Stirling Center, www.stirlingcenter.org, recognizes service excellence in both commercial businesses such as those served by City Beat News and Pulse of the City News, and its “life” and “public service” divisions.City Beat News and The Stirling Center are located in Lapeer, Michigan. For more information, call 866-732-9800 or go online to www.citybeatnews.com. Contact Information

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Ramadan In Canada: A Muslim Revert Shares Her Experience On Motherhood And Islam

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As Muslims around the world celebrate Ramadan and soon, Eid, it is interesting to learn about how different cultures around the world experience the same celebration with their unique cultural touch 😊 Each and every part of the world has their differences in celebrating these blessed occasions, but with the same beautiful purpose – to bring ourselves closer to God.
In this part of our Ramadan Around The World series, our contributor Rebecca , a Canadian Muslim shares her inspiring journey during Ramadan and experience as a mother, wife and as a new Muslim in Canada ❤️ Read on to find out more. 1. How is Ramadan like in Canada?
I converted to Islam in 2014, so my very first Ramadan was in the middle of the summer. The hours were long then, and still in 2019 we fast from about 3:30 AM to 8:30 PM. It can be a major struggle, particularly for those who have regular work hours, as you don’t get much sleep at night either! Because Canada is predominantly non-Muslim, there isn’t much of a festive atmosphere unless you are at the masjid in the evenings. It’s business-as-usual for most of us, going about our normal days. 2. What’s your biggest challenge or struggle during Ramadan and how do you overcome it?
My biggest struggle these past few years is that I have not been able to fast due to pregnancy, breastfeeding, and now another pregnancy. I have to find ways to make the month spiritually beneficial, all while taking care of my toddler son, working, etc. It can be a challenge being a mother in Ramadan – you simply don’t have as much time, and can’t go to the mosque for taraweeh, either. This year I made a goal to go on a “Negativity Fast,” where I avoid complaints and negative thoughts/behaviours, and that has been really great, alhumdullilah. 3. What are the timings for sahur and iftar like especially in summer VS winter? How does this affect your fast?
My husband wakes up for suhoor at 3 AM! He isn’t able to eat until about 8:30 PM – which is a very long day. Ramadan will be such a different experience here in the winter, I’m sure – short days and very cold weather. Alhumdullilah, everyone seems to be able to manage their fasts, even in the middle of summer. It’s extra important to hydrate well at night and eat healthy meals to get you through the long days. 4. What are some of the activities locals in Canada do during Ramadan?
Almost every mosque in my city offers free iftar daily. There are also so many mosques and organizations that do community outreach during Ramadan – organizing interfaith iftars, meals for the homeless, events for converts, etc. There are also different bazaars where local businesses get together to sell clothing, Ramadan/Eid decor, and food. And, of course, there are special spiritual gatherings during the month where scholars and community leaders speak. 5. Are there many non-Muslims where you are? Do they understand fasting and what are their reactions to it?
Most people in my city and country are not Muslim. In the larger cities, where the population is multicultural, many of them know about Ramadan. They all think it must be so difficult and always ask: “not even water?!” 6. What does Ramadan mean to you and how do you take care of yourself during this month?
Ramadan is a time to recharge. It’s a time to break bad habits we have picked up throughout the year and improve our character; a time to escape from the chaos of this world and immerse ourselves in gratitude to our Creator. Even when we can’t fast, we are given this month to reconnect. I try to focus on my spiritual self during Ramadan and not give in to the material world. 7. How do you reconnect with your faith and God during this month?
My goal every day of the year is to practice absolute gratitude to my Creator, but during Ramadan I also constantly remind myself to banish negativity and any toxic behaviour from my life. When I can’t abstain from food and water, I try to abstain from temptations of the dunya, and this helps me to connect to Allah. My husband and I spend more time discussing our faith and doing activities as a family that centre around togetherness. I also listen to more lectures on Youtube and podcasts (being able to listen instead of reading is a lifesaver as a mother!) and of course read and study more Quran. 8. What tips would you give to someone who’s visiting Canada during Ramadan?
I would say to visit many different mosques and experience the diversity of Canadian Muslims! As for fasting – it will be difficult, but Allah makes it easy for you when you have the best intentions. It always helps to take an afternoon nap, as well. 9. What unique dishes do locals or your family eat for sahur and iftar? What restaurants for iftar would you recommend to visitors who visit Canada?
We eat very normal “Canadian food” – which is actually a mix of food from around the world. I always rotate between meat, fish and vegetarian/vegan. We eat healthily year-round but make sure to eat extra well during Ramadan to fuel our bodies. A few examples of meals: coconut lentil curry, roasted chicken and vegetables, honey-soy salmon bowls with quinoa, beef stew, pasta, lots of big salads… Before our main meal, we break our fast with dates, milk and fruit. For suhoor, it’s usually eggs, oatmeal with seeds (like hemp, chia), and fruit. We don’t eat many desserts, but I did do some cookie baking and decorating this year!
My city has a large Muslim population, so we have a lot of halal restaurants. Mostly Indian, Lebanese and some north African. I love a North African restaurant called “La Khaïma Cuisine Nomade,” as well as an organic cafe-restaurant called Cafe Floraison, which is run by a beautiful Muslim community here. We also have tons of great vegan restaurants in Montreal, where you don’t have to worry about whether the meat is halal! My favourite is called Aux Vivres. 10. How do you celebrate Eid in Canada?
It’s so different depending on where you live (it’s a huge country!) and what your family is like. For us, we don’t have much family around, and most of our family is not Muslim, so we usually celebrate in a small way. Last year we went to the previously mentioned Cafe Floraison – they have special iftars every night, but also a big Eid brunch with wonderful food and entertainment. This year we will go to the mosque for Eid prayer and then attend brunch. Then, likely, we will spend the rest of the day together at the park, just enjoying ‘family time.’ Because my son is 2 now, we may get him a gift to mark the occasion, but my husband and I don’t exchange gifts.
In other communities, there are huge Eid festivals. Many people here have large families and do parties and gatherings. Canada is filled with a very diverse population of Muslims, who bring some traditions from their home countries and blend them into Canadian life.
In all honesty, Eid can be difficult as a convert because I am navigating new territory. Growing up without this holiday means I don’t have traditions – I have to make my own. However, it gives my husband and I the opportunity to choose exactly how we want our little family to celebrate. 11. When did you convert to Islam and how long have you been fasting for?
I converted in 2014, right before Ramadan began. I had been seriously looking into Islam for about a year, and I wanted to fast. This desire led me to finally admit to myself that I did believe, and I did want to become a Muslim. It was a difficult and scary decision to make, and I was truly thrown head-first into things with the beginning of Ramadan. I fasted in 2014 and 2015, and the following years until now I have been unable to fast due to pregnancy and breastfeeding. This will be my last pregnancy, so when I am done breastfeeding my youngest son, I will be ready to fast for the rest of my life inshallah! 12. What challenges did you face getting used to Ramadan at first?
My first Ramadan was difficult. I was living alone, as my husband was away in the United States. I had no Muslim friends and no connection to the Muslim community in my city. I worked full-time and would wake up for suhoor, go back to sleep, go to work, come home and nap, and then break my fast alone. I struggled to go to taraweeh because it was so late in the evening and I was getting so little sleep. But my new commitment to Islam kept me strong, and I managed to fast every day. It got easier as the days passed and my body adjusted. Alhumdullilah I was invited by a sister I met at jummah prayer to an Eid party hosted by a beautiful Indonesian family, so I did not have to spend Eid alone. 13. Where did you draw your support/encouragement when you began your revert journey?
I have always found the most comfort and support in the online community. There, I was able to connect with others who dealt with the same issues as me, and even just watch YouTube videos of other reverts sharing their experiences. My husband was always there for me as a support, but oddly enough, at the beginning of my journey I found it awkward and uncomfortable to discuss my faith. I was so used to a non-religious life. It took time for me to open up that part of my heart.
Shortly after converting, I also made a good friend who is Muslim. We are still friends today, and our sons were born 10 days apart. She has always been a supportive resource for me, and since her family lives in another city, we have been able to celebrate together a lot over the years.
My non-Muslim friends were also an incredible support to me when I converted. Even while I was fasting, they were extremely respectful, helpful and loving. 14. How has Ramadan changed/improved for you over the years?
Ramadan changed a lot when I had my son in late 2016, because I was no longer able to attend taraweeh or dedicate as much time to prayer and reading. But his presence has also made the month much more fun, as I get to teach him about our deen.
Although I have been unable to fast the past few years, the longer I am Muslim the more comfortable and confident I am in my religion, and this makes connecting to Allah easier. I look forward to being able to fast again to strengthen my spirituality even further during this month.
And that wraps up Rebecca’s inspiring story as a revert, mother, and her experience celebrating Ramadan and Eid in Canada ❤️
Head over to our Ramadan Around The World section to read more inspiring stories of Muslims around the world 😊And you can follow more of Rebecca’s inspiring stories on her Instagram @rebecca.khan 😊

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The road not taken!

Travelling is as much about the journey as the destination, which is just as well considering the amount of time we spend in transit on buses, trains, planes, tuk-tuks, and even horse & carts! When you live in a country like NZ, traveling isn’t a chore anymore, it’s a part of life. Despite being on a lot of trips in this serene country, I never posted any experiences on my blogs as some memories are best left in our hearts unless they are so amazing that you got to share them with the people online. While this post wouldn’t encapsulate the whole experience, it will surely provide the glimpse of what Wellington has to offer and what road trips, when done with the right people, can become.
Before I started my Ph.D., I have always imagined the life of a researcher means a lot of sleepless nights, lots of coffee and loads and loads of anxiety. I am in the 3rd year of what I call a never-ending mountain hike and guess what? I am exactly the researcher who I thought I would never become.
University is a funny place that shows you the reality when you reach its third year of education, with its everlasting stress, workload, and pressure to publish as many papers as possible. As I was going through all the above and my mental health started a back seat, so I decided to throw all these out of the window, and embark instead on a three-day road trip all the way to the capital city of NZ, Wellington. After three weeks of planning, budgeting, AirBnB selections, car rentals, the trip kicked off. The beauty of road trips with people you bond pretty well is that formalities are irrelevant, loud music is never “noise”, and you have a whole set of destinations collected and distributed in different phones. Advancement in technology means that one can have the pictures as proofs of the visit, stories on Instagram and Snapchat as updates to your friends of the trip, but the best memories both fights and laughs remain only in hearts!
DAY 1:
A road trip is not a trip that can ever be minutely planned, I had come to this stark realization when a 6-hr trip to Wellington city, took us 12hours with noise (lots of music), coffee and switching drivers. We found that as we did less research, we became more open to different experiences.
When you’re on a merry-go-round, you miss a lot of the scenery – Neil Diamond
When we had planned out my weekend itineraries, we felt a constant pressure to stick to our plan and didn’t truly open ourselves up to the spontaneity. But the reality of travel is that you can’t plan for everything. When we stopped micromanaging our hours, we became more adaptable and overall, much happier. Once we finally reached Airbnb, we were received by one of the best hosts in my overall 5 years Airbnb experience, who was polite despite our delays and late-night dinner antics. Finally, after some dinner and late night discussions about the basic structure of the trip for the coming days, we all went to bed pretty tired at 3AM in the morning hoping to wake up by 8AM. Little did we know, we were giving ourselves way too much credit and hope all at the same time!
Day 2:
Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a queen and dinner like a pauper, so they say! That’s how the second day started. Hungover, tired and everyone craving for some food in their belly. For someone who absolutely loves English breakfast when hungry, Welly sure did offer me too many places to choose and I wouldn’t be lying if I say, I gorged on that bacon and venison that I tried for the first time in my life!
With sumptuous breakfast in our bellies and coffee in our hands, we were off to the next adventure of our trip, the renowned cable car of Wellington. Though it didn’t offer much for a guy like me who isn’t too much into museums and ancient mechanical history of life, the sceneries one gets to watch whilst sitting in the cable car offered were nothing short of breathtaking.
A quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson sums up the experience for anyone who wants to try the cable car in Wellington:
Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience.
You hear the cable car start with a school bell and go up the ramp as slow as a cow walks while scenery hides from you and trying to show a peek of her gorgeous presence. And as you patiently go to the apex point, you watch reveal its magnificent beauty.
John Lubbock once said Earth and sky, woods and fields, lakes and rivers, the mountain and the sea, are excellent schoolmasters and teach some of us more than we can ever learn from books and a drive to Mt. Victoria set out just to do that to us.
For a generation of kids (read millennials ) who can’t keep hands off their phones to capture every coffee they drink, every view they see, we just stared into nature as it kept teasing us with its beauty. Mesmerizing, breathtaking and making sure everybody who writes about it runs short of adjectives to describe it, so I might as well show you what was in store for us.
After enjoying solitude and making our ways back to the developed civilization, I decided to walk in the city streets alone as one of the group members decides to join me in this adventure. Moments later, between finding a carpark and smoking cigarettes, the rest of the group managed to lose us and our position in the city that’s both new and confusing without maps. To add to the situation, low batteries, zero credit in our phones didn’t definitely help. Instead of trying to find the group, we did the one thing you would do when you know you are completely screwed – Laugh.
We laughed. We were rolling on the floor staring at the mess of the situation we are at. It was feeling of sitting in one of the best stand-up comedies and it hurt both of our stomachs to laugh any further but we couldn’t stop. Eventually, with multiple calls scraping the barely present cellphone battery charge, we managed to team up with the group and moved to the next biggest adventure in the city – finding a place to eat.
Cafes, pubs, amazing people and beautiful sceneries, while form the positives of the city, also become part of the problem by making it hard for you to choose. When the group has different perspectives about what they call food, it’s hard to make a unanimous decision. After having tried British, Mexican, and Indian cuisines on this trip, we decided on a Chinese place to eat and it surely didn’t disappoint our empty stomachs.
With our stomachs happy, and finally regaining the ability to think, we did what every teenager would do on a Friday night, get sloshed and hit the pubs. When you are from a place like Hamilton in New Zealand, seeing pubs opening until 5AM and no charge of entry in any pubs surprised and thrilled all of us. This only meant drinking until the sun shines and waking up with a massive hangover that can stop a horse in its tracks, but well, that’s just how the cookie crumbles.
DAY 3:
Waking up with a hangover and wishing that alcohol is illegal was the thought among all of us, however, we had the plan to visit space. Ahem! I mean Clifford’s space observatory. While the number of coffees we kept shoving down our dry throats to feel human once again wasn’t doing the job, the space museum had us in awe and making sure we were more human than at the start of the day. One thing that the movie in the space observatory offered is a constant reminder of how unimportant our lives, our grudges, our heartbreaks are in the grand scheme of things and how we must strive to be the best in what we are doing as after all, we might be alone in this universe and there is only one thing that matters: YOU! Maybe the nihilist society is trying to tell us the same for a long time and we just don’t listen to them.
While the amazement in the observatory continued, we decided to visit the sitting place of the group that governs this and a drive to visit the parliament started. After the visit to the Beehive (NZ parliament house), we were shown a path by one of the group members to the car park which seemed like an eternity as we walked through every nuke and corner of the city to find the car. God bless the Google maps and we eventually found our way around and ended up at one of the best places to eat the South Indian food. Most of the group was really “ hangry ” at this point and after food, we were contemplating the decision to hit the pubs once again for a second consecutive night. While a few didn’t have many opinions to hand in, the rest decided to get some shut-eye. In order to make sure we are mortal for the rest of the trip, we decided to hit the beds.
A part of the road trip experience is the different set of views one shares. While some can watch a painting for 24hrs, some can only watch the same for barely a minute, and if you are wondering which sort of the views I share, I can tell you that some people run to the museums for paintings while I run to the roof for the sunsets.
So the group split with the art enthusiast who was making his way to the famous Welly museum while the nature lovers ( read rest of the group ) left on an adventure to the hidden treasure named Somme’s Island. The 20-30 minute ferry ride consisted of everything I had imagined, if not, more. Breathtaking views, long talks on politics with friends, cool pictures to snap, and most importantly a place to read in solitude that I had been longing for in the whole trip.
“Everyone wants to live on top of the mountain, but all the happiness and growth occurs while you are climbing it.” – Andy Rooney
While I wouldn’t surely be allowed to live the rest of life with sheep as my company on this island, I definitely had all the happiness and growth while hiking up this magnificent mountain and the sentiment we all shared looking at the view was one memory for a lifetime. Once we got to the views, we all decided to take downtime and were lost in our solitude reminiscing our life choices while nature was talking to us in its own voice. Winds, the distant bleating of sheep, together as a group, but lonely individually, the trip to Somme’s island was the best crown we could put to our experiences. While I can write every minute detail of the experience in Somme’s, I am afraid I would not be able to do justice to every bit of nature for it’s the divine force which cannot be expressed in mere mortal language.
Cometh the ferry, cometh the time to go. As the feeling of returning home to Hamilton started sinking, emotions started running high. While there was a feeling of euphoria after having enjoyed a stunning 3 day trip to Wellington, there was a sadness of going back the same university life with long nights of research and assignments.
What a great and memorable Easter break it has been. Somewhere in the Easter break, the two options for trips diverged, and I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference by! For a guy who has always had a plan, I’ve never been more lost, and I’ve never been more ok with that.
Stunning locations, intelligent conversations, and some beautiful new spots. The great thing is, there’s still plenty more to see. Wellington, you have been nothing but amazing to us!

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Top 5 Things to do in Seminyak, Bali

May 26, 2019 Top 5 Things to do in Seminyak, Bali
For a town which started out with very humble beginnings, Seminyak has certainly evolved into one of Bali’s most fashionable areas. Originally a detached town with rice fields, farms, and local villages, it’s become an extension of Legian, with high-density shopping and fine-dining restaurants. A treasure trove of fashion boutiques, cool bars to sit and watch the world go by, and traditional markets.
Seminyak stretches from Double-Six Street in the south and up to the edges of Umalas and Kerobokan, and is around a 40-minute drive away from Denpasar Airport. It’s home to stunning beaches as well as the iconic Oberoi Hotel, where Mick Jagger chose to holiday on his trips to the island. The plush resort has also hosted Salvador Dali and Princess Grace. With such stars seeking out the good life here, it should be added to your list of must-see spots too.
Here’s my rundown of the five best things to do while you’re in town… Chill Out on Seminyak Beach ©iStock.com/archives
The golden sands of Seminyak beach are generally quieter throughout the day. There are many places to rent a daybed (which will run you about $3 to $7) and laze under a beach umbrella with a good book.
Swimming in the ocean is possible but look for the red flags displayed by the lifeguards first as undercurrents can be strong. Surfing is also available in certain areas and on balmy mornings, stand-up-paddle boards can be rented. Horseback riding can be organized from Umalas stables. On Sundays, the locals join in on the fun, with families flocking to the sand for beach soccer and kite flying.
The beach becomes a showcase at the end of the day, when the bars set up colorful parasols and lay out bean bags for you to settle into while the sun dips into the Indian ocean. Truly magical. ©iStock.com/RibeirodosSantos Visit Pura Petitenget
Petitenget Temple is revered by the locals and is a significant cultural landmark in Seminyak. This temple is one of the island’s collection of sea temples, which spiritually guard the shores of Bali.
Its beginnings date back to the 16th century when a Hindu priest visited from neighboring Java. If you’re lucky, you may just happen to visit during the temple’s anniversary celebrations which fall every 210 days. The temple is colorfully decorated with flags and parasols and the locals visit dressed in their best traditional clothing. ©iStock.com/Bicho_raro
Sometimes you’ll see young Balinese girls practicing their traditional dancing in the bale (pavilion) located across from the temple. Hit the Shops on Jalan Laksamana
The main road through the hub of Seminyak is known for its fashion and home to designers from all over the world. Adults and children clothing stores are scattered all over, and at the end of the street you’ll find two shopping centers with air-conditioned comfort. It’s also a great place for eclectic homewares shopping, with everything from cushions to unique paintings.
Jalan Laksamana is also known as Eat Street and is home to some of the best food on offer in Bali. There are at least 30 restaurants to choose from on this stretch of road, with diverse cuisine available. For my money, the best is Ginger Moon, offering Asian fusion sharing plates in a beautiful setting. A crab salad for $7… Chicken satay for $5… A crème brulee trio for $4.50. You won’t break the bank indulging here. Indulge Yourself at a Spa
One of Bali’s largest spas is Prana Spa. Located on Jalan Kunti, its décor will transport you to the Middle East as you’re pampered by trained therapists. Sure, there are the less expensive places to choose from, but this place is a real treat. ©iStock.com/Ridofranz
Their Signature Massage ($35) begins with a foot ritual, hot and tired from pacing the pavement, your feet are soaked in rose petal and peppermint water. Then you’re treated to a one-hour massage that will leave you invigorated and ready to hit the streets again. Seriously, it’s one of the best massages I’ve had in Bali. The Prana Spa also offers Yoga, with classes available seven days a week. Bargain Hunting at the Market
Despite the upmarket feel, bargains can still be had in Seminyak. Head to the Oberoi Flea Market, only a short walk from the main center. Here you’ll find fashion that you don’t see in every other market and some great leather shoes and bags too. Some rate them as the best markets in Bali, just come prepared to bargain and you’re bound to find something unique. Related Articles

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Can’t “whine” about these “wines”

Can’t “whine” about these “wines” By STACY HAZELTON Logan Daily News Reporter May 23, 2019 Save
LOGAN — Internationally recognized wine is available right here in Hocking County from the Hocking Hills Winery (HHW).
Hocking Hills Winery was awarded three medals at the Finger Lakes International Wine Competition held in Rochester, New York on April 13 and 14.
With three wines awarded in the competition, Hocking Hills Winery’s Riesling took home a silver medal, while their Chardonnay and Hocking River Red wines were awarded bronze medals.
This marks the winery’s second entry into the Finger Lakes International Wine Competition. In 2018 HHW took home two bronze medals for the Petite Syrah and Trillium wines.
The Internationally known Finger Lakes International Wine Competition (FLIWC) is the largest charitable wine competition in North America. The competition benefits Camp Good Days and Special Times, a camp dedicated to bringing smiles and memories to children whose lives have been touched by cancer and other life-threatening challenges.
In 2019, there were over 2,800 entries from over 450 wineries from 42 states and 16 countries.
“I am incredibly proud to have three of our wines recognized by the Finger Lakes Competition,” said CEO and Winemaker, Blaine Davidson. “We hope our customers enjoy these award-winning wines and all of our great selections at Hocking Hills Winery.”
The owners, Laura and Blaine Davidson, are “thrilled with the recognition two years in a year.”
“To have our wines awarded at such a known and sought-after competition with some of the best wines from around the world is very exciting,” Laura explained.
When they started the business, the land that the winery sits on was a cattle farm run by Max and Loris Davidson. The Davidsons are the grandparents of several of the founders of the winery. After their passing, the family sought a way to keep the land productive without selling to an outside entity.
After several family conversations, and a masters-level course in entrepreneurship by CEO Blain Davidson, the decision was made to launch the vineyard, followed shortly thereafter by the winery.
As the owners of a new business, Laura described the learning curve in any new venture as very steep.
“You can never totally know what to expect. Starting a business from scratch and adapting to the unexpected was the biggest challenge to growing the business to where it is today,” she added. “We are thrilled with the success we’ve had so far and hope that it continues and we’re able to keep locals and tourists alike returning to the winery.”
HHW crafts all of its wines on site in Hocking County, and is family owned and operated.
Founded in 2013 as the region’s first winery, HHW is in the heart of the Hocking Hills. It produces quality wines using locally grown grapes as well as grapes from around the world. The owners are dedicated to releasing the grapes natural characteristics to achieve premium quality table wines.
The HHW Riesling is a white wine grown on the American Northwest coast and harvested in 2017. It is recognized by displaying aromas of apricot, nectarine, and pear, and with flavors of apple and citrus undertones. Riesling pairs well with spicy foods such as Asian and Indian cuisines.
The HHW Chardonnay was aged on American Oak for eight months and has a rich buttery flavor with a hint of spice. This full-bodied white wine pairs well with chicken, shrimp or white sauce pastas.
The Hocking River Red is a sweet red wine blend which is a perfect fit for a cold day in the middle of winter to warm you up or to pair with holiday feasts, such as Thanksgiving or Christmas.
During the competition the entries were judged by a world-renowned panel of 54 judges. The panel was made up of 27 women and 27 men representing distributors, educators, sommeliers, restaurateurs, winemakers, and writers.
These experts came from all over the world, including countries such as the United States, Argentina, Czech Republic, Hungary, and Canada.
All of the wines are presented blind to the judges’ panel with only the grape or blend identified. No indication of geography, vintage, or price point is shared, ensuring totally unbiased evaluation. Each wine is judged on its own merit – its presence, balance and varietal character – not by how it compares to other wines in the flight. The judges award them unanimous double gold, gold, silver, or bronze medals.
The winery has future plans of continuing to look for new ways to delight its guests and look for continuous improvements to make the winery one of the premier destinations in the Hocking Hills.
They are currently awaiting results from a recent competition that was entered and they hope to enter more in the future. In 2018, its Lily of the Valley wine was awarded the Ohio Quality Wine designation.
This designation enables consumers to easily identify Ohio wines that are made with at least 90 percent Ohio-grown grapes.
Ohio winemaking goes back to the first wine producer from along the Ohio River, Nicholas Longworth. Longworth is recognized from 1803 as the Father of American Wine and Father of Ohio Wine as reported by the Ohio Winemaker’s Association.
In 1825, he recognized that the Catawba grape provided his inspiration to quit a law practice and become a full-time winemaker. The Catawba wine received so much attention for its quality, that well known poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote a poem entitled, “Ode to Catawba Wine.”
As reported by the Kent State University Libraries Collection,by the mid 1800s, Ohio wine was exceeding the production of the Californian wines; however, the tide turned when the Civil War broke out and lessened the labor force. Additionally around the same time, a widespread disease wiped out the Ohio population of grapes.
By the 1900s the market slowly crept up again and by the 1960s, it was in full swing again. Ohio is now listed as one of the top 10 wine producing states with all geographical areas of the state having notable “wine trails.”
The Ohio Grape Industries committee reported over 1.1 million gallons of wine are produced in the state on an annual basis.
The local Davidson family of the Hocking Hills Winery, working in the viticulture (grape growing) and enology (winemaking) industries since 2013, contributes to the continuation of Ohio’s long history with producing internationally recognizable wines.
More information can be found at www.hockinghillswinery.com/about-us

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Food News You Can Use This Weekend

Tweet Il Corvo fans tired of waiting in line for handmade pasta, rejoice: This week, chef Mike Easton opens his buzzed-about restaurant Il Nido in West Seattle, and it’s open for dinner five nights a week (snagging a reservation, however, might be easier said than done). Plus, Capitol Hill gets a new spot for Sichuan-style Chinese food, and a new Mexican brunch spot is open in Ballard. Read on for that and more culinary inspiration and food news for your weekend. For more ideas, try our list of Seattle food and drink specials to try in May , our Memorial Day calendar , and our full food and drink calendar .
OPENINGS Chuan on Capitol This Chinese restaurant specializing in Sichuan-style “dry pots” (a hot pot dish without the broth) softly opened in Capitol Hill on Sunday, May 19, and plans to have its grand opening by the end of next week. The dry pots are customizable, with protein choices like rabbit, spare ribs, and fried shrimp and options for spice levels and add-ons. The menu also includes side dishes like wontons, beef noodle soup, and fried rice and drinks like iced tea and Hong Kong-style milk tea. Capitol Hill
Il Nido On Tuesday, May 21, Il Corvo chef Mike Easton’s highly anticipated Italian restaurant Il Nido, which focuses on handmade pasta and seasonal vegetables, opened in West Seattle. Unlike the ever-popular Il Corvo, which is limited to lunchtime hours on weekdays only, the new establishment is open for dinner five nights a week and takes advantage of the larger space to add more time-intensive pasta varieties. Il Nido’s Instagram has previewed glimpses of focaccia and hand-rolled ricotta cavadetti . Dining room tables are available by reservation only. West Seattle
The team behind the pop-up Sazon Tacos has opened a brick-and-mortar location called Sazon Kitchen, serving breakfast and brunch. The restaurant features Baja-style Mexican-Mediterranean cuisine such as chilaquiles and grain casseroles, plus Macrina Bakery pastries and Caffe Vita coffee. Ballard
Travelers Thali House This vegetarian Indian restaurant in Beacon Hill announced on Facebook that it will shutter after seven years of business following its last weekend of service on June 1-2. According to a blog post on the restaurant’s website, the closure is due to several factors, including co-owner Allen Kornmesser’s health issues, debt, and being forced from their original location in Capitol Hill after the building was purchased by a real estate developer. Beacon Hill
OTHER FOOD NEWS Chef Zoi Antonitsas announces she is moving on from Little Fish project This week, acclaimed chef and former Top Chef contestant Zoi Antonitsas, who was set to open her long-awaited restaurant and microcannery called Little Fish in Pike Place Market with chef Bryan Jarr of Jarrbar , announced via Instagram that she has “made the difficult decision” to walk away from the project, which was originally scheduled to open in summer 2018 and which has been beset by multiple delays. Antonitsas also said in the post that she “wishes all parties involved the very best” and will be taking some time before announcing her future plans. Jarr is still attached to Little Fish, but details about the future of the restaurant are currently unknown.
Vinyl-themed bar opening in Capitol Hill soon Life on Mars , the 70s-inspired vinyl-themed bar project from John Richards (John in the Morning on KEXP), Amy Richards (Pair Music Collective), Steve Severin ( Neumos , Barboza , The Runaway ) and Leigh Sims (Wake Up Productions), is slated to open in Capitol Hill in early June. The bar will serve an all-vegan food menu with dishes like waffle sliders stuffed with a choice of chicken-fried artichokes, barbecue pulled jackfruit, or coconut bacon, plus local beer and cocktails.
Brewery with Korean food coming to Tacoma The owners of Magnuson Cafe and Brewery plan to open a family-friendly brewery called Kobrew near the Tacoma waterfront, featuring 14 rotating taps, soju, and a Korean-inspired food menu with bibimbap, bo ssam, Korean fried chicken, and pork belly. The gastropub, which offers copious outdoor seating and will be open seven days a week for lunch and dinner, is currently set to open within the next few weeks.
EVENTS

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Order Up! Pimento Jamaican Kitchen finally opens in Keg and Case, O’Cheeze replacing Gazta Enhancements – The Growler

May 24, 2019 by James Norton Pimento open now in the Keg & Case building in St Paul // Photo by Tj Turner Updated May 23, 2019
Order Up! is the Growler’s ongoing biweekly account of noteworthy Minnesota restaurant openings, closings, and future openings. Please send any tips to food@growlermag.com.
THIS WEEK’S GYST: The ambitious new St. Paul food hall Keg and Case (which we explored at some length when it first opened in September, 2018) is evolving as it settles into its niche. The upscale cheese pairing emporium Gazta and Enhancements (which we flagged as a questionable value prospect in our review) is throwing in the silk handkerchief and rebranding with its owners’ more accessible grilled cheese-focused O’Cheeze brand. And after months of delays, the Jamaican-themed Pimento Jamaican Kitchen has finally opened the doors of its Keg and Case location, expanding the market’s relatively slim roster of affordable lunch options. The opening of the Jamaican-themed Pimento somewhat offsets the sad closure of the much loved and well-reviewed Trinidadian Marla’s Caribbean restaurant in South Minneapolis after more than 10 years in business.
All dates are approximate based on best information available; opening dates, in particular, tend to shift around a lot.
RECENTLY OPENED (Up to 2 Months) Pig Ate My Pizza // Photo by Martin Rittenberry
Cheese Louise , 4279 Sheridan Ave. S., Minneapolis ■ Brunch, salads, and gourmet grilled cheese sandwiches makes up the bill of fare at this food-truck-gone-brick-and-mortar in Linden Hills, run by Cheryl Rossi (an alum of Lucia’s in Uptown) and business partner Holly Miller-Byzewski. Opened May 21, 2019.
The Fitz , 173 Western Ave. N., St. Paul ■ The Fitz is a more casual, Justin Sutherland-run reboot of the former Fitzgerald’s space in St. Paul’s Cathedral Hill neighborhood, featuring deep-dish pizza. Opened May 20, 2019.
Pig Ate My Pizza Kitchen + Brewery (reopening) , 4124 W. Broadway Ave., Robbinsdale ■ A popular Travail collective-owned pizzeria has reopened after a renovation that incorporates a brewery into the business model. Opened May 15, 2019.
Pimento Jamaican Kitchen (Keg and Case location) , 928 W. 7th St., St. Paul ■ After months of delays, the Keg and Case food hall location of Jamaican street food-restaurant Pimento is now open. Opened May 14, 2019.
The Prodigal Pub , 25 E. 26th St., Minneapolis ■ A British Isles-inspired tavern now open in the former Gyst space near Eat Street. Opened May 9, 2019.
Taco Arcada , 1910 W. Superior St., Duluth ■ The latest new concept from the Duluth Grill / OMC Smokehouse / Corktown Deli team, combining a bar, arcade, and “fresh-Mex” food. Opened May 5, 2019.
Minnesota BBQ Co. , 816 Lowry Ave. NE, Minneapolis ■ A mostly catering- and takeout-focused BBQ spot by the team behind Travail. Opened May 3, 2019.
Hamburguesas El Gordo (reopening), 1731 S. Robert St., West St. Paul ■ The St. Paul location of the popular Mexican hamburger restaurant shut down after losing its lease; it reopened this spring. Opens Summer 2019.
Meseret Ethiopian , 3867 Minnehaha Ave. S., Minneapolis ■ An East African market and catering operation expands into the world of sit-down food service with this new restaurant concept on Minnehaha. Soft opening April 25, 2019.
Elephant Bar , 213 E. 4th St., Ste. 100, St. Paul ■ A new restaurant by chef Lucas Almendinger replacing the former Hygga space in Lowertown, with some Pakistani flavor influences. Opened April 23.
Don Raúl , 4953 Xerxes Ave., Minneapolis ■ A new restaurant for Hector Ruiz (Cafe Ena, Rincon 38, Costa Blanca), opening at 50th and Xerxes. Menu features dishes including Tacos de Pato (duck tacos), Lechon (pork tenderloin medallions), Skuna salmon, and more. Opened April 12, 2019.
Bark and the Bite , 2186 Marshall Ave., St. Paul ■ The popular BBQ food stand (based in Sunny’s Market in Northeast) has moved to a bricks-and-mortar space in St. Paul in the former Heirloom location. Opened April 9, 2019.
Giulia , 215 S. 4th St., Minneapolis ■ A pizza- and pasta-focused spot with tableside mozzarella headed by former Copper Kitchen chef Josh Hedquist, housed inside the Emery hotel (the former Restaurant Max space inside the former Hotel Minneapolis). Opened April 3, 2019.
Ox Cart Arcade and Rooftop , 255 E. 6th St., St. Paul ■ A reboot of the Ox Cart Ale House, featuring arcade games and boozy snow cones. Opened March 28, 2019.
RECENTLY CLOSED (Up to 2 Months) Gazta and Enhancements // via Gazta Facebook
Marla’s Caribbean ■ Marla’s, a beloved South Minneapolis institution known for its chickpea doubles and other Trinidadian fare, is calling it quits after a decade-plus run. Will close mid-June.
Lola on the Lake (temporary, due to fire) ■ Lola on the Lake, a pavilion restaurant on the northeast corner of Bde Maka Ska, suffered what police are presuming to be an arson attack and is closed until further notice. Closed May 16.
Gazta and Enhancements ■ The high-end cheese pairing restaurant in Keg and Case food hall on West 7th in St. Paul has closed to rebrand as a more casual grilled cheese concept under the O’Cheeze name. Closed May 14. Read our review of Gazta and other Keg and Case restaurants in “ Case Study .”
Lee’s Liquor Lounge ■ After 62 years of operation, this legendary dive bar and live music venue is calling it quits. Closed May 14.
Russian Tea House ■ Forty years of borscht, piroshki (Russian hamburgers), and folk music come to a close with the shuttering of this charming little University Avenue spot. Closed May 4.
Fitzgerald’s (will reopen) ■ The upscale Cathedral Hill watering hole Fitzgerald’s has shut down in order to be renovated and reopened as the more casual Fitz’s, featuring pizza (including deep dish). Closed May 3.
Meyvn ■ Uptown’s stylish artisan bagel spot called it quits after a bit less than a year of operation. Closed April 21. Read our profile of owner Tim Niver, “ Dollars to Dumplings .”
just/us ■ Citing a major bump in rent, the St. Paul-based chef collective known for burgers and clever coursed meals closed on April 20. Read our review, “ Raw Talent .”
Martha’s Daughter ■ After a high profile but rocky run in Duluth, Martha’s Daughter has closed its doors—the concept will live on as a series of pop-up dinners in Duluth, Superior, and beyond. Closed April 9. Read our Duluth and Superior food roundup, “ Taste of the Twin Ports .”
Northern Fires Pizza ■ This popular wood-fired farmers’ market pizza mainstay was slated this spring to revitalize a former Chinese-American spot on East Lake Street, but shelved its plans due to unforeseen “unreasonable requests” from banks (as per a Facebook post ). Opening scuttled March 25, 2019.
UPCOMING (Most Imminent to Furthest Out) Daytons Food Hall & Market // via The Dayton’s Project Facebook
Loon Cafe , 426 Saint Peter St., St. Paul ■ A second location for the 37-year-old Minneapolis stalwart of the same name, located in the former Great Waters location. Opens June 2019.
Falls Landing at Artisan Plaza Eatery and Market , 1223 4th St. S., Cannon Falls ■ The next step for St. Paul mainstay J.D. Fratzke (Bar Brigade, Strip Club Meat and Fish) is a supper club-style restaurant at the Artisan Plaza in Cannon Falls. Opens June 2019.
Prieto , 701 W. Lake St., Minneapolis ■ Alejandro Castillon (Sonora Grill) will be taking advantage of the massive smoker at the old Hasty Tasty location to bring smoked meats together with house-made tortillas to Lyn-Lake. Opens Summer 2019.
A Dozen Excuses (second location), 4328 E. Superior St., Duluth ■ This Superior, Wisconsin-based doughnut bakery is bringing its fresh, classic product to a second location in the Lakeside neighborhood of Duluth. Opens Summer 2019.
Due Focacceria , 475 Fairview Ave. S., St. Paul ■ The former Espresso Royale space is being reinvented as a combination Italian market and restaurant. Opens Summer 2019.
Thr3 Jack , 729 Washington Ave. N., Minneapolis ■ Six state-of-the-art golf simulators and elevated comfort food will define this new 200-seat restaurant in the North Loop’s soon-to-open Nordic mixed-use complex. Opens Summer 2019.
Provision Community Restaurant , 2940 Harriet Ave., Minneapolis ■ A shared community kitchen and pay-what-you-can cafe are at the heart of this new business in the former Salty Tart space. Opens Summer 2019.
Pearl and the Thief , 811 Washington Ave. S., Minneapolis ■ This former Stillwater-based restaurant is in the process of relocating to downtown Minneapolis, colocating with the Moxy Downtown Minneapolis hotel and Ironclad Residential development. Opens Summer 2019.
The Nordic Galley Group project , 729 Washington Ave. N., Minneapolis ■ A four-restaurant food hall / incubator in the new Nordic development. Part of a series of Galley Group incubator spaces including spots in Pittsburgh, Cleveland, and Detroit. Opens Summer 2019.
Alemar Cheese Co. at The Food Building , 525 N. 3rd St., Minneapolis ■ A well-regarded Mankato-based creamery will open a facility at Northeast Minneapolis’ Food Building, taking the slot once occupied by Lone Grazer. Opens July 2019.
Graze Provisions and Libations , 525 N. 3rd St., Minneapolis ■ A new North Loop food hall with an exclusive emphasis on chef-driven dining. Opens Summer 2019.
Snack Bar , 800 Washington Ave. N., Minneapolis ■ The couple between 112 Eatery, Burch, and Bar La Grassa (Isaac Becker and Nancy St. Pierre) are opening a New York-inspired pizza slice shop and wine bar in the former Be’Wiched space. Opens Late Summer 2019.
New Vestalia Hospitality Concept [Name TBD], 1432 W. 31st St., Minneapolis ■ A new spot from Ann Kim’s restaurant group focused on tacos wrapped in handmade, traditional tortillas. 2019.
Dayton’s Food Hall & Market , 700 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis ■ Major new 40,000-square-foot food hall curated by Andrew Zimmern. 2019.
The Sioux Chef Restaurant at Water Works , On the Mississippi River, behind the Mill City Museum ■ A restaurant focused on American Indian cuisine as imagined by Sean Sherman, The Sioux Chef. 2019.
Malcolm Yards Market , 501 30th Ave. SE, Minneapolis ■ A food hall that will capitalize on its proximity to Surly’s massive brewery/restaurant complex. 2019.

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Friday Fun Food Facts – May 24, 2019

Triangle restaurant news…that not everyone knows. Impress your co-workers at the water cooler. Featured Restaurant News And now we know. Boylan Bridge Brewpub is no more. But the new owners, Chris Borreson and Sara Abernethy , have unveiled nearly all the details on the upcoming Wye Hill Kitchen + Brewing which takes over the same spot come June 5 . Some serious restaurant talent like Brad Wynn , Max Trujillo , Bobby McFarland and Kyle Fletcher are or have been involved in the “rebirth” of the best view of the Raleigh skyline. Looking forward to June 5! Keep up with them here . Wake County Restaurant News We are getting closer to the opening of The Kitchen Table at Relish , the newest concept from the folks behind Relish Craft Kitchen and Bourbon Bar . The new concept, located right next door to Relish in the former Dos Taquitos space at 5629 Creedmoor Road, features biscuits, brews and board games. The biscuits will feature the classic buttermilk biscuits, iced blueberry or blackberry biscuits, bacon and chive biscuits, jalapeno and corn biscuits, cinnamon biscuits, and vegan biscuits just to name a few. Brews means rotating selections from NC’s 130 plus craft breweries as well as locally roasted coffee. And Boardgames means they already have a collection of more than 400 board games! After a pre-opening event for friends and family, they are looking to open next week on May 30 . Keep up with Relish here . The ITB Insider reported this week that work is now underway on Rosewater , a Mediterranean restaurant from the Giorgios Group , in the old Bruegger’s space at North Hills . A set of permits were recently issued to be performed as an “alteration” to the space. Best guesses is that it will open before year’s end. Check them out here . Speaking of North Hills , friend Susan Tu and her brother Eddie are closing up their Spring Rolls location on May 26 after a nine-year run – that is the bad news. The good news is that they are moving it to Durham and their other Raleigh location in Wade Park will remain open. They will open the new location in Durham in the Chesterfield Building (701 W. Main St.) at the corner with Duke Street. Look for them to open in July. They will have a “Last Call” Celebration tonight ( May 24 ) at 5 pm featuring live music and drink specials at the North Hills location. Thanks to Kenan Barnes for the update on this. Visit Spring Rolls here . Over on Hillsborough Street, WRAL shared the news that Rush Bowls is opening their first Triangle location at 2811 Hillsborough Street on June 10th , with a Grand Opening Party from noon until 5 p.m. A location on Durham’s Ninth Street will not be far behind. They offer meals crafted from the finest fruit, topped with granola & honey, and blended with protein, vitamins and other nutritious ingredients that taste delicious while promoting a healthy lifestyle. Get to know them here . A few weeks ago we told you that the Garner Char-Grill was closing and being replaced by an Indian street food joint. Thanks to the News & Observer we now know that to be Chhote’s which already has a location in Transfer Co. Food Hall in downtown Raleigh. Chhote’s is designed by Andes Fernandes , a Mumbai native and founder of Biryani Maxx in Cary. The Garner Chhote’s is in its soft opening phase with a grand opening expected next month. Check out information on Chhote’s on the Transfer Co. Food Hall site here . Over in Cary, high school buddy Dana McCal l shared with me that BurgerFi is going into Cary Crossroads next to the new Cava , where Verizon once was. This will be the third location in the Triangle. If you are not familiar with BurgerFi , check them out here . Also in Cary, WRAL reported that a new coffeehouse and cafe is slated to open May 28th in west Cary. Sweetwaters Coffee and Tea will be located in Amberly Square off McCrimmon Parkway. The cafe will serve Asian and globally-inspired coffees, teas, pastries, sandwiches and salads. Sweetwaters is a franchise with more than 100 planned shops across the country. Get to know them here . And if you are a cat and coffee lover, you’ll be excited to hear that the newest coffee/cat combo joint is coming to Raleigh. Purr Cup Cafe announced this week that they found their home on Prospect Avenue just outside of downtown Raleigh. Get all the details here . And finally, some sad news for restauranteurs. Used Restaurant Equipment & Décor , which has served the restaurant scene for over eight years, will be closing at the end of this month and will hold a public auction to sell off all remaining inventory. It will be held June 3rd and 4th . You can visit their website for more info . Durham, Orange & Chatham Restaurant News Over in Hillsborough, Rasoi Ventures announced they are opening a new global tapas-style bistro at 124 King St. – they haven’t landed on a name yet. Part-owner of Durham’s Viceroy , BJ Patel has teamed up with friends and family, including Sejal Patel . They will be featuring mostly international flavors as well as exploring fusion-style cuisine – for example, Kimchi Samosas or Curried Poutine. They also hope to partner with area farms to bring an international flavor to locally sourced products. Look for a mid-fall opening. Keep up with them on Instagram here . A quick shout-out to our friends over at Heavenly Buffaloes . What originally started in Durham, then expanded over into Chapel Hill (on W. Franklin Street) has now announced they will open a third location this summer over in Greensboro! Kudos to them and their continued success. Visit Heavenly Buffaloes here . And finally, a bit of a retraction. We learned this week that news item we shared a few weeks ago is not actually going to happen. We had shared information from what we thought to be a credible source, but it turns out it wasn’t. There will NOT be a Chick-fil-A inside the Mountaire Farms chicken processing plant in Siler City. Sorry Chathamites! But maybe we got Chick-fil-A’s attention with all the excitement that was generated! Closings Sorry to have learned from reader John Norris that Wimpy’s Grill , at the corner of Hicks and Hillsborough streets in Durham, has closed. They had hoped to stay open through today, Friday, May 24, but once the news spread, they sold out of all their product at the end of the day yesterday according to the News & Observer . Readers Jane Paige and Samuel Allison notified us that there is a closed sign on the door at Hot Point Deli in Cary on Walnut Street. The folks over at EatRaleigh reported that the couple behind the amazing Filipino market and restaurant Bitter Melon in Angier have decided to retire, and will be closing shop on May 26th. There is still time to get by! Food Trucks This Sunday, May 26th from 1-5 pm at City Market in downtown Raleigh, be sure to stop by and enjoy Raleigh’s annual All-Dessert Food Rodeo ! Get by and enjoy four delicious hours of sweetness from 20+ vendors offering a range of goodies from Ice cream, Italian ice, cheesecake, pie’s, lemonade, pineapple drinks, popcorn, donuts, cupcakes, cookies, sno cones, cotton candy, various cake slices and much more including face painters and balloon artists for the kids. Get the details on WRAL here . Thanks to a note from Mark Ginsberg , I learned that the Knightdale Food Truck Thursdays is back up for the season. The event is held the third Thursday of the month from April through October at Knightdale Station Park for lunch AND dinner. Get all the details, truck schedule and more here . Go ahead and mark down the dates for 2019 for the Durham Food Truck rodeos – they are: June 16, September 1 and November 3! Get all the dates here . And the dates for the 2019 edition of the Raleigh Food Truck Rodeo have been released – they are Sunday June 9th – 12-6pm; Sunday August 4th – 3pm-9pm ( Evening Rodeo); and Sunday Oct 6th – 12-6pm. All are held along Fayetteville Street. Get all the details here . Events The Apex Latino Festival will take place on Saturday, June 1 from 3-10 p.m in downtown Apex. Celebrate the Latino culture with children’s arts and crafts workshops, local Latino art exhibits, a culinary event, Latin American dance, music performances, and an authentic arts and crafts bazaar. Purchase a passport to sample tasty authentic food and dessert delights from over 12 different Latino Countries. Get all the details here . They’re at it again! Al’s Burger Shack , Mel’s Commissary & Catering , and IP3 Italian Pizzeria III are teaming up to bring you a special Spring Caffe Marrone . Enjoy 5 courses of Italian favorites full of fresh, spring flavors and perfectly paired wines at the Mel’s Carrboro location on Wednesday, June 5th , at 7pm. The cost is $75 including wine. Get tickets (Now! They will sell out) here . On Saturday, June 8th from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. the Town of Cary will host the Pimento Cheese Festival where food trucks will line Academy Street to serve their regular menu, along with new dishes featuring a southern delicacy: pimento cheese! Enjoy live music at the Downtown Park, grab a drink from local breweries, and taste some of the best pimento cheese samples from local restaurants. You can even test your skills in the pimento cheese sculpting contest. Get all the details here . Also on Saturday, June 8th , Raleigh will play host to their own International Food Festival held in downtown on the Raleigh City Plaza . Last year nearly 17k people attended the day full of dance performances, bands and food from around the world from noon until 10 p.m. Get all the details here . Ever wanted to show off your pickle? Now is your chance. The Rickhouse hosts Durham’s 5th Annual PickleFest on June 22 – featuring a Home Pickler’s Contest . The pickle-packed tasting event and marketplace will be showcasing North Carolina made products from pickle vendors near and far including locally crafted kombucha and kimchi! Triangle area restaurants sample their unique pickle dishes as well as pickle flavored beers and a Bloody Mary bar to quench your thirst and pucker your lips! VIP $25 includes early bird entry from Noon – 1pm + Home Pickler’s Contest Tasting + (1) free drink ticket. General Admission $10 – Session 1 from 1 – 3pm | Session 2 from 2 – 4pm. Kids under 10 years old are free. Visit their Facebook event page here . The folks over at Pompieri Pizza are expanding their annual Lambrusco Fest this year – extending it over 6 days from June 17 through June 22 ! Lambrusco Fest was a one day festival, but this year they are changing up with events happening over six days. They will have pasta and parmesan dinners as well as specials featuring prosciutto and balsamic and fun things! Get all the details on what is being offered each day (some events are already sold out!). Taste celebrates the vibrant Durham-Chapel Hill culinary scene with a festival of food & beverage events, June 26-30, 2019 . All told, the event features 5 premium culinary events. New for this year, they are offering back-to-back nights of their signature Grand Taste Experience at the Durham Armory – with each night featuring over 30 great local restaurants. The week also boasts a 1920s themed Speakeasy Nightclub at a secret location, a 6-Course Southern Feast Dinner at Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club and a Boozy Brunch at Clouds Brewing . Get all the details and tickets here . It was recently announced that one of Chatham County’s largest food festivals, the 12th Annual Pittsboro Pepperfest , is returning to main street in downtown Pittsboro. The date for this year’s event is Sunday, September 22 from 3 – 6 p.m. So go ahead and mark your calendar to spend your afternoon in historic, downtown Pittsboro. Get all the details here . One of my favorite annual events released details about their event dates and when tickets will go on sale. The 10th anniversary edition of Terra Vita Food & Drink Festival will take place in Chapel Hill October 16 – 19, 2019 . Tickets go on sale July 11, so put that date on your calendar to snap up the quick sell-outs! Get all the details here . Food Bank Corner Forget the hassle of a trip to the grocery store for your next food drive…“Shop” with the Food Bank through our Virtual Food Drive and maximize your donation times ten! For every dollar donated, the Food Bank can provide $10.00 worth of food or five meals. Over half a million people in the 34 counties we serve struggle with food insecurity. You can make a difference in your community by hosting a Virtual Food Drive for your friends, family members or coworkers. Get all the details here . This entry was posted in Uncategorized on

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Looking for a cook urgently (familiar with Indian cuisine) 7998008

Looking for a cook urgently (familiar with Indian cuisine) 7998008 Location Rf 5,001 to Rf 10,000 Job Category
• Punctual is the best way of starting the day. • Skilled Cook to prepare delicious meals according to menu. • You will cook dishes that will delight our customers with their taste and timely delivery.• An excellent cook must be able to follow instructions in cooking and delivering well-prepared meals. • They must be deft in moving around the kitchen and apt in multi-tasking. • Experience in using various ingredients and cooking techniques is also important.• setting up workstations with all needed ingredients and cooking equipment• Preparing ingredients to use in cooking (chopping and peeling vegetables, cutting meat etc.)• Cooking food in various utensils or grillers• The goal is to help preserve and enhance our reputation so we can expand our clientele. Responsibilities• Set up workstations with all needed ingredients and cooking equipment• Prepare ingredients to use in cooking (chopping and peeling vegetables, cutting meat etc.)• Cook food in various utensils or grillers• Check food while cooking to stir or turn• Ensure great presentation by dressing dishes before they are served• Keep a sanitized and orderly environment in the kitchen• Ensure all food and other items are stored properly• Check quality of ingredients• Monitor stock and place orders when there are shortages
Requirements
• Experience in using cutting tools, cookware and bake ware• Knowledge of various cooking procedures and methods (grilling, baking, boiling etc.)• Ability to follow all sanitation procedures• Ability to work in a team• Very good communication skills• excellent physical condition and stamina• High school diploma or equivalent; Diploma from a culinary school will be an advantage Listing ID : 2634324 | Last Updated : 24-May-2019

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Spice Bazaar Sets Expansion Opening Date |

business Shared from Westfield, NJ Spice Bazaar Sets Expansion Opening Date Diners will now be given dinner and a show and a revamped menu. By Russ Crespolini, Patch Staff | May 22, 2019 10:00 am ET | Updated May 24, 2019 2:54 pm Spice Bazaar diners will now be given dinner and a show and a revamped menu. (Photo courtesy of Simran Bakshi) WESTFIELD, NJ – Spice Bazaar’s success in Westfield has afforded them the opportunity to expand into a new location, right down the street from their original one, and they are set to serve customers starting June 10.
“Spice Bazaar will no longer be known as casual dining as we have designed a more vibrant environment, making it into Modern Indian Dining” said one of Spice Bazaar’s owners, Simran Bakshi.
According to owners, Spice Bazaar’s new venue at 39 Elm Street will give New Jersey restaurant go-ers an opportunity to experience Indian delicacies in a way that’s never been done before. The restaurant will put a twist on the typical dining experience by providing tableside shows led by their chefs. Spice Bazaar now has the opportunity to seat more people and keep things as flavorful as ever, right in front of you, owners said.
By creating an interactive show while people eat, Simran and Kanika Vij-Bakshi said they will be bringing the modern era of Indian cuisine to Westfield. What started as a fun side investment by two foodies became a passion for bringing unique food to Westfield, they said.
The interior has a lounge-like feel, beautiful chandeliers, and elegant and chíc decor. Spice Bazaar has truly upgraded, the owners said.
“The goal of Spice Bazaar is to push the culinary envelope to a more modern interpretation of Indian cuisine,” Vij-Bakshi said.
Owners said dishes at Spice Bazaar will include Indian flavors that can’t be found anywhere else in New Jersey with an upgraded menu that will include new selections such as, guava oysters, pineapple avocado tacos and spiced pork ribs.
It will also include an interactive dessert, named The Chocolate Ball Smash, a chocolate, that will be garnished directly in front of you and blasted as you indulge.
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