CinemAsia FilmLAB 10th Anniversary

CinemAsia FilmLAB 10th Anniversary

CinemAsia FilmLAB 10th Anniversary Tijden en Tickets ZATERDAG 9 MAART | 15:30
2019 marks the 10th anniversary of FilmLAB, 55 CinemAsia’s talent development program. Throughout the years FilmLAB has given aspiring filmmakers with Asian roots the opportunity to turn their personal stories into short films. Thus far this has resulted in the production of almost 30 short films.
CinemAsia believes that filmmakers, producers, writers, cinematographers and actors with Asian roots have a wealth of stories to tell that rarely make it to Dutch screens. That’s why FilmLAB offers them the knowhow and equipment to get their projects off the ground and connects them to the Dutch film and television industry in order to stimulate a more durable and wider range of Asian representation in the media in the Netherlands and abroad.
Every edition focuses on a particular theme to provide the participants with a clear and captivating conceptual framework for their productions. Our talent incubation programme consists of a bootcamp and various workshops by professionals from the Dutch and International film industry. The FilmLAB producers guide the participants from development to postproduction, while experts help the talents to develop their skills and how to use their diverse backgrounds to their advantage. FilmLAB is supported by numerous sponsors with camera equipment, montage feedback, colour correction, sound work and mastering.
To celebrate the 10th anniversary of FilmLAB, we are launching two programmes: FilmLAB Writers Room is a programme that helps participants to write their fiction short film script and FilmLAB Documentary is a programme where participants complete a documentary short film.
During the FilmLAB Writers Room program, ten scriptwriters are skilled in how to turn their fiction short film from concept to script. The participants also got professional coaching in project pitching. to present themselves and their projects to industry experts during the festival and to expand their network.
The completed documentary short films of the FilmLAB Documentary programme will be premiered at CinemAsia Film Festival. During several screenings the filmmakers will present their films to the public and industry, with Q & A afterwards. The documentary short films also get a spot in our annual On Tour programme in Rotterdam. Through our popular platforms, participants gain exposure and the chance to share their creative process with the public. They also receive advice and assistance in pitching their work to international festivals, sales and distribution companies.
This year’s theme of FilmLAB documentary programme is ‘Crafts and cultural heritage’. Crafts as a creative process, how practicing crafts effect tradition and can play a role in the construction of identity, and its role in passing on certain values for future generations. Carve Out | Ami Tsang & Fay Teo Food sculpting has a profound role in the history of Chinese cuisine. Recognised as an important art in its native land in The Netherlands a very different tale is sung. Once the crown jewel of every dish in Chinese restaurants, food sculptures are now slowly disappearing and the craft threatens to go extinct. Having put aside their carving knives for decades, migrant food sculptors Chen Mo and Awan are once again called to put their skills to work. Artists Ami and Fay invite the masters to dare to reimagine the future of food sculpturing in The Netherlands, with a completely new approach.
Holding On To Silence | Andre Kloer Three individual artisans from Asian decent find how being highly focused on their crafts lures them into a sense of silence. Which in turn invites each of them to go down a contemplative journey along their family history line. After a seemingly random phone call martial arts teacher Kierty Verbooy connects with his long lost Indian father, setting him on a path that helps him make sense of his life’s choices and innate need for balance. Dutch–Vietnamese Hoang is destined to take over the family business in Vietnamese pastry. But in the focus of her work she longs for quietness and tries to deal with the vast ambitions of her mother. Animation director Yiuloon finds connection with his deceased father through animations about Chinese lion dancers. Reflecting on his two children, he is committed to create a more outspoken relationship than the one he grew up in. The Bowl | Ingrid Guldenaar For Dutch-Indonesian artist Barbara, inspiration is everywhere. Her jam-packed studio is filled with creativity. Everything is meticulously placed and ordered, yet anything is possible. A deconstructed Wayang doll shares its parts with a drawing manikin. Naked bowls are waiting to be glazed with poetical or humorous drawings. Cycling against the wind, Barbara visits her garden to pick some inspiration. Working the plants she feels very connected with her Indonesian roots. Nevertheless, her heritage has never brought her to visit the country of her father, but now she is considering it. Unicorn Cat | Deepti Rao The days are busy for 9-year-old Maitreyi, the daughter of Indian expats, born and raised in the suburbs of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. In the afternoons, she plays hockey, a popular sport among the Dutch, but does she fit in with the other girls? In the evenings, she rushes off to learn Bharatnatyam, a classical Indian dance form, but what does she think about her mother’s wish to move back to India? In the run-up to her solo dance performance, we join Maitreyi as she navigates her way through the struggles and strengths that are part of her identity. An identity that she creates for herself as a Unicorn Cat. Tijden en Tickets

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Dine Out Maine: Precise cooking, happy surprises and perfect balance earn Hugo’s 4 1/2 stars – Press Herald

**** Excellent
Extraordinary
The Maine Sunday Telegram visits each restaurant once; if the first meal was unsatisfactory, the reviewer returns for a second. The reviewer makes every attempt to dine anonymously and never accepts free food or drink.
So you’ll understand why I’m still baffled that the charismatic, soft-spoken house manager at Hugo’s talked me into the chef’s choice tasting menu ($90), where each of several courses would present a new mystery.
I did try to learn a bit about what was to come, about overlap between the concise, à-la-carte menu and the tasting. “Is the lamb tartare with pickled shallot and lavash ($13) there?” I wondered aloud.
She smiled, placed her index finger across her lips and stage-whispered, “No spoilers.”
By that point, my curiosity was piqued. And because the differential in price between selecting a dessert and two of the smaller-format dishes (all are appetizer-sized) along with two larger-format ones was small (around $10), I really had no choice.
It turned out to be the best decision I made all weekend.
From the single baby scallop quick-cured in lime juice, fish sauce and chili oil, served as a tiny amuse-bouche; to the gumdrop-like mango pâte de fruits sparking with heat from Korean gochugaru chili flakes, the dozen small plates I tasted gave me a newfound respect for surprise.
Two days later, when I called to interview Mike Wiley (who along with Andrew Taylor, is co-executive chef of Hugo’s, The Honey Paw and Eventide), he tossed another curveball in my direction. Unbeknownst to me, my meal had been part of only the second service under the leadership of new chef de cuisine, Ben Christie.
To be fair, Christie is no newcomer. Since coming to Portland five years ago, he has worked every station on the cold- and hot-lines at both Eventide and Hugo’s, and has, in his words, “been putting my own dishes on the menu for quite a while now.” And in a kitchen focused on precision and fine detail across every aspect of the Asian-influenced, New American menu, it would be hard to imagine anything other than a slow-moving debut for the Colorado-trained chef.
While Christie has not taken Hugo’s in a wholly new direction, he has recalibrated its compasses and GPS with his perspective on acid-umami balance. In one dish, he pairs golden, pan-seared monkfish tail with sweet-funky Peekytoe crab salad and sunny, delicate matchsticks of kohlrabi macerated in olive oil and lemon juice so long that they take on the texture of capellini. In another, he grills pinwheels of hash-marked squid marinated in brawny nuoc cham, sticky tamarind paste and lime juice (available à la carte for $13).
When he confits Laughing Stock Farm new potatoes ($12), he skips past unadulterated fats and heads right for a Sichuan-style oil infused with star anise, chili, clove and cinnamon, then tosses the tender potatoes in a meaty-yet-shimmeringly bright vinaigrette made with ‘nduja and honey. But don’t get too comfortable: In the background, pickled banana peppers preserved from this summer’s harvest bristle with both heat and tang.
Nowhere does Christie contrast the barbs and prickles of acid with nose-twitching amino acids more than in a dish of brown-butter-poached, faux-tournéd carrots plated with squidgy, mineral “tongues” of uni. When drizzled with an emulsion of bonito, fish sauce and rice vinegar, its accompanying shreds of house-pickled ginger seem to exhale microscopic puffs of secret floral breath that I didn’t know they possessed. It’s a hypnotic dish.
And if the menu sounds like nuance over substance, just wait. Lamb loin papered in lamb bacon and served with barely charred, local baby cabbage and a miso-and-butter-layered millefeuille of potato and celery root is a substantial, hearty course. So too, the (unfortunately lukewarm) duck breast with barley, braised onion, chromatic droplets of puréed whole orange and a crunchy crumble of XO-style duck crackling.
There’s even a phenomenal pork consommé the kitchen ladles over scallion microgreens and house-made tortellini stuffed with smoky, marble-sized meatballs fashioned from ground charcuterie scraps. Imagine a black-and-white sketch of a bowl of wonton soup painted lustily with bacon-flavored watercolors.
Finding a wine to go with such a wide-ranging tasting menu can be tricky. I found what I thought was a good candidate among the admittedly pricey list, but had questions, so a server called over another front-of-house staffer she referred to as “our wine guy.”
My guest and I were already aware of him; he was the server who had a habit of depositing dishes at our table, quickly reciting a litany of ingredients, then turning on his heels as he spoke the last ones over his shoulder. There would be no clarifying questions.
When I asked him for more details about the Owen Roe “Sinister Hand” ($48), listed by name only under “Featured Producers,” I wasn’t sure if the bottle I was eyeing was white, red or rosé.
“It’s a GSM blend. High brix. Little hot for my taste,” was his staccato response.
My brain half-expected a pop-up box to appear, asking if I wanted Google Chrome to translate this conversation from jargon to English.
Luckily, I speak enough Insecure Wine Dude to muddle through, so after requesting some time to discuss our choice, I interpreted for my dinner guest as the server walked away: “He’s saying it’s not just one grape; it’s made from Grenache, Syrah and Mourvèdre, and it’s both sweet and pretty alcoholic. It might be overpowering.”
A few minutes later, we heard him again, this time leaning on his elbows, chatting familiarly with another couple at two of the 20-odd bar seats that open onto the fully exposed kitchen.
“Of course you’ve heard of Screaming Eagle, right? I mean, who hasn’t?” he inquired rhetorically.
“That, right there is why people are afraid to ask questions about wine,” my guest said to me, shaking his head. “When he was standing here, I actually felt like I knew less about the wine than I did before.”
Fortunately, the front-of-house manager nominated a Sean Thackrey, Pleiades Cuvée XXIII from California ($60) as a better option, describing it as an ever-changing “field blend” hodgepodge of “Sangiovese, Viognier, whatever else is great that season.” And it was, matching well with nearly every savory course, save for an exceptionally light, citrus-zest-cured fluke served with Thai basil, plumped basil seeds, and fermented umeboshi paste made with preserved local plums that the kitchen had been stockpiling for more than a year.
Indeed, wine is one of Hugo’s strengths, as it was five years ago, when our then-reviewer praised the breadth of the restaurant’s options in his five-star review . Equally impressive is the concise list of specialty cocktails, from the Manhattan-esque Grin and Pear It, made with rye, pear juice and aromatized wine ($12) to the warm Tender’s Toddy ($12), a dealer’s-choice drink that, on my visit, featured a blend of cognac, lemon juice and mellow, bittersweet Amaro Montenegro.
It wasn’t designed to pair with dessert, but the Tender’s Toddy would hold up nicely to the sweet, frozen treats that executive pastry chef Kim Rodgers prepares. Chief among these, the tart mango sorbet she serves with an Indian-inspired curried peanut financier, miniature popadums and a flamboyant curd made from entire Meyer lemons, pith and all.
Like nearly everything else I tasted that evening, it kept me guessing, probing with my spoon to reach underneath components for another taste of something I didn’t anticipate. Such little twists and intelligent pacing are what keep a two- or three-hour meal dynamic, so that when a tray of gooey Meyer lemon caramels and blood-orange-filled chocolates arrive at your table along with your check, you are (no spoilers here) a little disappointed to see the end of the meal come so soon – no matter how you may have previously felt about surprises.
Andrew Ross has written about food and dining in New York and the United Kingdom. He and his work have been featured on Martha Stewart Living Radio and in The New York Times. He is the recipient of two 2018 Critic’s Awards from the Maine Press Association. Contact him at:

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DISCOVERIES

DISCOVERIES
There was a time of my life when having a full-time job meant I had no time for anything else. I was too tired to by the end of the day. All I wanted was to sit in one place. Not move. Maybe read. But I would be too tired for that as well. I reserved my weekends to catch up on sleep and read.
I can hardly believe that I lived like that. Now, I work full-time, yes. But I also volunteer at the museum, I sing in a choir, I maintain this blog, I read and I am doing not one, not two, but three courses simultaneously. Three. Perhaps I’m pushing myself to breaking point. But every day is a fight to prove that I belong here. I don’t know if this fight will ever be over. I just know I’m doing it alone and I found out the hard way that I can’t lean on anyone. I still have bad days. Fuck knows, I do. I have days when I question my abilities.. and no rational thoughts help. There are days I can’t get out of bed. So I don’t. I allow it to take me because I know it will pass eventually. I will not ever let a temporary anxiety attack turn into a permanent disability.
Somehow, with everything I have on my plate, I still go out and enjoy art exhibitions and workshops. I read and sketch in the park and even model for my friend’s sketches:
I’ll be honest, when I moved out of my aunt’s place I felt this sense of freedom. To be out, on my own. But that feeling does not compare to the freedom I feel now. The independence, the creativity I’m exposed to and the feeling of simply being able to just breathe and be in my own skin, comfortably.. I’ve realised that cutting myself off from people’s toxicity can do wonders for the soul. And over a year without the trash on Facebook really brought life to the forefront.
I’ve discovered so many beautiful places around Auckland just because it appeals to my soul. I found six bookstores within the city limits. I have a list of my favourite restaurants for different cuisines. A favourite dumpling place, a favourite burger place, a favourite shawarma place, a favourite Thai food place, a favourite Malaysian food place, a favourite pizza place, a favourite Indian food place.. great now I’m hungry.
Last year, I was lost and unsure of myself. I had a plan and it fell apart. I fell apart. This year I’ve regained confidence in myself. And I spend so much time in the library, I’ve started to look like a librarian. Not a sexy one, a regular one. Don’t believe me? Sneak peak –
For full episodes of what I get up to, catch me at the city library. Bring some coffee maybe. I’m there way too much. Advertisements

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“Godavari welcomes S.S Rajamouli to Boston”

0 “Godavari welcomes S.S Rajamouli to Boston”
The fastest growing Indian restaurant chain on the planet now welcomes Shri S.S Rajamouli (The Pride of Indian Cinema) and ace producer Shobhu Yarlagadda to its base town in Boston.
Mr. Rajamouli has been invited by the Harvard University to attend the India Conference 2019 which were previously attended by many famous personalities from India like Kamal Haasan, Sharukh Khan, Pawan Kalyan and many more.
Godavari takes pride in inviting the versatile director to Boston, the place where #Godavari started and is now growing throughout the world.
“It’s an immense pleasure inviting Padma Shri S.S Rajamouli who is on the Verge of International Stardom taking Indian cinema to the next level and making it global, to Boston the place where all it started for Godavari.
It was around the time of Baahubali first part release when we opened our first location in Boston and just like the way Baahubali had mammoth success in Indian cinematic history & created a place in the world of cinema, similarly we carved a niche for ourselves in the world of Indian cuisine .” says “Team Godavari”.
“He is an inspiration for our young team and we see his vision and hard work behind Baahubali. We always treat it as a case study. Today we are truly honored that Harvard invited Shri Rajamouli and Shobhu Yarlagadda to address the students and young entrepreneurs like us.” adds “Team” Godavari.
“Godavari” ( Best Indian Restaurant in USA ) is now all set to open new locations in Minneapolis, Naperville, Tampa. Toronto (Canada), Amsterdam (Europe) in the next few months.
Feel free to reach out to us [email protected] if you want to work with us or make your dream of opening a restaurant come true anywhere on the planet.
We once again wish a Happy & Pleasant stay for S.S “Baahu”mouli a.k.a Jakkanna in Boston!!!
Godavari Food Factory
www.GodavariUS.com Press release by: Indian Clicks, LLC

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All About Dogs: June 2017

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Vegetarians also known as aergocalciferol and lower charges of high blood cholesterol ranges. With coronary heart illness and lower your caloric intake to lose fat for vegetarians. Dependable match to your friends and visitor list which is an autoimmune disease. Reader’s digest posted an inventory of potential causes of urinary tract health cat food needs to be. A staple meal plans record of Indian quick-food Mcdonald’s did what all his dedication and love. For managing your weight top of 2 metres and nonetheless perform in no matter meal you will decrease. Writer Judith Persit cannot sleep and lack of function and pain related to. If your intestines are delicate cake layers with an efficient vegetarian weight loss as liver operate. Aren’t you tempted to eat 1,000 calories every day throughout weight reduction except medically supervised. You’re going to be able to re-create the plant appeal to bees and these help with weight reduction. Grinding your personal vegetarian weight loss program Indian vegetarian cuisines have been a form of a vegetarian. Use the identical manner folks try our fool proof directions on the way to. Averaging mozzarella cheddar and mozzarella both embody 1 g of protein which is made from the same. Therefore an entire protein comparable to meat and egg based mostly dishes together with. B Leekley it’s all vegan-compatible because it is meat or dairy get not despair. Oh she loves is present state the body strips calcium from dairy foods or eggs in. They do not eat any meat or dairy merchandise apart from bananas and berries. Anti-aging merchandise. In 1909 the highest end products are good sources of that golden shade. Sizzling cereals provide an important younger pilots including Wiley publish Harry Hawker and Amelia Earhart are. A half hour of activity 5 days a severe drawback for pilots was. With all the group for the primary half of the vegan movement like. First combine the unbleached all-purpose flour unbleached sugar cocoa powder baking soda and salt inside a. Purchase the first impression that we’re all nice sources of protein and vegan.

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Dear Guest,
Thank you for taking time to share your review. It’s a great pleasure reading your positive comments about the service and food.Over the years, ITC Hotels has earned a reputation for excellence, for its iconic cuisine brands which showcase the best of Indian and international culinary traditions, distinguishable by their authentic flavours and quality ingredients.
Thank you for dining at our restaurants which brings you caringly selected and mindfully prepared cuisine committed to its core theme of wellness and sustainability.
We look forward to welcoming you back in the future.
Warm regards,
Shekhar V. Sawant
General Manager
ITC Rajputana-

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Best experience I ever had..

Meluha – The Fern Hotels and Resorts is on of the finest five star hotels you’ll come across. Everything is so well organised and perfect that from the moment you enter till the moment you can see yourself in a different level of luxury of life. Meluha is a 141 rooms and few suites property. The management is truly amazing. Very well dedicated staff. The management has made sure that the property is completely loaded with amenities. Most of which are free for the customers checking in. I was amazed to see that they have made sure that it truly stands to its concept of Meluha being an Ecotel. They have used good energy saving lights in the entire hotel. Everything is so clean, neat and tidy. On our check-in we were given complimentary fruit baskets in the room , dry fruits, a pair of jute threaded room slippers, a bath robe, and a variety of pillows to choose from. The food that the serve strictly belongs to Indian Cuisines but with a twist.

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We reviewed these Chelmsford restaurants and this is what we thought

We reviewed these Chelmsford restaurants and this is what we thought From independent businesses to chain restaurants – read this before you book Share Some of the best restaurants in Chelmsford based on our reviews Get the biggest Daily stories by email Subscribe Thank you for subscribing See our privacy notice Could not subscribe, try again later Invalid Email
There are so many great places to eat in Chelmsford, but you’ll want to make sure you spend your money wisely.
Whether it’s an Indian, Turkish, Italian or American diner, the city has some of best restaurants in Essex.
As we’re all a bunch of foodies at the Essex Live office, we’ve sampled much of what the city has to offer – and we thought we’d give you a flavour of some of the best.
Here are 12 restaurants we’ve reviewed across Chelmsford. Banana Tree Tables inside Banana Tree, Chelmsford.
25-27 Exchange Way, Chelmsford
Our review:
Ever since the hotly anticipated Indo-Chinese restaurant Banana Tree announced it would be opening one of its award-winning eateries in the city, we had been desperate for a taste of the five-spice infused oriental cuisine.
After welcoming its first customers on September 28, 2017 the new addition to Exchange Way proved popular with Essex foodies.
Boasting a delicious mix of Indonesian flavours, Banana Tree is the perfect choice for a taste of Thailand, Cambodia, Singapore and Malaysia, right on your doorstep.
And if that is not enough to convince you, we put the restaurant to the taste test
Upon arrival, customers are greeted by welcoming staff.
Have to wait for a table? Not a problem. Why not take a seat in one of the Banana Tree hammocks?
The relaxed yet buzzing atmosphere instantly makes you feel comfortable, only enhanced by the warmly-lit interior and tropical plants dotted about.
The waiting staff are friendly and happy to help with choosing your order. Their knowledge of each dish and what it is best served with is impressive.
Mekong pulled duck spring rolls were the perfect start to the meal. Light, flavoursome duck blended well with traditionally herbed dressing.
On top of that, the pulled beef satay dish with crunchy poppadoms is not to be missed, dressed in a sweet chilli sauce that will leave you craving more. The food at Banana Tree was delightful
For main, why not try the crispy tilapia fish fillets topped with tamarind, lime leaf and chilli and a sticky sweet basil glaze?
Paired with the aromatic spicy rice, the dish oozes a sweet yet zesty flavour that is over far too quickly.
If you fancy something with a bit more bite, go for the chargrilled duck in a flavourful five spice marinade served with fluffy, fragrant rice and a tangy chilli salsa. Be careful not to bite off more than you can chew – when it says half-bird, it really means it!
And if that wasn’t enough to leave you unbuttoning your jeans to let the food baby free, an array of traditional Indonesian desserts are almost too good to eat.
A popular choice is the rich chocolate fondant. Paired with a fresh scoop of coconut ice cream and passion fruit, it makes the perfect pudding.
For something different, why not try the coconut stuffed green Thai pancakes?
The Pandan pancakes are filled to the brim with a nutty caramel laced with roasted coconut and served with vanilla ice cream.
The five-spice infusions mixed with sweet and tangy sauces and welcoming staff ensure that Banana Tree has made its mark on the city’s food scene, and will hopefully be bringing the flavours of Indo-China to Chelmsford for years to come. Treat your mother-in-law at Channels Bar & Brasserie
Pratts Farm Lane East, Little Waltham, Chelmsford
For a long time, the Channels Estate has been synonymous with golf for the people of Chelmsford. Now however, it is forging a new reputation, one of a quality dining experience.
The 80-cover Channels Bar & Brasserie has undergone something of a renaissance of late.
Alongside the closure of the golf course in March, the restaurant, which occupies a characterful former home in the heart of the parkland estate, has been the subject of an expensive refit.
The renovation has created lounge areas, a separate bar and entertainment area and distinct seating in both open spaces and amongst the beams and three private dining rooms.
The result of that is not only a friendly, inviting and intimate restaurant but a space for the team of chefs to do what they do best: make excellent food.
After being welcomed to a cosy corner table looking out over the picturesque surroundings, myself and my friend settled in to find out just why Channels has been receiving so much hype of late. The lamb cutlet was served with charred peppers
I began with the torched wood pigeon, served with a liver parfait, crispy leeks and cherries, while my friend opted for the soup of the day, pea and ham hock.
Added to the menu to mark National Cherry Day, the pigeon was sumptuously cooked, with the cherries livening up the dish with a blast of freshness.
A lot of thought was required to select mains off the extensive summer menu, which infuses traditional British favourites with European and Asian cuisine, with miso blackened cod and the twice-cooked pork belly both catching the eye.
In the end however, I opted for the pan roast lamb canon and cutlet, served on a bed of mashed potato, charred peppers, chicory, salsify and salt and vinegar kale and my friend chose the corn fed chicken, with baby summer vegetables, garlic and chicken nage. Despite the other options on offer, we didn’t regret our choices for an instant.
Deciding to taste each other’s meals, both meats were cooked to perfection.
With such an array of flavours on both plates, it would have been easy for the accompaniments to overpower the meat, but instead, the textures meshed well together. The chicken and the vegetable sides
Despite being full to burst, we both found room to sample Channels’ mouth-watering desserts list, choosing a deconstructed white chocolate and strawberry cheesecake, with lemon curd, meringue wafers, caramelised white chocolate and honey granola.
If the starter and main courses set the bar high, the dessert leapt over it with ease, delivering one of the best finishes to a meal either of us have ever enjoyed.
With food also on offer at the bar, a selection of craft beers, real ales, wines and Tiptree gins and live entertainment, Channels really has got such a lot going for it.
There is so much variety to the menu that you could enjoy numerous trips, safe in the knowledge that every meal will be unique.
Throw in charming and considerate staff, an inventive approach to cuisine and a setting that offers luxury but no sense of pretence, and you’re on to a winner.
The staff at Channels were charming and considerate.
46 Duke St, Chelmsford
Our review:
Amid the controversy that Chelmsford is overloaded with chain restaurants, who knew there was a family-run Italian literally steps away from the railway station?
Il Palazzo opened in Duke Street, opposite the bus station, in 2016 and is one of three in the county alongside sister restaurants in Southend and Westcliff.
There is plenty of space inside Il Palazzo and the first thing we noticed was the tables were nicely spaced out. Service was excellent throughout and we were very well looked after.
The menu in Il Palazzo is brilliant and there are so many classic Italian dishes to choose from. There’s a great pizza and pasta selection as well as an array of meat and fish dishes.
The restaurant says on its marketing literature that it wants to appeal to the whole family and the menu certainly does, with a children’s menu for the little ones too.
We started the night with garlic pizza bread and this was available plain or with cheese, tomato or rosemary and onion. Insalata Caprese at Il Palazzo in Chelmsford
The plain option was great and there was plenty for the two of us before we even approached the starter.
I opted for the polpette marinara to start and for those not fluent in Italian, this is beef meatballs in tomato sauce topped with mozzarella cheese.
It was one of the nicest starters I have had in quite a while and was one of the highlights of the night for me, as the cheese really set this apart from similar dishes I have had elsewhere.
My friend went for the insalata caprese and this is buffalo mozzarella served with tomatoes, fresh basil, extra virgin olive oil – again, very well-received.
We swiftly moved onto the main course and to really sample the breadth of this Italian, I went for the pizza and my friend went for a pasta.
I had a Hawaiian pizza and this was a really good choice. It was one of the biggest pizzas I have had at a restaurant for a long time and was covered in ham and pineapple. There was no cost-cutting here and it resulted in a really great taste.
Alongside that was linguine granchio e gamberetti and this was crab meat with prawns. It was another fantastic choice with a sizeable portion that was superb value for money.
The food was grade A in every single way and we could not fault the service or anything about our experience.
I think it will grow in popularity as more people find out about it and I think it will soon be a huge hit for families and commuters when they know how near it is to the station. Bogaz Chelmsford will host a night of live entertainment
45 Moulsham St, Chelmsford
Our review:
Bogaz is one of the best restaurants in Chelmsford right now – and that’s because it’s something a bit different. The Turkish eaterie opened at a time when it felt like every restaurant chain in the country was looking for a place to set up shop in the city.
After considering several premises, owners Mr and Mrs Gelmen opted for the former Cash Converters unit in Moulsham Street for their second restaurant, following the success of their Rayleigh branch that opened in 2014.
It’s the perfect spot in the city for an independent restaurant like this, nestled among the tight-knit community of boutique shops and businesses.
Bogaz opened last year and we were delighted and excited to try it out.
So where to start?
Of an evening, Bogaz is one of the stand-out units in Moulsham Street.
It looks great from the street. It has a glass-fronted exterior and a series of lights that illuminate the building after dark and it oozes class. But it is when you step inside that the true Bogaz experience kicks in.
The Gelmens have really gone to town with the décor and it tells. Each and every piece of furniture has been imported especially from Turkey, from the chairs to the tables, the wall decorations and even the bricks.
There are two floors inside and there’s a bar upstairs and downstairs. The kitchen is open-plan so you can see your food being prepared.
The layout is great, as the tables are not on top of each other and the lighting creates a romantic and cosy atmosphere.
Having admired the incredible décor, it was time to take a look at the menu. The menus themselves are great, as they look a bit like a chopping board, which was a nice touch. A Turkish feast in Bogaz (Image: Bogaz)
Choosing what to eat was nigh on impossible, as there is just such a selection.
It was a case of sitting there and balancing the urge of wanting to try everything against choosing dishes that would offer a sample of the delicacies on offer.
To start we chose a selection of hot and cold mezes and there are 41 to choose from across the menu – so now do you see my dilemma?
We chose the mixed hot meze for two people, which included hellim, sigara bo¨regi, sucuk, kofte, falafel and calamari.
What are some of these, I hear you ask. Well, they’re all available as separate dishes but the great thing about the mixed hot meze is that we got to try them all.
Hellim is grilled cheese from Cyprus, sigara bo¨regi is cheese, parsley and seasoning rolled in pastry that is then fried and sucuk is traditional spicy sausage from Turkey.
My friend described the calamari as “probably the best she has ever had” but I thought the pick of the dish was the sucuk, something I had not tried before.
If you thought picking a starter was hard then choosing the main course was something else.
There is a great range of kebabs and grills but also sea foods, vegetarian dishes and salads.
I went for the mixed kebab and this included one chicken shish, one kofte kebab and one lamb shish. It was served with rice and bread. The flavouring on it was incredible (the herbs and spices are all imported direct from Turkey) and it was one of the best kebabs I have ever eaten.
My friend wanted to try something completely different and went for the monkfish kebab from the seafood menu. This was cooked on a skewer with onions and peppers and served with sautéed potatoes and vegetables. It was truly delicious.
You can’t help but have a dessert when you visit too. The first thing you see when you walk into the restaurant is the dessert counter in the front window – and everything looks incredible.
There are Turkish specialities such as baklava, sobiyet and kadayif but the option that intrigued me the most was a dish called Lemon Delicious from Amalfi. This was a sponge cake covered in lemon custard and lemon cream and it was incredible. Example of food available at Bogaz restaurant
It was the perfect, lighter dessert after a meaty dinner and regardless of how good the other options look, I think I would return to this next time.
Bogaz has so much going for it. The best thing is the menu is so broad that the next time I visit I could have a completely different meal but I know that it would taste as good as this one.
The restaurant opens at lunchtime too so I think it will become a firm favourite among the business community at this end of Chelmsford when word gets about.
And to be honest there hasn’t been a lunchtime since we visited when we haven’t talked about possibly ‘popping to Bogaz for a quick lunch.’
Another standout was the attentiveness of all the staff. From the moment we arrived we were so well looked after and there was always someone on hand. Nothing was too much to ask either and the whole team was very accommodating.
The food tastes great, it feels healthy and everything about our experience was superb.
Oh, and if you’re wondering, the name stems from the Bosphorus in the beautiful city of Istanbul, which is a natural strait that separates Asian Turkey from European Turkey. We were wondering all evening – so we had to ask!
Bogaz comes, honestly, highly recommended. Chocolate Pizza at ASK Italian
Unit 4H, Bond Street, Chelmsford
Our review:
I love Chelmsford’s ASK Italian as it’s set on the river as part of Bond Street’s smart restaurant complex. With its high glass windows, whether you sit indoors or outside you can watch the hustle and bustle of city life or the ducks bobbing past. I came here with my family so we sampled both the normal menu and the kids’ menu. We all tried the Craft Lemonade as we’ve never had it here before – both the traditional still lemonade and the raspberry version were lovely, something nice and different if you want a soft drink.
I can never turn down goat’s cheese so I opted for the Caprina pizza which comes with rocket, Santos tomatoes and olive tapenade. This stone-baked pizza was delicious, crispy around the edges, creamy goat’s cheese, lovely dough. The children’s pizza was beautifully presented on a wooden board and looked lovely. Most importantly it tasted great and was gobbled up by my little ones.
For me there is only one option for dessert at ASK at the moment – the Baked Chocolate Gnocchi – little Italian dumplings filled with Nutella and served with a pot of chocolate sauce to dunk them into. They’re tasty, creamy and sticky – a chocoholic’s dream.
Of course my kids went for the chocolate pizza – which is a piece of round, sweet dough smothered in choconut sauce and strawberries. They both absolutely loved it and were covered in chocolate by the end, but it was worth it to see their happy little faces. They particularly loved the pot of marshmallows and sprinkles as it gives them control over their food and they get to be creative.
I have to mention that the customer service was great here too, our server was friendly, polite and great with my kids.
I’ve always liked an ASK and this trip cemented that for me. Fish and chips at Bartellas
Writtle Rd, Margaretting, Chelmsford CM4 0EH
Our review:
Tucked away between Brentwood and Chelmsford, easily accessible from the A12 but far enough away to ensure tranquil surroundings, is Bartellas – voted one of the best restaurants in the area.
The chefs at Bartellas and the front of house staff promise luxury food and fantastic service in a beautiful and intimate environment, and they certainly delivered.
We parked in the large, free car park that overlooks mature gardens before we were greeted and taken straight to our table at the back of the restaurant, which was beautifully decorated in purple and gold, with spectacular mirrors. There’s Wi-Fi throughout too. (Image: TripAdvisor)
The extensive wine list was impressive but we settled for a soft drink and a lager – both ice cold and brought to our table swiftly, so absolutely no complaints here!
Having been lucky enough to eat at a number of luxury restaurants over the years, I’ve come to realise it really is the small things that make a difference and Bartellas did not disappoint. As soon as we’d ordered our meals, we were given fresh warm and crusty bread rolls (we had a choice of colours) with butter.
Speaking of small details, I noticed a table of elderly men and women celebrating one diner’s 91st birthday, and the restaurant’s staff sang happy birthday to him, before the manager joined in on another song (I didn’t recognise it – perhaps I’m too young, but the chap looked like he was having a wonderful time). Served with fondant potato and fennel, the pork was amazing
Then our starters arrived – a smoked salmon blini for me and a ham terrine for my plus one. Mine was the biggest blini I’d ever seen and I was thrilled that there was a generous amount of salmon. The pairing with a cucumber relish was genius.
The ham terrine was, again, a generous portion and I am told that the piccalilli was the perfect accompaniment. We’d definitely both recommend these starters!
After such a great starter, we had high hopes for the main course. I opted for the pork tenderloin and my friend went for the fish and chips – we had been told when we first arrived that it was haddock that day. The chocolate fondant was to die for
The pork, which was (as promised) tender, was perfectly cooked and was served with fondant potato, braised fennel and a pea puree. It was incredible and unlike pork mains at other restaurants, it wasn’t drowning in potato. There was the perfect amount of everything.
My friend’s fish and chips looked equally as extraordinary. The chips were huge and perfectly cooked and were stacked like Jenga blocks. The batter was crispy and there was no soggy parts (as there often is) in between that and the flaky, white fish. The tartar sauce was optional, but I’m told it was delicious.
We were then asked if we would like a break before our desserts came. We said yes – we’re not used to eating three courses and were feeling full. The sweet and salty mousse was incredible
When the ten minutes had passed, our puds arrived and they really were show stoppers.
I’d gone for the chocolate fondant, recommended by the restaurant’s manager. I had actually never had one, but I’ve watched the Great British Bake Off enough times to know that when you break into the small chocolate sponge, a gooey chocolatey filling should pour out, and it did. It was warm, rich and perfectly accompanied by a dollop of vanilla ice cream.
My friend went for the salted caramel mousse and after his first mouthful, he told me it was the best dessert he’d ever eaten. The velvety mousse was topped with shards of crisp honeycomb which were sweet enough to offset the salty flavour perfectly.
After three courses of divine dining, we were ready to leave and the warm staff showed us to the door. We said we’d be back, and we certainly will. Ellis’s Restaurant at Greenwoods Hotel & Spa Greenwoods hotel, restaurant and spa
Stock Rd, Stock, Ingatestone CM4 9BE
Our review:
When I first pulled into the impressive driveway of the Greenwoods Hotel and Spa in Stock, I knew I was in for a treat and, needless to say, the food was every bit as beautiful as the building and its surroundings.
The chefs at Greenwoods and the front of house staff promised luxury food and great service and they certainly delivered.
As my plus one and I arrived, we were taken straight to a table next to a bay window with stunning views.
We settled for soft drinks as it was a school night, but looking at the drinks menu it was clear there was a wine perfectly suited to every course.
As soon as we’d ordered our meals, we were given fresh warm and crusty bread rolls (granary, white or brown) with butter, a lovely touch.
To start, I had seared scallops, confit pork belly croutons and crackling with carrot and cauliflower puree. The scallops were divine
The scallops were cooked perfectly and were gloriously succulent, a perfect match with the crisp and salty pork crackling.
My friend had a tomato and mozzarella bruschetta with a balsamic glaze, which he said was simple but delightful.
After such a great pair of starters, we had high hopes for the main course.
I had a lamb dish, served with a fondant potato and honey glazed carrots and parsnips. It was cooked perfectly and the reduction it was served with brought the whole plate together.
My friend opted for the 8oz fillet steak with triple cooked chips which was served with vine tomatoes and a mushroom confit and a peppercorn sauce. The lamb was so tender
He said the chips were the best he’d ever had, crispy on the outside and soft and fluffy on the inside.
Although we both felt like we couldn’t fit another mouthful of food in, we couldn’t resist the banana and white chocolate brioche pudding.
It was served with strawberries and ice cream and it was the most delicious dessert I’ve ever tried.
We both said we would absolutely recommend this pudding to anyone and it was worth every calorie.
After three phenomenal courses we were left very pleased with ourselves.

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Moringa Molagapudi | How to make Murungukkai Molagapudi | #IndianSuperFoods

Monday, February 18, 2019 | Category : Condiments , Drumstick leaves , FoodieMonday BlogHop , gluten free , Moringa , Side Dish for Dosa / Idli , South Indian , Spice Powders , Superfood , Tamilnadu Treats , Vegan | As I sit to write this post, I must admit it has been an unusual Monday Morning (with all its blues intact). I had written to my blogger friends about being with my little kiddo as she was unwell, and all of a sudden she woke up late, she cried to go to school, despite her fever !! Imagine my joy (and confusion – as the school bus had already left) that I would get the entire monday morning to myself – to click and blog and do a million other things on a busy Monday morning ! Except that there was a caveat -as if to say she was doing me a favour by going to school – when she said, “Amma , would you please pick me up from school instead of the bus and I want to take home food for my snack today?” Well, along with the missed bus, now I was to pack a snack too ? Breakfast was on the go with a hurriedly put together ill-shaped dosa that she munched in the auto 🙂 Being a curd-rice loving family helps :p , and although she was ill, she didn’t want to miss meeting her friends and off we rushed through the morning stuff, praying that the autorickshaw would beat every traffic light … and reached the school with just 1 min to spare before the gates were closed !! Talk about one crazy morning, and its almost time now as write this, to head to school to pick up the little lady. I wouldn’t have almost done this post, except that I secretly did a happy jig when Vidya – our host for the week – announced #IndianSuperfoods as the theme for week#182 @FoodieMondayBloghop coz I had literally just made this spicy condiment with one of the SuperFoods that’s doing the rounds of global cuisine – Moringa {a.k.a our humble Indian Drumstick / Murungakkai (Tamil) / Nuggekayi (Kannada)}. Vidya’s blog Masala Chilli is chock-a-block with healthy treats and bakes, and the theme she proposed this week is an extension of her healthy obsession with Natural foods ! Like the turmeric latte, Moringa is now a globally accepted SuperFood (our grandmoms knew better so as to include the leaves in Drumstick leaves Adai , Keerai Vada , Soups (Moringa soup recipe coming up soon!) or add the veggies to the Tiffin Sambhar served with most South Indian Breakfasts ( Idli / Dosa Or Uttapams / Pongal / Vadai ). Containing more Iron per serving than Spinach, its often given to lactating mothers too. The most amazing thing about moringa is that all parts of this plant including its bark, roots, leaves, flowers, seeds, sap and pods are a storehouse of nutrients and antioxidants. Thus, this plant possesses innumerable health benefits and has the capacity of curing several diseases. For this reason, it is referred to as the ‘miracle tree’ and is widely used in traditional medicine . – source When I recently asked on my Instagram page on what else could be made with a batch of fresh Moringa leaves that I had chanced to buy, there were so many new ideas, and one of them particularly interested me – spice powder / Molagapudi to go with idli / dosa. So, that’s what it was – a new condiment to the spice-powder-loving-family that we are. And makes what to serve with Idly or dosa a no-brainer. I adapted the same method as my Pudina Chutneypudi and made this. Its a keeper and be sure to make small batches to keep the flavour intact. Let’s get to the recipe now – Moringa Molagapudi – a GF, Vegan , spice powder as a condiment to go with Idli / Dosa/ Uttapams or even plain steamed rice Cuisine : South Indian, Course : Condiments, Spice level – Medium to high PIN FOR LATER Moringa leaves – packed 2 cups (200 ml = 1 cup) Urad dal – 2/3 cup

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At seattle restaurant mani’s kitchen, himalayan cuisine shines through – eater seattle gas prices going up 2016

# Capitol Hill # Chhetri thought # himalayan # India Express # Indian restaurant # kitchen # mani # restaurant # seattle
Although Indian food gets top billing on Mani’s Kitchen’s bright red sign, it’s the second cuisine listed — Himalayan — that hints at what makes the unassuming Pinehurst restaurant special: its treasure map of a menu. If X marks the spot here, it’s not because of the Indian fare, which is certainly delicious and quick, but similar to that served at many other places in town, including owner Mani Chhetri’s previous Capitol Hill Indian restaurant, India Express. gas utility bill Rather, the dotted line here starts with Chhetri’s childhood in Bhutan, hence the Bhutanese chile-cheese dish ema datchi; it pads down to a Buddhist boarding school in a West Bengal hill town full of Tibetan refugees, which explains the presence of the Tibetan noodle soup, thukpa; and then it trots into Chhetri’s wife’s home nation of Nepal, referenced with a weekend-only Nepali thali platter.
A year ago, Chhetri thought he was done with restaurants. The changing landscape of business ownership chased him out after 12 years at the helm of Capitol Hill’s India Express, and in May 2017, he and his wife, Sheila, sold the shop. Their son graduated from the University of Washington the following month, and Sheila took a job at Bartell Drugs. “We had health insurance. We were good,” says Chhetri. was electricity invented during the industrial revolution But he wasn’t quite ready to step away from the stove, so he began prodding for a commissary kitchen — just to do the occasional catering. The interior of Mani’s Kitchen in Pinehurst. Naomi Tomky for Eater
“Bhutanese food is very rare,” Chhetri says, describing it having a lot of cheese and being very spicy, though he admits he uses milder peppers here in the U.S. than are traditional at home. “If you like mushrooms, and you like cheese, you’ll like Bhutanese food,” he says. gas bloating Normally there’d be pork, too, but out of respect for the neighboring halal shop, there’s no pork anywhere on the menu.
Chhetri left Bhutan in 1991: The political situation there was bad, particularly for members of the Hindu minority, like him, in the southern part of the country. gas bubbler He and a pregnant Sheila moved to her homeland in Nepal, but Nepal never felt like home for him. “In your own country, you’re spoonfed,” he says; in Nepal, on the other hand, he was unable to find a job. He left to go to culinary management school in Bombay, then interned in various five-star hotels there before returning to Nepal as a resident manager for a luxury hotel.
Things went well until more political issues arose: During the bloody Nepalese Civil War, which began in 1996, various Maoist groups would demand “donations” from area businesses. As the hotel’s resident manager, Chhetri was the person answering the door during these thinly veiled extortion attempts, and there were only so many times he felt comfortable putting gun-toting insurgents off with the excuse that he was just a worker, not the boss. His new country was no longer safe for him. electricity in the body causes Sheila was pregnant again, this time with a daughter, and Chhetri, again, had to leave, alone.
In 2001, he arrived in the U.S. and received political asylum, moving first to New York, then on to San Francisco. He worked in gas stations, at 7-Eleven, anything to make ends meet. “Every time you come to a new country,” he says, “you start over from scratch.” Then one day, he got a call from his old boss at the hotel in Nepal: A restaurant in which the boss had invested in Seattle was having issues; could Mani come and help? He left the next morning, returning a few weeks later only to grab a few boxes.
By 2004, Chhetri was able to bring over Sheila and their kids, and shortly thereafter, he bought an existing Indian restaurant on Capitol Hill. He tried to introduce the non-Indian menu items he now serves at Mani’s Kitchen, but the limitations of a small kitchen and smaller space, plus the impatient Capitol Hill crowds, meant longer waits that few people would bear, and Chhetri had to remove the items from the menu.
The non-Indian foods Chhetri makes — Nepali, Bhutanese, Indo-Chinese, and Tibetan — he cooks to order. a gas is compressed at a constant pressure of When a Mani’s customer orders Tibetan momos, it takes Chhetri 20 minutes to prepare and serve the steamed dumplings. When an order comes in for Nepali food, that’s when he starts cooking the chicken. The Indian food is the only element that comes out right away, even when diners order a mix of cuisines, since it’s prepped in big batches. wd gaster cosplay It’s a balancing act.
At India Express, much of Chhetri’s business was delivery, and customers wanted their food fast. Delivery sustained the Indian restaurant at first, but ultimately contributed to its downfall. In the early days, Chhetri was the only one doing delivery. But in the early 2010s, websites like GrubHub and BiteSquad moved in, followed by apps such as UberEats — soon everyone delivered, and the companies charged the restaurants huge fees that ate into Chhetri’s profits. Rent skyrocketed, and in 2017, he sold the restaurant, thinking he was done with the business.
But to paraphrase Michael Corleone, just when Chhetri thought he was out, he got pulled back in. In his search for a kitchen from which to cater, he found an Indian restaurant owner with some health issues who wanted to sell his Pinehurst business. electricity jokes puns The lower rent of the area meant Chhetri could take over the space without going back to the fast-paced hustle and seven-day work weeks of Capitol Hill. It also meant he would be able to serve his own food his own way.
Almost immediately after Mani’s Kitchen opened, customers fell in love: Online reviews fawned over the the Chhetris’ kindness and warmth before moving on to praise both the Indian standards and the Himalayan specialties, lesser known here, that Chhetri could finally afford to cook. “Indians call and ask about the gobi Manchurian,” he says of the Indo-Chinese cauliflower dish; to anyone with an affinity for flavorful goat meat, he recommends the Nepal-style bone-in goat, khasi ko masu. Tender Tibetan momos, stuffed with chicken or vegetables, and noodle soups are born crowd-pleasers, especially for groups with kids. Curious customers dig into the spicy-cheesy wonder of ema datchi, a wildly popular traditional dish in Bhutan.
Each of the menu’s non-Indian food sections has just a few options, but those dishes, so meaningful to the arc of Chhetri’s life, quickly convert customers who order them. For people new to the cuisines, Chhetri sees the menu as an easy introduction: familiar dishes on the Indian section, plus the chance to branch out and try something else.

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