Business Meets Pleasure: Visit This Belize Overwater Coworking Space

Business Meets Pleasure: Visit This Belize Overwater Coworking Space

Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own. Travel I write about travel and lifestyle. Share to facebook Share to twitter Share to linkedin As more and more people work remotely, destinations are adapting accordingly. Yesterday Belize’s Tourism Board announced the opening of the country’s first-ever overwater bungalow coworking space on Tobacco Caye. A tiny private island ten miles off the coast of Belize, this destination is the perfect Caribbean getaway where you can also get work done — an ideal spot for entrepreneurs, freelancers and digital nomads. I spoke to Karen Bevans, the director of tourism for the Belize Tourism Board to find out more about Tobacco Caye and how it blends business and leisure, also known as “Belizesure” on the island. Read on to learn about the features of the co-working space, activities on the island and also the competition where you could win an all-expenses-paid, five-day trip for two to Belize. Belize Tobacco Caye Photo courtesy of Belize Tourism
Why do you think more and more people are mixing work with pleasure?
Karen Bevans: Everyone has their own reason, but there are a lot of common themes we’ve heard from visitors. Unfortunately, many working professionals have become “vacation-phobic” in recent decades — the idea of leaving work for vacation causes them anxiety. Project: Time Off published a survey last year that found fear of looking replaceable, a heavy workload and a lack of coverage by co-workers were the leading causes of stress related to taking vacation. It seems many people have decided the best way to offset that stress is to simply work while on vacation.
How is Tobacco Caye uniquely poised to combine work and vacation?
Tobacco Caye is a tiny private island ten miles off the coast of Belize that feels as far away as one can get from the stresses of work. However, the overwater bungalow coworking space we’ve opened on the island makes it possible for visitors to be productive (if they must). Tobacco Cay Coworking Photo courtesy of Belize Tourism
Describe the perfect Belizesure day.
The majority of a perfect Belizesure day would be spent enjoying all that Belize has to offer, whether it’s one of our picturesque beaches brushed by cool ocean breezes, a rainforest adventure to spot local bird and plant life, a totally relaxing hotel stay or a delicious dinner of local fare prepared by one of our talented chefs. The rest of the time could be spent sending a few emails and checking in with co-workers – just enough productivity to feel like you can transition back to vacation mode worry-free.
What makes Belize uniquely popular with visitors?
Belize is a small country that offers a rich mixture of cultures and activities. Because of our size, our geology and our many cultural influences — including Garifuna, Maya, Mestizo, Creole and Indian — you can be in Belize for seven days and make each day completely unique from the day before. The fact English is our official language also makes the country more readily accessible for American travelers.
How does Tobacco Caye make it easy to work away from a regular office?
Even though Tobacco Caye feels like a tiny, remote island in the middle of the Caribbean Sea, the overwater bungalow coworking space we created offers all the modern amenities guests need to be comfortable and productive. It features an open-concept layout, standing desks, a wellness center, executive parking, a VIP boardroom, WiFi and more.
What activities can people experience in or near Tobacco Caye?
The beauty of Tobacco Caye is guests can walk from one side of the island to the other within a couple minutes. There’s still plenty of room, however, to enjoy delicious cuisine, fishing, swimming and perhaps a book while swinging in a hammock. World-class snorkeling and diving in the Belize Barrier Reef is also just a short boat ride away. Tobacco Cay Photo courtesy of Belize Tourism
What are you looking for in the Belizesure competition winner?
We’re looking for applicants who can demonstrate their curiosity and appetite for adventure while also explaining how their work obligations would make the coworking space an essential part of their visit.
To win send an email to belizesure@gmail.com explaining why you’re the perfect candidate and you could earn an all-expenses-paid, five-day trip for two to Belize where you’ll have exclusive access to Tobacco Caye’s overwater bungalow coworking space. Rana Good Contributor I’m forever on a quest to try new hotels, food, and experiences. Originally from Switzerland, I now call New York home. Previously published in AFAR, Travel + Leisure, M… Read More

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Guardian article calls jackfruit ‘spectacularly ugly’, invites Twitterati’s wrath

Advertising Guardian article calls jackfruit ‘spectacularly ugly’, invites Twitterati’s wrath The Guardian wrote an article on jackfruit and how the fruit has become a “vegan sensation”, clearly ignoring the fact that the fruit has been a staple food for many Asian countries for ages. By Trends Desk | New Delhi | Published: March 30, 2019 10:59:42 pm 74 Shares Apple cancels AirPower and it’s raining memes and jokes online Netizens slammed the writer calling her “ignorant” and dubbing the article “racist”.
Great wars can be fought over food, and it isn’t restricted to Biryani or Pizza anymore. Comfy and humble foods too have ardent fans and you shouldn’t mess with them, at least on the Internet. Recently, British daily The Guardian wrote an article on jackfruit and how the fruit has become a “vegan sensation”. The article written by Zoe Williams went viral but not for the reasons the author would have liked, as it angered jackfruit-loving people not only from India but also from many parts South-East Asia, where it is enjoyed a lot. Advertising
Writing about the national fruit of Bangladesh and state fruit of Kerala, the writer in her article wrote, “The Indian fruit used to be left to rot on the tree, but has become a fashionable meat substitute.” The statement triggered a negative response from desi ‘chakka’ and ‘kathal’ lovers as they argued, the fruit is consumed widely by Indians in both its raw and ripe condition. Also highlighting how the fruit is not exclusive to just India but is widely available and consumed by many other tropical countries.
“A spectacularly ugly, smelly, unfarmed, unharvested pest-plant native to India,” the article continued to describe the tropical fruit which many saw as a slander. “Some people ate it, but only if they had nothing better to eat,” the article read.
As the writer tried to highlight how jackfruit became a hit meat substitute among vegans only in 2017 and many international brands like Starbucks used it in their vegan wraps, many highlighted how it has forever been compared to taste like meat and even has a name, gachh pantha (lamb of the tree) at least in Bengal. Advertising
While some questioned the research that went in writing the article, others dubbed it as “food racism” online, slamming the newspaper and its writer. Many also wondered why it isn’t a thing until discovered by the western world and blasted the writer for her “colonial hangover. This isn’t just offensive it’s… spectacularly ignorant? Like, how culturally unaware do you have to be to write an article like this?? https://t.co/lqixANo58V
— Nuri Tal (@CastNuri) March 30, 2019 Why is it that only if the Western world says ‘yes’ then it’s acceptable/fashionable food? It’s an insult to the people who eat jackfruit/ackee etc to be told these are weird. Totally disrespectful article @guardian Please get someone authentic to write about these foods. https://t.co/5p1aOB6kP3
— Susmita Bhattacharya (@Susmitatweets) March 30, 2019 Hey @zoesqwilliams your story in the guardian is bullshit.. without any basis you’ve claimed that Jackfruit rots on trees in India.. have you even BEEN to India? Doubt it !!
— #Chowkidar Rammohan B Alurkar 🇮🇳🇮🇳🇮🇳 (@RammohanAlurkar) March 30, 2019 @zoesqwilliams told my Bengali mum about your jackfruit article. She was not happy. She said the writer needs to go and talk to an Indian or Bengali grandma. We make chutneys, biryani, feed it to the cows, you can eat the blossoms with salt and pepper and tamarind
— S (@scootinby) March 30, 2019 “Pinterest named it as one of the hottest food trends in 2017”
I am so over these western “food trends”. EVERY single one of them have been around for CENTURIES and are staples in many non-western diets. https://t.co/RAv4S4dT6r
— Iman (@peakiman) March 30, 2019 . @zoesqwilliams your @guardian article about Jackfruit is uneducated and racist. Jackfruit has for example been used in Indonesian cuisine (Gudeg) for many, many years. Your claims about its status 5 years ago are 100% bullshit. @guardian you should delete this article, its false

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Michelin-Approved South Asian Restaurant Planning Two-Floor Lakeview Location

A rendering of the proposed Cumin in Lakeview. Cumin [Official Rendering] Next year, the owners of Cumin — one of Chicago’s more popular South Asian restaurants — are planning to open a new two-story location in Lakeview. The new restaurant would replace Mi Tierra, the former Mexican restaurant at 1039 W. Belmont Avenue that closed in 2017. Cumin’s owners, brothers Sanjeev and Rajesh Karmacharya, describe the new restaurant as a way they can celebrate Cumin’s 10-year anniversary which will be in 2020. The restaurant’s not moving, as it will be business as usual in Wicker Park. Cumin features Nepalese food, a cuisine more Americans are becoming familiarized. Nepalese dumplings, momos, are served side-by-side with Indian items at the original location. Cumin continues to offer buffets, but the restaurant’s menu is what earned a regular place on the Michelin Bib Gourmand list. An alert sent to local residents about the restaurant proposal mistakingly described Cumin as a Michelin star recipient. The stars are reserved for more fine dining restaurants, Bib Gourmands are for more value-minded spots. The brothers are waiting for approvals and they’ve been patient. They were going to move into the Mi Tierra property about a year and a half ago. But upon further inspection, the parties involved decided to tear down the former restaurant and build something new. Cumin will be part of a new four-floor building with three apartments . The ground-floor dining room will have a bar, lounge with fireplace, and space for more than 100 seats. While there’s no room for patio seating, Sanjeev Karmacharya is hopeful for some retractable window feature to give diners a larger breeze. The second floor will give Cumin space for private events. Many of Chicago’s South Asians look to the suburbs to hold weddings and other functions. This gives the community a venue to stay in the city. When the space isn’t rented out, the Karmacharyas are hopeful to hold special events like tasting menu dinners. This would give them a chance to experiment without altering the formula that’s worked for them for almost a decade. The second floor will be about the size of the main dining room at the original restaurant. Extra kitchen space will give them a chance to try new items, give customers more vegetarian options, and just be more creative. The space will also come in handy at the bar. The bar in Wicker Park is cramped. It serves as mainly wine storage. But in Lakeview, Cumin will have more space to serve fancier drinks. The Karmacharyas admitted that 10 years ago the bar program wasn’t a priority. Making sure customers were educated about Nepalese and Indian food without alienating core immigrant customers — the ones with a challenging perspective on alcohol in the Western world — were more important to them. They also had to get comfortable in Wicker Park. They were on a stretch of Milwaukee Avenue surrounded by furniture stores, but without many customers in the way of foot traffic. Sanjeev Karmacharya recalls how he spent part of the restaurant’s first day of business by the window looking around thinking “what the hell did I get into?” But Cumin has endured. The new location will give them the resources to revise their menus more. They teased a new item, a momo dish based on the classic Nepalese item, chicken chilli. It’s served with stir-fried green peppers and onions and spiced with ginger, cumin, and oil. Instead of the customary chicken, it’s served with a fried momo. Next year should be a party for fans of Cumin to celebrate its 10th birthday. Stay tuned for more info as the owners go through the approval process. Look for a 2020 late spring or early fall opening next year, subject to the city’s whims. Eater Chicago Sign up for our newsletter. Enter your email address Subscribe By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy and European users agree to the data transfer policy.

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Inside story – Mail Today

Left: Fitness fanatics work out at an Anytime Fitness outlet in West Delhi a little after midnight. Above: The ubiquitous presence of convenience stores open round-theclock, such as 24Seven, has expanded the buying bouquet for people even after hours. WHAT is it with superhero mammals and late-night food delivery? When the national capital region was introduced to the phenomenon of businesses delivering food after the Cinderella hour, one of the first movers in the space was Batman Delivers. Today, when ravenous graveyard shift workers – IT wizards, journalists, code writers and advertising mavens – want to satiate their hunger pangs, they swear by Fat Cat Bistro, the new kid on the block. Heck, they even have a Turkish Sambousek called Cat in A Boat on their menu.
Although there may only be a tenuous link between the nocturnal habits of felines and late night consumable brands, an entire array of products and services that people in the national capital region want to order after hours, has spawned a culture of consumption that has made conventional sleep routines redundant and thrown the Circadian rhythm out of the window.
Dr Akhil Rohatgi, 40, senior consultant (trauma and critical care), Max Shalimar Bagh, says with today’s hectic lifestyle, especially in urban India, the time of one’s workout can’t be restricted to morning hours. “On the days that I am operating late, I make sure to finish my case and hit the gym late at night, even if it is close to midnight. The body requires a minimum amount of overhaul. If my schedule doesn’t permit to happen early in the morning, I’ll ensure it gets it after hours,” says the doctor who was one of the earlier members to enrol at the Anytime Fitness chain of round-the-clock gyms spread across the national capital region.
Pankaj Mehta, a fitness expert with the GFFI Fitness Academy, says there is science to support those who prefer to hit the gym after hours. “Certain Swiss studies suggest that muscle recovery is better for those who exercise late in the night. But there is a caveat: They should be consistent with their workout and shouldn’t overeat after the exercise.”
Vibhas Dhingra, 45, a technology entrepreneur who develops apps, believes that those working in informal work setups, with the luxury of flexitime needn’t conform to conventional wisdom about when to eat, sleep, shop or exercise. “With the deep penetration of technology in our lives, many people, particularly millennials, find it increasingly convenient to order food and services irrespective of the time of the day through their smartphones.”
DEMAND, SUPPLY
The change in consumption habits and hours isn’t lost on those marketing these goods and services. According to Pankaj Sharma, head of marketing 24Seven, the chain of convenience stores has grown from 37 outlets in January 2014 to 91 stores in the national capital region at present.
“The demand is growing. More than 1200 customers walk into our stores every day, on an average. Of these, more than 500 visit us between 8 pm and 8 am,” he elaborates.
Affirms Anytime Fitness managing director Vikas Jain, “More than 10,000 people use our gyms from 8 pm in the evening to 8 in the morning. Looking at the demand, the number of gyms operational in the national capital region as grown from seven to 40 in the last three years.”
Many of these convenience stores are located on thoroughfares close to busy business districts. And since they are open late in the night, it is difficult to miss them on the commute after a late shift. Sandeep Rajan, a 35- year-old chartered accountant, for instance, likes to pick up cakes, imported chocolates and cheese from a 24Seven outlet on his way home in West Delhi, on days when he is working late.
“Typically, it happens on days when we are hard-pressed for time and the pressure to file taxes is high,” he says.
At the end of the day, it boils down to convenience and exercising your purchasing power at will. And in this regard, the Indian market is unique, says Rohan Mehra, a 30-year-old advertising executive. “When I was studying in Australia, the nightlife didn’t offer this convenience of ordering in gourmet food late in the night.
When I returned to the national capital region, a friend introduced me to the full pork burger from Captain Grub. While ideating for a client brief, if creativity strikes me late in the night, accompanied by hunger, I know where to turn to,” says Mehra.
GOURMET OFFERINGS
There was a time till about a decade ago, when options for nutritious and appetising food late in the night were limited. Oldtimers swore by paranthas laden with ghee had near the Moolchand Flyover or noodles and chai at JNU’s dhabas. But today, Delhi’s night-crawlers are spoilt for choice, that too of the international gourmet variety.
Brazilian food, anybody? Can be done. Mezze with soft pita bread? But of course. This is in sync with Delhi’s reputation as a cosmopolitan hub of international cuisine. And for those who’ve returned to the national capital region after studying or working abroad, it comes as a pleasant surprise. Shristi Das, a 26-year-old music consultant, ends up ordering prawn tacos from Fat Cat Bistro, which offers a selection of more than eight cuisines, when she returns home after a party or gig.
“When I was pursuing my post-graduation at the Berklee College of Music in Valencia, Spain, my flatmate was Mexican and my best friend Brazilian,” says Das.
“That’s where I developed a taste for Latino food.”
Another unique selling proposition of late night food delivery in the Capital is fresh ingredients, says Karan Nambiar of Captain Grub, known for their gourmet meat burgers. We’ve ensured our food isn’t processed for frozen.
Our team of chefs and a state-ofthe- art kitchen helps implement this,” says Nambiar. Vinay Chand of Fat Cat Bistro says since they open for business only from 6 pm to 3 am, the chefs don’t mind putting in a few extra hours.
With the boom in 24 x 7 convenience stores, round-the-clock gyms and late night food delivery options, the changes in lifestyle and natural biorhythms are becoming de rigueur, says N Chandramouli, CEO of consumer and brand consultancy TRA Research.
“I know of 40 year olds who follow a 10am wake up and 3am sleep pattern. All existing conventions are being readjusted to meet personal preferences. And technology and anytime-availability is just catering to this very need of consumers,” says Chandramouli.
“Brands will queue up to cater to this midnight audience and I wouldn’t be surprised if we soon see all-night movie theatres and dining soon here too.”
THE FLIP SIDE
Formation of new routines are being driven by individualistic consumption choices. How this affects our sense of happiness and wellness is tough to fathom, though. “Just like the light bulb gave more waking hours to everyone and changed habits to not follow the sun-cycle, this anytime-anything syndrome is creating a tectonic shift in people’s behaviour,” says Chandramouli.
“We are living in an era where the individual matters more than the collective. There is an accompanying problem in all this. It results in our personal connections breaking. “All of us know at least one couple where one partner works the day shift and the other works the night shift, rarely meeting, let alone spending quality time together. We are getting our midnight gourmet meals, entertainment at our fingertips, as also round-the-clock shopping, but we may be losing out on our relationships in the bargain,” says Chandramouli.
For now, the new generation of night-riders appears oblivious to this trade-off. Like bats, possums and cats, they want to be the most active between dusk and dawn. And there hangs a tale.
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Delta, Korean Air apologize to teens kicked off due to peanut allergy

Korean Air has apologized to a family whose sons were kicked off a flight because one of them had a peanut allergy. (Photo: Harriet Baskas for USA TODAY)
Two teenagers were kicked off a Delta Air Lines partner flight and stranded in Seoul, South Korea, because of peanut-allergy issues, according to their parents.
The brothers, 15 and 16, were traveling from Atlanta to the Philippines on their own and stranded in Seoul after Korean Air wouldn’t accommodate a request to refrain from serving peanuts around the teens since the eldest brother has a severe peanut allergy.
“It was the most, most stressed out I’ve ever been,” Prajakta Patel, the teens’ mom, told “Good Morning America.”
The boys’ father continued: “When you’re sitting halfway around the world and your children are stranded at an airport because they got kicked off a plane because of a food allergy, it’s a punch in the gut,” Rakesh Patel told “GMA.”
The family booked flights for the boys through Delta from Atlanta to Manila and alerted the airline ahead of time about the peanut allergy, the Patels said, but the connecting flight from Seoul to Manila was on Korean Air, a Delta partner.
When the teens boarded the plane, they were told peanuts would be served and that they either had to get off the plane or risk exposure, which could be life-threatening to the 16-year-old, the parents said. The brothers offered to sit in the back with the 16-year-old wearing a mask, but Korean Air agents denied the request, and the boys eventually flew back to Atlanta.
More: 10% of American adults have a food allergy
Korean Air and Delta have both apologized.
“Korean Air sincerely apologizes to Mr. and Mrs. Patel and their sons,” Korean Air spokesperson InSun Lee said in a statement to USA TODAY. “Customer service is a mainstay of the Delta and Korean Air partnership and we regret that the Patels’ experience did not reflect our common values. We are examining this incident and will work out to create a better customer experience.”
Lee stressed that the airline understands food-allergy risks.
“Korean Air is aware that peanut and food allergies are an industry issue and no airline can guarantee a food allergy-free environment. But we are reviewing ways to deal with this issue in a safe and feasible way. We totally understand the risks faced by passengers with nut and food allergies and will certainly try to accommodate them better in the future.”
Delta also apologized to the Patels.
“We’re sorry for this family’s ordeal, and we are working with our partner Korean Air to examine the processes surrounding this incident,” Susannah Thurston, spokesperson for Delta, said in a statement to USA TODAY. “We will use our findings to create a consistent experience for customers flying Delta and our partner airlines.”
The family has filed a complaint with Korean Air, according to “GMA”
Facebook Twitter Google+ LinkedIn Airlines’ in-flight food Fullscreen Post to Facebook Posted! A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.
On long-haul flights, Air France offers complimentary hot meals in Economy and Premium Economy Classes. courtesy of Air France Fullscreen In La Première and Business Classes, Air France has partnered with a group of Michelin-starred and renowned French chefs who take turns at the helm of the menu for long-haul flights. This year, participating chefs include Joël Robuchon, Michel Roth, Anne-Sophie Pic, Guy Martin, Régis Marcon and Olivier Bellin, pictured here. Bellin is the chef and owner of two Michelin-starred L’Auberge des Glazicks in Brittany, France. Claire Curt Fullscreen Bellin is known for his artistic plating of modern cuisine. Dishes he added to the Air France in-flight menu include beef confit with anchovy cream, conchiglie pasta with baby vegetables, and chicken fillet with white asparagus. courtesy of Air France Fullscreen The entirety of Air New Zealand’s dining program is devised with the country’s Maori tradition of hospitality in mind. In Economy Class, expect meals like chicken tikka masala with steamed jasmine rice and peas. Chad Slattery, courtesy of Air New Zealand Fullscreen New Zealand-born chef Peter Gordon is one of Air New Zealand’s two chef consultants. He is known for fusion cuisine that is influenced by his Maori heritage. His restaurants include Bellota and The Sugar Club in Auckland, and The Providores and Tapa Room in London. He is also co-founder of London-based gourmet doughnut company, Crosstown. courtesy of Air New Zealand Fullscreen Samoan-born and New Zealand-raised chef Michael Meredith is Air New Zealand’s other chef consultant. He is known for his fine-dining restaurant Meredith’s in Auckland, and is dedicated to the organization Eat My Lunch, a charitable business that provides free lunches for children in need around New Zealand. Josh Griggs, courtesy of Air New Zealand Fullscreen Chefs Gordon and Meredith work to produce Business Premier Class meals for Air New Zealand like tea smoked salmon. courtesy of Air New Zealand Fullscreen Complimentary Biscoff cookies and mini pretzels are on offer during American Airlines flights that exceed 250 miles. Meals like a continental breakfast box and a fresh sandwich are also free on flights between John F. Kennedy International Airport and Los Angeles International Airport, and John F. Kennedy International Airport and San Francisco International Airport. courtesy of American Airlines Fullscreen American Airlines has partnered with top chefs to create menus for their First and Business Class cabins. Their chef partners are Mark Sargeant, Julian Barsotti, Sam Choy and Maneet Chauhan, pictured here. Chauhan is behind Morph Hospitality Group restaurants in Nashville, Tenn., and is a featured judge on ‘Chopped’. Her menus can be found on flights from the U.S. to Europe and South America. Stewart Cohen Fullscreen Chauhan specializes in global cuisine with a focus on Indian flavors. Her menu items include falafel, slow braised lamb osso buco and ancient kamut grain risotto. Stewart Cohen, courtesy of American Airlines Fullscreen For every flight that exceeds 250 miles, Delta Air Lines offers complimentary snacks like the company’s signature Biscoff cookies, pretzels or almonds. Flyers can always request a cup of complimentary Starbucks coffee, too. courtesy of Delta Air Lines Fullscreen Delta has partnered with Los Angeles chefs Jon Shook and Vinny Dotolo whose popular restaurants include Animal, Jon & Vinny’s, Son of a Gun, Trois Mec and more. Delta One, a luxury business class cabin, offers customers meals designed by Shook and Dotolo on flights from Los Angeles International Airport to John F. Kennedy International Airport and Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport. courtesy of Delta Air Lines Fullscreen Shook and Dotolo’s menu items feature ingredients from their favorite California farmers and purveyors. Dishes include the duo’s famous marinara braised meatballs with Bianco DiNapoli tomatoes, garlic bread and Gioia ricotta, and Domenico’s pumpkin ravioli with Schaner Farms sage brown butter sauce and pecorino cheese. Peter Garritano Fullscreen Hawaiian Airlines serves complimentary meals in its Main Cabin during long flights. On flights from New York to Honolulu, fliers can expect dishes like eggplant pasta with cream and marinara sauce. Chad Slattery Fullscreen Select domestic flights offer First Class fliers meals conceived by one of Hawaii’s top chefs as part of Hawaiian’s Featured Chef Series. Chef Wade Ueoka of MW Restaurant in Honolulu is the current featured chef. courtesy of Hawaiian Airlines Fullscreen Chef Wade’s menu items include ground beef and Portuguese sausage meatloaf, homestyle gravy with sauteed mushrooms, potatoes and kale. courtesy of Hawaiian Airlines Fullscreen Chef Lee Ann Wong of ‘Top Chef’ and Koko Head Café, an island-inspired brunch spot in Honolulu, had so much success during her stint as featured chef that Hawaiian just named her its new executive chef. Wong will design and oversee Hawaiian’s in-flight dining for First Class on domestic flights, and Business Class and Economy on international flights. courtesy of Hawaiian Airlines Fullscreen One of Wong’s most popular dishes is her mahi mahi poke omelet with spicy masago aioli and hash brown potatoes. courtesy of Hawaiian Airlines Fullscreen In Japan Airlines’ Economy and Premium Economy Classes, in-flight menus are invented by chef finalists from RED U-35, Japan’s largest culinary competition aimed at discovering young talent. Menu items include beef sukiyaki and chicken with taro. courtesy of Japan Airlines Fullscreen For its First Class on international flights, Japan Airlines has partnered with two Japanese chefs, each from restaurants that boast three Michelin stars. Chef Hideki Ishikawa is the chef and owner of kaiseki restaurant Ishikawa in Kagurazaka, Tokyo, and chef Kouji Koizumi is head chef of Ishikawa’s sister spot, Kohaku, which serves creative Japanese cuisine. courtesy of Japan Airlines Fullscreen Ishikawa and Koizumi’s menu is made of traditional Japanese dishes, like takiawase (vegetables and meat served as part of a kaiseki meal), tomewan (miso-based soup) and kounomono (seasonal pickled vegetables). courtesy of Japan Airlines Fullscreen JetBlue’s complimentary snack options include Cheez-It crackers, Rold Gold Pretzels, PopCorners popcorn chips, Abby’s Cookies Chocolate Chip and TERRA Sweets & Blues potato chips, while complimentary drinks range from Seagram’s Ginger Ale to Ocean Spray juices to Dunkin’ Donuts coffee. courtesy of JetBlue Fullscreen Mint, JetBlue’s premium class that is available on select coast-to-coast and Caribbean routes, has partnered with chef Brad Farmerie of Saxon + Parole in New York City for its inflight menu. courtesy of JetBlue Fullscreen Chef Farmerie has developed a rotating menu of small plates, like mushroom mousse topped with jelly made with Parole whiskey, served with grilled bread. “I want every single guest to wonder why they’ve never tasted food like that on a flight before,” says Farmerie. Simon Lewis Studio Fullscreen Mint has also teamed up with dessert wizard Christina Tosi, the chef, founder and owner of Milk Bar, a bakery that has locations in New York, Toronto, Washington D.C. and Las Vegas. courtesy of JetBlue Fullscreen Tosi offers her everything bagel rounds stuffed with scallion cream cheese and green juice on flights that serve breakfast, and signature cookies for a sweet treat after lunch and dinner. courtesy of JetBlue Fullscreen In KLM Royal Dutch Airlines’ Economy Class, many food options may be complimentary depending on the flight. Within Europe, there may be a sweet and savory snack option or a fresh sandwich or wrap. On intercontinental trips, fliers are offered a choice of two hot meals and a fresh bread roll with butter and cheese. PHILIPS, Capital Photos Fullscreen Business Class meals on intercontinental flights are prepared by Dutch chef Jonnie Boer. He is the chef and co-owner of Michelin-starred restaurant De Librije in Zwolle, Netherlands. courtesy of KLM Royal Dutch Airlines Fullscreen Boer’s menu items take influences from all over the globe and are served on tableware created by Dutch designer Marcel Wanders. courtesy of KLM Royal Dutch Airlines Fullscreen On international flights, Qantas serves its Economy class dishes like spiced lamb koftas with tomato, Riverina feta and roast potatoes, and yellow curry barramundi with jasmine rice. Monkeys, Getty Images Fullscreen For more than 20 years, Qantas has engaged in a partnership with Australian chef Neil Perry, who currently has seven restaurants in Sydney, Melbourne and Perth, including a location of his esteemed Rockpool Bar & Grill in each of the three cities. Perry and his team of culinary consultants design the menus for First and Business Classes on international and domestic Qantas flights. Brent Winstone, courtesy of Qantas Fullscreen Dishes like seared seafood in shellfish broth with fregola, grilled broccolini and tarragon aioli are prepared, cooked and reheated in Qantas’ Sydney catering center to simulate on-board experience and ensure that the quality and taste pass the highest Rockpool standards. “Listening to customer feedback, engaging with the crew who prepare the menu inflight and being sure to create dishes that use the best seasonal produce across each destination that Qantas flies to, are the three vital components to creating a successful menu each season,” says Neil Perry. Ted Sealey, courtesy of Qantas Fullscreen Hot meals are complimentary in Economy Class on Singapore Airlines flights and special meals to accommodate dietary restrictions are available upon request. courtesy of Singapore Airlines Fullscreen For Suites, First, Business and Premium Economy Classes, Singapore Airlines has assembled an International Culinary Panel of chefs to create its menus. Los Angeles chef Suzanne Goin of a.o.c., Lucques and Tavern is a member of the panel. Colin Wee, courtesy of Singapore Airlines Fullscreen Goin is known for her seasonal, California-inspired cooking, which she brings to her in-flight dishes like salmon with cherry tomatoes, summer squash and corn. courtesy of Singapore Airlines Fullscreen New York chef Alfred Portale of Gotham Bar & Grill is another member of Singapore Airlines’ International Culinary Panel. courtesy of Singapore Airlines Fullscreen Portale brings expertise in American cuisine to the in-flight menus with dishes like beef fillet over spinach with asparagus. courtesy of Singapore Airlines Fullscreen Complimentary snacks on United Airlines may include a snack mix, nut mix or Stoopwafel, a Dutch treat made of two thin waffle layers with caramel syrup in between. courtesy of United Airlines Fullscreen In United Polaris, the airline’s business class, flyers are served meals developed by chefs from The Trotter Project. The nonprofit organization devoted to mentoring and inspiring young culinary talent was created in honor of the talented late chef Charlie Trotter. “What makes The Trotter Project and United Airlines’ relationship so special and groundbreaking is the true philanthropic nature of our partnership. Together we value supporting underserved youth interested in the culinary and hospitality industry,” says Derrek Hull, executive director of The Trotter Project. Wayne Slezak, courtesy of United Airlines Fullscreen Dishes like spicy chicken in Thai-style coconut ginger broth with udon noodles appear on United Polaris menus established by The Trotter Project chefs. This one was created by chef Bill Kim of Urban Belly restaurants in Chicago. Wayne Slezak Fullscreen Interested in this topic? You may also want to view these photo galleries: Replay 1 of 40 2 of 40 3 of 40 4 of 40 5 of 40 6 of 40 7 of 40 8 of 40 9 of 40 10 of 40 11 of 40 12 of 40 13 of 40 14 of 40 15 of 40 16 of 40 17 of 40 18 of 40 19 of 40 20 of 40 21 of 40 22 of 40 23 of 40 24 of 40 25 of 40 26 of 40 27 of 40 28 of 40 29 of 40 30 of 40 31 of 40 32 of 40 33 of 40 34 of 40 35 of 40 36 of 40 37 of 40 38 of 40 39 of 40 40 of 40 Autoplay Show Thumbnails Show Captions Last Slide Next Slide

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It’s a bit subjective, everyone things their home country’s food is best.
Complex and need effort, unlike just putting meat and Tomato between two buns and call it best sandwich. What a juvenile generalisation sirji. Have you tried all the non Indian foods? Yes, they can also be crazy complex and effort needed.
In terms of meat, Indian cuisine just destroys flavour/texture of the meat by masking it with heavy masalas and high temperature cooking. The taste you get is masalas. This is true for veg food too, just masala taste. Western cooking has more subtle flavours & more difficult to get right.
Healthy unlike a pizza with maida. No, Indian food can be the most unhealthy. Carb heavy and low protein. We are already genetically predisposed to heart issues, diabetes & high BP. The food makes it worse.
We have the vast diverse cultures and unique flavours. True that
Mouth watering types of sweets and time pass namkeen. Subjective. Sweets are too sweet, fried to death and the worst kind health-wise.
In short, Indian food is different. There is no ‘best’ here. Enjoy in moderation

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5 last minute ideas for Mother’s Day

Food & Drink , Healthy Eating , London , Travel , Trends , UK March 28, 2019 5 last minute ideas for Mother’s Day
Still on the hunt the perfect place to treat your mum this Mother’s Day? From an Indian feast to a four course French banquet, we’ve rounded up five of the best restaurants in London that are sure to make your mums feel like one in a million.
26 Grains
Open all day, 26 Grains focuses on simple, quality and seasonal cooking with a menu featuring sweet and savoury porridge, topped toasts and savoury plates such as yellow dal and warming salads. The perfect healthy treat for mums this Mother’s Day.
Farmer J
Farmer J serves honest food, that rolls with the seasons, is mindfully sourced (from as many, high-welfare British farms as possible), is bursting with flavour and most importantly, is scratch cooked on-site. This health hot spot has launched ‘Build Your Own’ brunch at the recently opened all-day restaurant on King William Street. Known for bringing the best of the fields to the City, Farmer J invites guests to create their own feast from a selection of favourites, enjoyed alongside bottomless bubbles or brunch cocktails.
Orrery
For one day only, Orrery, the French restaurant in the heart of Marylebone, is celebrating Mother’s Day on the 31st March with a four course lunch and dinner menu, specially curated by Chef Patron Igor Tymchyshyn.
The one-time menu includes seafood ravioli with lobster bisque, butternut squash velouté and Dorset crab for starters, followed by the likes of red leg partridge, Loch Duart salmon served with confit potato, Jerusalem artichoke risotto and for dessert, Valrhona Manjari device with salted caramel tuile, apple and cinnamon creme brûlée and passionfruit panna cotta. The menu will be served for both lunch and dinner on the 31st March only and costs £45 pp. Orrery is sure to give your mums the mother of all Mother’s Days!
Jamavar
Located in Mayfair and named after the intricate and vibrant 16 th century shawls of Kashmir, Jamavar showcases a wide array of flavors from across India. Founded by the Nair family as part of the Leela Palace Hotel group and run by Samyukta Nair, the menu features dishes from the royal kitchens of the North along with those from the shores of the South. Jamavar was awarded their first Michelin star within a year of opening. This is an indulgent Indian banquet that all Mother’s deserve on their special day. Hoppers Located in Soho and St Christopher’s Place, Hoppers brings Sri Lankan cuisine to London and it certainly is worth a visit. The menu centres around Hoppers’ namesake dish, a bowl-shaped pancake made from fermented rice batter and coconut milk, and the dosa, made from a fermented batter of ground rice and lentils. These are served alongside a selection of traditional Sri Lankan dishes. Share this:

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Superb Location and Great Ambiance with Royal touch

Located on the hills overlooking Fatehsagar lake and nested in beautiful green surroundings, you can not go wrong with this place. You can watch sunset over cup of tea with live bagpiper band from their large beautiful garden at front. It has three restaurants Oko (Oriental cuisine, only for Dinner) , Aangan (Indian cuisine with live folk music and dance, only for Dinner) and Padmini (all Day). Tried Oak and Aangan, food quality and overall experience is top notch. Check-in/out is smooth and fast. Rooms are large with private seating space. Compared to its 5 star level, bathrooms are poorly maintained and toiletries and housekeeping service needs improvement.

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Bengaluru is idli capital of India

Despite the fascination of Bengalureans with global cuisines and gastronomic experimentation, the comfort of familiarity can’t be denied when it comes to food. Which is perhaps why Bengaluru regularly consumes the most number of idlies among all the cities in India.
According to an analysis of its orders by food delivery platform UberEats, the humble idli is the most ordered breakfast item on its platform in India. Bengaluru consumes the most idlis, and the ‘thatte idli’ is the clear favourite in the city.
Next in the list of top idli-loving cities are Mumbai, Chennai, Pune and Hyderabad.
“It’s absolutely healthy because it is the only fermented food which is steamed. It’s high in proteins and can be easily digested by the body which makes it very good for your health. A diet of idlies will ensure good weight loss. There is almost a cult following for idlies, our orders for the same have increased exponentially in the past one and a half years,” says Manu Nair, corporate executive chef, Bonsouth, Upsouth and South Indies.
Breakfast staple of India
Idli has emerged as the staple Indian breakfast with the item being most consumed during the morning, especially between 7.30 am and 11:30 am, according to the UberEats analysis.
However, Manu says that it has now become an ‘anytime’ meal; you can have it anytime during the day.
Peri peri idlies
Makeover mania
“In the wake of experimentation (we are serving some innovative chutneys with our idlies), people have started liking this even more. We have also come up with something called ‘Uthly’, which is like a burger made from idlies. It is low on calories and quite tasty. It can be had on the go, unlike a traditional idli dish,” says Manu Nair.
Some éclectic makeovers have resulted in dishes like Chicken Fry Idli, Idli Manchurian, Chocolate Idli, Mushroom Fry idli, French Fry Idli and so on.
How did World Idli Day originate?
It’s said to be the brainchild of Eniyavan, a popular idli-only caterer from Chennai. For the last three years, March 30 has been celebrated as World Idli Day. #WorldIdliDay has been one of the top trending hashtags on Twitter on the day for the last three years.
What the order analysis also found
Most Indians requested extra chutney, sambhar and the spicy ‘podi’ to go with a plate of hot idlis. Among the beverages, the preferred partner for idlies is fresh lime soda, masala lassi and jal jeera.
Globally, San Francisco, London and New Jersey are the top idli ordering cities.
A consumer in Mumbai ordered 110 plates of idlis on February 23, 2019.
Some of the best idlis in town
Even though there are many places serving ‘idli with a twist’, some of the old eateries are still the best bet for hot steaming idli. Apart from the plain idlis, rava idli, thatte idli, podi idli and more can be found here.
Here are some of the places that serve soft, moist idlis with spicy chutney and sambhar.
Veena Stores, Malleswaram Dakshin Cafe, JP Nagar Phase 7 Brahmin’s Coffee Bar, Basavanagudi Taaza Thindi, Jayanagar Mavalli Tiffin Room, JP Nagar Madhurai Idly Shop, Indiranagar Sree Krishna Kafe, Koramangala 5th Block Maiyas, Jayanagar New Krishna Bhavan, Malleswaram Sri Udupi Park, Indiranagar Adyar Ananda Bhavan, across the city Airlines Hotel, Lavelle Road India Coffee House, Church Street Nandi Upachar, Devanahalli Hotel Janatha, Malleswaram

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Your Medicine is in Your Pantry

~ admin
Karta Purkh Khalsa – Food has been the medicine of humanity since the dawn of time. Many herbs that we associate only with seasoning our food are, in fact, potent herbal medicines.
The distinction between herbal food and herbal medicine is actually quite subjective. There is a wide area of overlap with the two categories. If you think of all the plants we consume, for whatever purpose, as being on a spectrum, from food on one end, to medicine on the other, you will see what I mean. On the food end would be plants like potatoes and carrots- potentially medicinal, but mild and safe. The other end of the spectrum contains medicine plants like opium poppy and foxglove, the source of digitalis- definitely not food, but clearly serious medicine.
The gray area is in the middle. Take echinacea . None of us would consider sitting down to a delicious bowl of echinacea soup. Yuck. But you could. And it would be safe. How about parsley? In a salad, it’s a food. Used as a juice to treat edema, it’s a medicine.
The truth is, herbal medicines have about the same chemical components as food plants. Herbal medicines are just selected from plants that have greater concentrations of active ingredients, making them more convenient to use.
European herbal medicine, the tradition from which contemporary American herbalism mainly derives, does not see much overlap between food plants and herbal medicines. Foods you eat, spices make the food taste better, and herbal medicine you take in a tincture. Asian medical systems, however, make no distinction between the two. Food is just less concentrated herbal medicine, and every meal is viewed as a chance to get in more healing herbs. In fact, the Chinese word for the medicinal brew that people use daily to maintain their health is “soup.”
The complex cuisines of China and India began, thousands of years ago, as recipes to get healing herbs and foods into people. Gradually, as the process evolved, complicated mixtures of food ingredients, herbal medicines, and flavorings coalesced into a tasty amalgam that warms the soul, heals the body, and pleases the palate.
For example, Indian food typically starts with a combination, a “masala”, of onions, garlic, ginger, and other various spices, selected for their medicinal virtues, and taste. Since many of these herbs can cause gas, additional herbs, such as fennel and coriander seeds, are added to counteract that tendency. Ginger and mustard, for example, speed up the digestive process, so that the meal is efficiently processed and moved through the digestive tract.
Although the list of herbal medicine foods is huge, here is a selection of remedies that are easy to find, and particularly effective.
The carrot and parsley family ( Umbelliferae ), in particular, is a huge source of edible plants and good tasting medicines. These plants grow all over the world, and are used in a broad range of cultures. This group of plant medicines has unusual chemistry, so they make their way into the kitchens and medicine chests of many native medical systems. The seeds are typically the medicinal part, but various parts are used, depending on the plant. Some well-known members of this family include parsley, coriander (cilantro is coriander greens), fennel, anise, cumin, and dill.
Plants in this family contain compounds that act like calcium channel blockers, benefiting angina. Herbs in this family generally have estrogenic action, especially the seeds. The popular Chinese herb dong quai is in this family. These parsley relatives are prized around the world for treating intestinal gas, a property herbalists call “carminative.” Fennel
In my personal clinical experience, I would pick fennel seed as the premiere carminative in the world, especially for adults. Literally, I have never seen a case of painful gas that was not relieved by fennel seeds, provided of course, that the dose was high enough.
Fennel contains creosol and alpha- pinene, substances that loosen lung mucus and help clear the chest, benefiting asthma. (1) Recent research shows that this spice also lowers blood pressure. (2)
This herb has been used for centuries to promote lactation, which makes sense, from what we now know about its hormonal action. It will also hasten a period . As a bonus, it increases libido.
For gas, try chewing 1 Tbs. of the tasty seeds, or brew a tea with 1 Tbs. seeds in a cup of water. You may use the powdered seeds as a seasoning, or in capsules.
Of course, you can also steam the stalk as a delicious celery-like vegetable. The properties are similar, but milder than the seed. Dill
Dill seed is, for gas, for children, what fennel seed is for adults. Called “the secret of British nannies,” dill is the active ingredient in the famous “gripe water,” the colic remedy taken round the world in the British empire.
Dill seed is truly miraculous for infant colic. It can save a parent’s sanity. Dill promotes menstruation, so it can be used to encourage a late period. For adults, dill, along with fennel, treats heartburn. (1) The weed is milder. In a pinch, fennel and dill can be interchanged. For infant colic, brew 2 Tbs. dill seed in 1 cup of water, cool, sweeten, put in a bottle or dropper, and serve to the screaming baby. You will carry a sleeping tyke back to bed. Parsley
Ever notice that green sprig of garnish at the edge of your plate? Usually discarded, that parsley is one powerful herbal medicine. While the seeds, leaf, and root of this plant are all used for food, the main herbal uses come from the leaf.
Parsley is a source, as you might expect, of phytoestrogens, so it has potential for treating osteoporosis and amenorrhea, and for promoting lactation.
This medicine has a long history of use with the urinary system. Research shows that it is diuretic (3), and it has a long history of herbal use in treating bladder infection.
Parsley treats angina. (1) Crushed, and applied to a bruise, it heals. It inhibits the release of histamine, so is useful for allergies and hives. It prevents and treats kidney stones. (4)
Parsley is a treasure trove of vitamins and minerals. It is a rich source of boron and fluorine, critical minerals for bone health. It contains 3.5 times as much vitamin C as oranges, and twice as much calcium as broccoli.
Because parsley is a rich source of calcium, magnesium, and potassium, it is an effective treatment for cramps, such as leg cramps. (5)
Three ounces of parsley contains about 3 mg of boron, the dose suggested for bone health. In my clinical experience, a dose of about 2 ounces per day of parsley juice treats edema very well.
Parsley leaf is widely available in capsule form, both as a single herb, and in combination. It works well as a digestive aid combined with turmeric. A typical dose would be 2-9 grams per day, but, of course, this herb is very safe at any dose. Thyme
Thyme contains anti-aging chemicals. (1) Historically, this herb has been used for headache.
Thyme is known as a general antimicrobial, especially for bacterial infection, and an expectorant, which also treats fever, so it is a well-known treatment for diseases like the flu.
One ingredient, thymol , has antiviral properties, and is also antispasmodic, so it is used in headache and cramps. (6)
Use thyme as a tea, or gargle. Basil leaf
Originally from India, this spicy herb has grown to great popularity around the world. There are many varieties of the plant, but they all basically have the same medicinal qualities. One famous variety, “holy” basil , is a standout in the Ayurvedic pharmacopoeia. Historically, basil has been used as a digestive aid, to relieve gas and speed digestion, and to warm up and mobilize stiff arthritic joints.
Basil is a pungent herb that increases body heat. It is used to treat respiratory conditions, like the flu, and to lower fever by sweating. Since it’s also an expectorant, it can be used for conditions like emphysema and asthma. (1)
A member of the mint family, basil contains antibacterial compounds. (5, 8) Recent studies have shown that basil appears to prevent cancer . (7)
Basil lowers blood pressure. Basil contains antiviral compounds. (1) A common folk remedy for warts is to apply crushed basil directly to the wart.
Use basil liberally in food, such as pesto, or brew in tea. For a headache, try chewing several fresh basil leaves. Black pepper
The herb is known only as a humble condiment here, but in Asia, it is considered to be the foremost detoxifier and anti-aging herb.
Black pepper is a warming digestive remedy, which has a carminative action.
This herb increases circulation, and lowers blood pressure. (1)
This medicinal herb also contains compounds that prevent osteoporosis.
While black pepper has been esteemed as a detoxifier, particularly in Ayurveda, recent research has begun to bear this out. At least in rats, pepper seems to increase release of carcinogens through the liver, reducing cancer. (9) Piperine, a main active ingredient, protects against liver damage almost as well as milk thistle . (10) This alkaloid is also getting a reputation for increasing bioavailability and absorption of nutrients.(13) For example, in one recent study, scientists measured the absorption of turmeric active ingredients. Administering the turmeric along with Piperine increased bioavailability by 154%, and reduced the time for absorption by half. (14)
Black pepper reduces free radicals. It is antioxidant, and prevents the depletion of glutathione. It also prevents the destruction of other antioxidants, such as vitamin A. (11)
Pepper is used in Ayurveda to release sinus congestion. (12)
Black pepper is available in the health food store as a supplement. Use 50 mg per day or more of extract standardized to Piperine.
Use black pepper as a culinary spice. An excellent Ayurvedic preparation for sinus congestion is to boil 10 peppercorns in milk, strain, and drink. Nettles
That’s right- the stinging nettles you dig out as a pesky weed. Even though less well-known as a food here, nettles are quite edible and tasty. The sting is neutralized when the plant is dried or cooked. This vegetable is prepared like spinach, and has a similar, but saltier, taste. Please don’t harvest this vegetable unless you know what you are doing- the sting, before being neutralized, is painful.
Nettle is a favorite of European herbalists, who use it as a general nutritive tonic, similar to the way alfalfa has been used in American herbalism. In addition, it has been historically used to treat childhood eczema, respiratory conditions, and to strengthen the circulatory tissue. (16)
Recently, nettle has been getting attention in natural healing circles for the treatment of allergic rhinitis (hay fever).(17)
You will find nettle in the health food store in capsules. Most people find that about 2 grams will relieve an allergy attack. Fenugreek seed
This little legume is getting a lot of attention lately for its many medicinal virtues. It is a very rich source of soluble fiber.
It is a very effective diabetes treatment, promoting substantial reductions in blood sugar, both from its fiber content, and the presence of other metabolically active components.
Fenugreek seed lowers total cholesterol, while increasing HDL.
It contains very high amounts of choline and beta carotene, both of which have been linked to Alzheimer’s prevention and treatment. (1)
Fenugreek contains the phytoestrogen diosgenin, which has gotten attention lately for its role in preventing breast cancer.
Use fenugreek liberally as a spice in foods. The dose shown in experiments to control blood sugar was much higher, about 100 grams per day. That’s a lot of fenugreek, which can be bitter in those quantities. In scientific studies, the fenugreek seed was often baked into a flat bread, or cooked into a soup. I have had good success with having people soak the seeds overnight to soften, and the just chow down, perhaps mixed with a mild food like oatmeal.
However, one recent study showed significant reduction in total cholesterol and triglycerides with a dose of 2.5 grams twice daily, a dose that can easily be taken in capsules.(15) Fenugreek can be found in the health food store as whole powdered herb in capsules, or as a standardized extract.
With such a rich selection of healing foods to choose from, there should be little problem putting together a menu of delicious medicinal recipes. Use these foods daily. You’ll like making you cupboard in to your medicine chest. Food Medicines

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