Bosh!'s recipe for bhaji burgers | Food

Bosh!’s recipe for bhaji burgers | Food

A fantastic fusion of flavours make this Indian take on the classic American burger such a treat – with additional toppings to taste. T his juxtaposition of Indian cuisine with the classic American burger works incredibly well. It’s a fantastic fusion of flavours that are really big and satisfying, and you can play with really interesting toppings. They are great with mint raita, or you can make smaller bhaji bites and serve them with curry.
Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes
Makes: 6 burgers
2 red onions, finely sliced
6cm piece fresh ginger, chopped
1 fresh red chilli, deseeded and chopped
20g fresh coriander leaves, roughly chopped
1½ tsp coriander seeds
1½ tsp cumin seeds
300g gram flour
1½ tsp garam masala
200ml water
Salt
500ml–1l vegetable oil, for deep-frying
4 good-quality burger buns
To serve:
3 tbsp vegan mayonnaise
¼ small cucumber, thinly sliced
1 large tomato, thinly sliced
1 avocado, thinly sliced
1 baby gem lettuce
2 tbsp mango chutney
1 poppadom, broken up
Put the onion, ginger, chilli and coriander in a bowl. Crush the coriander seeds and cumin seeds with a pestle and mortar or the end of a rolling pin. Add them to the bowl with the gram flour, garam masala, water and a generous pinch of salt and mix until everything is well combined and covered with a wet, sticky batter.
Pour the vegetable oil into a large saucepan so that it comes no more than two-thirds up the side of the pan. Heat to 180C/350F/gas mark 4, or until a wooden spoon dipped into the oil sizzles around the edges.
Divide the mixture into six and use your hands to mould it into patties about 9cm wide and no more than 1cm thick. Use a metal spoon to carefully lower two of the patties into the hot oil and cook them for about five minutes, flipping them over halfway. Remove the patties when they are golden and crisp and transfer to a plate lined with kitchen paper to drain any excess oil. Repeat with the remaining patties.
While the bhajis are frying, slice the burger buns in half and spread the bottom halves with vegan mayonnaise. Thinly slice the cucumber and tomato. Halve and carefully stone the avocado. Scoop out the flesh, then slice finely.
To serve the bhaji burgers, lay a few lettuce leaves on the bottom of the burger buns and place the burgers on top. Spread a little mango chutney on top of each, followed by slices of tomato, avocado and cucumber. Break up the poppadom and sprinkle it over the top.
Henry Firth and Ian Theasby are BOSH! Their BOSH! cookbook became the highest-selling debut cookbook of 2018 and the highest-selling vegan cookbook of all time.
Topics Vegan food and drink Fast food Food Fast food Indian food and drink recipes

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Delightful hotel with great service

We visited Varanasi (India) in December. We were blown away by the service and personal attention from the moment we arrived at the hotel. We were welcomed warmly with a special Indian ritual called aarti and flower garlands (lei) and shown to our spacious room after a quick check-in. It was just after Christmas and the hotel was decked out with a Xmas tree, reindeers and other holiday decorations. The room was very spacious and had a good view of the neighboring park as well as the open kitchen downstairs where they were making traditional hot pooris (fried) and jalebis (sweet) for a very regionally unique breakfast. Overall the room was well appointed and clean with no complaints whatsoever. After a sumptuous buffet breakfast we chatted with the concierge to plan out our activities in the city. He was extremely helpful and suggested several option from guided tours to key areas to explore on our own. The other staff at the hotel were also very friendly and courteous and ready to help. We took a guide to visit Sarnath where Buddha gave his first sermon after enchantment. We also took his recommendation to do a boat tour of the Ganges covering all 80 ghats (stone steps to river) culminating in a memorable evening Ganga Aarti from the river that attracts thousands of locals and tourists every day. If you want to try authentic Indian food especially the local cuisine based largely on fresh seasonal vegetables and ingredients you must try Varuna, a small restaurant on the property. They make everything fresh after you order so budget plenty of time but you will relish the delicacies.

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Check in: Four Seasons provides a peaceful refuge in quaint Jimbaran Bay

Read More Rooms Our sanctuary during our stay is the newly refurbished one-bedroom premier ocean villa . The villa is a serene thatched-roof hideout that is a contemporary re-imagination of the traditional Balinese courtyard house. It comes with a separate bedroom and living area, minibar, walk-in wardrobe, indoor and outdoor showers, and poolside open-air bale and infinity plunge pool that overlooks the shimmering ocean. Premier Seaview Villa. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Infinity pool. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) The entrance to the villa. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) In-room breakfast. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Premier Seaview Villa. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Infinity pool. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) The entrance to the villa. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) In-room breakfast. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) 1 2 3 4 Guests can enjoy butler service and a 24/7 buggy service from their villas, which can be very useful — especially when the resort is spread over 14 hectares of lush gardens. Otherwise, you can take a casual stroll and admire the resort’s 300 shrines, including one that dates back to the 15th century. The resort was built around the existing shrines and temples of Jimbaran Bay — including the Historical Temple, a 17th century marvel that has been carefully preserved. Food & Beverage Besides the exceptional service, Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay is internationally known for its culinary options; especially considering its location in a fishing town. It goes without saying that seafood is king here. The resort is home to three dining establishments — the sophisticated and chic Sundara Beach Club, authentic Taman Wantilan, and casual Pool Terrace Cafe. Breakfast is served every morning at the buffet-style Taman Wantilan, which offers an extensive array of Asian and Western cuisine — from street-food style laksa to the seafood-on-ice and sashimi bar or naan and lamp chops prepared by Indian Specialty Chef Anil Naudiyal. Taman Wantilan is also an establishment to go to for dinner. Indian cuisine station at Taman Wantilan. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Taman Wantilan. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Taman Wantilan. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Street-style laksa. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Taman Wantilan. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Indian cuisine station at Taman Wantilan. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Taman Wantilan. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Taman Wantilan. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Street-style laksa. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Taman Wantilan. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) 1 2 3 4 5 Alternatively, the famed Sundara attracts both in-house and outside guests. We enjoyed sipping on a cocktail while soaking up the sun during the day, and indulged in a candlelit, Asian-inspired dinner in the evening. The highlight here is Sundara’s unique customised dining experience, the first of its kind in Bali, where each dish is available in three different portions (small, medium, or large), depending on the mood or occasion. Crab and coconut at Sundara. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) As we wanted to try a wide range of dishes, we ordered tapas-style portions of the fried eggplant, BBQ pork belly, torched foie gras, and crab and coconut — with flavours and textures that complemented each other really well. Remember to make room for the restaurant’s signature dessert, the Samurai, made of valrhona ghana 68 per cent dark chocolate ganache and mousse, with fig and sansho pepper compote cinnamon konbu ice cream. The sinful dessert was dreamt up by the resort’s World Champion Chocolate Chef, Yusuke Aoki, and won an accolade at last year’s Valrhona C3 . Sundara Beach Club. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Amenities The resort is a destination in itself, with daily activities such as various types of yoga , beach sports (like stand up paddle boarding, kayaking, and heli-surfing), and even a cooking academy for those looking to recreate the flavours of traditional Balinese cooking in their own kitchens. We highly recommend the class at Jala Cooking Academy , spearheaded by chef Kristya Yudha, who shares his knowledge of authentic flavours and his mother’s recipes. The cooking class started early in the morning, where we were whisked away to the Jimbaran fish market, the biggest on the island, to shop for the freshest produce. We then headed for the cooking academy, where chef Kris taught us the methods of preparing a full Balinese meal, which included minced chicken in banana leaves (usually prepared for Nyepi ), pepes ikan kakap (snapper wrapped in banana leaves), lawar kacang panjang (tossed long bean with spicy grated coconut) and sambal matah (spicy lemongrass shallot relish). Finally, we ended the class by preparing kue labu (sweet pumpkin treat), before sitting down and trying the dishes we prepared for lunch. Suara Jimbaran treatment. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Suara Jimbaran treatment. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Suara Jimbaran treatment. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) Suara Jimbaran treatment. (Image credit: Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay) 1 2 After which, pamper yourself at the resort’s award-winning Healing Village Spa, one of the finest spas on the island. We tried out the Suara Jimbaran (“sounds of Jimbaran”) treatment in an open-air bale overlooking the expansive sea. The 120-minute treatment begins with a sound bath featuring the deep soothing tones of Balinese gongs, said to clear, synchronise and recharge the mind, body and spirit. The sound bath is then followed by a glass stone massage with aloe, frankincense and geranium butter, as well as a hydrating wild basil and neroli face treatment. We left with glowing complexions, feeling fully relaxed after the treatment. Verdict Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay brings the brand’s signature hospitality to Bali’s southwestern coast, where guests can immerse themselves in the island’s history and culture before retreating into the luxurious villas at the end of the day. Whether you’re there for a week or just staying one night before heading to Four Seasons Resort Bali at Sayan in Ubud, be sure to experience the wellness and culinary offerings of this stunning resort. We guarantee you’d want to come back for a longer stay the next time you’re in Bali.

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La Linea Verde Launches New Asian-Style Soups That Guarantee A ‘Wow Effect’

La Linea Verde Launches New Asian-Style Soups That Guarantee A ‘Wow Effect’ La Linea Verde Launches New Asian-Style Soups That Guarantee A ‘Wow Effect’ Previous Next
La Linea Verde, an Italian leader in the production of bagged salads and fresh ready meals, has introduced a new range of Asian-style fresh soups.
These new recipes are in keeping with the latest food trends, and aim to widen the company’s target, in particular, young consumers.
These Asian-style soups do not cannibalise the current chilled soup market, but foster new business by targeting a distinct consumer segment that prefers chilled fresh soups.
The new line has been the result of a long work of research and studies, the company said. A Leading Fresh Soup Producer
La Linea Verde’s know-how as a leading fresh soup producer has been strengthened through close collaboration with specialised chefs and tests on consumers.
In doing so, it has preserved the core values of the brand’s soups – naturalness, freshness, high-quality ingredients.
The company came up with original proposals inspired by Asian cuisines, giving importance to the right balance of flavours.
According to Andrea Battagliola, the director general of the group, this move represents a turning point for the fresh soup segment.
The recipes are inspired by Japanese, Thai and Indian cuisines. They have been prepared with genuine, premium and original ingredients and bring innovation in the fresh soup market. The New Flavours
Tokyo soup: A typical tasty and flavoursome Japanese dish which combines Wakame seaweed with shiitake mushrooms. Bean sprout and tamari sauce amplify the Umami flavour – the fifth taste that humans possess.
Mumbai soup: This recipe is inspired by a typical South Indian soup. It is packed with spiced chickpeas, with a slightly sweet taste. Coconut milk gives it a creamy texture.
Bangkok soup: A typical Thai soup with chicken, edamame beans, red lentils, and spices. Spicy curry and bitter lime are combined together to create an interesting dish with contrasting flavours. It offers an unforgettable gourmet experience.
The soups are available in a microwavable glossy black bowl, which contains a rich, single serving of 350 grams.
La Linea Verde is always committed to bringing innovation through the eyes of future consumers, so the market is always new, and the ‘wow-effect’ is assured.
For more information visit www.lalineaverde.it .
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Most enjoyable and value for money. Definitely recommended

No airconditioning but evenings are cool.
The location was great near centre town and food was really good – especially the Indian cuisine. Staff very friendly, service good, have a bell at table to order just great all round. Rooms very spacious
Stayed in February 2019

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Giving Muslim Visitors a Place at Japans Tables – Nippon.com

Giving Muslim Visitors a Place at Japan’s Tables Giving Muslim Visitors a Place at Japan’s Tables Guide to Japan Food and Drink Travel Lifestyle Feb 15, 2019 Muslim visitors from places like Malaysia and Indonesia are eager to try traditional Japanese food, but Islamic dietary requirements can make this difficult. A growing number of Japanese restaurants are beginning to accommodate these needs, though. English Русский The Challenge of Eating Out in Japan
With the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics fast approaching, Japan—in both the public and private sectors—is gearing up to welcome a fresh wave of visitors from overseas. Above all else, there is a drive to assure these foreign guests that Japan is a safe and fun country. Of the more than 2.8 million overseas tourists who visited Japan in July 2018, the Japan National Tourism Organization says that more than 2.4 million—a significant majority—were from neighboring countries and regions in Asia, including from Malaysia, where Islam is the official religion, and Indonesia, which has the largest Muslim population in the world. This is heightening awareness in Japan of the need to create a Muslim-friendly environment that ensures an enjoyable experience for these visitors.
Meals are a special matter of concern for Muslims because of their religion’s dietary requirements, such as the Islamic prohibitions against pork and alcoholic drinks. Only halal food and drink, processed according to Islamic dietary law, is permissible.
Halal seals of certification displayed in restaurants, on menus, and on restaurant websites are one way of assuring Muslim visitors that they can eat safely in these places. But while there are as many as 20 institutions authorized to provide halal certification within Japan, the certification is not well known, to the extent that it makes the news when halal certification is awarded to places like Fujita Kankō’s Origami Asakusa, a Japanese restaurant in Tokyo’s popular Asakusa district, or Sōjiin, a Mount Kōya temple that provides lodging and vegetarian cuisine. Fujita Kankō’s Origami Asakusa restaurant offers a halal menu. (Photo courtesy of Fujita Kankō.) Origami Asakusa’s beef shabu-shabu course. (Photo courtesy of Fujita Kankō.)
Japan is also seeing growth in eateries that may not be halal-certified, but can be categorized as Muslim-friendly just the same. Kobe Misono, the original teppanyaki steak house, makes it clear that it has not obtained official certification. But the restaurant offers halal Kobe beef stored separately from other meats, prepared with special halal cooking utensils, and served on halal dishes, and has staff who have undergone the Japan Halal Association’s training program for Islamically accepted food handling. The original teppanyaki steak house, Kobe Misono. (Photo courtesy of Misono Inc.) A serving of halal Kobe steak. (Photo courtesy of Misono Inc.) Online and Print Guides for Halal Diners
The Tokyo Convention and Visitors Bureau has published the Tokyo Muslim Travelers’ Guide 2018–2019 , listing 93 halal-certified and Muslim-friendly restaurants in the metropolis. Available online as a PDF download , this is a valuable resource for Muslim tourists seeking good places to eat. The Tokyo Muslim Travelers’ Guide 2018–2019 lists 93 halal-certified and Muslim-friendly establishments in Tokyo. (Photo courtesy of Tokyo Convention and Visitors Bureau.)
The concierges at the Nihonbashi Information Center right by the famed bridge in Chūō, Tokyo, will happily print out a computer list providing access information on Muslim-friendly eateries in the nearby Nihonbashi, Hakozaki, Koamichō, Hatchōbori, and Kanda areas, including places serving Malaysian, Arabic, and Indian cuisine.
The Asakusa Culture Tourist Information Center, across the street from the Kaminarimon gate to the temple Sensōji in Taitō, Tokyo—one of the must-see places for foreign tourists—offers a Tokyo Map for Muslims and information and assistance for Muslim tourists. The map provides an easy-to-use guide with photos of the 21 halal-certified restaurants in the Asakusa and Ueno districts. The latest version of the Tokyo Map for Muslims is also available online (see link above).
Naritaya Asakusa, a popular rāmen shop located on Asakusa’s Nishi Sandō Shopping Street with halal certification from the Japan Islamic Trust, does not use any alcohol-based ingredients, pork, or pork-based soup stock in its food. Naritaya Asakusa. (Photo courtesy of Fellows, Inc.) Naritaya Asakusa’s halal rāmen. (Photo courtesy of Fellows, Inc.)
On the second floor of Naritaya Asakusa is a prayer space and place for ablutions. On the ceiling is a Qibla arrow indicating the direction of Mecca. This kind of service and attention to Islamic requirements is not surprising—Naritaya Asakusa originated in Malaysia’s Johor Bahru, only to move to Japan later, giving it a natural edge when it comes to accommodating the needs of Muslim customers. Naritaya also has branches in Kyoto’s Gion district and Osaka’s Minami district.
I spoke with some Malaysian tourists enjoying a meal in the rāmen shop. “We have great difficulty finding halal restaurants in Japan,” they said. “We just happened to see this shop’s seal of certification when we passed by here. When we can’t find a halal restaurant, we buy salmon onigiri rice balls in a convenience store.”
In another conversation with some Muslim women from Indonesia taking photos at Sensōji’s Kaminarimon, I was told: “All Japanese food is delicious. We always ask first if a dish is halal and have never had any problems.” Apparently, not all Indonesian Muslims are strict adherents to the Islamic precepts, and while they will not eat pork themselves, do not mind if it is served in a restaurant where they are eating. With this attitude, they do not fret too much about a particular restaurant’s qualifications, though they will avoid places that obviously specialize in pork dishes, such as shops serving pork-broth rāmen or tonkatsu (pork cutlet) shops. Pork-Free Restaurants Gaining Popularity
For traditional Japanese cuisine, Tokyo Shiba Tōfuya Ukai is especially popular among Muslims. Located near Tokyo Tower in Minato, Tokyo, this restaurant specializes in tōfu dishes. Though it does offer duck roast and roast beef, there is no pork on its menu. Well-known on the tourist route, Ukai has English-speaking staff and happily accommodates the needs of Muslim customers.
In Kyoto, Tempura Endō Yasaka Gion is well-known to wealthy Muslims, government officials, and corporate executives from Indonesia. Reservations can most easily be made at the Tempura Endō North Branch in Kyoto’s Okazaki district. This restaurant serves exquisite tempura made of fresh vegetables and seafood only, leaving no need for concern about pork or pork soup stock. Customers savor the tempura at a counter seat while enjoying conversations with the English-speaking tempura chefs.
Indonesian visitors are also keen on the Kani Dōraku crab restaurants. This chain originated in the Kansai area, but its outlets now can be found throughout Japan. Crabs are not a common food in Southeast Asia, and if eaten at all, are usually deep-fried whole. In contrast, Kani Dōraku offers a rich variety of crab dishes at reasonable prices, including crab stews, tempura, sashimi, and boiled crab. Kani Dōraku’s main Dōtonbori restaurant in Osaka. (Photo courtesy of Kani Dōraku.) A traditional kaiseki multicourse meal of crab. (Photo courtesy of Kani Dōraku.)
Sushi is probably the most popular Japanese food among visitors from Southeast Asia, many of whom make a beeline to conveyor-belt sushi restaurants and immediately post photos of their dining experience on social media channels. Visitors from Malaysia and Indonesia commonly opt for salmon and ikura (salmon roe) sushi, some of the most familiar items served at the sushi eateries in their own countries. Visitors from Singapore, Thailand, and the Philippines, on the other hand, are likely to eat the full range of sushi offered, giving an interesting glimpse into the diverse cultures and religions to be found in Southeast Asia.
The Japanese government expects as many as 1.4 million Muslim visitors in 2020, and the country will need to ramp up its level of food hospitality by the time of the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics.
Halal-certified restaurants must keep ingredients, dishes, and cooking utensils intended for Muslim consumption completely separate from those for other guests. Pork, pork-derived foods, and seasonings and condiments containing alcohol cannot be used at all. The strictest adherence to halal requirements means even the people who prepare the food must be Muslim. These are difficult standards to meet in Japan.
Still, Muslim-friendly eateries and restaurants try their best to comply, including seating Muslim customers away from customers drinking alcoholic beverages. In ways small and large, Japan is making sincere efforts to accommodate its Muslim visitors and ensure that they will enjoy their time in this country.
(Originally written in Japanese. Banner photo: Muslim tourists in Asakusa. © Ōtsuka Tomohiko.)

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10 Most Instagrammable Places in Singapore

56 Shares Last updated on February 15th, 2019 at 09:26 pm
Singapore is both an island country and a city which has been Southeast Asia’s most modern city for over a hundred year. There’s no doubt why it is considered as “the easiest place to do business” by the World Bank. Public transportation in Singapore is outstanding, and walking and wandering around is a good way to explore the city. We will show you our favorite instagrammable places in Singapore.
All tourist attractions are also accessible by tour buses. And this sounds like Singapore is such a nice place to travel but be warned since it is a big business center in Asia, it might be an expensive city to visit. In Singapore, you can find the world’s tallest indoor waterfall about 35 meters high. It is also one of the world’s greenest cities since it is filled with lush greenery. Believe it or not but almost half of Singapore’s land area is under green cover. With various parks and gardens, there are bunch of undiscovered plant life housed in the most uncommon places. Singapore even holds the world’s first night-zoo called the Night Safari!
Read here our full Singapore travel guide ! How to get to Singapore
You can find cheap airlines flying to Singapore. And you should check Skyscanner to find the best and cheapest flight that fits your budget. There are also other airline companies that you can take a look at like Jetstar , Scoot, Air Asia. You can also take a bus and buy a ticket from Kuala Lumpur to get to Singapore. Best time to visit Singapore
Singapore’s wet season is from November to January and it will be the hottest around May and June. So the best time to visit Singapore is from February to April between the summers and winters which has the most comfortable weather and temperature and bunch of outdoor activities will be best available that time! Click here to know more about the weather in Singapore! Intagrammable places in Singapore 1. Marina Bay Sands
Marina Bay Sands is the primary tourist destination in Singapore with its wide range of attractions and places of amenity. Aside from the beautiful things to see around the city, the area is also packed of fun and appealing activities to do. There are short cruises and River Taxi rides which only cost $5-$6. The cruise will take you around the Bay to witness all of Singapore’s iconic sights such as the Five Boys by the River, Merlion, and the astounding Fullerton Hotel and you can have brief facts of Singapore’s history through the cruise ride. At night, there’s water and light show that I bet you’ll enjoy watching! It also offers the best restaurants to hotels, shopping centers, night life and scenic views- Marina Bay just got it all! It is absolutely a combination of both leisure and business into just a single place. How to get there Marina Bay Sands is located on 10 Bayfront Avenue you can take the East Coast Parkway (ECP) expressway from Changi Airport. And it will directly take you to Sheares Avenue across the Benjamin Sheares Bridge. You can also grab a taxi and just mention to the driver to take you to Marina Bay Sands, and you’ll get there safe and sound. 2. Garden by the Bay
Garden by the Bay is truly a stunning destination that tourists must not miss to visit while in Singapore. This garden is home to thousands of plants, which is why Singapore is aiming for their island to be a ‘city in a garden’. Wonderful sceneries are really around the Flower Dome, you will see tons of flowers and various rare plants that for sure, you have never seen before. You must also try to climb up and reach the top stairs level and see worthy magnificent view from above. At night, the trees in the Gardens come alive for a sound and light show. And it’s interesting since they use the solar energy they have saved up during the day. Garden by the Bay has the best architects and landscape artists to present, there’s no doubt why it’s so powerful and beautiful! How to get there You can get there via The Circle Line or Downtown Line. Or take the Bayfront MRT Station (CE1/DT16) and get out of the Exit B and cross the Meadow or Dragonfly Bridge going to Garden by the Bay. 3. Sentosa Island
Sentosa has a lot of fun and activities to offer from waterparks, cable cars, beaches and many more! Sentosa has the Universal Studios, where there’s a massive themed-rides and this location is great for family and friends to enjoy live shows and Hollywood-themed attractions. You can also visit Sentosa beaches which has pristine white sands and crystal blue waters! And if you want some thrilling adventures, you can go to Adventure Cove Waterpark Singapore try their fun ride and slides. Well, they say that Sentosa is a place of infinite possibilities because they sure have a lot of fun to offer! How to get there: Take the Singapore MRT Service, whichever is near your place and make your way to Harbour Front Station on the North-East Line. Then enter Vivo City Mall and head straight to the 3 rd floor where you can purchase a Sentosa ticket/pass $4 SGD per person. 4. Chinatown
Your trip in Singapore wouldn’t be complete if you won’t visit Chinatown. It surely has it all from traditional temples to bars which are for explorers, party-goers, and history enthusiast. If there’s a must-thing to do in Chinatown, it is to grab a meal! It is the best place to experience the authentic flavour of Singapore and Maxwell Food Centre is the most popular one to visit. You can also go to the Thian Hock Keng Temple which is one of the oldest Chinese temples in Singapore. There are a lot of temples around so be prepared to be astonished with how they showcase the Chinese architectural styles! How to get there The best way to get to Chinatown is by taking the MRT subway train to Chinatown station on the North East Line. Then take the Exit A, which will lead you right in Chinatown. 5. Little India
There are bunch of must see attractions in Little India since it is the centre of life for Indian community in Singapore. So explore the combination of their Chinese and Hindu temples, mosques and churches. Well, it’s awesome since the touristic spots are just near to each other so you can visit all the beautiful places in a day and it will offer you its vibrant culture and incredible shopping experience! How to get there It is so easy to get here. Just take the MRT Chinatown Station to MRT Little India Station and it is with a direct purple line and a direct route. You can also take a subway from Clarke Quay to Little India which is 4-minute away! More Instagrammable places in Singapore 6. Masjid Sultan
Masjid Sultan, also known as the Sultan Mosque, is located in Kampong Glam Malay Heritage District. Sultan Hussein Shah, was the first sultan of Singapore and the mosque was built for him in 1824. The Mosque has domes with arabesque style, detailed decorations and ornaments. Its design is really interesting since it is a combination of traditional Indian and Islamic elements with European architectural features. It is so great and ravishing for the eye. It is a masterpiece! Masjid Sultan also has a prayer hall which can accommodate more than 4000 people in mass prayer. Interesting, isn’t it? How to get there: You can get to Masjid Sultan by taking the Bugis MRT Station to Masjid Sultan by night bus, taxi or foot. It is the cheapest and will cost you $1-$2 and will take around 3-hour drive. 7. People’s Park Complex Image from Flickr
If you want to go somewhere that’s budget friendly, then People’s Park Complex is for you! You can have a meal here and choose from a lot of variety of foods and cuisine. They almost have everything from meat, pork, chicken, and anything in between and it will just cost under $10 for a great meal already. It is also considered as the largest shopping complex along New Bridge Road and Eu Tong Sen Street. So they have a lot to offer like gifts, souvenirs, clothing, food, and other things that hit their fancy and interests. And again, all are cheap in price! How to get there: You can take an underground (East West Line) from Bedok Mall, Singapore directly to People’s Par Complex and you’ll get there after 30-25 minutes ride! 8. Library Orchard
Library Orchard is a public library under the National Library Board of Singapore located on the 3rd floor of Orchard Gateway. If you are a bookworm and just really fond of books, this is the right place and a heaven for you! There are plenty variety of books in this huge library. There are also spots where you can sit down but it can be limited and at times, the library can get a little crowded so the table and chairs are first come first served. But it is still a cozy and attractive place to relax and just geek around! How to get there: Best way is to take any near MRT station going to Somerset MRT (NS23) and it will just be a 2-minute walk to get to Library Orchard. 9. Helix Bridge
The Helix Bridge is previously known as Double Helix Bridge that’s connecting Marina Centre and Marina South. The bridge is definitely very eye-catching and stunning especially at dawn when you get to witness the mesmerizing night views. It will be the best experience too if you’ll walk through the bridge to get some fresh air, and there will be viewing points to stop along the way where you can capture great and beautiful photos! This bridge for sure, will satisfy your instagrammable feed desires! It is indeed an masterpiece of engineering and architectural design. How to get there: You can easily get there by taking the Promenade MRT station. Then you can take the Exit A. You will get to the bridge by walking for just 7-minutes! 10. Old Hill Street Image from Flickr
Police Station Old Hill Street Police Station is one of the National Monuments in Singapore. It is located at the end of Clarke Quay and is a great example of restored colonial architecture. It is a neon-colored building and the station just stands out the most. The building is a nice and great photography spot especially during twilight. And may it be day or night, it is absolutely one instagrammable spot in Singapore! How to get there: I guess by this time you are just strolling around Clarke Quay and trying to find more touristic spot, so the cheapest way to get to Old Hill Street Police Station from Clarke Quay MRT Station is to take a bus which costs $1-$2 and will just be a 1-minute ride! Need Accommodation in Singapore?
If you’re looking for a cheap place to crash, there are dorm rooms in Singapore that only go for $20 or less. Another inexpensive lodging option is AirBnB, where you can get rooms for $40-50. Click here to get a $30 USD discount on your first booking when you sign up on AirBnB! Those who want to treat themselves can always book luxury hotel rooms starting at around €200 per night.
Planning to book accommodation for your next trip to Singapore? Click here to book with Booking and Agoda ! Hope you like our favorite instagrammable places in Singapore. Read here for most instagrammable places in Paris , Instagrammable places in Hong Kong and instagrammable places in France . Love our content? Share this post so it can reach more people who need to know about Singapore! Happy Travels!

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Britain’s best cities for eating out | Telegraph Travel

Telegraph Travel experts
B ritain’s restaurant scene has never been more exciting. Our cities, and the neighbourhoods within them, are developing their own distinctive culinary characters, drawing on tradition and local produce, but spun in new ways by dynamic chefs. From small plates to pies, Indian to Italian, it’s enough to make us hungry for our next weekend break. Here’s our definitive guide to the best homegrown cities for foodies. London
The London restaurant scene is one of the world’s best, and it runs the gamut from great British institutions that have been around for decades to trendy no-reservations spots that open faster than you can keep track of. It should come as little surprise that innovative and impressive chefs from all over the world are keen for a place at the (dinner) table here. Pull up a stool at a long steel counter to watch as Northern Thai dishes are cooked over open flames, sink into your leather booth and press the button for champagne to enjoy with lobster mac ‘n’ cheese, or order a whole spread of small plates inspired by Italy’s diverse regions. If you’re serious about food, you’ll find London has plenty to offer. The best restaurants in London Manchester
M anchester’s restaurant scene is thriving, with independent establishments serving imaginative dishes and big-name chains pulling out all the stops to impress. One of the joys of dining in this multicultural city is the range of dishes on offer, whether you fancy a spicy Indian breakfast, an ethically sourced British pie or a high-end tasting menu with paired wine. And neighbourhoods have their own culinary characters, from trendy Ancoats where innovative independents are constantly springing up, to the luxurious business hub of Spinningfields, and the city’s more relaxed suburbs. The best restaurants in Manchester Brighton
G one are the days of good-but-staid establishments, second-rate pizza parlours and soggy fish and chips. Brighton today has an increasingly sophisticated restaurant scene that easily outshines other seaside resorts. The trend in many is to emphasise locally sourced ingredients, and that’s all to the good, given Sussex’s burgeoning vineyards, artisan cheesemakers and organic farms. There’s plenty of variety too, from a tiny Italian joint serving silky homemade pastas to a café serving southern Indian street food. The best restaurants in Brighton Edinburgh
E dinburgh’s thriving restaurant scene stretches from cheap, chilled cafés to sophisticated modern dining rooms, all fuelled by Scotland’s excellent natural larder. It’s also one of Britain’s top gourmet destinations when it comes to counting Michelin stars. From a decadent bowl of Orkney lobster thermidor macaroni cheese to the best fish and chips in town, there is no shortage of fantastic foodie experiences in the Scottish capital. The best restaurants in Edinburgh York
I t wasn’t so long ago that there were only a handful of expensive restaurants in the city to get excited about. Now, York’s fine food scene is vibrant, modern and fresh, with new restaurants with a hipster flair – but still a reassuringly Yorkshire identity – setting up shop along the cobbled streets. Here’s an insider’s guide to the best places to eat in York, including seriously impressive British dining, quality Korean barbecue, new takes on gastronomical greats and where to find the best espresso. The best restaurants in York Belfast
B elfast may not be considered a world-renowned culinary capital, but it certainly can’t be overlooked: the fine-dining scene is very much thriving, with Michelin-starred OX and EIPIC the undisputed marquee names. Slightly lower on the price meter are up-and-comers EDŌ and The Muddlers Club, which is so good a Michelin star may very well be in its future. Then there’s the delicious and affordable seafood: thanks to the depth and cold temperatures of the Northern Irish seas, the city enjoys an abundance supply of fresh fish; some might even argue that it has the world’s best fish and chips. The best restaurants in Belfast Oxford
O xford’s food scene has improved enormously in recent years with the city’s top-end but somewhat conservative old guard now joined by a host of bright and lively restaurants, trendy pubs where the food outshines the booze, and small but stellar independents serving up authentic Asian cuisine to avid local fans. For a quintessential Oxford experience, head to the Cherwell Boathouse in summer where you you can eat out on the deck, listen to the soft splash of punts on the river and enjoy ambitious but well-balanced fare. It’s also well worth making the trek out of the city centre to get to some of these lesser-known gems. The best restaurants in Oxford Glasgow
T ales of deep-fried Mars Bars have faded into urban legend. Glasgow is bursting at its culinary seams with award-winning chefs and young pretenders competing with innovative cuisines to suit every taste and budget. Classic restaurants in the city centre and the West End have upped their game to match a lively new scene between them in the Finnieston district, and there are encouraging signs of a culinary revival south of the river. Fresh fare from Scottish hills and sea lochs is as good as it gets and even haggis is given the nouvelle cuisine treatment. The best restaurants in Glasgow Bath
B ath used to suffer from a dearth of good, affordable places to eat. But a foodie transformation (and the acquisition of a Michelin star) has taken place at a number of the city’s restaurants, pubs and, thanks to the wealth of fabulous local produce available, Bath’s independent city and farm cafés are thriving. Vegetarian and vegan eateries are also increasingly winning locals over, as are the city’s international street food stalls, new small-plate restaurants and supper clubs.

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Bragard Supports Zest Quest Asia, Seeing University of West London Retain Its Crown

Recipes Bragard Supports Zest Quest Asia, Seeing University of West London Retain Its Crown (London, 11th February 2019) For the second year running, students at the University of West London have been crowned Zest Quest Asia champions. Their outstanding achievement was announced at the Zest Quest Asia Gala Dinner and Awards Night held on Friday, 8th February 2019 at the Hilton London Heathrow Airport Terminal 5 (Hilton T5). Attending the event were some 300 representatives of the UK culinary education, food and drink, and equipment sectors.
University of West London once again triumphed at the cook-off finals held earlier in the day at Mr Todiwala’s Kitchen, the signature restaurant of Hilton T5, seeing off challengers from Colchester Institute, North Hertfordshire College, New City College, Farnborough College of Technology and Westminster Kingsway College.
Marian Tandy, Mika Narciso, Bhumika Rai and their tutor, Tarik Ramjaun, win a trip of a lifetime: a seven-day educational journey to Manila, the vibrant capital of the Philippines and an emerging food city. They will be booked at the 5-star Fairmont Makati, conveniently located in the heart of the city’s modern business district, where they will enjoy a stage in the hotel’s kitchens. Other planned activities include a visit to Pampanga, one of the Philippines’ culinary epicentres; cooking at a Zest Quest Asia fundraiser to be held at Romulo Café Makati, and a definite highlight – taking part in a ‘fun cooking session’ at the residence of His Excellency Daniel Pruce, British Ambassador to the Philippines.
Judges were unanimously impressed by the team’s South Indian/Goan menu: a starter of South Indian Ulundu Vadai with Jerusalem Artichoke; a main course consisting of British Partridge Goan Cafreal made with fresh mint and coriander; and a dessert of Bibinca and parsnip Serradura. Marian, Mika and Bhumika also came away with two other prizes, for Display of Sustainability and Best Wine Pairing, sponsored by Loch Duart and Castelnau/Patriarch Pere et Fils, respectively. In addition, as the new Zest Quest Asia 2019 champions, University of West London was presented with a state of the art Robot Coupe machine for its training kitchens. Other awards on the night were:
• Master Chefs of Great Britain Best Team Spirit Award – Colchester Institute • Glengoyne’s Best Menu Planning Award – North Hertfordshire College • Chefi’s Minimum Wastage Award – Westminster Kingsway College • Tilda’s Award for Best use of Rice – New City College • KellyBronze Best Use of Local Sourcing Award – Colchester Institute • The Koppert Cress Award for Best Use of Living Ingredient– Farnborough College
The evening began with a canape reception prepared by last year’s winners, also from the London Geller College of Hospitality and Tourism at the University of West London, led by UWL tutor Nathan Vasanthan. The outgoing champions created a Southeast Asian medley inspired by their prize trip to Vietnam last April. Dinner was a 5-course ‘Menu with an Extra Dose of Rice’ designed by Cyrus Todiwala OBE, DL featuring a dessert by Town and Country Fine Foods. Andy Kemp, Group Sales & Marketing Director of Bidfood, led grace.
The evening’s special guest speakers were American chef, author and TV presenter, Ken Hom OBE and Lord Karan Bilimoria CBE, DL, chairman of Cobra Beer. In his speech, the legendary chef noted the rising importance of Asian food in Britain and around the world, while Lord Bilimoria, picking up on Zest Quest Asia’s ethos to ‘aim high’, shared his own life’s lesson: ‘Work as hard as you can, then go that extra bit further.’ Likewise attending the evening was Vice-Consul Stacy Danika Alcantara-Garcia of the Philippine Embassy, who introduced a short film on Manila by stressing the power of food to forge connections and relationships. She was joined on stage by Peps Villanueva, representative of Crystal Travel.
Now in its sixth year, Zest Quest Asia was founded in 2013 by Cyrus and Pervin Todiwala, with the support of The Master Chefs of Great Britain, to help address Britain’s skills and knowledge gaps in Asian cuisine. The competition also aims to be a catalyst for the inclusion of traditional Asian cookery in the curriculum.
Leading the judging panel was chairman Andrew Bennett MBE. Fellow judges were Cyrus Todiwala of Café Spice Namaste and Todiwala’s Kitchen, looking very smart in his Bragard Grand Chef jacket, Pervin Todiwala of Café Spice Namaste and Todiwala’s Kitchen, Steve Munkley of the Royal Garden Hotel, Clive Roberts of Master Chefs of Great Britain, and Murray Chapman of Passion to Inspire. The evening was emceed by Nigel Barden, the BBC broadcaster, food and drink journalist, and chef.
Cyrus Todiwala OBE, DL, who for the first time will be joining the winning team on their prize trip, said, “Zest Quest Asia was always going to be a strong student competition because of its rigour and ambition. Every year we’ve enjoyed the great support of friends and colleagues from industry and beyond. But this year, our sixth, we are extremely grateful for how we’ve been able to move to an entirely new level. You could see it in the effort and determination of students to win, and the passion of everyone involved in creating a positive buzz around Zest Quest Asia. You could see it in the quality of entries and finished menus and in the incredible support that the finalists generally received from their colleges. Unfortunately, there could only be one overall winner, and this year University of West London did it again. Congratulations to them and to the other teams who all proved their mettle in a tough competition.”

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How Your Restaurant Biz Can Make a Difference

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Michelin-Star Chef Alfred Prasad is credited with elevating the reputation of British Indian food with his delicate treatment of fresh, seasonal produce. Becoming the youngest Indian chef to receive a Michelin star at the age of 29, he retained this accolade at Tamarind. Alfred Prasad is highly appreciated in the industry for his original take on traditional cuisines of India.
In an interview with Restaurant India, Chef Alfred Prasad talks about the elements that restaurants in India need to implement to cater to the changing market needs.
The Culinary Journey to Getting a Michelin and Retaining it
The choice to enter the hospitality industry is something I counted on completely by myself. It was my mother who had filled up the form of the hotel school on my behalf, without my knowledge. The joy of becoming a chef came up pretty early while I was still studying in college. The kitchen at home was a happy place to be. I was naturally grown to cooking. I was one of the first to be appointed at the ITC Sheraton Chennai for an executive training program which jumpstarted my career.
I moved to the UK in 2001, the Indian food was more primitive in the UK then. The majority of the restaurants were owned by the Bangladeshi entrepreneurs who were very much familiar with the British palate. I took up the job of sous chef at Tamarind in London’s Mayfair. I brought the idea of serving the authentic Indian food there.
In 2002, I was awarded a Michelin star; At 29, I became the youngest Indian to receive a Michelin star . It’s one of the biggest achievements a chef can have. I wanted to tell people in the UK that Indian food is just not the tandoori chicken or murg makhni, there is a lot more. And I am pleased that people have now discovered regional cuisines.
Elements that Restaurants in India Need To Implement to Cater to the Changing Market Needs
We need to pick three things for the Indian restaurants to look at in order to be treated on par with that of the world.
As a chef, I would probably start with the kitchen . A big reason why people eat out at the restaurants is – the food. Good, honest cooking, chef’s individualistic flair, having the freedom to put your own imprint – are the only things that will bring the pride. It’s much more important for chefs to bring their own style and legacy, and believe in that. If you, as a chef, believe in your creations, the customers will buy it too.
Another is Supply Chain . Mostly, the supply chain at restaurants is poor. The level of pride at which an ingredient is treated and cared for while growing at the farms has not been achieved yet in our country. As a chef or hotelier, I would like to see more of the organic farm. If consumers start paying the heed from where the ingredients come from it will make a difference for the businesses.
Thirdly, focus on the customer experience . We, blinker, a little too much on the ambience, the uniform of the waiting staff, or the aroma and décor of the restaurant. Instead, focus on providing a good experience to your customers. That’s probably why the customers go back and never return. To give a good experience to your customers, you must know which table they would like or what drink you could suggest for them. You might not be able to remember everything but some, in particular, matters. If you know their likes and dislikes, you will create loyal customers for your brand.
The voice, control and customer engagement techniques, all are important for a brand’s longevity.
Click To Read: Michelin-Star Chef Vineet Bhatia Says Restaurants Should Focus On Technicality And Flavours
Indian Cuisines in the Michelin World
There are quite a few restaurants in India which we accolade, but the fact is the Michelin is limited by the resources; if they have to reach to the country such as India, they will probably need around 100 such inspectors.
India is a very important player in the global space. Rightfully, that applies to our cuisines as well. The Indian food is an amalgamation of several cuisines, cultures, religions and ways of life – there’s so much depth to the cuisines we serve. A lot of international diners will wait to have the Indian cuisines, which certainly didn’t happen two decades back. It’s the fact, once anyone knows the depth of the Indian cuisines they get automatically drawn towards them.
The Indian cuisines have the capacity to hook you on its flavours and make you an addict.
Indian foods and spices have the properties to release endorphins and the feel-good hormones. There is a long way to go but we are certainly on the right track. I hope Michelin considers India, but my gut feeling is they will be only able to do city-wise and not the country as a whole.
Contribution to Food Wastage
Growing in the Indian sub-continent, the poverty is all around you. As a chef, we are on the side where we see excess food wastage is common – be it banquets or restaurants. As chefs, we have to be ambassadors of this aspect. We have to be more active on raising awareness of food wastage. I started following a charity based in London; their motto read ‘food wastage and food poverty shouldn’t coexist’ and that really struck a chord. I was invited by Akshay Patra as their ambassador for the UK; the organization provides almost two million school kids with a nutritious meal at lunchtime at schools. It is phenomenal. I go for the fundraising events of Akshay Patra and talk to my chef community about the impact.
The Art of Plating Trends in 2019
The molecular gastronomy has had its time in the limelight. Talking about the plating trends in 2019, perhaps at restaurants in India and abroad, the more focus will be on the textures that complement the dishes . For the longest time, the restaurants had lacked in presentations. The traditional food concept was based more on taste, flavour, aroma and it was less about making the food look beautiful, presentation-wise. But, certainly, I think chefs who are looking to challenge that perception would look to take Indian dishes out of their bowls and contemplate the addition of texture or colours.
Must Read: Add 3D Effect To Your Food With This Simple Tip By Chef Gautam Chaudhry
More importance will be given to the ingredients . The ingredients have to be the star of the plate. Using ingredients that complement the dish but add colour and texture and wealth, without necessarily going down the route of molecular forms will be another trend.
The plating styles will see a balance between making food look good without taking away the authenticity . I see more coming in the supply chain whether it is micro greens or edible flowers. Some cities in India have little more access to exotic ingredients. I hope it gets more mainstream.
There has been a shift towards the market segment in Indian cuisines. The fun element that restaurants create will be translated more onto the plate. The food served could have the chef’s signature imprinted onto the dish.
This article was originally written by Sara Khan. More from Entrepreneur Learn to be a better leader and develop successful marketing and branding strategies with Dr. Patti Fletcher’s help.

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