Best new restaurants in Abu Dhabi

Best new restaurants in Abu Dhabi

Cultural melting pot: a selection of dishes at innovative Indian restaurant Namak 9 January 2019 • 2:30pm Follow Some of the world’s most innovative and exciting dining experiences can be found in the city encompassing a wide range of cuisines
H ead to New York or London and never a week goes by without some hot new restaurant opening its doors to great acclaim – but those aren’t the only cities where chefs go to try out their latest culinary concepts.
Abu Dhabi’s dining scene is a hotbed of innovation and activity, with world-class, often Michelin-starred, chefs eager to stamp their culinary signature on the city. From international restaurants set in swanky five-star hotels to creative pop-ups that garner attention through word of mouth alone, every meal is an opportunity to try somewhere that will get the taste buds tingling.
The Warehouse Wine & Tapas Bar at the Pearl Rotana Capital Centre is a good place to start, with crowd-pleasing Mediterranean small bites served in sharing platters, perfect for friends, families or couples in search of a leisurely dinner. Add an impressive wine list and warehouse-inspired decor that is urban cool to a T, and you’ve got a good all-rounder. Crowd-pleaser: the Warehouse Wine & Tapas Bar at the Pearl Rotana Capital Centre
The striking interiors at Back Yard Bistro also offer plenty of fodder for dinner conversation, with old bikes, classic car parts, stools made out of mannequin legs and plenty more touches that up the quirkiness factor a few notches. Instagram snaps aside, the food is just as much of a draw, with American classics served to perfection – provided you can get your head around eating bright-blue sliders.
Don’t put the camera away just yet, though – you’ll need it to capture the stunning sea views from the rooftop terrace at Saadiyat Rotana Resort & Villas, where Turtle Bay Bar & Grill is now open. Tuck in to locally caught seafood or hearty steaks with a surf-and-turf menu that puts quality ingredients above all else, although the attentive service and superb location come a close second. Superb location: the rooftop terrace at Saadiyat Rotana Resort & Villas offers stunning sea views
If that steak gets the mouth watering for culinary delights of the carnivorous kind, make a beeline for new Brazilian churrascaria Olá Brasil at Al Ghazal Golf Course. If you’ve never tried a churrascaria before, the concept is simple: meat, meat and more meat, which just keeps coming until you admit defeat and tell the waiters “no more”. Quality is just as important as quantity at this new opening, though, with rump of beef, sticky ribs, tender lamb and grilled prawns among the highlights.
There’s plenty more in the cultural melting pot that makes up Abu Dhabi, but innovative Indian restaurant Namak is one of the real standouts. With celebrity chef Kunal Kapur of Masterchef India fame at the helm, expect an ultra-modern take on authentic Indian cuisine, presented in bold and surprising ways. The restaurant can be found at the Dusit Thani Abu Dhabi, open for lunch and dinner. Ultra-modern: a dish at Namak restaurant, at the Dusit Thani Abu Dhabi
After so much good food, fitting in dessert might seem ambitious, but when you see the so-called “freakshakes” – a towering milkshake topped with all manner of sweets and treats – at new dessert stop Black Tap in Yas Mall, you’ll want to make room. Sit back and admire the elaborate creations (one shake even comes with an entire slice of cake on top) or get stuck into some unusual flavour combinations.
There’s even more excuse to indulge at Chateau Blanc in Marina Village – think custom-made cakes and patisserie as elegant as anything you’d find in France – just don’t expect to fit into your jeans on the flight home. Award-winning cuisine in Abu Dhabi Elegant Emirate
Abu Dhabi is a world-class destination for those seeking the best of all worlds, from sun, sea, and family-friendly adventure to indulgent spas and traditional local culture – and it’s just seven hours away with Etihad Airways.
And now, thanks to Etihad’s new Extraordinary Abu Dhabi Pass, visitors to Abu Dhabi will be given discounted access to some of the emirate’s leading attractions, restaurants and spas simply by showing their boarding pass.
To find out more about Abu Dhabi, Etihad Airways and the new Extraordinary Abu Dhabi Pass, visit etihad.com/YourAbuDhabi Shares

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Sabinsa Corporation, Z Automation Company, Inc Profiled in Black Seed Oil Market 2018-2024 | Prominent Players – Flavex International, Kerfoot – Avril group, Organika Health Products, Connoils LLC, Earth Expo Company, SanaBio GmbH, Henry Lamotte Oils, Hea

11. Florapower GmbH & Co. KG 12. Manish Agro, Inc 13. AOS Products Private Limited 14. Amazing An Nutrition, Inc 15. SNN Natural Products, Inc 16. Paras Perfumers, IncPresence of micro components including mystric & steric acid, proteins and vitamins B1, B2, B3, folate, copper, iron and zinc allow the product to have application as a functional food and dietary supplements. Additionally, cumin seed oil can be utilized as herbal medicine for sores, bites, rashes, inflammation and skin irritation, thereby driving black seed oil demand. Capsule based nigella sativa oil demand may exceed USD 1.5 million by end of forecast period. Growing product usage in nutraceuticals as dietary supplement or functional will favor industry growth. Increasing consumption of food supplements in capsule form due to easy digestion is likely to further boost industry growth.Germany black seed oil industry share from cosmetic & personal care application is likely to witness significant gains at over 6%. These products have soothing and anti-inflammatory properties which suits skin and cures eczema, acne and psoriasis. Growing personal care market size globally is likely to favor industry growth due to its usage in shampoos, soaps, skin care products, massage oils and fragrances.Browse key industry insights spread 280 pages with 372 market data tables & 35 figures & charts from the report, “Black Seed Oil Market Size, By Form Type (Capsule, Oil), By Application (Personal Care & Cosmetics[Skin care, Hair care, Fragrances], Pharmaceuticals, Nutraceutical [Food supplement/Dietary supplement, Functional Food], Flavoring & Dressing, Culinary), Regional Outlook (U.S., Canada, Mexico, Germany, UK, France, Italy, Russia, Spain, Switzerland, Belgium, China, India, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Australia, Brazil, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Egypt, South Africa), Price Trend, Competitive Market Share & Forecast, 2019 – 2025” in detail along with the table of contents: www.gminsights.com/industry-analysis/black-seed-oil-market Lack of research, availability of numerous essential oils and its potential toxic nature at high dose is likely to hamper industry, thereby affecting black seed oil price trends. These products can allergies and rashes if applied directly on skin and can also affect liver and kidneys, if consumed too much, thus further affecting industry growth.U.S. black seed oil market size from nutraceutical application may surpass 130 tons by 2025. Shift in consumer preference from synthetic to natural ingredients along with mounting demand for sustainable products is likely to drive regional growth. According to the research, consumption of cumin seed oil may help in lowering body mass without any significant side effects. Growth in obesity rate in this region has expanded the market for functional food and dietary supplements, which will thereby favor regional product demand.India black seed oil industry size from culinary applications is may grow over 7% by 2025 due to its usage as providing flavor and aroma to numerous curries, breads and bakery products. Wide usage of spices in Indian cuisines in order to enhance taste and smell of curry is predicted to fuel black seed oil demand.Egypt black seed oil market is poised to witness gains of over 7% owing to high production of cumin seed oil due to easy raw material sourcing. Growing product usage in breads, naan & curries for taste and health benefits is anticipated to stimulate industry size.Inquiry before buying @ www.gminsights.com/inquiry-before-buying/3085 Global black cumin seed oil industry share is highly fragmented among player including, Manish Agro, Sanabio, AOS Products, Sabinsa Corporation, Amazing Nutrition, Flavex, Henry Lamotte Oils GmbH, Z-company and Kerfoot Group. Manufacturers are expanding the farming of black seed owing to high demand along with improving extraction technique in order bring down production cost.Continue…About Global Market Insights: Global Market Insights, Inc., headquartered in Delaware, U.S., is a global market research and consulting service provider; offering syndicated and custom research reports along with growth consulting services. Our business intelligence and industry research reports offer clients with penetrative insights and actionable market data specially designed and presented to aid strategic decision making. These exhaustive reports are designed via a proprietary research methodology and are available for key industries such as chemicals, advanced materials, technology, renewable energy and biotechnology.Contact Us:

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Moving to India – Moving to India, Moving to Mumbai, Pune, Bangalore

Did you know that unfurnished apartments in India come without furniture, kitchen appliances and air conditioners? Plus, ovens are a rarity and power outages are frequent. And, families are the priority. Continue reading for more practical advice about moving to India.
What is it like living in India? When we asked expats what it’s like living in India , they responded:
“Basically, in India, daily life revolves around five quadrant i.e family, work, religion, self and socializing. But for the past few years the younger generation are more focused on work and being financially secured, unlike the older generation who had a higher level of contentment,” commented one expat who made the move to India.
“For the working partner, life revolves around work and related socalizing. However, there is plenty to do in terms of sport clubs, Movie Clubs, Toast Masters Club, etc..,” said one expat who moved to Pune, India.
” Hyderabad is a city steeped in history and is more than 400 years old. It has a cross cultural mix of people from all walks of life. Hyderabad is now noted for its advancement in ITC and has a lot of Expats around the Hi Tech City. Hyderabad is noted for its age old cuisine and the city people are very outgoing and love eating out. Family is a very important part of life and you will see complete families, including older parents and grandparents freely doing the rounds in the city. The city is also a very keen sports city with golf sailing etc.. a very important event,” mentioned another expat when asked about moving to India .
Another expat said, “I thought I would be lonely when I moved to India. However, I had an enriching lifestyle. I met loads of other expat people, enjoyed events organised by 2 expat groups in India and learned new stuff while living in Pune. I wasn’t allowed to work according to my dependent visa which was a pain as I had job offers coming in. But I took the time to learn about yoga & became a certified yoga teacher as well as a certified makeup artist. I improved on my language skills as I met foreigners who spoke French and Mandarin. Instead of being lonely, I was very busy each day. I got to know the locals as well and you learn to appreciate local delicacies. I enjoyed eating Indian food. That was one aspect of being an expat that lived beyond my expectation. I will definitely miss living in India for this reason!”
Choosing the Right Neighborhood “We had the services of a relocation firm who lined up a lot of places to look at. We didn’t plan it, but we lucked out as unlike a lot of the usual expat colonies in Pune , once our driver has gone for the day we aren’t confined at home or relying on autorickshaws. It is a short stroll to some very good restaurants, and a couple of blocks to the local supermarket and plenty of other stores whilst still being a quiet neighborhood,” recounted one expat.
Slums in India “As for slums, there are a lot, and they coexist among the newly built condominiums too. The divide between rich and poor is so obvious. At every corner, there are beggars begging for money. It’s something you have to learn to be immune to as you can’t be giving all the time and some are organised gangs of beggars,” explained one expat in Pune .
Typical Expat Apartments in India & How to Find Them “We live in a 3 bed apartment with a roof terrace. There is a variety of housing available including bungalows and townhouse type homes. Most expats will live in apartments. Property rental here is expensive, we pay nearly $2,000 a month for our 3 bed, 3 bath apartment. Undoubtedly, expats pay more than locals and rental amounts are increasing quite quickly due to an influx of expats. Agents tell us that suitable properties are increasingly hard to find,” explained one expat.
Another expat advised, “Ideally, talk with people who have lived there. Is the water supply ok? Is it safe? What kind of neighbours? Any mold risk? Who is paying for the gate guards and what is the deal. Are there quarters for servants and maids?”
“Be very clear to what you want and make sure the settling in people stick to your guidelines as they will waste your time showing things that don’t fit; I knew what was on the boat and needed 4 bedrooms and they kept showing us 3 bedroom flats. I knew that I wanted to be close to Indian culture without sacrificing access to expat shopping. I did not want my husband and children to spend more than one hour on commuting. Ask Indians for advice; so many freely helped us navigate the waters. They were our saving grace,” advised one expat.
“We live in 2000 sq ft, flat; 4 bedroom that 3 bedrooms have 2 floor to ceiling wall closets; 5 bathrooms as the smallest is for the maid; 3 patios with 2 small patios attached to 2 bedrooms. The kitchen is small with one sink and a built in stove and a patio for the washing machine. I had to buy the refrigerator. I have a storage room with shelves. I have wall sliding glass doors in 2 bedrooms and the living room, and large window in the dining area, giving the place lots of light, and unfortunately, heat. We have an AC unit in each bedroom and living room. It is smaller than most expats’ homes. They tend to live in much larger flats,” wrote an expat who moved to Mumbai . You’ll Need a PAN Card to Rent an Apartment
India’s Income Tax Department issues each resident a Permanent Account Number (PAN) for income tax purposes. “Get your PAN card ASAP; you can’t sign a lease agreement without one,” pointed out one expat. For more information: Additional check list for foreign citizen PAN applicants . Furnished vs. Unfurnished Apartments in India
“Bear in mind that unfurnished here means not just no furniture but no air conditioners, appliances and so forth. Make sure you know exactly what is included. Don’t be shy about asking for things such as new mattresses and also new furniture if it looks well used! Decide before packing whether you will choose to live in unfurnished, partially furnished or furnished. A colleague packed assuming he’d find an unfurnished apartment but wasn’t able to find one (mostly furnished here) and now he and his wife are having to try and store furniture that they brought from the US. No easy task,” advised one expat.
“Don’t expect an oven, very few places have them. We only saw one apartment with an oven (which we now live in, but that wasn’t the deciding factor). Microwaves are smaller than in the US but you can get combination microwaves that also double as a convection oven. You won’t be cooking big turkeys so a small oven shouldn’t be too troublesome. Insist on a water purifier. When you arrive start out with bottled water and after several weeks convert to the purifed water and your stomach should adapt pretty well,” said one expat. Healthcare in India
“The quality of medical care in India varies considerably. Medical care in the major population centers approaches and occasionally meets Western standards, but adequate medical care is usually very limited or unavailable in rural areas. Outbreaks of avian influenza (H5N1 virus) occur intermittently in eastern India, including West Bengal, Manipur, Sikkim, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, and Assam. Malaria prophylaxis depends on time of year and area the traveler is visiting. Dengue fever presents significant risk in urban and rural areas. The highest number of cases is reported from July to December, with cases peaking from September to October. Daytime insect precautions such as wearing long-sleeved shirts and mosquito repellent are recommended by the CDC,” wrote the US State Department .
“Medicine costs are reasonable compared to US. Many pharmacies sell medications. May not get exact name brands as in USA but chemically equivalent medicines can be obtained. Most medications need Prescriptions. Many pharmacies do give out medicines if you tell them the local name,” said one expat in a report about healthcare in India .
Expats living in India interested in expat health insurance should take a minute to get a Quote: from our trusted expat health insurance partner, CIGNA .
What to Bring When Moving to India (and what to leave behind) When we asked expats living in India what they wish they had brought when moving to India and what they wish they had left at home, they replied:
“Three things I wish I had brought: a good pair of winter slippers, because houses here are uninsulated, so the winters can be cooler inside than out; another set of good kitchen knives, since ones we have found here are not of very good quality; another pair of indestructible sandals from some of the big name brands, since here you can get cheap sandals custom-made…but they also require resoling, and have no arch support! Three things I wish I had left at home: electric blanket, because even despite a transformer & converter, it still blew and now the fancy function doesn’t work; our queen-size fitted sheets that we were told to bring, because you can’t get fitted sheets here–only to find out that ‘queen size’ is really closer to king, it being two single beds pushed together; my winter coats, because you can manage just fine with a sweater and t-shirt, silk underwear and normal clothes, and so on – winter coats are a waste of space and it’s not cold enough,” said one expat who moved to Mussoorie, India.
“I wished I had brought a good mattress, good pillows, I should have not have brought thick clothes and medicines,” mentioned another expat when asked about moving to India .
“I wish I brought my vacuum cleaner as Mumbai is terribly dusty. Otherwise, I’ve been able to buy anything else I need. I wish I left all my oven cookware behind as ovens don’t come with flats. It is an appliance I’m not willing to buy,” commented one expat who made the move to India.
Bringing Your Pet to India In a discussion about moving to Pondicherry , one expat told newcomer who asked about brining their pet, “Pet relocation take a little planning, the dog needs rabies vaccination 30 to 60 days prior to departure so the pet passport needs to be checked to ensure that the timelines are maintained as you mentioned that you shall be relocating in March’17. To import a pet into India one will need to obtain permission from the quarantine department, in your case the pet will either arrive in Chennai or Bangalore, we prefer bangalore we are at the location and can facilitate the process faster. The permission is valid for 7 days and one needs to make sure in advance that everything is in place.” Be Prepared for Frequent Power Outages
“Power blackouts are common. Make sure you have generator back-up or at least an inverter (battery back up) or you’ll spend a lot of time in the dark,” cautioned one expat. Another expat recommended that newcomers looking for an apartment, “Check if there is a generator and what is connected to generator. For eg it is very important to have air conditioners connected to generator.”
“You have to make do with sporadic power outbreak. Initially, I was informed that Thursday was the day where power would be cut off for a few hours. A couple of times, power outbreak lasted over 24 hours. Sometimes, it did extend to other days as well,” described one expat.
Driving in India is Dangerous According to the US State Department, “Travel by road in India is dangerous. India leads the world in traffic-related deaths and a number of U.S. citizens have suffered fatal traffic accidents in recent years. You should exercise extreme caution when crossing streets, even in marked pedestrian areas, and try to use only cars that have seatbelts. Seatbelts are not common in three-wheel taxis (autos) and in taxis’ back seats. Helmets should always be worn on motorcycles and bicycles.Travel at night is particularly hazardous. On Indian roads, the safest driving policy is always to assume that other drivers will not respond to a traffic situation in the same way you would in the United States. Buses and trucks often run red lights and merge directly into traffic at yield points and traffic circles. Cars, autos, bicycles, and pedestrians behave only slightly more cautiously. Use your horn or flash your headlights frequently to announce your presence. It is both customary and wise. Inside and outside major cities, roads are often poorly maintained and congested. Even main roads frequently have only two lanes, with poor visibility and inadequate warning markers. On the few divided highways one can expect to meet local transportation traveling in the wrong direction, often without lights. Heavy traffic is the norm and includes (but is not limited to) overloaded trucks and buses, scooters, pedestrians, bullock and camel carts, horse or elephant riders en route to weddings, bicycles, and free-roaming livestock. Buses, patronized by hundreds of millions of Indians, are convenient in that they serve almost every city of any size. However, they are often driven fast, recklessly, and without consideration for the rules of the road. Accidents are quite common.”

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What’s happening: week of Jan. 24

What’s happening: week of Jan. 24 Posted in Community | Front Page | News
What’s happening events must be open to the public, of general interest, 60 words or less, and received at least two weeks prior to the event. Please include ticket prices, if any, and a phone number or website where readers can obtain more information. Email notices to
Pre-Budget Rally
The Ontario Health Coalition holding a rally outside an Ontario pre-budget finance committee hearing at the Holiday Inn in Point Edward, in anticipation of government cuts to health care and programs. 12 noon, 1498 Venetian Blvd. For more, call 416-441-2502
Weight Loss Support
West Lambton Community Health Centre holds “Waist Away Support Group” with a registered dietitian and group of peers. 429 Exmouth St., 10:30 a.m. Monthly, every fourth Friday. To register for this free program, 519-344-3017, ext. 259
Twenties Gala
Noelle’s Gift holds a Roarin’ Twenties Gala at the Dante Club, 1330 London Rd., doors open at 5:30 p.m. Riverboat Casino open from 5:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. Includes silent auction, live auction, hors d’oeuvres, and more. $125 per ticket. To register, visit www.noellesgift.ca/events or Noelle’s Gift on Facebook
Donor Clinics
Canadian Blood Services hosting a blood donor clinic at Temple Baptist Church, 9 a.m. to 12 noon. For more, call Stephanie at 519-331-0764
Hike
The Lambton Outdoor Club is hiking at the Lambton County Heritage Forest. For more, visit www.lambtonoutdoorclub.org
Card Making
A card making class offered at the Point Edward Library, 220 Michigan Ave. 11 a.m. Cost is $10, which includes supplies for two cards. Must register by calling 519-336-3291
Music & Meat Draw
All welcome to an open jam session and meat draw at the Corunna Legion, 350 Albert St. Vocal warm-up at 3 p.m., meat draw at 4 p.m. Food available. Wheelchair accessible. For more, call 519-862-1240
Ham Dinner
A ‘Lunches for Learning’ fundraising dinner at Grace United Church, 990 Cathcart Blvd., 5 p.m. Includes spiral ham, scalloped potatoes, homemade desserts, and more. Tickets available at church office, $16 adults ($17 at door), $8 ages 13-16, free 12 and under. For more, contact Pauline at 519-339-9763 or
Italian Heritage
Michael Iannozzi and Caroline Di Cocco to present a first look at the digital archiving of Sarnia’s Italian community. 2 p.m. at Sacred Heart Church, 1465 Lecaron Ave. All welcome. Light refreshments served. For more, contact Michael at 519-868-0509 or
Family Literacy Day
Organization for Literacy in Lambton holding a Family Literacy Day event at Coles in the Lambton Mall, 1380 London Rd., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Bricks 4 Kids offering hands-on learning for families, colouring, math games and reading activities. For more, contact 519-332-4876 or
Teen Cuisine
Rapids Family Health Team offering a free cooking class for teens ages 13+. 460 Christina St. N. (use back entrance), 4 p.m. Must pre-register by calling 519-339-8949
Chili Dinner
Girl Guides hosting a chili dinner at Dunlop United Church, 757 Rosedale Ave., 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., to raise funds for girls attending the provincial LEAP camp. Includes variety of chili, rolls, drinks and dessert. Tickets at door, $10 adults, $5 for children 5 to 12. For more, call 519-312-4256
Cooking Class
A free hands-on cooking class offered by Twin Bridges NPLC. Explore the convenience and versatility of soup in time for National Soup Day. 153 Christina St. S. (use Front St. entrance), 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Register at www.tbnplc.com
MS Pizzafest
Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada holds its 24th annual MS Pizzafest, a family event with live music by CD/DC and cash bar. Sarnia Legion, 286 Front St. N., 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tickets $10 for 4 slices. Take-out available. For tickets, contact or 519-680-7878
Facts and Chat
Strangway Centre hosts a Habitat for Humanity presentation on “Accessing Home Repairs.” 260 East St. N., 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Free. Pre-register by calling 519-332-0656
Girls Like That
Theatre Sarnia presents Girls Like That, a new play that explores the evolution of feminist consciousness and modern female friendships. Imperial Theatre, 7:30 p.m. nightly till Feb. 2. Tickets, $25 adults, $22 seniors, $12.50 youth, available by calling 518-344-7469
Live Music
Strum n Drum performs live acoustic stylings at Cheeky Monkey during First Friday, 130 Christina St. N., 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Also art show and sale by Bill Walters. For more, call 519-332-0978
Women’s Wellness
A four-week series to create a supportive group environment that explores health and wellness. Topics include self and body image, setting healthy boundaries in relationships, and more. 153 Christina St. S., 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Register at www.tbnplc.com
Photo Exhibition
Rayjon, its volunteers and how they contribute to global change are included in this year’s Transformations Photojournalism Exhibit at the Lawrence House. 127 Christina St. S., 7 p.m., as part of First Friday. Runs till Feb. 23. For more contact Dianne @ 519 862 1963 or the Rayjon website @ www.rayjon.org
Seniors’ Coffee
West Lambton Community Health Centre hosts a seniors’ coffee and board games day each First Friday of the month. 429 Exmouth St., 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Free. No registration required. For more, call 519-344-3017
Trivia
A trivia night in support of the CNIB and the visually impaired will be held at the Sarnia Legion Hall, 286 Front St. N. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. $30 a person, with tables of eight available. Tax receipt included. For more, call Turner Moore CPAs at 519-344-1271
The Lambton Outdoor Club is hiking at Pinery Provincial Park. For more, visit www.lambtonoutdoorclub.org
Concert
Sisters of Soul perform Motown and more at Camlachie United Church, 6784 Camlachie Rd., 7 p.m. $15 adults, $8 students, free under 12. Light refreshments after show. Accessible and fragrance-free building. For tickets, call the church office 519-899-4720 or Shirley 519-491-2517. For more, visit www.camlachieunited.ca
MADD Auction
MADD Sarnia/Lambton presents the “MADD About You” live auction of “Date Night” packages. Lambton Mall, 1380 London Rd., 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Free pre-registration suggested, but registration also prior to event in the food court. For more, visit www.maddsarnialambton or the Madd Sarnia/Lambton Facebook page.
Luna New Year
The Vietnamese Canadian Club celebrates its 4 th annual Luna New Year (Year of the Pig) at the Sardo Hall, 770 Maxwell St. Authenic foods, music, dancing, cash bar and traditional fashion show. For more, contact Helen at 519-332-8089 or
Travel Group
First meeting of a new travel discussion group in which experienced or hopeful travellers can share information in an informal setting. Coffee Lodge, 400 Exmouth St., 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Meets first Monday of the month. For more, call 519-491-8163
Chair Yoga
Free yoga program suitable for most abilities offered by Twin Bridges NPLC. Mondays until Feb. 25, at 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. or 11 a.m. to 12 p.m., and Wednesdays until Feb. 27 at 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. 153 Christina St. S. (Front St. entrance). Register at www.tbnplc.com
Gentle Yoga
Free introductory-level yoga program for adults suitable for most abilities, offered by Twin Bridges NPLC. Bring your own mat. 153 Christina St. S. (Front St. entrance), 12:15 p.m. to 1 p.m. Mondays until Feb. 25. Register at www.tbnplc.com
Meditation
Help boost self-esteem, improve concentration, lower blood pressure, reduce stress and achieve emotional balance. West Lambton Community Health Centre, 429 Exmouth St., Mondays at 10:30 a.m., or Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. Register at first class. For more, call 519-344-3017
Women’s Fitness
Free bootcamp-style fitness class that includes cardiovascular, strength and flexibility exercises. Suitable for most levels. Consult Primary Care Provider before participating. Offered by Twin Bridges NPLC. 153 Christina St. S. (Front Street entrance), 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays until Feb. 26. Register at www.tbnplc.com
Yoga
Free yoga program for adults suitable for most levels, offered by Twin Bridges NPLC. Bring your own mat. 153 Christina St. S. (Front St. entrance), 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays until Feb. 26. Register at www.tbnplc.com
Travel
Photographer Kieron Nelson present the multi-media show, Stairway to Heaven, documenting his travels to Laos and northern Vietnam, at meeting of Sarnia Photographic Club. 6:30 p.m., admission free, Sarnia Library Auditorium. For more, visit www.vanishingculturesphotography.com
Donor Clinic
Canadian Blood Services hosting a blood donor clinic at the Dante Club, 1330 London Rd., 2:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Also Feb. 12 at the Dante Club, same time, and Feb. 23 at Temple Baptist Church, 9 a.m. to 12 noon. For more, call Stephanie at 519-331-0764
Conquering Anxiety
A four-week program facilitated by a Registered Social Worker to help shift anxiety by changing thoughts, behaviours and perspectives. 153 Christina St. S., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Register at www.tbnplc.com
Book Launch
Local author James R. Wallen will launch his new book Gridiron Underground, about black U.S. football players coming to Canada to play. At The Story, 179 Christina St. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., with a brief reading at 8 p.m. For more, contact The Book Keeper at 519-337-3171 or www.sarniabookkeeper.com
Meditation
A free four-week session to teach the basics of various meditation practices and provide practical ways to increase mindfulness in everyday living. Offered by Twin Bridges NPLC. 153 Christina St. S., 12 p.m. to 12:45 p.m. Register at www.tbnplc.com
Chordsmen Valentines
The Sarnia Bluewater Chordsmen are offering singing valentines. Includes 3 love songs, a rose and a card with a personalized message from the sender. $40 in the city, $60 for a county delivery or group valentine. All proceeds to charity. For more, call David at 226-404-3060
Shibashi
West Lambton Community Health Centre offering free Shibashi classes. All Saints Anglican Church, 248 Vidal St. N., 11 a.m. Feb. 7 to March 28. Register at first session. For more, call 519-344-3017
Knitting Group
West Lambton Community Health Centre holding “Knit & Natter Knitting Group” to knit hats and mittens for those in need. Accepting donations of completed hats and mittens. 429 Exmouth St., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. No registration required. For more, call 519-344-3017
Diabetes Cooking Class
West Lambton Community Health Centre holding free “Healthy You Diabetes Education & Cooking Class” led by a registered dietitian. Topic is vegetarian. 429 Exmouth St., 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. All skill levels welcome. To register, call 519-344-3017, ext. 259
Live Music Cafe
Sarah Rankin will perform and Sisters of Soul host the Live Music Cafe. Foursquare Church, 207 Talfourd St., 7:30 p.m. Donations welcomed. For more, contact Fran at
Souper Lunch
Prepare two nutritious soups at West Lambton Community Health Centre’s “Souper Lunch Friday.” Bring containers to take soup home. St. Luke’s United Church, 350 Indian Rd. S., 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Monthly, every second Friday. Free. No registration required. Free. For more, call 519-344-3017
Charity Bootcamp
LD Fitness is hosting a charity bootcamp in support of Life’s Lessons Care and Support. 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. 1730 London Line. Cost, $15 for 30 minute class. To register, call 519-337-0100.
Tuesday, Feb. 12
Sheila Hewett will discuss using censuses and wills to reconstitute families at a meeting of the Lambton County Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society. Free, all welcome. 7:30 p.m. LDS Church, 1400 Murphy Road. For more, contact Janet at 519-383-0468 or
Improving Communication
A session facilitated by a Registered Social Worker to learn constructive ways to communicate your needs, desires and perspectives within a relationship. 153 Christina St. S., 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Register at www.tbnplc.com
Photography Show
Featuring three local photographers, E. Buchner, B. McCarthy, and C. Roenspiess. St. Luke’s United Church, 350 Indian Rd. S., 7 p.m. Admission by donation, proceeds to YMCA Breakfast and After-school programs. Refreshments provided. For more, call 519-344-1781
Green Drinks
An informal gathering featuring John Degroot leading a discussion on how to defend trees against Oak Wilt. Free. 100 Christina St. N., open 6:30 p.m., discussion at 7 p.m. For more, contact

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All The Reasons To Visit The Royal State Of Rajasthan At Least Once In Your Lifetime

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Rajasthan- the largest state of the Republic of India is the perfect amalgamation of India’s grandeur and magnificence that dates back to several centuries. From its rich culture, magnificent forts and palaces and its delicious cuisine to the red sands and the blue cities and the golden sunsets, the state is a conglomerate of historical and cultural treasures. Rajasthan is a stage set that conjures up storybook India, a land where fabulously wealthy kings fought and loved and indulged their fondness for pomp and ceremony.
Here are all the reasons why Rajasthan should be on every traveller’s list.
Desert Safari
Walk through the yellow sands glowing under the sunlight, far away from the hustle bustle of city life. The whooshing sound of shifting sand dunes, dancing to the tunes of the wind as you ride a camel through the Thar Desert is simply breathtaking. Wait, there’s more! The sun slowly disappearing on the horizon as it makes way for a calm evening – it’s a magical experience you can’t miss.
Forts and Palaces
All our childhood stories of Prince and Princesses come alive in the magnificent forts and palaces, as their walls speak out loud about their glorious past. From Golden Fort to Amber Palace, Hawa Mahal to Jal Mahal , the architecture, artwork and paintings are of sheer brilliance. While the Chittorgarh Fort will surprise you with many stories of valor, courage and sacrifice, you’ll be mesmerized by Mehrangarh Fort’s architectural splendor. BTW, the latter was not seiged even once and the Citadel of the Sun remains invincible and inspires awe from all. These monuments actually allow you to travel back in time and get a glimpse of the royal way of living back then.
Rajasthani Cuisine
If food is your true love, Rajasthani cuisine will never disappoint you. Be it the classic dishes like dal bati churma or gate ki sabzi or the traditional thali , Rajasthani food is every vegetarian food lover’s delight. While the vegetarian cuisine is popular across the world, there are options for meat lovers as well including laal maas and bhuna kukda . Each and every dish from Rajasthan will leave you craving for more.
Heritage Hotels
Indulge in Rajasthan’s affluent culture and tradition by staying in one of the stunning palaces-turned-heritage hotels. Thriving in an old kingly atmosphere, these hotels offer a warm ambience laced with royal comforts and grandeur that the erstwhile kings and queens were known to relish. Be it The Oberoi Udaivillas in Udaipur or Umaid Bhawan Palace in Jodhpur or The Gulaal in Jaisalmer, they surpass all the bounds of luxury and offer an royal stay that you might have never even imagined in your lives. The combination of modern day facilities, well clubbed with age old traditional practices make your dream of living the life of a Prince/Princess come true.
Festivals
Rich in tradition and culture, Rajasthan has a lot on its plate to offer when it comes to festivals. One of the largest livestock fairs of the world, the different colours and the grandeur of Pushkar Fair can only be felt when you witness it for real. From taking a hot air balloon ride over the fair to grooving to fusion bands on the desert to watching a wide range of out-of-the-box competitions, the fun of the festival just doesn’t seem to fade away. Even if its the Teej Festival or the lively Elephant Festival, the colourful essence of the place is always well reflected. These festivals allow you to be a part of the rich merrymaking Rajasthani culture and take home the best memories.
Wildlife
Maybe because of the landscape, but we cannot think of any other animal other than camels to be found in the land of Golden Sands. But despite the limited greenery, this royal state calls to wildlife enthusiasts and bird lovers alike. Irrespective of whether you’re a casual tourist or an avid bird lover, Bharatpur Bird Sanctuary will impress you with its variety of thousands of birds. Birds migrating together, venturing together and posing together beautifully for photographs – it’s your perfect date with nature. Rajasthan has also been a home to a large number of animals including Royal Bengal tigers and endangered river dolphins. You can experience wilderness at its best by taking a jeep safari or a boat ride at these wild locales.
Shopping
The colourful bazaars in Rajasthan are bustling with jewellery, pottery, leather items, paintings, textiles and the list is endless. Shopping here is another way of discovering the state’s cultural side. The indulgence of art in every small piece of work fills the market with eye-catching and vibrant souvenirs at display. These show pieces are not just souvenirs but also magnificent pieces of art. Drown yourself in the variety of Indian handicrafts in Tilonia bazaar near Ajmer, pick up all things traditional and colourful from Bada Bazaar in Udaipur or indulge your love in all things Rajasthani at Kote Gate in Bikaner.

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Best Cuisine For Everybody Is Indian Food

I am a sound bias when I say that Indian cuisine is the best cuisine, but I do have points to prove that that is right. Indian cuisine is one cuisine which offers you plenty of options to choose from and everybody will get something that is going to suit everyone’s palette. Indian food has got sweet food, they have got spicy food, blend food or you can try sweet and sour options or the super hot options and there’s plenty of options in both vegetarian and non-vegetarian delicacies making it a versatile cuisine. There are many Indian restaurants in Fremont w here you can enter into some really tasty Indian delicacies.
Taj-E-Chaat is one such restaurant where to get amazing tasting authentic Indian food which will make you to have some more everytime you go to eat there. Taj e Chaat in Fremont offers you some really good chat options like the street food varieties of Indian food which is mouth-watering delicious goodness. Write from having some really nice Samosa Chaat to begin your meal with, delicious lovely vada pav or dabeli or Pav bhaji for your appetizer cravings of something very tasty sweet and sour hot and tangy deliciousness in every bite.
You can get amazing vegetable curries as well as lentils which are fully packed of protein and spices that I have got therapeutic effects for you. You have delicious different types of naan bread and rice delicacies to try with your amazing curries and vindaloo…
You can on the extreme end of your meal try out some amazing desserts that a restaurant offers right from the kulfi that will amaze you as ice cream to the gulab jamun or gajar ka halwa that will just make you crave and what more every time you take a bite. the best part about everything that this particular restaurant so it’s that now you can order food online in Fremont via Taj-E-Chaat get the food delivered at your doorstep and that sounds like a real good deal when you really don’t want to cook a go to dine out.

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#TheFWord | Make America Chop Suey Again: We Shouldn’t Put the Foodie Before Food

3-min read #TheFWord | Make America Chop Suey Again: We Shouldn’t Put the Foodie Before Food A new weekly food column, The F Word explores the minutiae of meals, the traditions of dining, the inner workings of chefs’ minds and the ever evolving culture of eating. Updated: December 23, 2018, 9:59 PM IST Representative image. (Reuters) So the other day I was having dinner with family who are over from the US and we’d gone to a generic Delhi Chinese restaurant to satiate their Chinjabi cravings. And as we tucked into the Kung Paos and Hakkas and Manchurians of unknown provenance and the din of conversation dimmed to a lull of chewing and the occasional little sigh so ubiquitous to the Indian dining experience, a casual remark was thrown out, “I miss real, plain food like this.” And while this was in reference to a bastardized quasi-Chinese meal made to tickle the jaded palate of a Delhi diner, and soused with the devil knows how much soy and ‘chili vinegar’, I knew exactly what they meant. And you know what? I miss “real”, plain food too. Aren’t you all kind of done with fusion follies, super whatevers, and a sundry of other cutting-edge culinary key terms. Look, I get it: the boundaries and borders between cultures and cuisines are being demolished as the internet and social media weaves the world into one common beautiful tapestry of humanity with everyone being the same yet each individual their own unique snowflake. I totally get it. And culinary experimentation and innovation is literally the butter to my bread as a (sort of) food writer, and in the past, I’ve waxed poetic of the dynamism of the F&B industry and the exciting marriage of techniques, traditions and ingredients from all around the word which are pushing the boundaries of dining out and taking food into the future. And it is great, don’t get me wrong. And fairly obvious. Thanks to MasterChef Australia and the profligation of the idea of being a foodie is a membership requirement of human society these days, everyone knows their consommé from their Caprese and that it’s Gathzpacho, not Gas-patcho. These little artisanal crumb fried morsels (never nuggets) of food trivia are familiar to anyone and it’s no big deal to come across a Japanese style Surf and Turf (the addition of Wasabi in anything makes it Japanese-style) or a butter chicken stuffed taco. And no matter what your feelings over this continental fusion, or con-fusion if you will, there’s no denying that it was a logical fallout of cultural exchange and that it is here to stay. I just worry that in the razzle-dazzle of all this new age dining we’ll forget the Frankenstein foods of yesteryear, the queer culinary hybrids that helped break in our palates back in the day and prepare them for the gastronomic extravagances of today. Foodies and gourmands who wouldn’t be caught dead ordering an American Chop Suey at a multi-cuisine Mughlai Chinese restaurant today forget that once upon a time, for many people it was fascinating dishes like these that were our introduction to the exotic and the new. Never mind that the Indian concoction of noodles, radioactive red sauce and a sunny side-up fried egg has nothing in common with the original American Chop Suey, which was essentially an Italian-American khichdi of leftover pasta, meats and veggies thrown together, but it was once the most exciting dish on the menu, damn it. I’d like to think that more than Matt Preston’s cravat or Gordon Ramsay’s frequent cussing, it was the American Chop Suey or the pizza parantha or the masala macaroni that first opened my eyes to the larger world of food out there. And a lot of you may have had their first acquaintances with Food, as opposed to home food, in similar settings and with similar dishes. And so, while I’m grateful to live in a world where Sriracha is as common as ketchup and where people know that Chicken Tikka Masala was created by Bangladeshis in Britain and is not an Indian dish (though we take full credit for curry in its every form) and where I can have my cake, and gulab jamun too, I do also still love my Manchurian. You know, the “real”, “simple” food. Catch the Biggest Newsmakers and the Biggest Newsbreaks on CNN-News18, your favourite English TV news channel. Keep watching CNN-News18 at just 50 Paise per Month. Contact your cable /DTH operator Now! *Rental / capacity fee of Rs.130/- as charged by cable / DTH operator may apply. **GST extra.

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Frumpy Middle-aged Mom: I’m back from India and I’m glad I don’t live there – Orange County Register

Things To Do Frumpy Middle-aged Mom: India was great but I’m glad I don’t live there I appreciate my life here so much more now. The author, Marla Jo Fisher, with tuk-tuk auto rickshaw, her main method of transportation in India, (Courtesy of Marla Jo Fisher) By Marla Jo Fisher | mfisher@scng.com | Orange County Register PUBLISHED: January 23, 2019 at 6:07 am | UPDATED: January 23, 2019 at 2:33 pm Oh, gee. So now I have to summarize my trip to India, for those of you who’ve been foolish enough to read my columns about my planned trip there. Well, let’s just say this: I’m home now, and it’s great to sleep in my own bed and listen to our dogs snore underneath it.
I’d wanted to experience India for many years, even though — decades ago — I met a famous Indian filmmaker who told me, “Don’t go there. You won’t like it.” I took umbrage at the time, assuming he meant I was too much of a pantywaist to handle his country.
Well, in some ways, he was right. India is a tough country to experience, at least the way I did it, which was to take a tour with Intrepid Travel. This company aims to let you experience the real thing, local people, local trains, local buses, local pollution. You’re not tucked away in some grand hotel built by the British Raj, like some deluxe tours take you, where you’re waited on by Indians dressed in embarrassingly archaic uniforms who duck and bow as if colonialism had never ended. You’re standing at the desk of your tourist-class hotel, asking them to please turn the hot water on so you can take a shower.
So, here’s my impression: India is bursting with color, full of monuments, palaces and temples so ancient it’s hard for us to even grasp them as Americans whose oldest history only dates back a couple of hundred years. That’s not even enough to be considered historic there. Seriously, it’s not. Most people are kind. The food is amazing. There’s a reason that Columbus ran into the Americas while he was looking for a better way to get spices from India. That reason is that Indian spices make life worth living.
I never had the slightest idea what type of food I was ordering off any menu. I’d just point and say, “This one.” And whatever they brought me was always delicious. If there were a better word than delicious, that would be it. When I took an Indian cooking class, I discovered why: They cook everything in massive amounts of oil and ghee, which is clarified butter, along with tons of sugar. And they use fresh whole spices in everything. Even though I ate vegetarian food on the entire trip, I still gained weight, because I couldn’t stop eating. I simply could not leave one bite of food on a plate.
Food in India is amazing. Here, the author is eating who knows what at a restaurant that specializes in South Indian cuisine with her tour group from Intrepid Travel. Wandering around thousand-year-old temples and massive palaces was a surreal experience. As was wandering through a small village where we were like rock stars, because they seldom see tourists. People would appear out of nowhere and want to have their pictures taken with us. Kids would stop playing cricket in the street to surround us, just to say hi.
So what was hard? Well, firstly, I’d have to say the air pollution. I really, really don’t want to see the air that I breathe. India supposedly has pollution controls on cars, but there’s so much corruption that no one actually bothers to comply. It reminded me of the bad old days before unleaded gas, when the air hung yellow in the summer in Pasadena. Remember that? Well, that’s India. Even in the Northern India countryside, you could see the air, because of dust and things burning. In Varanasi — India’s holiest city — that includes the bodies of the departed. And that city has a very peculiar air quality and odor all its own.
And, yes, the people. They are kind and funny, but there are too many of them — 1.3 billion, many of whom were in the northern part of the country I visited. In a land mass one-third the size of the U.S. I used to think I was a fairly aggressive driver. I can fend for myself in Tijuana traffic. But every day in India makes Tijuana look like a Sunday morning in rural Iowa. Traffic lanes and lights are only a suggestion. Drivers honk their horns every 18 seconds. Seriously. I’m not kidding. If a driver in India broke his horn, he couldn’t drive. Often, I would just close my eyes. I’d rather not know if I was about to die. Like the Indiana Jones ride at Disneyland? It lasts four minutes. Imagine three hours of that rocking and bouncing and pounding, which is what it’s like to travel 60 miles on a potholed Indian highway, dodging cows and goats and monkeys and stray dogs, not to mention motorcycles, cars, pedestrians and tuk-tuks.
A street cow falls in love with a tourist in a lane in tiny Alipura, a village in India. Photo by Marla Jo Fisher And then there are the cows wandering the streets. As a rancher’s daughter, this was a hard one for me. I wanted to jump out of the auto rickshaw and herd them all up. As you may know, cows are considered a living representation of the Hindu cow goddess, so no one eats them, though they drink their milk. The McDonald’s I visited in Delhi had no beef on the menu — but a corn and spinach burger. Yes, you heard that right. Corn and spinach. I had to try it. It wasn’t bad with ketchup.
India is a huge country with many disparate regions. I only saw a small portion of it, so I really can’t generalize. The delicious masala chai tea made all the hardships worthwhile. Will I go back? Well, right now it’s too early to say. I’m just glad to be back in a neighborhood where I can’t see the air, and people are more likely to flip you the bird than blow a horn at you. And I have unlimited hot water when I turn on my shower. One of the great benefits of travel is so you can appreciate your cushy life back home. And that’s never been more true for me than now. So, thanks for being part of that. And if you want to go to India, by all means, go. You’ll never forget it.
Related Articles Frumpy Middle-aged Mom: I’m still in India. Let’s hope I’m alive Frumpy Middle-aged Mom: If all goes well, I’m in India right now Frumpy Middle-aged Mom: My 10 realistic New Year’s resolutions for 2019 Frumpy Middle-Aged Mom: Yes, it’s almost New Year’s Eve. You’ll probably live through it Columnist Marla Jo Fisher, aka the Frumpy Middle-aged Mom, at the Taj Mahal, Agra, India in January 2019.

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Diner’s Update

The latest Rhode Island food, drink, restaurant and dining news and events. January 22, 2019
By Kendall Cairoli, Jamie Coelho, Courtney Dell’Agnese
JANUARY 2019
Every Friday in January
The eight-part series “ Maria’s Portuguese Table ” will air on WSBE TV- RI PBS every Friday in January from 8 to 9 p.m.
1/13-1/26
Providence’s culinary scene warms up during Providence Winter Restaurant Weeks . Choose from menus at nearly 100 participating restaurants . Enjoy three-course lunches at $16.95 and three-course dinners at $29.95 or $34.95, as well as two-for-one specials .
1/22-1/31
At Carrabba’s Italian Grill in Warwick, guests can get a free order of made from scratch lasagna or spaghetti starting Tuesday, January 22 through Thursday, January 31. When guests dine-in and enjoy one of Carrabba’s three signature dishes, wood-grilled chicken Bryan, chicken marsala or pollo Rosa Maria from their Carrabba’s Today, Carrabba’s Tomorrow menu — they will take home their choice of a free order of lasagna or spaghetti.
1/23
Furloughed federal employees and their families can enjoy a complimentary dinner prepared by local food producers at Hope and Main in Warren on Wednesday, January 23 at 6 p.m. The dinner is offered to Coast Guard and other federal employees, sponsored in part by Dawn dish detergent’s Step Up To The Sink program, “which encourages people to ‘step up’ and help those in their lives that need it most – starting with the dishes.” Participating food and drink producers include Avenue N American Kitchen, the Backyard Food Company, Blount Fine Foods, Easy Entertaining, Eat Drink RI, El Rancho Grande, GottaQ Smokehouse BBQ, K and S Pizza, Warwick Ice Cream and Yacht Club Soda. RSVP here . Open to first 100 registered attendees. You can also email audrey523@mac.com to confirm that you’re attending and let her know the number of people in your family coming with you!
1/24-1/27
Calling all wine connoisseurs and food aficionados! The Sun Wine and Food Fest at Mohegan Sun is back. Sip and sample your way through endless vintages and signature dishes and explore the incredible showcases and tastings during this four-day affair in the Uncas Ballroom and new Earth Expo Center. A portion of all the proceeds go to Channel 3 Kids Camp. Check the website as times and ticket prices vary.
1/26
The 2019 Rhode Island Brew Fest will sample more than 175 of the Ocean State’s best beer selections at a brand new venue this year, the WaterFire Arts Center in Providence. With a tasting glass in hand, guests can enjoy beer samples, live music, food for purchase and/or samples from an array of local vendors like Knead Doughnuts , The Edgewood Cheese Shop and Narraganset Creamery. The event will have two, three-hour sampling sessions from 1–4 p.m. and 5:30–8:30 p.m. Purchase tickets here.
1/26
The annual Taste of The East Bay returns! Join food and drink producers in an intimate, cozy setting at Hope and Main as you savor and sip the best local food and drink — all while helping animals in need. This year’s event will benefit the Rhode Island Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals . Tickets are $40 for the VIP tasting from 5 to 6p.m., and $25 for general admission from 6 to 8 p.m.
1/26
Celebrate the life and works of the acclaimed Scottish poet and National Bard, Robbie Burns at DeWolf Tavern on Jan. 26.
1/27
Two of country’s biggest stars, Martina McBride and Kimberly Schlapman of Little Big Town, team up with Food Network’s Anne Burrell to bring Southern charm to Mohegan Sun’s Sun Wine and Food Fest’s Sunday Brunch on January 27 from 11 a.m.– 2 p.m. in the Uncas Ballroom . Guests will enjoy country brunch food, while watching live demonstrations as Martina, Kimberly and Anne share their favorite recipes. A DJ set during brunch will be by Questlove , famous band front man and Southern cuisine connoisseur. Tickets are $90 per person and on sale now via Ticketmaster at ticketmaster.com . Tickets are also available at the Mohegan Sun Box Office, subject to availability.
1/27, 2/10, 2/24
The Providence Flea winter market returns for the second and fourth Sundays of the month on January 27, February 10 and 24 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Hope High School at 324 Hope Street in Providence. The markets will be held in the cafeteria at the building’s rear entrance. The markets include a juried selection of handmade art and design, craft and clothing, jewelry, accessories, vintage wares and small-batch food items from local vendors. Pop-ups will also feature a rotating lineup of favorite hot food and drink trucks from around the state, including Presto Strange O coffee truck, Luluna Kombucha , Crepe Corner Belgian crepes and European pastries, Gotta Q BBQ smoked meats and sides, HG80 Tacos plus housemade sodas and fries, Ming’s Asian Street Food , Red’s Street Kitchen cheesesteaks and fries, Rocket Fine Street Food Angus burgers, mac ‘n cheese and sides, Clover Desserts mini cheesecakes plus chocolate and fruit tarts, Blush Bakeshop scratch-made vegan baked goods, and Proud Mary Donuts.
1/31
Matunuck Oyster Bar is hosting the Justin Vineyards and Winery wine dinner on Jan. 31 at 6:30 p.m., hosted by Justin’s master of wine Joseph Spellman. Guests will enjoy Matunuck oysters at the reception followed by a first-course of shitake uni baked oysters, prosciutto-wrapped shrimp and mini lobster rolls; a second-course of local steamed naked mussels with cilantro, lime, coconut, toasted cashews and curry-style sticky buns; a third-course of confit-style boneless duck with Moonstone mushrooms and roasted butternut squash over cavatelli; and an entree of boneless beef short ribs with sauteed escarole and roasted garlic white bean puree. Reservations are $99 per person, plus tax and tip. Book your reservation by paying a $20 deposit .
2/5-2/10
Castle Hill Inn in Newport is hosting a special five-course Cantonese-inspired menu from February 5 to 10 to celebrate the Chinese New Year . Chef Andy Taur honors the Year of the Pig with five courses, including mushroom congee; steamed cod with wilted lettuce, bottarga and black vinegar; black-vinegar braised pork jowl with mung bean noodles, aged rice wine and peanuts; “Peking” squash hoisin with cucumber and leek ash; and Tangerine Bavarian, a citrus-infused stirred custard with almond cookie crumb, white sesame and kumquats.Reservations are $92 per person or $127 per person with beverage and wine pairings. Call 401-849-3800.
2/5
Amos House is hosting its Comfort dinner for the second year in a row on Feb. 5 from 6 to 9 p.m. to benefit Amos House. Guests will enjoy a delicious five-course meal prepared by Rhode Island’s best chefs, including Benjamin Sukle of Oberlin and birch, James Mark of Big King and north, Beau Vestal of New Rivers, Melissa Denmark of Gracie’s, Champe Speidel of Persimmon and others. Each dish will be accompanied by a wine pairing provided by Bottles Fine Wine and all guests will leave with special parting gifts to commemorate the evening. Purchase your ticket today to be a part of an evening to help ensure that there is always a seat at the table at Amos House. Tickets are $250 per person.
2/27
Rhode Island Day of Portugal is hosting the third annual Taste the Passion wine dinner at the Capital Grille on February 27 at 6:30 p.m. The reservation-only event will teach diners about Portuguese culture through food and wine, while stimulating the senses and encouraging conversation and friendships. Leading food and wine experts will provide in-depth information on the wines, wine regions and exquisite cuisine of Portugal. Reservations are now available for $125 per person. For reservations, call the Capital Grille 401-521-5600.
ONGOING EVENTS
Matunuck Oyster Bar is hosting a first week of the month three-course $29.95 dinner special. On the first week of the month, now through April, diners can start with a choice of Matunuck oysters or a stuffie, followed by a second choice of a Matunuck farm house salad or chowder and you can choose any entree on the menu for $29.95. Make a reservation online at rhodyoysters.com . This offer excludes Saturdays, and there is a $5 upcharge for steaks and boiled lobsters and a $15 upcharge for king crab and $9 baked stuffed lobster.
Chef Joe Simone is back, hosting cooking classes at Hope and Main in Warren. Here’s the list of classes: January 15 —Welcome back; January 29 —Pasta Boot Camp 1; February 5—Instant Pot; February 12 —Date Night at Home; and February 26 — Soup! All classes are held on Tuesday evenings at 691 Main St. in Warren at 6:30 p.m. and finish up by 9 p.m., unless otherwise noted. Recipes, tastes and wine will be served. Classes are $65/person. To book, email .
At Red Stripe in both Providence and East Greenwich, guests save 50 percent off bottles of wine every Tuesday from 6 p.m. to close.
Every Thursday from 5:30–9:30 p.m., Stoneacre Tapas hosts “ Stoneacre Sushi ” night. Bowls, specialty rolls, nigiri and other delicious Japanese dishes are served. Guests can enjoy the sesame udon bowl that is made with housemade udon noodles, Berkshire pork belly steamed buns and tuna tartare with gochujang and bean sprouts. Book a table here.
Begin your weekends on Wednesdays at CAV in Providence with live music featuring Alexus Lee with half-price wine bottles and the new Bistro Menu. Thursdays also host live jazz featuring the Classic Jazz Trio.
Chez Pascal in Providence started a Cookbook Culinary Series. Chef Matt Gennuso has more than 400 cookbooks that he has amassed over the years. He will be highlighting a favorite cookbook from his collection each month, and every Tuesday through Thursday, the restaurant will offer a special three-course menu inspired by the recipes of selected books for $38 per person (not including tax, gratuity or beverages) in addition to the regular menu. The courses will have the option to be paired with a thoughtfully selected cocktail, wine or beer. The cookbook will change each month.
Join Jamestown Fish in Jamestown for Vintage Thursdays: a casual and affordable exploration of wine and food where the only agenda is enjoyment and education. Guests are invited to not only sample the provided offerings of the night, but to also bring their own bottles that fit the occasion to enjoy and share with others (if they wish). There is no set time to arrive. Enjoy a two-course dinner , paired perfectly with these wine samplings for just $25.
Ella’s in Westerly offers a three-course pre-fixe menu for $25 per person on Monday through Thursday evenings. Choose from appetizers like roasted fall soup, salmon tartare and a greens salad; entrees like squid arrabiata, grilled swordfish and a grilled porkchop, and pumpkin cheesecake or chocolate mousse for dessert. For reservations, call 401-315-0606.
OPENINGS AND LAUNCHES The new Barnaby’s Public House opened as a pre-Prohibition style restaurant and bar, located at 385 Westminster St. in the historic Conrad building in Providence. Barnaby’s has been completely renovated to preserve the Victorian details and original character of the building, which was erected in 1885 by its namesake, Jerothmul Bowers Barnaby. Read more about Barnaby’s Public House . Revival Brewing has moved upstairs in the former Brutopia space in Cranston, serving a menu of ramen and barbecue favorites based on the beers that are on draft. The location is now Revival Foodworks and Brewery . Read more about the menu here . Tricycle Ice Cream is now open in north Bakery’s former location at 70 Battey St. on the West Side of Providence. Get a sneak peek at the opening menu here . The first Firehouse Subs opened in Cranston this week, under the ownership of first-time Firehouse Subs franchisees Sejal and Harsh Patel . The restaurant serves premium meats and cheeses steamed and piled high on a toasted sub roll, and the Cranston location showcases a mural depicting the true story of the local heroes of the Cranston Fire Department working together to fight a fire at an apartment complex where they saved several lives back in March of 1992. Firehouse Subs is l ocated at 1000 Chapel View Blvd, Suite 108, and it’s open Sunday through Thursday from 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Fridays and Saturdays from 10:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Graze Burgers opened in October in Westerly, featuring grass-fed burgers, french fries, custard shakes, vegan and gluten-free options, fresh chicken sandwiches – and beer and wine. The grass-fed beef comes directly from the family farm in Stonington, Connecticut, or one of the local partner farms. They also offer convenient online ordering of the entire menu. LineSider Brewing Company is East Greenwich’s first brewery. It opened to the public in November with a 4,200-square-foot facility, featuring a large, comfortable tasting room and outdoor courtyard. The Shaking Crab Cajun restaurant is now open at 284 Thayer Street in Providence, in the former Kartabar space. It’s the restaurant’s tenth location, serving Cajun-style seafood boils with crab, shrimp, lobster and other shellfish. The owners of Basta have opened a second restaurant, Bettola , at 44 Rolfe St. in Cranston. It’s a casual Italian eatery and upscale neighborhood pizza parlour with pizza flour flown in from Naples, Italy, and local ingredients for toppings. The Perfect Sweet Macarons has opened a bricks and mortar bakery at 16 Joyce St. in Warren, serving traditional French macarons and Modern American macarons in an endless variety of flavor and color combinations. Baked goods like cinnamon rolls, cheesecakes and cookies and coffee are also available.
Early in the New Year, Yogurt Beach in Plainville, Massachusetts, is transforming into Tasty’s Bagels, Cold Treats and More . The self-serve frozen yogurt is there to stay (in addition to ice cream and other sweet treats) and will now be complemented by locally roasted coffee and espresso from Red Barn Coffee Roasters , breakfast and specialty sandwiches, house-baked cookies, muffins, brownies and much more. Rendering of Ellie’s bistro.
Gracie’s and Ellie’s Bakery in Providence are getting a little sister. Ellie’s – a Parisian-inspired neighborhood eatery – is the latest brainchild of Ellen Slattery, proprietor of Gracie’s Venture. The new restaurant will feature distinctly French, bistro-style dinner classics – elevated by Gracie’s executive chef Matthew Varga – in addition to the wholesome breakfast, lunch and dessert items offered at Ellie’s Bakery. Along with Varga, Gracie’s executive pastry chef Melissa Denmark will put a unique spin on Ellie’s bistro-style offerings. Ellie’s will make its home at 225 Weybosset Street. Green Line Apothecary announced it will be opening a second Green Line Apothecary location on North Main Street in Providence in early 2019. The Guild Beer Hall is now open in Pawtucket with extended hours, including Tuesday through Thursday from 4 to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday from noon to 11 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 6 p.m. The new Hometown Cafe and Poke Bar is open at 185 Camp St. in Providence, from the owners of Hometown Poke mobile food trailer. The cafe serves coffee, pastries, toasts, acai bowls and poke bowls. Read more about it here . Frisky Fries will be opening a third location, this time in Barrington! The famous fries smothered with toppings are coming to the East Bay at 186 County Rd., located in the Barrington shopping Center. It will take some time to hire and staff the location, but we will keep you posted on an opening date.
Garden City will also be welcoming a few more new restaurants over the next few months, including an Indian restaurant from the owners of Rasoi, Rasa and Kabob and Curry. The restaurant is named Chaska Indian cuisine, scheduled to open this winter next to Bistro 22. Expect freshly baked naan, chicken tikka masala, lamb kebab and vegetarian options including spiced curry dishes. Tropical Smoothie Cafe opened in the newly constructed retail space between Newport Creamery and Bank of America. The sports bar and neighborhood restaurant Tavern in the Square , and Legal Sea Bar , a Legal Sea Foods concept offering casual seafood-centric dining and an outdoor patio, will also both open this fall.
The Chanler at Cliff Walk presents a new dining experience, Cara Restaurant , replacing the Spiced Pear. With views of the beautiful Atlantic Ocean, Cara is home to creative dishes of French, Italian and Spanish influence. In addition to creative dishes, Cara has a fantastic wine list and cocktail menu. Joining Cara is the Cafe at the Chanler. The Cafe is more casual and provides a lively, shared setting for friends and family to enjoy and dine on Mediterranean-inspired dishes as well as signature wine and cocktails. The Cafe offers al fresco dining seasonally on the terrace.
TRANSITIONS
Sweet Indulgence bought a building, which will be a restaurant, bakery and bar all in one in Warwick Conimicut Village. Stay tuned to its Facebook page for updates.
Chez Pascal in Providence is currently undergoing renovations on the Wurst Kitchen side, but it is open for business as usual. Only difference is, now you can order items from the Wurst Kitchen and enjoy them right in the dining room while they renovate. The Wurst Window may or may not be open due to construction, but you can still come in and order inside and take it to go if you wish. Both menus, Chez Pascal and the Wurst Kitchen will be available to all in the Chez Pascal dining room.
CLOSINGS
Ken’s Ramen in downtown Providence closed in late December. From the Ken’s Ramen Facebook page : “We will be relocating to a new playground soon. Location TBA.”
Cook and Brown in Providence closed on December 29 after nine years in business. From owner Nemo Bolin on Facebook: “This restaurant has been an interesting, challenging, difficult, wonderful adventure for the past nine years. I know it hasn’t been a perfect restaurant but a lot of great food, cocktails, and hospitality was served to, and by, some really amazing people over the years. I hope you’ll come in for a visit in the next few weeks.”
4corners Coffee and Pink Pig BBQ are closed permanently and will not be continuing in the New Year at the Warwick location. The restaurant group is working on a new idea for the location.
The Remington House Inn in Warwick closed on November 30 after eighteen years in business.
The Country Inn in Warren abruptly closed this fall.
The Marrocco Group restaurant, Caffe Dolce Vita on Federal Hill, closed for good after twenty-six years in business. The Federal Hill fixture, known for serving breakfast, lunch and dinner in the beautiful al fresco DePasquale Square, served its last guests and closed its doors. Gianfranco Marrocco says in the release: “after twenty-six years, I have decided to downsize and semi-retire, I plan to offer some consulting services within the industry. My goal will be to find a suitable tenant to occupy this premier space in the plaza.” The Marrocco group also owns Hotel Dolce Villa and Blend. The release reports that all team members at Caffe Dolce Vita have been offered new positions among Marrocco’s industry connections.
Merienda Tapas and Wine Bar in Warren closed on Sept. 22. From the Facebook page: “Much like great Jamon, all good things must come to an end. Merienda served its last plates of Jamon, tapas and paella Saturday September 22. We enjoyed bringing a little bit of Spain to Warren. While we are on to a new chapter in our lives we will be keeping our Instagram and Facebook pages open to let you know what’s happening in the future. We thank all of our amazing staff and the wonderful people we met and who supported us in our little endeavor. Gracias!”

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DHABA AT CLARIDGES – LOHRI SPECIAL

admin 0 Comments Best Butter chicken in Delhi , Best Dal Makhni , Best family place , Best food Blogger , Best Mutton in Delhi , chefs , Claridges New Delhi , dhaba , Indian food , North Indian food , Punjabi food , Review on Food , top food blogger in Delhi , Travel blog We are a festival nation. The wide variety of festivals celebrated in India is a true manifestation of its rich culture and traditions. Of the many festivals we celebrate in our country, Lohri is the first to come at the start of the year. Popular belief in Punjab is that it marks the end of peak winters but traditionally it’s related to the harvest of Rabi crops. This festival is quite easy to remember as it always falls on the 13th January by default. Khajoor te Lal mirch Da Paneer Tikka Punjab being an agricultural state, the next day is thus celebrated as their Financial New Year (Makar Sankrant) Every festival is associated with food and that too celebratory cuisine. Lohri is not an exception at all, everything from Sarson ka Saag, Desi Ghee, Butter and Jaggery Rice, Til (sesame) Gajjak, Pop corns and even Non vegetarian food is consumed. Dera Ismail Khan di Mutton Chaamp Ajwain te Peeli Mirch wale Jheenge We as Delhiites being in a city only indulge in good food of all sorts associated with the festival and celebrate the festival with family and friends over a Bon fire. LOHRI SPECIAL THALI Dhaba at The Claridges, New Delhi, being an icon of Punjabi Cuisine has always been a frontrunner in this regard. A Team of talented Chefs like Tikka Manpreet Singh and his team has curated a wonderul menu which is full of rustic ingredients from the Pinds (rural areas of Punjab) and tradition. Dal Palak with Bathua, Fukkan wala Sirka Paneer, Chaunk ke Chhole, Tali Machchi, Mutton Chaamp, Aloo Hara Choliya and even Achari Kathal (Jackfruit). With Team Dhaba Gajrela and Gur Kheer I loved the Hari Moong Dal Palak Bathua to the core, though I am a hardcore meat eater. Dishes which are not so common but are eaten regularly at homes in Punjab have been brought to the dining table. The service is impeccable and outstanding. The menu at Dhaba is iconic and has some dishes which have been so strongly working for a long time and have been a big hit since last many years like the Balti Meat, Mutton Boti, Dal Dhaba to name a few. I highly recommend this place if you are craving for a typical Punjabi style meal which include thebworld favourits Dal Makhni and Butter Chicken of sorts. Share this:

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