Best Indian restaurants in Glasgow

Best Indian restaurants in Glasgow

Share on Facebook Glasgow’s best places to get a curry, as hitlisted in our Eating & Drinking Guide
Home to some of the most venerable curry houses in the country, Glasgow’s love affair with Indian cuisine goes way back, but it doesn’t stand still. New innovations abound, so whether you are looking for some quick and spicy street food, elegant high dining, or just a ruby and a pint of lager, Glasgow has something for you. Here’s our favourites:
Mother India West End trailblazer that continues to innovate after more than 20 years, and is back in stunning form.
Mother India’s Cafe A Glasgow heavyweight that is consistently excellent and exciting across an impressive list of tapas-style dishes.
The Lansdowne The Mother India restaurant group adds some Middle Eastern flavour to classic desi dishes at their latest venture.
Madha Contemporary Merchant City dining spot serving up regional Indian cuisine prepared with passion, skill and artistry.
Obsession of India Welcoming and exceptional service in this newly refurbed eatery. Dishes are light and easily made vegetarian.
Ranjit’s Kitchen Southsider with great sense of place and style of cooking that stands out from the rest, unbeatable value. A 1355 Argyle Street, Glasgow, G3 7RU Wildly popular branch of the Mother India family, offering tapas-style portions of immaculately spiced Indian dishes. B Mother India 28 Westminster Terrace, Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow, G3 7RU High quality, big hitter of an Indian restaurant serving a fusion of Punjabi and British cuisine and living up to its well-earned reputation as one of the best. C 7a Lansdowne Crescent, Glasgow, G20 6NQ The Mother India restaurant group adds some Middle Eastern flavour to classic desi dishes. D 607 Pollokshaws Road, Glasgow, G41 2QG A family-run Southside favourite serving freshly made vegetarian dishes, from the Punjab with love. E 42 Albion Street, Glasgow, G1 1LH Contemporary restaurant in the Merchant City serving outstanding regional dishes from across India. F 25 High Street, Glasgow, G1 1LX Modern venue serving North Indian favourites with an emphasis on fresh, light dishes.

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Food chat: Traditional Indian or personal preference? Cookbook author Priya Krishna says ‘You do …

All About Greek Food May 30, 2019 Orektiko is an appetizing taste into the finest Greek cuisine. We provide you with all sorts of mouth watering news, recipes and videos from the region. Contact us:

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What makes Bangalore’s darshini cafes so special?

Sparkling stainless steel tables, but no chairs to sit on. Swift service, but no waiters. High quality, low pricing. Brief menus, long queues. That’s how a visitor to Bangalore would describe the quick-service cafes typical to the South Indian city. To us Bengalureans, it’s a darshini, where we get our f ill of thick filtered kaapi (coffee in Kannada, the local language), soft fluffy idlis, crispy vadas and crusty masala dosas within half a mile of our home, and priced at less than a dollar.
What are darshinis? Conceptualised in Bengaluru in the 1980s, darshinis were meant to serve quick and wholesome grub to the city’s always-pressed-for-time working middle class. However, as their popularity grew among locals and tourists alike, so did their number, and currently almost 5,000 darshinis dot the 700-square-kilometre city.
A darshini is a great social leveller. It is perhaps the only eating space where a chief executive and a cobbler can be found sharing a table. “Darshini means you just look at the picture and select the food; there is no language barrier there,” says R Prabhakar, 67, a consultant who is said to have conceptualised darshinis. He is referring to the visual menu on display boards that these cafes are known for.
In 1983, Prabhakar designed Cafe Darshini for his brother-in-law, which is believed to be the first such quick-service eatery in the city. It was sold six years later and morphed into Upahara Darshini, one of the most popular outlets serving South Indian food in Bengaluru even today.
During his trips to South-East Asia and Europe, Prabhakar was impressed with the hygienic self-service fast-food chains he saw there and made up his mind to introduce them in his city with a South Indian flavour.
Accordingly, most darshinis have glass doors for their kitchens, to give a view of the cooking process, primarily to exhibit their high standards of hygiene. Every night, the staff use hot water to clean the counters and steel utensils. Spoons and forks remain simmering in a clean vat of hot water throughout, until picked up by a customer to dig into their idli or vada.
How it became popular With the success of Cafe Darshini, hundreds of other people interested in the industry came to Prabhakar for help to open their own outlets. “He modified my cooking equipment for efficiency, stressed on keeping the food additive-free and advised me to keep the kitchen bigger than the eating area,” says BM Dhananjaya, whose darshini South Thindies is well-known for its variety of dosas. “We work on the economies of scale,” says Santosh Prabhakar, R Prabhakar’s son, who opened his first darshini – South Kitchen – in 2011, after being privy to hundreds of conversations on the food industry over the years. “It was time someone in our family opened our own darshini,” he adds.
Like most others, South Kitchen has just four snacks on the menu, apart from tea and coffee. Idli, vada, khara bhath (a savoury snack prepared with roasted semolina seasoned with spices and vegetables) and kesari baat (a sweet made with semolina, sugar and clarified butter) are staples found in every ­darshini. Sticking to a limited menu keeps the inventory small and ensures no wastage, while the low pricing – Vasudev Adiga’s, one of Bangalore’s most successful darshini chains, for instance, serves its snacks for 50 rupees (Dh2.5) – is made up for by high volumes resulting in quick profits.
Masala vada at South Thindies While Prabhakar gave them the darshini format, quick-­service cafes such as Brahmins’ Coffee Bar and SLV Corner Restaurant, have been in existence in Bengaluru since the 1970s. The former is perhaps the oldest in the city, earlier known simply as an “idli hotel”. It started life in January 1965 when Nagesh Rao rented a car garage in Basavanagudi to sell coffee, with buns and pastries outsourced from a city bakery.
Five years later, he added tea, idli, vada, khara bhath and kesari baat to the menu and stopped serving the baked products. Every day – even now – the lentil and rice for the batter are soaked and ground in his home and transported to the cafe where the items are freshly prepared. The concoction for filter coffee is prepared in copper dispensers, and Rao’s 87-year-old wife still makes the chutney for the cafe, while one of his sons is always around to oversee the cooking and customers.
Why people love them Soham Shoney, a food photographer has been doing the rounds of SLV Corner Restaurant in the Basavanagudi neighbourhood since he moved to the city in 2011. “Nothing has changed at SLV in years. The idlis and khara bhath still taste the same,” he says. “And somehow, surprisingly, food is always ready on time.” When the eatery opens at 8am, every item on the menu is available. “I’m never told an item is unavailable because the staff did not arrive on time.”
Podi idli at Adiga’s Shoney visits a darshini ­whenever he wants to grab a quick meal. “It is the best option for someone who wants hygienic, homestyle food served in three minutes or less,” he says. He loves that he can finish a meal and walk out 10 minutes later.
Quick service aside, a darshini’s success ultimately lies in keeping the quality of its food and service consistently stellar. “A darshini-goer looks for accuracy and consistency in his order,” says Santosh. “Everyone is a connoisseur of our cuisine; after all, they eat the same food at home every single day.”

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Hotel Review: Movenpick Karon Beach Resort & Spa, Phuket

– Advertisement – A tropical paradise, and more.
Surrounded by lush tropical gardens and only steps away from the pristine sands of Karon Beach, Mövenpick Resort & Spa Karon Beach Phuket is a 5-star luxury resort that offers guests the ultimate holiday experience.
Perfect for families and groups of friends, each of the resort’s 362 well-appointed contemporary guest rooms, suites and villa s are well equipped to provide the luxury of comfort and privacy amidst idyllic tropical surroundings.
Checking into our Plunge Pool Villa, we were welcomed by a complimentary platter of fruits, which we enjoyed while lounging on the room’s comfortable king-sized bed. Wooden sliding windows opened up onto a private terrace, which featured its very own outdoor plunge pool and rainforest shower. – Advertisement –
Guests will also find a complete suite of amenities, including fluffy bath robes, a massive bathtub and separate shower, lighted makeup mirror, closet, safe, tea and coffee making facilities, a minibar and complimentary Wi-Fi.
Being Villa guests, we enjoyed exclusive access to the tranquil ambience of The Coconut Grove Pool. Families might want to head to the main pool, which has a waterslide, a cool swim-up bar and a children’s mini-pool. Further catering to those travelling with little ones, the resort has a Little Birds Club with a large play area and a range of programmes and recreational activities to keep them entertained.
A not-to-be-missed experience is at The Spa , where one can indulge in pampering treatments to rejuvenate the body and mind. The spa grounds feature three couples’ villas and four elegant individual cabanas for privacy. Let the resident therapists soothe your tired muscles using only the finest spa products, as soon as you arrive from your flight. Meanwhile, gym enthusiasts can work out at the fully-equipped fitness centre located just next to the lobby. MINT restaurant and bar
When it comes to dining, guests will be spoilt for choice with an impressive selection of food and beverage options. With a total of 7 restaurants and bars , there is always something for all tastes, palates and moods. We recommend dinner at OrientAsia, which offers both authentic Indian and Thai cuisine, with dishes such as shrimp pakora served alongside tom kha gai (chicken cooked in coconut milk). Then, adjourn for drinks and light bites at MINT, with live music to wile away the night. Number of rooms: 362 What stood out: Elegant villas with a tropical ambience, beautifully landscaped grounds What we love most : Movenpick’s signature Chocolate Hour, which happens daily at 3PM with free flow of chocolate treats and snacks for guests at the lobby

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Microbrew Fest

Chili Cheese Lover’s Deal @ Wienerschnitzel – Irvine May 30 @ 10:00 am – 11:45 pm Chili Cheese Lover’s Deal Wienerschnitzel Chili Cheese Lover’s Deal (April 29-June 30): After existing as a regional offer only for years, Wienerschnitzel’s Chili Cheese Lover’s Deal becomes a chain-wide phenomenon April 29-June 30. The restaurant’s three most-requested[…] Meat Your Match at Sausage Night @ Hotel Irvine – Irvine May 30 @ 10:00 am Meat Your Match at Red Bar and Lounge’s Sausage Nights Thursdays. Thursdays at Red Bar and Lounge, guests can dig into a selection of incredible specialty sausages, including rattlesnake, wild boar, lamb and blood sausages.[…] Buck-a-Beer Thursdays @ C4 Deli – Santa Ana May 30 @ 11:00 am Buck-a-Beer! Buy any burger and get a Czechvar or White Rascal for just $1 at C4 Deli! 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And all of it topped[…] Mr. Belvedere Thursday @ Ways & Means Oyster House – Huntington Beach May 30 @ 11:00 am Mr. Belvedere Thursday – $8 Belvedere vodka martinis to complement a selection of oysters or other bites like Maryland-style crabcakes and lobster mac n’ cheese. Located by the beach, Ways & Means’ cuisine features fresh, sustainably-caught[…] New Seasonal Menu Items @ Counter (The) – Newport Beach May 30 @ 11:00 am – 9:00 pm New Seasonal Menu Items The Counter announces two new seasonal menu offerings: The Juicy Lucy Burger and the Farm Fresh Salad will be available for a limited time only. 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About[…] Taco Tuesdays & Thursdays @ Hacienda On The Lake – Mission Viejo May 30 @ 11:00 am – 11:45 pm Taco Tuesdays & Thursdays Taco Tuesday from 11:00 am to midnight offering tacos and drink specials. (must order a drink to get the taco special). The same special is now offered on Thursdays as well.[…] Thursday Burger and Beer @ Chapter One: The Modern Local – Santa Ana May 30 @ 11:00 am Thursday Burger and Beer at Chapter One! Burger And Beer Thursday! Grab any one of Chapter One’s 3 mouth-watering burgers and tack on a selected craft beer for only $1 All day and all night[…] Express Lunch @ Gaucho Grill – Long Beach May 30 @ 11:30 am – 4:00 pm For the busy Long Beach executive on the run! Gaucho Grill on Pine Avenue, in the heart of the city’s bustling downtown, is debuting Express Lunch where guests can order and enjoy a wide range[…] Grab & Go Lunch @ Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse – Irvine May 30 @ 11:30 am – 3:00 pm Grab & Go Lunch Davio’s has a rotating menu of items available for Grab & Go during lunch hours. In addition to menu, they have daily soup, sandwich, and salad specials. Call Grab & Go at 949.763.3171 or sign[…] Kids Eat Free! @ Mama’s on 39 May 30 @ 11:30 am – 9:00 pm Kids Eat FREE Thursdays Kids 12 & Under eat FREE all day/night every Thursday (Purchase of Adult Entree Req’d. Kid’s Free Meals from Lil Rascals Menu Only) *Amazing Balloon artist Malinda will be here every[…] Local’s Lunch Thursday @ Rooftop Lounge (The) – Laguna Beach May 30 @ 11:30 am – 3:00 pm Local’s Lunch Thursday Come and join the Rooftop Lounge for its weekly Local’s Lunch Thursday. You will have 25%! off final bill with proof of OC residency. Enjoy the exquisite views and a dog-friendly atmosphere[…] Lunchtime Plates Menu @ The Capital Grille – Costa Mesa May 30 @ 11:30 am – 3:00 pm Lunchtime Plates Menu With your time at a premium during the day, The Capital Grille has made it so a remarkable lunch can easily be yours to enjoy. The Plates menu promises two courses for $20, served[…] Two Course Express Lunch Specials @ Royal Khyber Fine Indian Cuisine – Santa Ana May 30 @ 11:30 am – 2:00 pm Healthy and nutritious two-course Express Luncheon Menu Monday-Friday: 11:30 am – 2 pm. Entrée Specials (Choice of 1) $10 *Selections served with Soup of the Day, Basmati Rice Pilaf, Veggies & Nan Bread SAAG DAL[…] Teacher Nights @ Mama’s Comfort Food & Cocktails – Los Alamitos May 30 @ 3:00 pm – 7:00 pm Every Tuesday at Mama’s on 39, teachers can come in after school for: $3 Mai Tais $3 Margaritas $3 Small Plates 1/2 Off Wine by the Glass Thursday Specials @ Campus JAX – Newport Beach May 30 @ 3:00 pm Campus JAX hosts Thursday Specials with Happy Hour drink prices and menu ALL night long! 3pm to close…$2 off ALL drafts, $3 off ALL wines, $5 deep well, and featured specialty cocktails! For more information, visit www.campusjax.com. Wing Thursdays @ ParkStone – Newport Beach May 30 @ 3:00 pm Wings special valid for dine-in and To Go only– not available in drive-thru. Beer special for dine-in only. Mainstream Pints include Bud Light, Budweiser, and Coors Light. Above specials not valid with other coupons, offers[…]

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Marwari Cuisine, Indian Regional Cuisine

Marwari Cuisine, Indian Regional Cuisine Published on by IndiaNetzone
Marwari Cuisine is the cuisine of the people from the east while princely state of Marwar in Rajasthan . It is primarily vegetarian and offers a fabulous variety of dishes. The cooking style used is mainly based on the natural climatic conditions of the desert land from where the Marwari people have originated.
Features of Marwari Cuisine There are some specific reasons for the use of some specific ingredients . The local people who use various types of spices and herbs . The Marwari Jain people prepare food without using onions , garlic or any ingredient grown under the soil, except ginger and groundnuts.
Delicacies of Marwari Cuisine In Marwari cuisine, the use of gram flour and curds is very common, each tasting dhoklas different from the other. ‘Gatta’, ‘Chilla’, ‘Kadhi’, ‘Pitthor’, ‘Pakodi Ki Sabzi’, all of these have gram flour & cu rds. The flours such as bajra, makai, jawari are used in rotis , porridge, dhoklas and even in raitas. Some of the breakfast dishes are ‘Bajre Ka Khichdaa’, ‘Makai Ki Ghaat’, ‘ Moong Dal Khichdi ’, served during winter .

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Spice Nirvana

By CJ JUNTEREAL
Spices-Pavillion serves Asian cuisine in an elegant and relaxed setting.
Spices at the Peninsula Manila now has a great goat Rogan Josh on its menu. The meat is tender and clean tasting. The sauce is rich, silky, the distinct flavors of the individual spices used in the dish melded together seamlessly so that I couldn’t pick out a single note, just a harmonious melody. Just for information though, among the spices used were cardamom, cloves, and cumin. What makes that Rogan Josh unusual is that Spices’ new Indian Specialty chef Radhey Shayam is a strict vegetarian.
Spices’ Butter Chicken
Shayam says that he manages his diet restrictions by perfecting the sauce before adding the meat or fish. It makes sense because in Indian cuisine, it is the quality of the sauce that elevates a dish. This is particularly true for the Northern Indian cuisine that forms part of Shayam’s culinary background. He was born and grew up in Rishikesh town in the state of Uttarakhand, which is near the Himalayan foothills bordering Nepal and China.
Subtly spiced tandoori prawns
While Spices serves some Southern Indian dishes, most of what is on the menu are the Northern Indian dishes that are the chef’s specialty. Northern Indian cuisine is characterized by its heavy use of whole and ground spices, yogurt, butter, cream, and the tandoor oven. It is influenced by the cuisine of the Mughal Empire. The Mughals ruled India from 1426 to 1857. During that time, they introduced a style of cuisine that was rich with butter and cream, and made use of complex combinations of spices with dried fruits and nuts. Mughlai dishes are layered, rich, subtle, and sophisticated. The cuisine blends the culinary styles of Northern India, Central Asia, and Persia. But while the cuisine developed in the royal kitchens of the Mughal Empire, it eventually made its way into the kitchens and street food of the common folk.
Mango-flavored kulfi, a traditional Indian dessert that is a denser, creamier version of ice cream; Chef Shayam’s Chili Paneer dish, which he created while working in China, beautifully combines Indian and Chinese flavors
We don’t realize it but dishes like Rogan Josh, samosas, biryani, tandoori chicken, chicken tikka , and gulab jamun that we eat when we have an Indian food craving are Mughlai cuisine. When eaten in mediocre Indian restaurants, they are simply greasy and spicy, but when eaten in higher caliber restaurants like Spices they come closer to the refined and luxurious roots of Mughlai cuisine.
Beautifully combines Indian and Chinese flavors
Shayam’s version of murgh makhani (more popularly known as “butter chicken” uses free-range Pamora Farms chickens in a subtly spiced tomato sauce silky with copious amounts of butter and cream. Many online recipes present butter chicken as a quick, easy to cook dish and the end result is often something with a harsh spice taste. At Spices, there’s elegance to the sauce that suggests long, gentle cooking of the spice mixture. The same holds true for the dal makhani .
Other dishes show the application of classic culinary technique to Indian recipes. There’s an outstanding salmon fillet tikka masala on the menu, with perfectly cooked and moist Norwegian salmon that has the typical spice-charred appearance of something cooked in a tandoor oven. I don’t always like tandoori dishes because in the hands of a less skilled chef they turn out dry and burnt outside. But at Spices the dish is executed well and served on a bed of creamy fenugreek based sauce. Tandoori jumbo prawns receive the same treatment, arriving barely charred and juicy, with a tart coriander yogurt and mint sauce on the side.
Chef Radhey Shayam elevates Indian cuisine to its refine and luxurious Mughlai roots
Shayam obviously shines in his execution of vegetarian dishes. Kofta is usually made with meat, but Spices’ Malai Kofta is Shayam’s version made with balls of grated paneer (cottage cheese), potatoes, nuts, and dried fruits. It turns into a savory-sweet “meatball” bathed in spicy tomato sauce. Chili paneer is another example. It’s a cross between Chinese cooking and Indian cooking and brings together paneer cheese, capsicums, and onions stir-fried in a chili glaze. Shayam created this dish while he was working in China where he spent several years in Nanjing and Beijing, where his last position before taking over Spices was at the Peninsula Beijing.
Shayam admits to a weakness for highly spiced vegetarian fare and a love for Szechuan food, courtesy of his years working in China. He wants to introduce more Indo-Chinese influenced dishes into Spices’ menu, and has added a few aside from the chili paneer . One of these is chicken manchurian —a stir-fry of chicken with garlic, ginger, XO sauce, chilies, cashews, and bok choy —that can only be found in India. Soft shell crab chili masalais another one of those delicious hybrids. The soft shell crabs are deep fried before being bathed in a chunky, buttery, mouthtingling, onion-tomato curry sauce. The sauce in itself is hefty enough to spoon over rice and eat as “ ulam .” Shayam’s skill shows in the way that none of the curry sauces taste the same—even if they look similar—as is sometimes the case in generic Indian restaurants.
While Spices is a restaurant that highlights the cuisines of Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Singapore, Sri Lanka, and India, its focus often depends on the nationality of the chef de cuisin e at its helm. For the past couple of years, it’s been Thai food. I’m happy to see a new focus on Indian food, and look forward to more outstanding vegetarian, Northern Indian, and Indo-Chinese dishes from chef Shayam’s repertoire. If the restaurant does a promotion on Thali (an Indian-style meal consisting of a variety of small dishes served on a round platter), it would be the best way to sample Shayam’s cooking. Otherwise, have dinner with a bunch of friends, the bigger the group, the better the opportunity to order a large variety. And please, please forget about this no-carbs nonsense because it would be a crime to eat goat Rogan Josh and soft shell crab chili masala without rice or garlic naan to soak up those richly layered sauces!
Spices at the Peninsula Manila is open daily for lunch and dinner. Call (02) 887 2888, (02) 812 3456, or (02) 810 3456 extension 6754, for reservations.
Email me at cbj2005@gmail.com
Tags: CJ Juntereal , Food , Indian Food , Radhey Shayam , tikka masala

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The real ‘taste’ of travel

May 30, 2019 AGENTS , In-the-Issue
Gastronomic experiences are increasingly becoming the sole reason among many to travel. Ruhani Duggal , Director, Minar Group, speaks about her company’s approach to promoting culinary tourism in the country.
TT Bureau
A country as diverse as India is bound to have an array of culinary choices; from Rajasthan’s dal baati to Kerala’s prawn curry, the options are plenty. Sharing statistics on the rise of food-based tourism in the country, Ruhani Duggal , Director, Minar Group, says that the culinary tourism market will register a CAGR of over 9 per cent by 2023. “We’re now observing a trend where gastronomic experiences are becoming the soul reason of travel. Besides countries like Germany, France and Spain, India is also making its mark on the world’s food map,” she says.
So, how does Minar Group promote food tours? Duggal says that they believe in the premise of innovating and always trying to offer more. “Earlier, good food was a bonus but now, good food is the highlight of a journey. We aim to provide our clients with authentic experiences where they can immerse themselves and actually feel the Indian culture in all its glory. A big hit with our clients has been cooking demonstrations at the homes of local chefs,” says Duggal.
“When travellers are sightseeing, it’s fulfilling when they can explore famous eateries as well such as Karim’s in Old Delhi, serving delicious kebabs since 1913. Our culinary voyages take our clients on a fresh adventure, where their palette is exposed to the finest Indian gourmet available in grand restaurants, hotels, as well as famous local eateries. From traditional Indian thalis to tasty street food or exclusive regional delicacies, they can get a real taste of some of India’s most famous culinary traditions,” she adds.
The concept of culinary tourism allows the traveller to explore and connect with a region and its culture. It is clear that food holds a soft corner in every traveller’s heart. Indeed, a number of tourist destinations have remained popular only because of the food they offer.
Elaborating on Minar’s other initiatives, Duggal adds, “We organise itineraries centred on the type of cuisine our client would like to experience, from Kerala’s curry tours with live, hands-on cooking classes, visits to the Spice Village and unravelling the savoury secrets of Kerala’s cuisine to wine tours with visits to some of India’s best vineyards. Then, there is the option of food walks or food crawls available that we usually do in Delhi, Agra, Jaipur and Goa.” Their clients often get the chance to interact with local chefs as well as reputed chefs from renowned restaurants to grasp the varied nuances of Indian cuisine.
Duggal concludes by saying, “Whether you enjoy cooking or are just a foodie by heart, this is surely something you’ll cherish and relish! After all, food is our common ground; no matter where you’re from, food is a universal experience.”

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How Madhur Jaffrey Changed Indian Home Cooking in the West

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Before Madhur Jaffrey became one of the most celebrated Indian cookbook authors in the world, she found herself at parties and PTA meetings in New York being approached by a surprisingly eager set of Americans. The sari she wore and the complexion of her skin likely made her the closest thing they had to an expert on India. There was one question on everyone’s mind: Could she recommend a restaurant that served good Indian food?
At this point, Jaffrey had the unpleasant task of telling them that such a thing did not exist in New York or anywhere in America. Indian restaurants in the United States showcased almost none of the regional texture of India’s cuisine and seemed to fear their clientele would be put off by dishes deemed too unfamiliar.
“At this, their faces fall and I begin to feel a familiar upsurge of guilt and patriotic responsibility,” Jaffrey, now 85, wrote in 1973 in her first cookbook, An Invitation to Indian Cooking , which featured recipes from her growing years in Delhi. Shop the Story
And so she would invite those people over for dinner and cook for them. When this grew a bit tiring and uneconomical, she started writing down her recipes and handing them out to those curious enough to ask about Indian food. This was among the reasons—which also included a glowing New York Times article from Craig Claiborne—that led from an award-winning acting career to a long culinary career writing more than two dozen cookbooks and appearing on cooking shows in the U.S. and the United Kingdom.
From her very first book, Jaffrey—who was born in Delhi and later moved to London and finally New York—had a simple tenet she followed: “Indian recipes completely adapted to the American kitchen, some easy and simple, others to be mastered with patience and practice.”
46 years later, Jaffrey is revisiting that approach in her latest cookbook, Madhur Jaffrey’s Instantly Indian Cookbook , a collection of her Indian recipes for the electric pressure cooker, the Instant Pot. Jaffrey meticulously tested each recipe, she recently told The Guardian , and the result is Gujarati mango soup, black-eyed peas with mushrooms, Rajasthani red braised lamb, and more. Jaffrey is once again bringing her knowledge of Indian cooking to today’s Western kitchens. The One Piece of Madhur Jaffrey Advice I Live By
But even early in her career, as Jaffrey sought to adapt Indian cooking, she understood that a country of 1.3 billion people wasn’t creating an amorphous cuisine, despite how it was often depicted outside the country. She didn’t want to underestimate the American palate’s ability to embrace food that may be utterly unfamiliar to their own, the way the restaurants of the time did. She also urged the home cook not to feel unmoored by a long list of ingredients—if you can add two spices to a dish, you can add seven just as easily.
As she writes in Instantly Indian , “Many of the recipes have more ingredients than you may be used to using. Do not let that worry you. I did not want to dumb down India’s authentic tastes for this book.”
Jaffrey hails the electric pressure cooker as a quick and easy path to getting dinner on the table. Yet even in her praise, she urges practical caution: “I have to stress that an Instant Pot is not a Magic Pot. It will not, in most cases, take over and cook for you (though sometimes it can).”
The Instant Pot, made by a Canadian company, has inspired scores of cookbooks and a breathless fan following that only seems to be growing. Jaffrey wasn’t the first to see the possibilities the appliance could hold for Indian food. Instantly Indian is among more than a dozen cookbooks offering Indian recipes for the Instant Pot, including the Indian Instant Pot Cookbook by Urvashi Pitre, the woman behind that famed viral butter chicken recipe .
“Of all the genres of electric pressure cooker cookbooks, there are more for Indian food than for any other cuisine,” Melissa Clark wrote for The New York Times last year. “More than keto. More than paleo. More than vegan. There are six separate Indian Instant Pot Facebook groups with a combined membership of almost 200,000.”
Many, including Jaffrey, have ascribed that trend to India’s familiarity with the Instant Pot’s old-school predecessor, the pressure cooker, a common appliance in Indian kitchens. “The idea of a traditional Indian food being prepared with a pressure cooker is not new or alien to me or to any Indian,” she writes in Instantly Indian . “I was drawn to the Instant Pot because it was not only a pressure cooker that allowed me to cook faster but much, much more.” 9 Indian Instant Pot Recipes for Rich, Comforting Flavor Fast
When I first moved away from India, my pressure cooker was one of the first cooking tools I packed, waiting to be used on the other side of the world. Except I hated it (and to be fair, I don’t think it liked me much either). The shrieking whistles always seemed a bit too close together, it leaked all the time, and I misplaced the crucial regulating weight more times than I care to count.
With the Instant Pot, however, it appeared that I didn’t need to worry about any of those things, so I gave it a shot. My first mistake was being ravenously hungry when I pulled the appliance out of its packaging to start making Jaffrey’s simple dal recipe. But I chugged along, reading the manual (as Jaffrey suggested I should) before diving into her book. And just when I couldn’t take another setting or safety warning, it was done. In front of me was a lovely dal that I ladled onto rice for lunch.
Worldwide, the Instant Pot is unlikely to replace the pressure cooker anytime soon. The electric pressure cooker still isn’t easily available in India and it’s roughly four times the price of a standard pressure cooker.
But through Instantly Indian , Jaffrey has kept that promise she made all those years ago—bringing Indian food to Western kitchens with flavors that stay true to her version of the cuisine.
“The foods in this book are very Indian,” she writes. “But you may eat them in as American a way as you like.”

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Verve Weekend Guide

May 30, 2019 Verve Weekend Guide
From Russell Peters’ stand-up show to an exhibition on portraiture, Verve gives you the lowdown on the events that should be on your radar this weekend
ART KM Madhusudhanan, Archaeology of Cinema – 5 KM Madhusudhanan, Archaeology of Cinema – 5
Featuring portraits by a range of diverse artists including Dhruvi Acharya, Atul Dodiya, KM Madhusudhanan, Gieve Patel, Sudhir Patwardhan, Varunika Saraf, and Mithu Sen, this exhibition takes a closer look at the art form of portraiture. Keeping the idea of the portrait fluid, the artists explore various themes like questions of identity, existentialism, trauma and belonging. As the press note aptly says, “The act of making portraits is not only a celebration of the human form and the ability to capture the inner lives of the subjects but an acknowledgement of the fragility of the body and its inevitable mortality”. Outside/In: An exhibition of Portraits is on display at Vadehra Contemporary ( D-53, Block D, Defence Colony), New Delhi until June 3.
Kolkata|Santiniketan, Mumbai
This group show features works by 6 artists who share a connection with the cultural hub of the east, Kolkata. With creations by Somnath Hore, Jogen Chowdhury, Sunil Das, Chittrovanu Mazumdar, Jayshree Chakravarty and Radha Binode Sharma, Kolkata|Santiniketan takes a closer look into the worlds and minds of these artists who hail from there, each with a unique artistic oeuvre. Kolkata|Santiniketan is on display at Galerie Mirchandani + Steinruecke (First Floor, Sunny House, 16/18 Mereweather Road, Colaba), Mumbai until July 20.
FOOD
Vietnamese Cooking Class at Flavour Diaries, Mumbai
Find the perfect balance of tastes and flavours in the cuisine of this Southeast-Asian country. At this cooking class, learn how to conjure up a delectable Vietnamese spread, including griddled broccoli with black sesame peanut salt, sticky caramel chicken or mushrooms with ginger and chilli, and a fragrant chicken or rice noodle salad. The Vietnamese Cooking Class will take place at Flavour Diaries (3rd Floor, Rohan Plaza, 5th Road, Off S. V. Road, Khar West), Mumbai on May 31. Class fee Rs. 4,000 per person.
World On A Plate with Marco Pierre White, Bengaluru
Who wouldn’t like to hang out with the ‘Godfather Of Modern Cooking’ to learn about the world of food? This season, World On A Plate brings celebrated chef Marco Pierre White to Bengaluru, for a 2-day celebration of all things food, with stalls by the 16 finest restaurants in the city. Indulge in masterclasses, photo ops with Marco, installations and even a farmers market with fresh produce, and of course a meet-and-greet with your favourite chefs. World On A Plate will be taking place at The Ritz-Carlton (99, Residency Rd, Shanthala Nagar, Ashok Nagar), Bengaluru, on June 1 & 2.
MUSIC & THEATRE Russell Peters Russell Peters
He’s one of North America’s funniest comedians of Indian-origin, and now he’s coming closer to home to bring in the laughs. Russell Peters comes to India with his Deported tour, that will feature brand new material as well as his signature audience interactions. Bring on the laughter! Russell Peters will perform at the Indira Stadium (Indraprastha Estate, Grand Trunk Road, Near Raj Ghat), New Delhi on May 31 and at NSCI Dome (Lala Lajpatrai Marg, Lotus Colony, Worli), Mumbai on June 2 and 3 at 6.30pm.
Totò Tribute Band, Delhi
One of the most successful Album-Oriented Rock (AOR) bands in the world, Toto is known for their hits like Hold the line , Africa , Stop Loving You and the Grammy-winning Rossanna. Get your fill of their music at this tribute show, where some of Delhi’s best musicians take the stage to belt out Toto’s greatest hits. The Totò Tribute Band will perform at The Piano Man Jazz Club (Commercial Complex B 6/7-22, Block B6, Safdarjung Enclave), New Delhi on June 1 at 9pm.
BOOK OF THE WEEK
The Nine Waves: The Extraordinary Story Of Indian Cricket by Mihir Bose
If you live in India, cricket is something you can’t ignore — it’s almost like a religion for many. Award-winning journalist Mihir Bose’s latest book takes a look at this sport and it’s history, right from the early days it was introduced to the current Virat Kohli era. Trace Indian cricket’s journey, filled with “mesmerizing stars, thrilling moments, great victories, heartbreaking losses and significant turning points”, as Bose tells stories of each “wave” of the sport. A great pick for diehard fans of the gentleman’s game, The Nine Waves is a pleasing read for this World Cup season.

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