Best cuisine for vegetarians?

Best cuisine for vegetarians?

My daughter lives a couple hours away, so we meet halfway, in Cranberry, PA, for dinner every so often. She is a vegetarian, and I usually eat vegetarian when we dine together.
What cuisine do you think offers the best options for vegetarians? IME I would say Indian food fits the bill. We ate at an Indian place last night and there were at least as many vegetarian choices as meat options, and they were all delicious. 1

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A friendly, welcoming atmosphere.

Unable to park in carpark as my van was too high. In saying this there was plenty of parking in the street, only a few feet away from the entry door to the motel.
So close to Beaumont Steet, where there’s many lovely food venues to choose from; I chose yummy Indian cuisine. Such a lovely, quiet, calming place to rest before a busy next day. The dining room was so light (big windows) & spacious (tables not crammed in).
Stayed in May 2019

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[INTERVIEW] GOPIZZA discovers allure of single serving

Lim Jae-won, founder and CEO of GOPIZZA, poses for a photo at a store branch in Sangsu-dong, Seoul, May 20. Courtesy of GOPIZZA
By Kwak Yeon-soo
Lim Jae-won, 30, is the founder of a pizza startup that now has over 30 franchise stores across the nation. He started the business in 2016 by selling pizzas from a food truck, and then moved to open up shops and make a foray into India.
In April, he was listed on the Forbes 30 under 30 in Asia. Surprisingly, however, he confessed that he never wanted nor intended to become an entrepreneur.
“Honestly, I never imagined myself starting a business because I’m not the type of person who likes challenging the status-quo. I’ve always wanted to work at large global companies,” Lim said.
“Nonetheless, the idea of GOPIZZA struck me one day all of a sudden when I wanted a pizza but thought it was too big and expensive for a single person. I also didn’t want to wait a long time for it.”
He wanted to make single serving pizza that could be easy to make and fast to consume. So he started selling small pizzas from a food truck nearby the Han River and at festivals.
“The reason I sold pizzas from a food truck was to prove that I, a nerdy guy, can get tough too and have great business ability,” he said. “But again, I never thought I’d become a full-time businessman. It was GOPIZZA that I wanted to bet my youth on, not just any business.”
Lim graduated from Singapore Management University and got a master’s degree in engineering from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology.
For one year, he continued to operate the food truck while keeping his day job at an advertising firm.
“Of all things, it was not safe to stick my hand into a 500 degree oven for hours, constantly moving the dough around so it didn’t burn,” he said. “That’s why I focused the next two years making a ‘Goven.'”
The Goven is a patented oven that cooks single serving pizzas to perfection in three minutes. The oven improves efficiency and allows employees to spend time on less tedious work.
Lim attributed GOPIZZA’s whirlwind expansion to the Goven. By end of 2018, GOPIZZA received over 2 billion won ($1.6million) in investments and surpassed 500 million won in monthly sales in April.
All pizzas are made and served on the spot, while the dough is produced at a separate processing factory.
“As for the dough, processing is more important than mixing. That’s why we produce them at a factory,” he said.
Lim explained that GOPIZZA products are fairly easy to make from simple recipes and ready-made ingredients, and this differs the brand from other relatively cheap pizzas.
“The store is easy to manage because you just have to add toppings and put it in the Goven. The process can be done by a small number of people who are not well-trained,” he said.
Indian customers pose for a photo in front of a GOPIZZA store branch in Bangalore, India, May 17. Courtesy of GOPIZZA
Regarding the company’s foray into India in April, he said there is great potential overseas because pizza is a universal food.
“We decided to enter the Indian market because pizza is popular in India. Naan, which is similar to bread, and paneer, which is similar to cheese, are ubiquitous in India’s native cuisine. Tomatoes and sauces are also prevalent everywhere.” Lim said.
He also pointed out that a middle class is emerging in India as some rural areas are seeing increasing prosperity and the country has about 65 percent of its population below the age of 35.
“India is the second largest market for the U.S. pizza brand Domino’s, which means there are a lot of possibilities for smaller players to share the market,” Lim said.
Lim said the business environment in India is much better compared to Korea, citing that Indians have immense pride in operating restaurants.
“There are about 10 people working at the India branch in Bangalore, including two employees from GOPIZZA headquarters and four part-time workers,” Lim said.
“The city’s per capita gross domestic product is about $8,000, and since the store is located near Tech Village, most of our customers are coders, developers and consultants,” Lim said.
Speaking of his future goals for GOPIZZA, Lim said he is planning to expand retail channels by lending Govens or supplying pizza recipes to pubs.
“Compared with January 2018, December monthly sales grew over 25 times. This year, we expect to reach 5 to 7 billion won in annual sales, from 1.5 billion won last year,” Lim said.
GOPIZZA also aims to reach 100 outlets this year and make the best pizza possible. “I personally don’t like stiff competition. I don’t plan to win over other major pizza franchises. I just want to focus on making the best pizza in the world,” he said.
yeons.kwak@koreatimes.co.kr More articles by this reporter

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Being British

But like, where are you from from? When I started secondary school, I was introduced to a poet Benjamin Zephaniah with a classic pre-teen favourite, Talking Turkeys, which is about being kind to your turkeys this Christmas. Another addition in my life to small things that led me to being a vegetarian (but that’s a blog for another day).
Whilst enjoying this poem, I came across another by Zephaniah. Perhaps one of the most important poems I’ve ever read in my life in terms of finding my own identity; The British (Serves 60 Million) .
Growing up mixed race is never always easy, and endless questions of your ethnicity and nationality are interrogated. It gives you a feeling of not belonging, because if your country won’t accept you and your ethnicity’s countries won’t accept you, then who will? Questions of who or what you are start to haunt you and when the inevitable question of “where are you from?” is asked, you suddenly realise that even you have no idea. A situation perhaps best summerised in this meme:
However, whilst analysisng this poem with some students recently, it suddenly hit me. This is probably one of the most perfect ways to describe what it actually means to be British. Since the dawn of British civilisation, the evolution has always been through interactions with other races through travel, conflict, and even marriages. Be it Romans, Normans, and Vikings from ancient history or from the old Empire, Windrush, and current migration to the UK. The culture of being British is just that, a culture.
Sure, it is a nationality, after all, my passport says British. However, it doesn’t just mean coming from the United Kingdom and it’s slightly more complicated than being English. To be English simply means to be from the country of England, but it is absolutely possible to consider yourself British without being born on the British Isles. Whilst there are many examples of this, perhaps my favourite is the late Queen front man Freddie Mercury: born in Zanzibar to Indian parents – both countries belonging to the British Empire, moving to the UK aged 18 and being unbelievably patriotic to a country that often rejected him, defining his identity as British, not as either of the other countries to which he could also claim to belong.
This can also be said for second generation children; somebody born in the UK but to foreign parents. These could be countries which belong to a community of ex-British colonies, known as the Commonwealth, such as children from British India, like my mother and her family, or from a country that is largely outside of historical foreign involvement from the UK, for example Poland. Coming closer to home, equally there is the conflict of identity between the English and the Scottish and the union of the two countries under the island and laws. Whilst there are cries for more devolution and even movements for independence, the two countries are still connected under the umbrella of being British.
There are many countries that have been mentioned in this poem which shows that being British is not one simple fixed thing, rather it is a nationality and an identity that is both without a territory and is different for everyone. The interesting thing for me is what a British culture actually means. The poem mentions one phrase in particular that I believe completely sums up nicely what the culture and identity results in; a melting pot. The make up of the UK and the culture of the UK do not really match. The population is still overwhelmingly white at 87.2%, and yet there is still a heavy influence from non white communities in the country that have completely reshaped it. The obvious example is probably food; after all, the most popular cuisine in the UK is Indian food but the most popular dish is an Indian inspired dish created in Glasgow – the tikka masala. The most popular dish in British reflects perfectly that melting pot of cultures, unified mostly by a shared language; English. A personal English that has been embellished with foreign cultures and little accents here and there which makes it English, yes, but a unique brand of English, perfectly mirroring their unique brand of Britishness.
It can be very easy for woke millennials to have a negative view of being British – tying it to the connotations of colonialism and propelling the fear of a very misunderstood concept of nationalism. There is often a rejection of pride in being British, and anything or anybody that demonstrates anything on the contrary can often be met with judgement and disgust. Sadly, what these people don’t understand is that perhaps for them as they seek their new identities as being not British, but rather, European, is that they are neglecting the people with whom they already have a community. This is not to say that we mustn’t be friends with Europe or anyone else for that matter, and perhaps British identity is evolving into a more Pan European identity amongst young people. However, we do already have an identity and that is British, something that a lot of us cling to because it’s all we can take, and it means everything.
I consider myself part of the furniture

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8 Great Ways to Have Fun in Washington DC

Featured › 8 Great Ways to Have Fun in Washington DC 8 Great Ways to Have Fun in Washington DC Categories: Featured
It is seemingly a rite of passage to visit Washington, DC. Reluctantly, it seems for many people, visiting DC means checking off a list item, making sure the family sees the monuments appearing on US money, and zipping through a White House tour before heading off to the next location.
Fun in Washington DC, of course, is a subjective thing. Some people crave nightlife while others may rejoice in fine arts. Washington, DC is a growing foodie scene with many small and interesting neighborhoods.
I have lived in Northern Virginia, 20 miles from the Nation’s Capital for over 20 years and here are some of my favorites. 8 Great Ways to Have Fun in Washington DC Washington DC Museums
Do you enjoy free museums? Washington, DC has over a dozen world class museums, which are ABSOLUTELY FREE to visit. In fact, the top two most visited museums in the United States are in Washington, DC (and are free): Natural History Museum and Air & Space Museum .
Those are amazing museums but I prefer other Smithsonian properties —including American Indian Museum , Portrait Galley , Renwick Gallery , and Hirschhorn Sculpture Garden — Botanic Garden and Folger Shakespeare Library . If you really want to drop some money, visit Newseum and Spy Museum .
check out the current exhibit at Renwick Galley DC National Zoo
Also part of the Smithsonian is the National Zoo which is also free, FREE, FREE. If you happen to visit on a scorching hot summer day, overhead water misters will keep you cool. Try to visit, though, in the spring, when there are new baby animals. Visit DC Outdoors
Washington, DC ranked #8 on a list of US cities for outdoor enthusiasts and interestingly #1 for commuters who walk or bike to work. On a mild day, it will be hard to avoid, but fun to join, the hordes of people running along the National Mall paths. It is two glorious miles between the U.S. Capitol Building and Lincoln Memorial.
Rock Creek Park is a magnificent city park and is actually a US National Parks property. Whether you run, bike, or drive Rock Creek Parkway, take time to admire the unique bridges (they are all different). things to do in Washington DC: running on the National Mall Eat at DC Food Trucks
Hungry yet? While you can find great food all over Washington, DC—and I am happy to help you further research that topic—food trucks are something DC does very well. On most weekdays, there are usually 15 food trucks near Union Station and another 15-20 food trucks in McPherson Square. There are other plazas and areas, including along the National Mall on weekends, where groups of food trucks gather. In addition to typical Mexican, Italian, and American foods, I have had Laotian, Ethiopian, Cajun, Jamaican, Vietnamese, Venezuelan, Peruvian, and other cuisines from DC food trucks.
A useful resource for food truck listings in DC (and also Northern Virginia and Maryland) is Food Truck Fiesta . places to eat in Washington DC: food trucks For more info about DC food trucks, please read 8 Great Washington DC Food Trucks Senate Cafeteria
For a fun (and relatively inexpensive) dining experience, have breakfast or lunch at the Dirksen Cafe . While this is the place where most of the Congressional workers dine, it is also open to the public. The salad bar is an especially nice deal. I like to make my own salad and it usually costs half the price of nearby take out places. Every year in the middle of November, Dirksen serves traditional Thanksgiving food for lunch. Shall we meet there then? This past summer, I walked past Bernie Sanders on the sidewalk outside of the building entrance, so I can truly say that you never know who you will see there.
Did you know you can also eat at cafes inside the Supreme Court and Capitol Building? Hang With Albert Einstein
One of my favorite fun things to do in Washington, DC is to visit the Albert Einstein statue . Did you even know such a statue existed? The twice life-size statue of Einstein is located on the grounds of the National Academy of Sciences across the street from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. This, my friends, is a classic DC selfie spot. Climb in his lap, put your finger in his nostril or ear, play with his mustache. Send me a copy! places to see in Washington DC: Albert Einstein statue Georgetown
The oldest part of Washington, DC is Georgetown , where you will find gorgeous row houses, old cobblestones streets, and a world class university (walk around and find the on-campus cemetery!). I have seen visitors from all over the world walking up and down the Exorcist Stairs. fun places to visit in Washington DC: Exorcist Stairs, Georgetown For more info about Georgetown, please read 8 Great Things to Do in Georgetown Explore the World
Nearly every country in the world has an embassy in Washington, DC . These embassies are staffed with people from those countries so simply walking into the building you can met someone from Romania, Yemen, or Togo. During the month of May every year, the Passport DC program offers events and fun from dozens of embassies. The EU (European Union) open house is particularly popular, and is being held on May 14th this year. Washington DC embassy row Embassy of Togo in Washington, DC
How do you have fun in Washington DC?
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8 Great Ways to Have Fun in Washington DC was first published on McCool Travel on 8 March 2016. Share this McCool Travel article:

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Indian Shrimp Market Report 2019: Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecasts 2011-2018 & 2019-2024

DUBLIN , May 24, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — The “Indian Shrimp Market: Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecast 2019-2024” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.
The Indian shrimp market reached a volume of 0.67 Million Tons in 2018
Shrimp refers to an invertebrate marine animal with an elongated body which is often used as a food product. It is regarded as nutritious since it contains proteins, selenium, antioxidants, phosphorus, magnesium, copper, iron and vitamin B12. Some of the health benefits associated with shrimp consumption include weight loss, fighting aging, improving bone health, decreasing menstrual pain and preventing cardiovascular diseases. In India , fisheries represent a significant economic activity and offer vast growth opportunities. This is due to the country’s varied resources and potentials.
Easy availability of shrimp and their high nutritional content represent the major growth-inducing factors. They form an important part of various cuisines being one of the most traded seafood species. With the rise in demand for disease-free and healthy shrimps, India has become one of the largest shrimp exporters to the US and the European Union.
One of the key trends witnessed in the Indian market is the expansion of the food industry owing to the rising demand for ready-to-eat food products. This is supported by forces such as rapid urbanization, changing lifestyles, hectic work schedules and increasing working women population. As a result, the shrimp market in India is witnessing a healthy growth. In addition to this, a rising demand for shrimp worldwide has positively influenced shrimp imports from India .
Moreover, increasing health consciousness amongst consumers, escalating disposable incomes and improving standards of living remain some of the other major factors which are further augmenting the demand for shrimps.
Looking forward, the market is expected to reach a volume of 1.13 Million Tons by 2024, exhibiting a CAGR of around 9% during 2019-2024.
Key Topics Covered: 1 Preface 2 Scope and Methodology 2.1 Objectives of the Study 2.2 Stakeholders 2.3 Data Sources 2.4 Market Estimation 2.5 Forecasting Methodology 3 Executive Summary 4 Introduction 4.1 Overview 4.2 Key Industry Trends 5 Global Shrimp Industry 5.1 Market Overview 5.2 Market Performance 5.3 Wild Shrimp Vs Farmed Shrimp 5.4 Market Forecast 6 Global Wild Shrimp Industry 6.1 Market Overview 6.2 Market Performance 6.3 Market Forecast 7 Global Farmed Shrimp Industry 7.1 Market Overview 7.2 Market Performance 7.3 Major Shrimp Producing Countries 7.4 Major Shrimp Consuming Countries 7.5 Market Breakup by Species 7.6 Market Breakup by Shrimp Size 7.7 Exports 7.8 Market Forecast 8 Indian Shrimp Industry: Market Insights 8.1 Evolution of the Indian Shrimp Industry 8.2 India’s Position in the Global Shrimp Industry 8.3 India’s Shrimp Product Portfolio 8.4 Regional Insights 8.5 India’s Shrimp Exports 9 Indian Shrimp Industry: Value Chain 9.1 Broodstock Sourcing 9.2 Indian Shrimp Feed Industry 9.3 Shrimp Farming 9.4 Shrimp Processing 9.5 Shrimp Processing: Competitive Landscape 9.6 India’s Competitiveness with Other Countries 9.7 Government Support and Subsidies 9.8 Potential of India as a Market for Processed Shrimps 9.9 SWOT Analysis 9.10 Market Outlook 9.11 Key Market Drivers and Success Factors 10 Market for Value Added Shrimp Products 10.1 Types of Value-Added Products 10.2 Processing Requirements 10.3 Infrastructure and Skill Requirements 10.4 Domestic Demand 10.5 Export Market 10.6 Market Outlook 11 Indian Shrimp Industry: Key Players 11.1 Capacities of Key Players 11.2 Profiles of Key Players 11.2.1 Nekkanti Seafoods 11.2.2 Avanti Frozen Foods Private Limited 11.2.3 Devi Sea Foods Limited 11.2.4 Falcon Marine Exports Ltd. 11.2.5 BMR Group 11.2.6 Baby Marine Eastern Exports 11.2.7 Sandhya Marines 11.2.8 Apex Frozen Foods Limited 11.2.9 Ananda Aqua Exports Private Limited 11.2.10 Crystal Sea Foods Private Limited 11.2.11 Citrus Alpha Marine LLP 11.2.12 Jaya Lakshmi Sea Foods Private Limited 11.2.13 Ifb Agro Industries Limited 11.2.14 S.S.F Limited 11.2.15 A.M.Fisheries 11.2.16 JRJ Sea Foods India Private Limited 11.2.17 Anjaneya Sea Foods 11.2.18 Kings Infra Ventures Limited 11.2.19 Kadalkanny Frozen Foods 11.2.20 The Waterbase Limited 11.2.21 Geo Sea Foods 11.2.22 Abad Fisheries Private Limited 11.2.23 K V Marine Exports 11.2.24 Liberty Group of Seafood Companies 11.2.25 Zeal Aqua Limited 11.2.26 Frontline Exports Private Limited 11.2.27 Jude Foods India Private Limited For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/h9pqbs
Research and Markets also offers Custom Research services providing focused, comprehensive and tailored research.
Media Contact:
Research and Markets Laura Wood , Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716
View original content: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/indian-shrimp-market-report-2019-industry-trends-share-size-growth-opportunity-and-forecasts-2011-2018–2019-2024-300856484.html
SOURCE Research and Markets

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Indian Shrimp Market Report 2019: Market is Expected to Reach a Volume of 1.13 Million Tons by 2024, Exhibiting a CAGR of Around 9%

May 24, 2019 07:50 ET | Source: Research and Markets
Dublin, The “Indian Shrimp Market: Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecast 2019-2024” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering. The Indian shrimp market reached a volume of 0.67 Million Tons in 2018Shrimp refers to an invertebrate marine animal with an elongated body which is often used as a food product. It is regarded as nutritious since it contains proteins, selenium, antioxidants, phosphorus, magnesium, copper, iron and vitamin B12. Some of the health benefits associated with shrimp consumption include weight loss, fighting aging, improving bone health, decreasing menstrual pain and preventing cardiovascular diseases. In India, fisheries represent a significant economic activity and offer vast growth opportunities. This is due to the country’s varied resources and potentials.Easy availability of shrimp and their high nutritional content represent the major growth-inducing factors. They form an important part of various cuisines being one of the most traded seafood species. With the rise in demand for disease-free and healthy shrimps, India has become one of the largest shrimp exporters to the US and the European Union. One of the key trends witnessed in the Indian market is the expansion of the food industry owing to the rising demand for ready-to-eat food products. This is supported by forces such as rapid urbanization, changing lifestyles, hectic work schedules and increasing working women population. As a result, the shrimp market in India is witnessing a healthy growth. In addition to this, a rising demand for shrimp worldwide has positively influenced shrimp imports from India. Moreover, increasing health consciousness amongst consumers, escalating disposable incomes and improving standards of living remain some of the other major factors which are further augmenting the demand for shrimps. Looking forward, the market is expected to reach a volume of 1.13 Million Tons by 2024, exhibiting a CAGR of around 9% during 2019-2024. Key Topics Covered:

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Eat Up! 20 Excellent Picture Books and Board Books About Food

Jen Sherman 05-24-19
I love reading about food in books (some of the best parts of the Famous Five series by Enid Blyton were the descriptions of food). It turns out this applies not only to the books I read for myself but also to the books I read with my 18-month-old toddler. I have discovered some wonderful, gorgeous children’s books (for a range of ages) about food and cooking. Here are some of my favourites. These are fabulous for introducing new types of food and cuisines to children, and getting them involved in cooking and food preparation. At the most basic level, these picture and board books about food teach them what IS food and therefore is acceptable to put in their mouths, and what should definitely stay far away from their mouths. Yes, child, I’m talking about that blue crayon. Not food. Board Books About Food For Babies and Toddlers (0–3) Cook in a Book: Tacos! Illustrated by Lotta Nieminen
This is an interactive recipe board book and I love and adore it. The book lets toddlers and young children ‘cook’ by themselves, without a stove or any mess. The book begins with the ingredients, the equipment needed, and then continues with step by step instructions. At each step, there are tabs to pull or wheels to spin so the young reader can really pretend cook. This book is part of the Cook in a Book interactive recipe series which also includes Pancakes! , Pizza ! , and Cookies! . First Book of Sushi by Amy Wilson Sanger
This is part of Sanger’s World Snacks series, and I love all the books in the series. This one is a lovely introduction to Japanese cuisine, with fun rhyming text and cheerful illustrations. Touchwords: Food by Rilla Alexander
I love everything in the touchthinklearn and touchwords series, and this might very well be my favourite simply because it’s about food. These board books are very tactile and encourage touching and exploring. This book shows the food as well as utensils or equipment commonly associated with the food — so the rice page has a pot showing rice cooking, as well as a wooden spoon and some cilantro. The best page is the pie page, because hey, who doesn’t love pie? Can You Eat? By Joshua David Stein, Illustrated by Julia Rothman
A delightfully whimsical look at what is food and what isn’t: ‘A pea, a pear? A bee, a bear?’ The artwork is gorgeous enough to be reproduced as a print to be hung in a kitchen. A little silly, a lot fun, and very, very pretty. Yummy Yucky by Leslie Patricelli
With Patricelli’s distinctive style, this is a great board book that also contrasts foods with not-foods. Blueberries are yummy, but blue crayons are yucky. Sandwiches are yummy, sand is yucky. Soup is yummy, soap is yucky. This is one of my toddler’s favourites and I try to use that to my advantage: ‘Don’t put that crayon in your mouth! It’s yucky, remember? Like it says in your book!’ Exotic Fruit by Huy Voun Lee
I love this book because it introduces kids to fruits that are a little more unusual than the typical apples, bananas, and oranges. There are nine exotic fruits covered in the book, and each fruit has a gorgeous illustration, a brief description, what other name it might be known as (and how to pronounce it), and where it comes from. Picky Eaters by Ellen Jackson, Illustrated by Amy-Clare Barden
This one isn’t about human food, technically. It’s about animals and the special diets they have. In particularly, it is about picky eaters — the animals that only eat one specific thing. Like koalas and eucalyptus leaves, and pandas and bamboo. This is a lift-the-flap board book so I would suggest only showing it to toddlers who are gentle with flaps and books. Nom Nom Opposites by Forrest Everett
A cute board book about opposites that uses food to illustrate the concept. For example, the ‘hot’ page has drawings of a hot dog, a bucket of fried chicken, and a corn on the cob. On the opposite page, the ‘cold’ page shows lemonade, an ice block, and watermelon. I highly approve of using food to teach non-food concepts (my husband says I’m very food motivated). My Very First Book of Food by Eric Carle
Another interactive board book, this time with flaps. The pages of the book are split horizontally down the middle. Along the top pages are various animals, and along the bottom are different kinds of food. The goal is to flip back and forth and match the animal to its food. My favourite part of this book are the pictures, done in Carle’s distinctive style, recognisable to anyone with a passing familiarity to books like The Very Hungry Caterpillar and Brown Bear Brown Bear What Do You See? Picture Books ABout Food For Early Elementary (4–8) The Ugly Vegetables by Grace Lin
A young Chinese American girl wishes her mother grew pretty flowers like the rest of their neighbours in their garden, and not the ugly, twisty vines with fuzzy leaves and prickly stems. When it’s harvest time, though, and her mother turns those ugly vegetables into a delicious soup that attracts all the neighbours, she learns that beauty and purpose can come in all shapes. Bee Bim Bop by Linda Sue Park
A fun rhyming picture book about a little Korean girl who helps her mama make dinner. We see the process of grocery shopping, food preparation and cooking, and finally the whole family sitting down to eat. I love how it’s a celebration of the family meal, and it’s a great one to read aloud. Hot Hot Roti for Dadaji by F. Zia and Ken Min
Another picture book that highlights a different culture and its food traditions, this time about India. This is about a young Indian American boy whose grandparents come to stay and he becomes inspired to make roti, an Indian bread. A lovely book about food, Indian culture, and the relationship between grandparents and grandkids. Can I Eat That? By Joshua David Stein, Illustrated by Julia Rothman
This is the picture book version of the Can You Eat? board book (or rather, the board book is a simplified version of this book). Questions about food are posed and then answered, like, ‘can I eat a potato, a tomato, a tornado?’. No, you can’t eat a tornado but you can eat tonnato, an Italian sauce made from tuna; tournedos, a French steak; or a tostada, a Mexican dish. There is a lot of fun word play accompanied by bright, cheerful illustrations. A great book for those who love food, words, and learning new things. What’s Cooking? By Joshua David Stein, Illustrated by Julia Rothman
Similar to Can I Eat That? , this book poses questions and offers answers that are quirky and whimsical. The focus here is more on food preparation: ‘If I fry a strip of potato, and a slice of tomato, can I fry a scoop of gelato?’ (The answer is yes, yes you can. Fried ice cream is delicious.) The book is full of interesting facts and philosophical food questions for kids. A truly delightful book. Chicken Soup, Chicken Soup by Pamela Mayer, Illustrated by Deborah Melmon
A little girl is half Jewish, half Chinese, and her two grandmothers each make a version of chicken soup. Which is the ‘right’ chicken soup? I love this picture book for highlighting the tensions that can arise when two cultures and two traditions merge, but also shows how those tensions can be resolved. I also love this book because I think my daughter can easily be the protagonist in this story since she too has one Jewish grandmother and one Chinese grandmother (and both types of chicken soup are delicious, as I can attest). Soup Day by Melissa Iwai
Another soup book! What can I say? I like soup. This book follows the day of a little girl and her mother as they shop for the ingredients for soup, make the soup, and finally eat the soup. I love how this breaks down the process of making soup and shows how cooking and grocery shopping can be a simple pleasure. This is also now available in board book format. No Kimchi for Me! by Aram Kim
This is a charming book about family, food, and Korean culture. Yoomi hates spicy, stinky kimchi, so her older brothers call her a baby. She decides to try and overcome her disgust of kimchi and tries to eat it with other things (like cookies and pizza) to no avail. Grandma comes to the rescue and together, Yoomi and Grandma make a kimchi pancake, which they ALL eat. The author also includes her mother’s kimchi pancake recipe in the end, which looks delicious. Pretend Soup and Other Real Recipes by Mollie Katzen and Ann Henderson
A recipe/cookbook for kids, aimed at children between the ages of 3 and 8. There are instructions for the grown-up helping, simple and bright drawings that illustrate each step of the method for the kids, and these are all recipes that require minimal adult intervention. A great way for getting kids to participate in the kitchen. Later Elementary (8–12) Julia, Child by Kyo Maclear, illustrated by Julie Morstad
This is a fictional picture book loosely based on Julia Child and it is a delightful celebration of food and childhood. Friends Julia and Simca create a feast for grown-ups that helps them rediscover the joy and innocence of childhood. United Tastes of America by Gabrielle Langholtz, with drawings by Jenny Bowers and photos by DL Acken
This is one of my favourite books of 2019. It is a stunningly beautiful book, the kind that makes you appreciate the book as an object: hardcover, heavy paper, beautiful illustrations and photographs throughout. Langholtz takes you on a journey through the 50 states of America, with a recipe from each state, as well as information and fun facts about food from each state (what kinds of foods are grown there, eaten there, by whom, and how it has changed over time). This books makes me want to travel all over the country, eating.
What are your favorite picture and board books about food? Sign up to The Kids Are All Right to receive news and recommendations from the world of kid lit and middle grade books. Thank you for signing up! Keep an eye on your inbox. By signing up you agree to our Terms of Service We have 5 copies of My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite to give away to Book Riot readers! Go here to enter for a chance to win, or just click the image below. Good luck!

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India Food Tours With City Visit

Tourism , Rajasthan Food Tour Packages , Rajasthan Tourism India Food Tours With City Visit
A food tour is one of best ways to explore cuisine, sights and culture . It is a city tour, food walk, sightseeing, urban exploration and culinary tour of India city in one package. The eating part of the food tour include sampling different varieties of street food from various places in the itinerary. Food is all that you can eat, but we insist you to have a little of everything and enjoy the variety. We place a lot of stress on hygiene and only trusted and safe vendors which serve good and hygienic food are on our list. Apart from the usual and must see, the food tours cover some under-rated and less explored places of India which very few people know about. there are some food items which are staple food for almost all across the country. Rice and various types of Indian bread like, chappatis, rotis, naan, and puris are consumed along with side dishes of pulses, vegetables, meat, yogurt and pickles. The curries and gravies are the ones that mainly differ in each zone.

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2019 Rhode Island Summer Guide: Fairs and Festivals

2019 Rhode Island Summer Guide: Fairs and Festivals Jan Flanagan Journal Staff Writer Saturday May 25, 2019 at 9:30 PM
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Gaspee Days Arts & Crafts Festival: Narragansett Parkway, Warwick. gaspee.com. More than 100 artisans, community groups and nonprofits, live music, food court, children’s activities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Zink Alloy performs, 1-4 p.m.
Virtu Outdoor Arts Festival: Wilcox Park, 44 Broad St., Westerly. 596-7761, oceanchamber.org. Arts and crafts festival featuring the works of professional artists and artisans from around the country; live entertainment. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Rain or shine.
27
Gaspee Days Arts & Crafts Festival: Narragansett Parkway, Warwick. gaspee.com. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Black & White performs, 1-4 p.m. See May 26 for details.
Lincoln Memorial Day Parade/Post Parade Celebration: Chase Farm Park, 669 Great Rd., Lincoln. Parade with floats, bands, Vets for Vets steps off at Smithfield Avenue on extended route to Chase Farm Park for celebration with food trucks, live music, cartoon characters including Paws Patrol, superheroes, antiques. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. facebook.com/lincolnmemorialdayparade.
North Smithfield Heritage Fair: Heritage Hall, Kendall Dean and Church Common, 101 Greene St., Slatersville. 447-6394, nsha@nsheritageassn.org. Antiques, photo exhibits, Civil War reenactors, church tours, touch-a-truck, National Park Ranger walking tours, children’s activities, food, drinks, more. 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
JUNE
1
Shady Lea Open Studio Tour: Shady Lea Mill, 215 Shady Lea Rd., North Kingstown. 290-7548, themillatshadylea.com. Meet and view the works of painters, potters, weavers, jewelry designers, wood workers, fiber artists, sculptors, collagists, spa product crafters and more, wander through the historic mill, enjoy refreshments. Acoustic performances. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free.
2
Gaspee Days Blessing of the Fleet: Rhode Island Yacht Club, 1 Ocean Ave., Cranston. gaspee.com. Bring your boat to be blessed and participate in the Gaspee Days parade of boats, or just come and watch from the lawn. Pub and kitchen open at the yacht club. 11 a.m. Free.
Sea Glass Festival: The Windjammer Surf Bar, Mariner Room, 321 Atlantic Ave., Westerly. Sea glass and ocean-themed creations, from martini glasses to house decor to jewelry and more. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free entry.
Strawberry Festival: Rehoboth Antiquarian Society, Carpenter Museum, 4 Locust Ave., Rehoboth. (508) 252-3031, carpentermuseum.org. Festivities, strawberry shortcake and strawberry lemonade, historical crafts and demonstrations including candle-dipping, rope-making, pottery, more, inside and outside the museum (weather permitting). 1-5 p.m. Free admission.
6
PVD Fest: downtown Providence. first-works.org. Cultural performances, music, dance, discussions with artists, food. Details at website.
7
British Motorcar Festival: Independence Park, 419 Thames St., Bristol. britishmotorcarfestival.com/visitor-guide. Street party. 6-9 p.m. Details at website.
8
Artisans by the Bay Craft, Garden and Botanical Show: Elks Lodge lawn, 141 Pelham St., Newport. ladedart@gmail.com. Jewelry, plants and herbs, handcrafted wooden items, handmade soaps, local honey products, jams and jellies, soy candles, hand-blown glass, fine art, garden/lawn items, shell art, fashion scarves, Greek olive oils. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission.
British Motorcar Festival: Colt State Park, Hope Street, Bristol. britishmotorcarfestival.com. Classic motorcar show; British attire competition. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $10, children 11 and younger free. Free parking. No pets or bicycles allowed.
Gaspee Days: Warwick venues. 781-1772, gaspee.com. 5K foot race, Narragansett Parkway, 9:30 a.m. Parade, along Narragansett Parkway to Broad Street, Cranston, 10 a.m. Colonial Encampment, Pawtuxet Park, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Free.
South County Museum Family Picnic: 115 Strathmore St., Narragansett. 783-5400, southcountymuseum.org. Old-fashioned fun through themed activities, crafts and games. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Museum admission $12, seniors $10, children 6-12 $5, children 5 and younger/military families free.
Spindle City Fest: Narrows Center for the Arts, 16 Anawan St., Fall River. (508) 324-1926, narrowscenter.org. Artist market, holistic makers, beer/wine tasting, free fitness classes, psychic readings, food. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free admission.
SVF Foundation Visitors Day: SVF Foundation, 152 Harrison Ave., Newport. 848-7229; info@svffoundation.org. Visitors can learn about heritage breed livestock through self-guided tours; meet the SVF laboratory, veterinary and animal-care staff; visit Chip, a rare Tennessee fainting goat born from a frozen embryo; and learn about other endangered breeds of livestock. Watch live cryogenics and sheep-shearing demonstrations, shop SVF’s selection of farm products and heritage-breed meats. Free admission. Julian’s Omnibus, a double-decker food truck serving local heritage-breed burgers and snacks, will be on-site. Parking available at Fort Adams State Park with free trolley service 9 a.m.-3 p.m. No parking at SVF.
9
Gaspee Days. Pawtuxet Park, 2 East View St., Warwick. 781-1772, gaspee.com. Sunday in the Park, noon-4 p.m., with children’s games, live performances, music from 12:30-3:30 p.m. Burning of the Gaspee, 4 p.m. Colonial Encampment continues until 4 p.m. Free.
11
Block Island Film Festival: Water Street district, near the Old Harbor waterfront, Block Island. blockislandfilmfestival.org. Featuring feature films, short films, student short films, screenplays. Registration, Ballard’s porch at the beach, 9-11 a.m. Schedule subject to change. Visit the website.
12
Block Island Film Festival: Water Street district near the Old Harbor waterfront, Block Island. 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m. See June 11 for details.
13
Block Island Film Festival: Water Street district near the Old Harbor waterfront, Block Island. 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m. See June 11 for details.
14
Block Island Film Festival: Water Street district near the Old Harbor waterfront, Block Island. 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m. See June 11 for details.
Secret Garden Tours: Newport. 439-7253, secretgardentours.org. Self-guided walking tours of more than a dozen private gardens and properties in the historic Point District. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $20 advance; $25 day of; good for any or all days of tours (June 14-16). Tickets can be purchased on tour day at the Newport Visitor Center, 23 America’s Cup Ave., or picked up at the tent in Storer Park, 32 Washington St. Rain or shine.
15
Blackstone River Theatre Summer Solstice Festival: Blackstone River Theatre, 549 Broad St., Cumberland. 725-9272, riverfolk.org. Four stages featuring Celtic and world music, dance and culture. Session tent run by Bob Drouin and and Tir Na Nog Irish Dance. Children’s activity area, 40 food and craft vendors. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. $15, 65+ $13, children 6-13 $5. brownpapertickets.com/event/4200940. Rain date June 16.
Block Island Film Festival: Water Street district near the Old Harbor waterfront, Block Island. 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m. See June 11 for details.
Borders Farm family event: 31 North Rd., Foster. bordersfarm.org. Working farm, museum and agricultural education center. Providence Brigade Band (Civil War-era brass band), flag-retirement ceremony, draft horse demonstration, family fun. Farm open from 8 a.m.; band performs at 2 p.m.
Providence Preservation Society Festival of Historic Houses: 831-7440, ppsri.org, providencehousetour.com. Self-guided private house tours in the Paterson Park Neighborhood, in the Blackstone Park Historic District, Providence. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Festival preview party June 13. Go to website for details, ticket information.
Quononoquott Garden Club Jamestown Garden Tour: Tour of many private Jamestown gardens. Guidebooks and tickets available at 141 Southwest Ave., Jamestown, after 9:30 a.m. on tour day. $20 advance, $25 day of. Tickets may be purchased (cash only) at Baker’s Pharmacy, 53 Narragansett Ave.; Grapes & Gourmet, 9 Ferry Wharf; or Secret Garden, 12 Southwest Ave., all in Jamestown. 487-1789.
Rhode Island PrideFest and Illuminated Night-Time Parade: South Water Street, Providence. prideri.com. Festivities include vendor area, full bar, main stage, Hasbro Kids Zone. Illuminated Night Parade kicks off at sundown and winds through downtown to the parade-reviewing stand in front of the Providence Performing Arts Center. 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
Secret Garden Tours: Newport. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. See June 14 for details.
Strawberry Festival: Smith’s Castle, 55 Richard Smith Drive, North Kingstown. smithscastle.org. Strawberry shortcake, kids’ puppet shows, children’s activities including free pony rides, craft vendors, food booths, tours of the 1678 house led by docents in Colonial dress, three Colonial gardens, free soil testing, walking trails on Mill Cove, entertainment by pianist/vocalist Jack Picard. $10, 65+/military with ID $8, children 6-12 $5, children 5 and younger free. Noon-4 p.m. Rain date June 16.
16
Open House/Family Event: Smith-Appleby House Museum: 220 Stillwater Rd., Smithfield. Old-fashioned Father’s Day event includes guided tour of the historic homestead by costumed docents; croquet, lawn bowling and other historical outdoor games, watermelon and lemonade. 1-4 p.m. Event free. House tour $5 donation, children free.
Providence Preservation Society Festival of Historic Houses: Guided walking tours of the Paterson Park Neighborhood in Providence, including its green spaces. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. See June 15 for details.
Secret Garden Tours: Newport. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. See June 14 for details.
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Strawberry Festival: Fayerweather House, 1859 Mooresefield Rd., Routes 138 and 108, Kingston. 789-9072, facebook.com/FayerweatherCraftGuild. Fresh strawberry shortcakes made with freshly picked local berries, choice of beverage. Noon-3 p.m. $5.
20
Crave RI: Dunkin’ Donuts Center, 1 La Salle Square, Providence. (800) 745-3000, ticketmaster.com/CharityClassic. Food festival featuring samples from more than 100 restaurants, breweries and wineries, as well as cooking demonstrations. 5:30-10 p.m. $23. In conjunction with the CVS Health Charity Classic golf tournament.
21
Crave RI: Dunkin’ Donuts Center, 1 LaSalle Square, Providence. 5:30-10 p.m. See June 20 for details.
Newport Flower Show, “Audubon — Artistic Adventures”: Rosecliff, 548 Bellevue Ave., Newport. 847-1000, newportflowershow.org. Lifestyle expert India Hicks, gardening expert Laura LeBoutillier, floral and garden designs, horticulture exhibits, special events, vendors. Front lawn of Rosecliff transformed into an aviary of both real birds and birds made of plant materials, with vibrant gardens inspired by pink flamingos and blue herons, circular gardens based on Audubon’s paintings of birds, topiary peacocks made entirely of flowers, more. 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $25, $20 advance; children 6-17 $6; 5 and younger free. Opening night party, 6-9 p.m.
22
Narragansett Art Festival: Veterans Memorial Park at The Towers, 35 Ocean Rd., Narragansett. wakefieldrotary.org. Works by more than 100 New England artists. 9 a.m.-8 p.m.
Newport Flower Show, “Audubon — Artistic Adventures”: Rosecliff, 548 Bellevue Ave., Newport. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. See June 21 for details.
Summer Craft Fair: First Congregational Church, Bristol. 253-7288, fccbristol.org. Jewelry, sea-glass items, wood working, knitted items, bird baths, pet goods, other vendors. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Strawberry Thanksgiving: Tomaquag Museum, 390 A Summit Rd., Exeter. 491-9063, tomaquagmuseum.org. Cultural celebration including traditional native music, dance, games, native vendors, tours of the museum and more. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Opening ceremony 10:30 a.m. Free with museum admission: $6, elderly/college students $5, children $3, children 5 and younger free.
WaterFire: Waterplace Park, Providence. waterfire.org. Full lighting, from sunset to half past midnight. Free.
23
Narragansett Art Festival: Veterans Memorial Park at The Towers, 35 Ocean Rd., Narragansett. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. See June 22 for details.
Newport Flower Show, “Audubon — Artistic Adventures”: Rosecliff, 548 Bellevue Ave., Newport. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Champagne & Jazz Brunch, 11 a.m. See June 21 for details.
28
Our Lady of Czenstochowa Polish Festival: OLC School grounds, 222 MacArthur Blvd. and Route 117, Coventry. 821-7991. Games, raffles, children’s area, dancing, cow chip bingo, Polish and American food. 5-10 p.m. Dance music by The Maestro’s Men. Free admission.
29
Gardening With the Masters Tour: University of Rhode Island Master Gardeners. 874-2900, web.uri.edu/mastergardener/tour. Each of the 26 gardens were created and maintained by certified URI Master Gardener volunteers. Tour-goers can ask questions, take pictures and notes, and enjoy the gardens. Register online to receive a tour guidebook by mail; this serves as a two-day admission ticket for the June 29 and 30 tour. Guidebooks are required for admission to tour gardens without exception and can be purchased for $25 each or in multiples of two for $22 each. Children 17 and younger free. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Our Lady of Czenstochowa Polish Festival: OLC School grounds, 222 MacArthur Blvd. and Route 117, Coventry. 5-10 p.m. Dance music by The Eddie Forman Orchestra. See June 28 for details.
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Gardening With the Masters Tour: University of Rhode Island Master Gardeners. See June 29 for details.
Our Lady of Czenstochowa Polish Festival: OLC School grounds, 222 MacArthur Blvd. and Route 117, Coventry. noon-4 p.m. Dance music by The Maestro’s Men. See June 28 for details.
JULY
4
Ancients and Horribles Parade: Chepachet. glocesterri.org. Irreverent parade steps off at 4 p.m. near Town Line Farm, 45 Walt’s Way, Glocester/Burrillville line.
Arnold Mills Fourth of July Celebration: Nate Whipple Highway, Route 120, Cumberland. 333-1381 arnoldmillsparade.com. Road Race (51st annual) 9 a.m.; parade (93rd annual) 11 a.m.
Bristol Fourth of July Celebration: The parade — part of the oldest Fourth of July celebration in the nation — steps off at the corner of Chestnut and Hope streets, in Bristol, and ends on High Street between State and Bradford streets. 10:30 a.m.
Fourth of July Antiques Show: Meeting House lawn, Tiverton Four Corners, 3850 Main Rd., Tiverton. 624-6200, fourcornersarts.org. New England dealers showcase their wares. Some items and artifacts may have been produced when lots for this village were first laid out around the Mill Pond by Joseph Taber in 1710. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Admission $7.
South County Museum Chick Hatch: 115 Strathmore St. 783-5400; southcountymuseum.org. Visitors will have a chance to see eggs hatching in the incubator, hold day-old chicks, see the Rhode Island Red Heritage flock on the living history farm and learn about raising chicks of their own. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $2, under 1 free.
13
United Congregational Church Summer Fair & Road Race: 1 Commons, Little Compton. 635-8472, ucclittlecompton.org. A 4.8-mile road race kicks off Summer Fair Day, which offers crafts vendors, a book sale, white elephant, silent auction, bake sale, lobster lunch, food court, music, children’s games including an obstacle course and dunk tank, dog show. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids’ race start at 8:30 a.m.
Wickford Art Festival: Wickford Village, Brown Street, North Kingstown. 294-6840, wickfordart.org. Juried selection of more than 200 arts exhibitors, kids’ corner, wandering musicians, food trucks. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Street parking; complimentary shuttle service from Wilson Park, 201 West Main St., or the former Wickford Elementary School, 99 Phillips St., to the village center.
14
SummerFest 2019: North Kingstown Town Beach, 10 Beach St., North Kingstown. summerfestri.com. Outdoor concert, food trucks. 3-8 p.m. $35 advance, $40 gate. Open seating. Bring chairs, blankets, coolers, picnic. Parking in beach lot and Town Hall lot; shuttle provided.
Wickford Art Festival: Wickford Village, Brown Street, North Kingstown. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. See July 13 for details.
16
Open House/Pirate Event: Smith-Appleby House Museum, 220 Stillwater Rd., Smithfield. Costumed pirates guide guests on a journey to make and race pirate ships, go on a treasure hunt and walk the plank. Wear your favorite pirate garb and possibly be chosen as an honorary pirate by the captain of the Jolly Roger. Free family event. 1-4 p.m. House tours available for a $5 donation, children free.
20
Arts and Artisans Summer Festival: Mill Pond Shops, 3998 Main Rd., Tiverton. Works by more than 60 local and regional artists, live music, food trucks. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Kenyon’s Summer Tour Weekend and Kayaking Event: Kenyon’s Grist Mill, 21 Glen Rock Rd., Usquepaug (Richmond/South Kingstown). 783-4054, kenyonsgristmill.com. Free tours of the mill. Sample free jonnycakes and local coffee. Kayak along the Queen’s River. Kayak rentals first come, first served; no reservations. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
WaterFire: Waterplace Park, Providence. waterfire.org. Celebration of 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission and man’s first steps on the moon. Full lighting, from sunset to half past midnight.
21
Kenyon’s Summer Tour Weekend and Kayaking Event: Kenyon’s Grist Mill, 21 Glen Rock Rd., Usquepaug (Richmond/South Kingstown). 10 a.m.-5 p.m. See July 20 for details.
1920s Celebration, Antique Cars and Summer Picnic: Hearthside House, 677 Great Rd., Lincoln. 726-0597, hearthsidehouse.org. Gathering of antique cars on the museum’s grounds. Docents and car owners dressed in 1920s-style attire, jazz ensemble playing Roaring ’20s music and tours of the c. 1810 house featuring exhibits and fashions from the 1920s. Visitors invited to bring a picnic lunch and enjoy the afternoon on the grounds or next door at Chase Farm, where the one-room schoolhouse will be open for tours 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Stop by the blacksmith shop to see hand-forging demonstrations. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $10, youth 10-17 $5.
24
Blueberry Festival: Fayerweather House, 1859 Mooresefield Rd., Routes 138 and 108, Kingston. 789-9072, facebook.com/FayerweatherCraftGuild. Baked goods made with freshly picked local berries, choice of beverage. Noon-3 p.m. $5.
25
Blessing of the Fleet Festival: Memorial Square (next to the Towers), Ocean Road, Narragansett. narragansettlionsclub.org. live entertainment, children’s activities, amusements and rides, beer tent, wine, food vendors, music by The Heavy Rescue Band. Festival hours: 5-10 p.m.
26
Blessing of the Fleet Festival: Narragansett. 10-Mile Road Race starts at Narragansett High School, South Pier Road, with finish at The Towers, Ocean Road. Start times: people with walkers 5 p.m.; people in wheelchairs 5:45 p.m.; runners 6 p.m. Music by Roger Ceresi’s “All-Starz.” Festival hours: 5-11 p.m. See July 25 for details.
Hellenic Festival: St. Spyridon Greek Orthodox Church, 390 Thames St., Newport. hellenicfest.org. Greek culture, food, pastries, wine, music, dancing, children’s activities. 4 p.m.-1 a.m. July 26-28.
27
Blessing of the Fleet Festival Port of Galilee, Salty Brine State Beach parking lot, Narragansett. Parade of commercial and recreational vessels, blessing by clergy and prize judging. Noon. Music by Steve Smith and The Nakeds. Educational demonstrations 10 a.m. Festival hours: 2-11 p.m. See July 25 for details.
Cultural Survival Bazaar: Tiverton Four Corners, 3852 Main Rd., Tiverton. tivertonfourcorners.com. Indigenous artists, cooperatives and their representatives from around the world sell their work. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Hellenic Festival: St. Spyridon Greek Orthodox Church, 390 Thames St., Newport. Noon-2 a.m. See July 26 for details.
28
Cultural Survival Bazaar: Tiverton Four Corners, 3852 Main Rd., Tiverton. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. See July 27 for details.
Hellenic Festival: St. Spyridon Greek Orthodox Church, 390 Thames St., Newport. hellenicfest.org. Noon-6 p.m. See July 26 for details.
AUGUST
2
Charlestown Seafood Festival: Ninigret Park, 5 Park Lane, off Route 1A, Charlestown. 364-3878, charlestownrichamber.com/seafoodfestival.html. Seafood hotline 364-4031. All types of local seafood available for purchase, plus other food. Amusement rides, midway, rock-climbing wall, arts and crafts, animal shows and live music. Noon-11 p.m. $10, 65+/military with ID $7, children 10 and younger free. Ride all rides $25. Rain or shine.
3
Charlestown Seafood Festival: Ninigret Park, off Route 1A, Charlestown. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Fireworks 9 p.m. Rain date Aug. 4, 9 p.m. See Aug. 2 for details.
Family Pet Advocates Paws 4 Art Fair: Courtyards, 3980 Main Rd., Tiverton. 624-8682, familypetadvocates.org. Pet-themed artwork by New England artists and artisans, silent auction items, local musicians, children’s activities. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Leapfest: 3119 Ministerial Rd., South Kingstown. leapfest.com. Watch teams jump out of planes during this international static line parachute-training event and competition sponsored by the Rhode Island Army National Guard. Designated area for spectators on the edge of the drop zone. Free. Check website for time. Rain date Aug. 4.
River Glow: 37 Main St., downtown Westerly. 596-7761, oceanchamber.org. Floating bonfires illuminate the Pawcatuck River. Hayrides through town, live music in three locations, dancing, children’s activities, shopping specials, more. 7-10 p.m.
WaterFire: Waterplace Park, Providence. waterfire.org. 6th annual “C is for Cure” event marking fight against hepatitis C in Rhode Island. Full lighting, from sunset to half past midnight. Free.
4
Charlestown Seafood Festival: Ninigret Park, off Route 1A, Charlestown. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. See Aug. 2 for details.
6
Rhode Island International Film Festival: film-festival.org. Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 1 Avenue of the Arts, Providence. Opening night 7 p.m. $15. With gala, $50. Festival runs Aug. 6-11 at venues in Providence, Woonsocket and Warwick. Film screenings $10.
7
Rhode Island International Film Festival: See Aug. 6 for details.
8
Norman Bird Sanctuary Beach Bash: Third Beach, Third Beach Road, Middletown. normanbirdsanctuary.org. Beach party features live music, dancing in the sand, food trucks, kayaking/paddle boarding, seining activities for kids looking for local fish and maybe some tropical fish brought in on the Gulf Stream. Bring your own beach chairs, blankets, beach tables. 6-9 p.m. $25, under 21 $10; includes two beer and wine tickets per adult; additional tickets available for $5.
Rhode Island International Film Festival: See Aug. 6 for details.
9
CumberlandFest: Diamond Hill Park, 4097 Diamond Hill Rd., Cumberland. cumberlandfest.org. Food vendors, arts and crafts, sports celebrities, entertainment. 6 p.m.-midnight.
St. Bartholomew’s Church Feast & Festival: 297 Laurel Hill Ave., Providence. 944-4466, stbartschurchri.org. Amusement rides, games, Italian and American food, cash raffle, nightly musical entertainment. 5-10 p.m.
Rhode Island International Film Festival: See Aug. 6 for details.
10
CumberlandFest: Diamond Hill Park, 4097 Diamond Hill Rd., Cumberland. Performance by James Montgomery; fireworks. 10 a.m.-midnight.
Narragansett Indian Tribe 344th annual August Meeting/Pow Wow: Narragansett Indian Church grounds, Old Mill Road, off Route 2, Charlestown. 364-1100, narragansettindiannation.org, crazycrow.com. Oldest recorded powwow in North America. Traditional Narragansett cuisine, modern American food, native jewelry, music, artwork, books and traditional Native American dancing. Gates open 10 a.m. $6, children $2.
Rhode Island Blues Festival: Mulligan’s Island Events Center, 1000 New London Ave., Cranston. 464-8855, mulligansisland.com. Gates open at noon. Free.
St. Bartholomew’s Church Feast & Festival: 297 Laurel Hill Ave., Providence. 5-10 p.m. See Aug. 9 for details.
Rhode Island International Film Festival: See Aug. 6 for details.
11
CumberlandFest: Diamond Hill Park, 4097 Diamond Hill Rd., Cumberland. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. See Aug. 9 for details.
Narragansett Indian Tribe 344th annual August Meeting/Pow Wow: Narragansett Indian Church grounds, Old Mill Road, off Route 2, Charlestown. Gates open 10 a.m. See Aug. 10 for details.
Rhode Island Blues Festival: Mulligan’s Island Events Center, 1000 New London Ave., Cranston. See Aug. 10 for details.
St. Bartholomew’s Church Feast & Festival: 297 Laurel Hill Ave., Providence. See Aug. 9 for details.
Rhode Island International Film Festival: See Aug. 6 for details.
14
Washington County Fair: Fairgrounds, 78 Richmond Townhouse Rd. (Route 112), Richmond. 782-8139, 377-2418, washingtoncountyfair-ri.com. Agricultural events and shows, exhibits and displays, tractor and horse pulls, farm museum, daily country music concerts, midway, kiddie area (separate fee for ride tickets, games), food contests and concessions. Gates open 8 a.m.-10 p.m. Most vendors and activities open at 10 a.m.; last shuttle to offsite parking leaves at 11 p.m. No dogs or personal pets allowed except authorized service animals. Admission is $11 for adults and includes all activities except rides and midway. Children 10 and under admitted free. Free parking.
15
St. Rocco Church Feast & Festival: 927 Atwood Ave., Johnston. 942-5203. Home cooking featuring doughboys, pasta and meatballs, pastries. Live entertainment, beer garden, rides, games. 6-10:30 p.m.
Washington County Fair: 78 Richmond Townhouse Rd. (Route 112), Richmond. See Aug. 14 for details.
16
St. Rocco Church Feast & Festival: 927 Atwood Ave., Johnston. 6-10:30 p.m. See Aug. 15 for details.
Washington County Fair: 78 Richmond Townhouse Rd. (Route 112), Richmond. See Aug. 14 for details.
17
St. Rocco Church Feast & Festival: 927 Atwood Ave., Johnston. 6-10:30 p.m. Fireworks. See Aug. 15 for details.
Washington County Fair: 78 Richmond Townhouse Rd. (Route 112), Richmond. See Aug. 14 for details.
WaterFire: Waterplace Park, Providence. waterfire.org. Showcase of innovation, with a technology job fair. Full lighting, from sunset to half past midnight. Free.
18
St. Rocco Church Feast & Festival: 927 Atwood Ave., Johnston. 1:30-10 p.m. Religious procession after 11 a.m. See Aug. 15 for details.
Washington County Fair: 78 Richmond Townhouse Rd. (Route 112), Richmond. See Aug. 14 for details.
21
Open House/Victorian Picnic: Smith-Appleby House Museum, 220 Stillwater Rd., Smithfield. Experience a typical Victorian afternoon on the lawn. Wander through the grounds as authentically dressed reenactors enjoy their own picnic and explain the finer points of a Victorian picnic. Learn the history of Victorian fans and fan language and view period examples of fans in the museum collection. Bring your own family picnic basket and play lawn games. Free. 1-4 p.m. House tours available for a $5 donation, children free.
25
Civil War Encampment: Hearthside House, 677 Great Rd., Lincoln. 726-0597, hearthsidehouse.org. Display of civilian and military life off the battlefield. Listen as reenactors participate in scenarios of life in 1864, from ladies discussing women’s rights to children playing with simple toys to men cleaning their guns before heading out to the next battle. Events indoors and on the lawn. Tours of the museum with Civil War artifacts on display. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $10, youth 10-17 $5.
Providence Folk Festival: Rose Larisa Memorial Park, Roger Williams National Memorial, 282 North Main St., Providence. providencefolkfestival, hearinrhodeisland.com. National, regional and local folk, acoustic and singer/songwriter acts on two stages. Noon-6 p.m. Free. Bring a picnic lunch or dinner. Well-behaved dogs welcome.
30
Rhythm & Roots Festival: Ninigret Park, Old Post Road, Charlestown. 783-3926, rhythmandroots.com. Music on four stages, two covered dance floors, Cajun and zydeco to blues, swing and everything in between for all ages. Also, camping, food, family festival. 1 p.m.-midnight. See website for pricing.
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Rhythm & Roots Festival: Ninigret Park, Old Post Road, Charlestown. 1 p.m.-midnight. See Aug. 30 for details.
SEPTEMBER
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Rhythm & Roots Festival: Ninigret Park, Old Post Road, Charlestown. 1 p.m.-midnight. See Aug. 30 for details.
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Dragon Boat Parade and 20th Anniversary Celebration: Festival Pier, Tim Healey Way, Pawtucket. 724-2200, blackstonevalleytourismcouncil.org. Dragon boat parade and celebration, with six new boats gifted from Taiwan. 6 p.m.
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Green Festival: Stillwater Mill Center, 75 Tinkham Lane, Harrisville. Focus on green energy conversation, recycling and wellness. Local musicians, beekeeping, Master Gardeners, children’s activities, food trucks, farmers’ market. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Spindle City Fest: Narrows Center for the Arts, 16 Anawan St., Fall River. (508) 324-1926, narrowscenter.org. Artist market, holistic makers, beer/wine tasting, free fitness classes, psychic readings, food. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free admission.
Taiwan Day Festival (20th Anniversary): Festival Pier, Tim Healey Way, Pawtucket. 724-2200, blackstonevalleytourismcouncil.org. Entertainment, food trucks, dragon boat races featuring local and national teams competing on the Seekonk River. 8 a.m.
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