Best Buffet Places for Mother's Day – What's New Bali

Best Buffet Places for Mother’s Day – What’s New Bali

Best Buffet Places for Mother’s Day Image by KSAT 4 hours ago share It’s Mum (and Grandma’s!) big day, so start her Mother’s Day off on the right note with table full of sweet and savory treats. However, if your cooking skill is out of the question, then you can give your Mother her well-deserved break this time by taking her out to one of these places for a long and leisurely buffet brunch. ps: As Mother’s Day falls this coming Sunday, you and your Mum might enjoy some special treats! 1. The Cafe – The Mulia Nusa Dua The Cafe presents innovative dining, with seven cooking theatres each featuring International culinary favourites. Delight as each of our chef’s engage in the preparation of signature dishes with meticulous detail to satisfy your palates. The Mulia’s chefs prepare authentic dishes from selected regions, such as fresh sashimi, oysters, and sushi rolls, Chinese barbequed duck and pork, Thai salads, exotic Indian butter chicken or naan, as well as rich flavour of Korean cuisine and a la minute pastas for those that desire Western cuisine. The dessert section is abundant with chocolate fondues, homemade ice cream and sorbets, cakes and mousse. The Cafe| The Mulia, Mulia Resort & Villas – Nusa Dua Bali| Jl. Raya Nusa Dua Selatan Kawasan Sawangan| Call +62 361 3017777 2. Kwee Zeen – Sofitel Bali Nusa Dua Beach Resort Interactive boutique dining with authentic market feel. Open for 24 hours serving Pan Asian cuisines. Modern and comprehensive buffet and a la carte menu are available. Inspired by street-side hawker market in Asia, the buffet offers exciting cuisine from Japan, China, Thailand, India, to local Indonesian bests. Enlightened by the warm and cozy interior with pretty garden views. Kwee Zeen| Sofitel Bali Nusa Dua Beach Resort, Kawasan Pariwisata, ITDC Lot N5, Nusa Dua, Bali 80363| Call: +62 361 8492888 3. Feast – Sheraton Kuta Bali Resort The open kitchens and the live-action food stations of Feast, a restaurant in Kuta, display an abundance of fresh ingredients creating authentic global cuisines. Signature martinis and outdoor lounges create an informal and relaxed atmosphere. Join the revolutionized Bali brunch scene with its market brunch themed “Sip, Savor and Shop”. With market shopping, you are invited to pick out some groceries to take home, or purchase premium items such as cheese and cold cuts, fresh seafood and even kitchenware! The brunch also comes with live entertainment, a children’s play area with several fun activities, and dog care. Feast| Sheraton Bali Kuta Resort| Jl. Pantai Kuta, Kuta| Call +62 361 846 5555 4. Brazilian BBQ Aussie Located in, this award winning restaurant offers sensational food. With all you can eat BBQ package, you will enjoy delicious, mouth watering, and tender meats. The menu comprises of specially meat cuts and delicious salads. The concept of the restaurant consist of more 10 different meat cuts including a salad bar & soup station with a variety of salads & sauces to choose from. The Brazilian Aussie BBQ grill also offers customers the option to completely prepare their own meal size. All you can eat at a set price for both adults and children. Definitely for a meat lover! Beraban Square| Jl. Beraban, Seminyak, Bali, Indonesia| Call +62 819 9909 4104 5. Anarasa – Movenpick Bali Settle into urban style restaurant for breakfast, lunch or dinner, Anarasa faces the tropical garden and offers a wide array of Asian delicacies, artisanal Balinese specialties, international favourites, as well as a Robata grill. With breakfast buffets, set menus for lunch and themed night buffets every Wednesday, Friday, and Sunday with live entertainment, you can look forward to an exciting culinary journey. A dedicated children’s dining zone means your little ones will have a lovely time too. Anarasa| Movenpick Hotels & Resorts| Jl. Wanagiri No.1, Jimbaran, Bali 80362, Indonesia| Call: +62 361 4725777

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Nibbles, Votes and Wins – The Zomato Premier League Scorecard

As the IPL season grips the nation, the only place that matches the excitement of the playground and perfectly pairs with cricket evenings on the couch is the Zomato app. With Zomato’s own Premier League, everyone not only gets to savour their favourite food but also predict the winner of that day’s match and win rewards.
It has been raining predictions on ZPL– so far, 14 million predictions have been registered from 224 cities, helping ZPL players, aka Zomato users, to save ₹ 150 million collectively. In view of the ongoing zealous in-app matches, Zomato released a ZPL scoreboard ; below are some of the interesting nibbles, votes and wins.
Match summary:
Chennai Super Kings (CSK) leads the overall Vote Board with 20% predictions made in its favour. Mumbai Indians (MI) follows the suit with 18%. Out of 224 cities where Zomato is present in India , CSK is the most voted team in 189 cities. Its biggest supporter is Madurai. While Delhi is the biggest foreteller with 1.5 million predictions, Warangal has made the most correct predictions so far It’s interesting to note, Rajasthan has predicted more for CSK than Rajasthan Royals(RR) while, Jammu & Kashmir is cheering for MI Tripura has a cosmic connection with Sunrisers Hyderabad and boasts of 100% win ratio when voting for it. Coming to some of the most interesting matches in IPL and ZPL :
The match on March 23rd between CSK & RC witnessed the highest correct-prediction-rate: 100% correct prediction from 22 emerging cities in India. The SRH vs RR match on April 27th received 500,000 predictions- the highest so far. So far, both the matches (April 13th & 20th) between RR & MI have shown Rajasthan winning on the field but losing with their fans in the app . Rajasthan predicted that MI would win both times, while RR changed the course of the match both times and won. Talking about food – favourite teams battled on-screen, favourite meals delivered off-screen; watching matches have never been happier for cricket enthusiasts!
North Indian cuisine is the most popular choice and the perfect partner for all the steaming match contests in the living room. It’s sweet victory indeed for the Zomato users as they win rewards too! No wonder, ZPL cashback winnings are mostly going to dessert orders.

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Vacacy for Jr. Chef / Cook | Chef Bowral Area – Bowral | 1217487186

Location:
Southern Highlands
Duties
The Jr Chef / Cook will be responsible to oversee the overall operations of the restaurant
kitchen, under the direction of the Executive Chef
It is the primary responsibility of the assistant chef /cook to perform basic food preparations
Ensures to maintain quality and proper presentation of food Communicates with chefs, management, employees and guest efficiently.
Required:
Must have a minimum of 6 months of working experience in Indian cuisine . Ability to work in a high-pressure environment.
Extensive skill, knowledge and experience in all aspects of the kitchen operation, interpersonal service skills, organization skills to plan time effectively.
Excellent customer service skills. Work varied shifts, including weekends and holidays.
Able to effectively communicate in English, in both written and oral forms.

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Why Papad’s popularity in Indian cuisine won’t fade away

Why Papad’s popularity in Indian cuisine won’t fade away 06/05/2019
Ramana Maharshi, whose 140th birth anniversary falls this year, was at 29 already a sadhu when his mother came to stay. Sri Ramana warned her not to expect help from him, yet one day she asked him to help make appalams, the South Indian papads which families prepared and dried during summers. He refused to interrupt his meditations, but perhaps to compensate composed a song linking papad-making to a spiritual journey.
The song Appalam ittup Para accurately describes the making of appalams, including local details like the use of the juice of pirandai, a cactus-like creeper (Cissus quadrangularis), and the seasoning of jeera, pepper and hing.
Just as the mind must pound away at the self, papad dough must be kneaded and “then with the rolling pin of Shanti, roll out on the platter of evenness”. Finally the self, like papads, must be “fired by the flames of wisdom’s enquiring… thus you can have the papad and eat it too!”
It is no surprise that papads are used for philosophy in India. They are a uniquely Indian product, made and consumed across nearly every region of the country, and appreciated abroad as an excellent Indian innovation. “It is not bad, even to a novice,” says Hobson-Jobson, the compendium of British Indian terms, in an entry for Popper Cake. In 2017 the Wiggles, an Australian children’s music group, released the Pappadum Song video, which consists of them just singing that one word, and crunching papads.
In 1915, when cash and commodities were collected to support Indian soldiers in the Great War, the Times India (ToI) reported “tins of papads” among the donations. In 1935, when the first air services from India were starting, ToI noted that consignments included pearls, mangoes, betel nuts and papads. Decades later, immediately after 9/11, when a panicked US banned air passengers bringing any food products, so many pickle and papad packets were discarded by Indian travellers that airports were reported to resemble grocery shops.
Some communities are particularly associated with papads. Sindhis famously eat papad anytime and with anything, and this can’t be unlinked from the fact that papads are one product that is easy to make in their arid, and now lost, homeland. When the writer Namita Devidayal married into a Sindhi family, an old aunt told her how in that austere era, a wedding baraat was greeted with just papad and sherbet: “The idea was that rich people should not be allowed to do what the poor man could not aford.”
Students are another type of community who have valued papads. As a student in London, Dr BR Ambedkar sustained late-night studies with papads cooked on his room heater. A friend explained how in her Mumbai hostel they used a hot iron to cook papads pressed between a towel. Some office-goers use the canteen microwave to make papads, even if this lacks the savour of slight charring that comes from an open flame.
Originally most papads were made with urad or other dal flours, but over time they have been made from every kind of starch, from rice to potatoes to tapioca and, now, of course, you can buy quinoa papads. Innovations like this tend to cover up the fact that some traditional varieties are becoming harder to find, like the strip-like Parsi sarias or the nests of fermented wheat noodles made in Maharashtra called kurdaya. While not flat like most papads, they serve the same role of providing a crunchy contrast to curries and rice.
In Theresa Devasahayam’s study When We Eat What We Eat: Classifying Crispy Foods in Malaysian Tamil Food , she argues that “the texture of crispy foods arouses emotions of play, pleasure and delight differently from other foods.” Because they are seen as fun rather than filling, they aren’t taken as seriously as other foods. This may be why the habit of making them at home has faded. Even orthodox households, which are always careful to make most of their food at home, were generally willing to buy papads made outside.
Today, it is women’s cooperatives like Lijjat that famously command this market, but there have always been communities who made them professionally, like the so-called Appala Chettis from Thrissur in Kerala who moved to Madurai district around 1950 and made it a centre for papad production. Professional papad-makers have driven innovations in ingredients and flavours, but they now risk being swamped by the money and marketing of snack-food giants that offer an array of crispy foods that don’t even need cooking.
Some restaurants like Bombay Canteen have tried showcasing papads, which is welcome, but sometimes it feels that the way they choose to do so, offering a papad and pickle platter as free welcome dish, reinforces the marginal status of papads. Perhaps we need to rediscover the traditional dishes made with papads like the Paporer Dalna made in Bengal where papads are cooked with potatoes, or similar Gujarati dishes made by treating raw papads like a kind of pasta, to eat in soupy, spicy stews.
There are dishes made with crumbled papads, like pappadam pazham, a delectable mash of bananas, sugar, rice and ghee topped with crisp-fried papad crumbs, or the paranthas stuffed with crumbled papads you can find in Old Delhi. Skilled cooks can shape papads into cups or rolls that are stuffed with spicy fillings. We may no longer have the time (or the terraces) to make papads in summer, but this should not mean ignoring the many varieties and values of such an intrinsically Indian ingredient. Source:-https://retail.economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/food-entertainment/grocery/why-papads-popularity-in-indian-cuisine-wont-fade-away/69183141 Twenty 14 Holdings to invest Rs 2000 crore to build seven hotels in India GST investigation arm finds Tata Starbucks guilty of profiteering Rs 4.51 crore BigBasket parent has a $100-m plan to build tech & supply chain

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15 Best Vegetarian Indian Thali Meals You Must Try

Home India 15 Best Vegetarian Indian Thali Meals You Must Try 15 Best Vegetarian Indian Thali Meals You Must Try By Telegram Indian Thali – who does not love eating that riot of flavors and tastes. If you are an Indian, you probably know the different Indian Thalis found across the geography of India. If you are a visitor, you need to know that there is no single Indian Thali. Each region of India has its own version of Thali. Some of the items like Rice or Pickle are found in almost all Indian Thalis. However, there is something unique about each Thali, some preparation that makes it belong to a particular region in India. I am going to share the unique aspect of each Indian Thali in this post. Best Indian Thalis to Enjoy. Stock Photo – Shutterstock Being a vegetarian, I am going to restrict this to Vegetarian Thalis of India, for that is all I know. What is an Indian Thali? Well, Thali is actually the large circular plate raised around the circumference on which food is served. It is usually made of metal. Steel is the most commonly used material these days, followed by brass. Copper Thalis can be seen at places as can be experimental clay ones. The Gods, kings and the wealthy used to have the Thalis made of Gold and Silver. Maybe they still use. Food is served on a plate and in small bowls called Katoris. It is like putting the sample of the whole menu at one place, in one go. Ingredients Indian Thali is supposed to have the 6 tastes that Ayurveda prescribes. The six tastes being: Salt Spicy Astringent A perfect Indian Thali is the one that balances these six tastes. It is not just the tastes, but the colors are also balanced. The Thali, when served, is as colorful as India is as a country. You will see reds, greens, browns, yellow & white colors in the dishes. The aromas from various dishes mish-mash and create their own riot. In short, a Thali appeals to all your five senses. There is a play of grains based on what is easily available locally. This makes Indian Thali perfect local cuisine to try. Rice, Raita and Salad is usually a part of all Indian Thalis. In the western world, food is served course by course. To me, this is like someone else deciding what I should eat and in what order. When the meal is served, I choose to eat in whatever order, though the purist would always suggest an order. A Lassi or Chhaas goes perfectly with Indian Thali. Take your pick based on the weather. So, let’s take a tour around India with the Indian Thali. 1. Rajasthani Thali Rajasthani Thali Call me biased, but Rajasthani Thali is my favorite Indian Thali. It comes with the flavors of the desert that are dry and rich at the same time. Richness comes from oodles of desi ghee used. Some unique dishes to try in a Rajasthani Thali are: Dal Bati Churma – a true blue desert food Gatte ki Subzi – when the vegetables are not easily available, gram flour is used to make curry Ker Sangri – This is one indigenous wild plant that grows across the desert. You get both Sabzi and pickle from Ker Sangri Bajre ki Roti – Roti made of Bajra, usually drier than wheat roti, so eaten with a layer of Desi Ghee Lahsun ki Chutney – Garlic Chutney Khichdi – A multi-grain khichadi with Wheat, Bajra & Jowar Kadhi – although you find it in many menus, each region has its own recipe Roasted Papad Ghevar – a traditional Rajasthani sweet dish, usually available in monsoon season. 2. Bengali Vegetarian Thali Bengali Thali Vegetarian and Bengali sound bit of an oxymoron. However, to my delight, they do have a lot of options for vegetarians. There is no dearth of flavors or options for vegetarians. Bengalis like to add a bit of sweet in their food, so everything, except maybe rice has a tinge of sweetness in it. What makes a Bengali Thali is: Mishto Doi – Told you everything is sweet here & the sweet set curd is the most celebrated part of Bengali meal. Baingan Bhaja – Brinjal or Aubergine fries Aaloo Posto – Potato cooked with poppy seeds, a combination you find only in Bengal Luchi – It is like a small-sized Poori, but made with Maida, and tastes a bit different Rasgulla or Roshogulla – No Bengali Thali is complete without this favorite sweet of Kolkata. Daal, seasonal vegetables cooked in mustard oil and rice complete the menu. 3. Goan Vegetarian Thali Goan Vegetarian Thali Yes, it is not impossible to get a vegetarian Thali in Goa. It is not easy but you do get it at many places. Remove all the non-vegetarian food from a Goan Thali and you are left with rice, salad & sol kadi. Now add shallowly fried, semolina soaked Phodi made with local vegetables including banana, roots, and breadfruit. That is the crispy element on the menu, found only in Goa. Add a seasonal vegetable in coconut curry . Daali Toye – a watery and rather bland version of the usual Daal. Add Tambri Bhaji or Patal Bhaji usually made with red leaves That is your Goan Vegetarian meal. 4. Gujarati Kathiawadi Thali Gujarati Kathiawadi Thali Just like Indian meals, there are various variants of a Gujarati Thali. Kathiawadi Thali is particularly famous. Like Bengali Thali, Gujarati one is also quite sweet. It is incidental that the east and west of India has a similar fetish for sweet. However, in Gujarat, you find a generous flavor of garlic. Many dishes will have a pre-fix Lehsunia, which means ample garlic. Tamatar Shev ki Sabji – This is what defines a Gujarati Thali for me. Papad ki Subji – yes you can make a curry from Papad too Undhiyo – a version of Khichadi Kadhi Dhokla or Khandvi shine with their bright yellow color Small sized Rotis or Bhakris made of Bajra accompany the meal. Desi Ghee and Jaggery are used to give a finishing touch to the Gujarati Kathiawadi Thali 5. Punjabi Thali Makki ki Roti, Sarson ka Saag Stock Photos – Shutterstock What I am going to share here is my version of a Punjabi Thali, the one I love and miss. Best time to have this meal is in winters while soaking in the warm sun. This has limited menu options, but as they say in Punjab – Sawa Lakh se Ek ladaun or my one dish is worth thali full of yours. So, this Punjabi Thali has: Sarson ka Saag with a thick layer of desi ghee floating on it. Freshly made Makki ki Roti with a layer of what else, Desi Ghee. Raddish or Mooli dipped in vinegar or maybe lime juice A bit of raw onion Mango Pickle Chunks of jaggery or Gud to end the meal
Simple thali but the taste would linger on your tongue for a long time to come. 6. Malwa Thali from Madhya Pradesh Malwa Thali with Paniya & Daal Baafne This is an unusual, not so well-known Thali from the heart of India. I had it in Mandu , which was once the capital of Malwa. It is also a relatively simple meal, but it demands some time and patience from you to develop a liking for it. Honestly, I did not like its key ingredients Paaniya and Daal Bafna in the first go. Slowly, the taste began to get friendlier with my tongue. Paaniya is made with corn flour or Makki ka Aata while Bafna is made with Toor Daal. They used to be typically roasted on cow dung in a traditional Chulha or open fire. The dish would be covered with leaves as it cooked. These days they are typically baked in a tandoor or clay oven. Apart from these two heroes of a Malwa meal, you have daal, rice, seasonal vegetable, kadhi, salad and a sweet. 7. Andhra Thali Andhra Thali The Andhra cuisine in my mind stands as the spiciest cuisine of India. A layer of red from the red hot Guntur Chilles always floats on its dishes, especially the sambhar and rasam. A pile of shining white rice comes with bright curries. The things that make an Andhra Thali are Parripu Podis – Dry lentil-based chutney powders. You can add them to any other items, after mixing it with ghee or Til oil. Gongura – this is sour leave that you get only in Andhra and hence only in Andhra cuisine. You may find it as part of Dal or as chutney or as part of a side dish. Personally, this is the high point of Andhra meal for me. Baingan Subzi – Many regions of India have Brinjal as part of their special fair, Andhra is also one of them. Avakai – An Andhra style mango pickle, true to the cuisine it is spicy. If you are not used to spices like me, take a big bowl of curd to balance the spice level. 8. Kashmiri Thali Kashmiri Thali or Wazwan A vegetarian Kashmiri Thali has to be custom made on order in most of Kashmir. During my Gulmarg visit, I had the opportunity to explore a vegetarian one. The unique elements include: Nadru or the Lotus stem crisps. They can also come in the form of stuffed Kebabs. Kashmiri Dum Aaloo – The whole potato cooked in curry is a defining element of Kashmiri cuisine for vegetarians like me. Haak – lightly sautéed fresh greens that have a tinge of the bitter taste Walnut Chutney – Walnut comes from Kashmir; you find it everywhere including in the furniture and souvenirs made from walnut wood. In your Kashmiri meal, taste it as tangy walnut chutney. Kashmiri Roti – Tandoori roti usually infused with spices Phirni – threadlike noodles cooked in milk with nuts on top is a soothing sweet dish, save some space for it. Raita with Gheeya or bottle gourd is popular in Kashmir Kahwah – No matter what you eat in Kashmir, finish it with a cup of saffron infused, nut loaded Kashmiri Kahwah . 9. North Karnataka Thali This is a Thali that I remember from my Infosys days. This used to be served on a Banana leaf. It also meant you sometimes had to wait in the queue to have it, but it was worth it. North Karnataka Thali It is a rather simple meal of freshly made Jowar Rotis and Baingan Subzi . This was the meal. Rice and Sambhar were given but more to complete the meal. A glass of spiced Chhaas went perfectly with the Jowar Roti meal. Pickles, salads and fried papads were served in multiple rounds. A cooked grains vegetable would be there, but it was mostly ignored. I again had this in Bijapur and in Dharwad at local Khanavallis. The Jowar roti is dry and it goes perfectly with the rich Baingan subzi. Not too many options, but a tasty wholesome meal. 10. Maharashtra Thali Typical Maharashtrian Thali Maharashtra again is a big state. Different variants of Maharashtrian Thali are available in different parts of the state. In a generic thali, apart from Daal, Rice, Roti and seasonal vegetables, you can expect the following Sabudana Wada comes as a starter for me, I simply love it Varan Bhat – Maharashtrian version of Khichdi Amti or the Chana Daal, the Maharashtrian style Puran Poli – a favorite Maharashtrian mild sweet dish Shrikhand – I am not too fond of Shrikhand, but don’t that to Maharashtrians 😊. You get it in various flavors including Mango called Amrakhand . 11. Ladakhi Vegetarian Thali Ladakhi Vegetarian Thali Ladakh is another region where vegetarian food is not easy to find, but not impossible. In these parts of the world, a vegetarian Thukpa is the staple food for me. It is a noodle soup with few vegetables thrown in, along with lots of garlic. Garlic helps you deal with the mountain sickness at high altitudes. Do read our post on Vegetarian Food in Ladakh. Others things that add up a vegetarian Ladakhi Thali are: Vegetable Noodle Soup with boiled grains like a variety of mini chana thrown in with mild spices Vegetable Momos with Walnut Chutney Apricot based dessert Cheese platter, though not traditional is easily available Gud Gud Chai – Tea made with butter and salt Chaang – a local fermented drink 12. Karnataka Thali Karnataka Thali on Banana Leaf Sit down and wait for a banana leaf to be laid in front of you, that you must wash before you eat. A series of servings will follow, starting with salt, sweet, pickle and Papad. Wait for all the servings to be served and admire the whole menu in front of you on a bright green background. My favorite part, of course, is the crisp fried papads and bhajjis which are like pakodas or fritters. Tangy Sambhar with drumsticks is the highlight of this meal. Enjoy it with rice. 13. Lucknow Thali Thali at Netram Ajay Kumar – Ameenabad, Lucknow
Lucknow is usually known for its street food and Kebabs. The vegetarian in me loved the street food of Lucknow. I love the Bedmi Puri meal. It has stuffed Puris along with Chana, Raita, seasonal vegetable & Chutney. Add a glass of Lassi and you have one of the most satisfying meals. 14. Nepali Thali Nepali Thali The food in Nepal is not very different from India. Daal and rice are a staple there too. Seasonal local vegetables are cooked and eaten with the staple. 15. Ashram Thali I have eaten across Ashrams in India, be in Kanchi Kamkoti Peetham in Kanchipuram or an Ashram in Ayodhya or at Kumbh Mela Bhandaras or at local temples in Goa . No matter which ashram you eat at, the food is more than just food. There is a spirituality in food. It is served with devotion as a prasad or blessing from God, and that’s what makes it special. Satvik Food at an Indian Ashram Ashram food is served on a leaf, mostly banana leaf in south India. The food is made without using any Tamasic elements like onion or garlic. The food is simple yet sumptuous, it satisfies you instantly. The cuisine is usually local, made using local seasonal vegetables. Eat it with gratitude. I think if you want to taste the basic cuisine of different meals from India, you must try some at an Ashram. TAGS

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Why being alone is not a bad thing.

The best part about being alone is that you really don’t have to answer to anybody. You do what you want.
– Justin Timberlake And yes this is it, this quote always works well with me. There is no need for us to feel sad about the idea of being alone, there is a big difference between being lonely, and being alone. And most of the time we get confused between these two ideas. Where being lonely is always project your weak side of being sad and hopeless, choose be alone on the other side shows your stronger self. That you are not afraid of not having anybody on your side and you still can manage it on your own, doesn’t matter if you are a girl or a guy. You choosed to be alone with your own abilities, powers and self control.
I am living alone since i was 14. Far from my family, my loved once, for few years far from my country, and when i came back, it was so hard to accept that i am not having any childhood friends anymore because after a certain gap you feel it difficult to connect with your old people and their different ideas, so i chose to go on my way, having no big social circle, close buddies actually nobody. But i never felt bad or sad about my lone side. I always enjoyed it, and i would say that the best days my life were,when i had nobody around me. I never had to take permission from anybody to do what i wanted to do, but yes i was always aware of my boundaries and limitations. Being alone is not a problem the problem is when you always projecting that you have nobody at your side. I feel i am more happy when i have nobody, i get enough time to complete my work, enough time to think and get ideas about my future plans, i can sleep whenever i am tired, simply i am more productive when i am alone, and i love being that way. its not that i chooses to be alone, its just sometime you can’t help but to be alone even if you don’t want, you get no choice.
So whenever you feel like a victim of being alone, here i want to share few of my real time ideas with you to always keep in your mind and to give it try in your alone time just to explore the world on your own ways.
Learn how to enjoy things alone,if you want to be strong.
Never say no to a new adventure : you will be always scared in some point of time to explore new things in order to experience failure but believe me even if you gonna fail, it will be always a new learning, a new experience and a new you. You are going to reveal a hidden side, whenever you face a new challenges your subconscious self always find a new way to deal with it. so go try that new cuisine, meet and interact with new people, explore new places, try new accessories or clothes, a new hairstyle, hair or eye color, pick a new hobby, dancing ,singing, driving, swimming, just try anything new. and be a new you that you never imagined you can be. Read and read a lot: Have you ever thought about picking up a book to read and never got time or found something more important or interesting as compare to reading a book, my friend it doesn’t matter which book you want to read but trust me all the successful people always have been a good reader first, because without reading, you might never gonna learn to try the new things with all the new ways. While you read you are only connected to the characters and their stories mentioned in the book and for that particular moment you are free of your alone side because now you are spending your time with all the characters in the book, you are learning and connecting with them. so any book which you gonna pick gonna serve you a lot, i love reading autobiographies, success stories, philosophy, motivational books more, on daily basis at least for half n hour sometimes an hour but daily. Travel solo: Once in a while pack your bags and go on a solo trip and while you are travelling give your entire time to connect people on your way, to try to learn the new language if you encounter any. spend time with the local people, try the local food, detoxify your mind, find a peaceful place and connect to your soul completely which is not always possible when you are traveling with friends, family or in a group. Solo traveling always serves you the opportunity to meet other travelers around the globe, and trust me i have done it many times and i met wonderful people and had amazing time to remember and cherish always. Become your own chef: So this was the best part of my aloneliness that while i had to stay far from my home for my studies, i had to learn cooking so that i could survive in a country where finding Indian food was like searching for water in a desert. I am not saying that anybody who gonna live outside of their country should learn cooking but in order to survive alone you need to learn cooking, cooking not only provide you the taste of your own but also serves you the healthy and hygienic food and saves a lot of money which you spend while you order food online or do it takeaway. So in my case, I can’t eat outside daily, i feel cooking is something i really enjoy and it doesn’t have to be any special dish but cooking dal rice also gives me same happiness and its a real time savior for me. Exercise: At-least 3-4 times a week make time to do exercise or have a walk, run around, do some weight lifting, it helps you to activate your mind and body, it helps you to get in shape that we all know, and most importantly it gives you a certain confidence where you are working on yourself in order to look better and to be fit than you are right now. Even if you are already perfect in your shape, do it to boost up your metabolism which really speed up your digestion and helps you to stay healthy in many ways. Drink more water: When we are talking about exercise and healthy living we can not ignore the importance of being hydrated. According to different age groups our 50- 70% body is made up of water,so see how important it is for us. Exercise can only help you when there is enough water in your body. otherwise you gonna take a wrong side where you are doing physical activity just to be frail and gonna have weak bones and joints, if you are not drinking enough water, at-least 2-3 liters per day. Go Spiritual: So there were times when due to my aloneliness i used to have fear , night mares and night terrors, and it was not all because i was alone but the way i have experienced and lived my life, so it was the great impact of my complete journey, i believe i was very near to getting depression or may be i had, and never accepted. because i never wanted to go for the help, assuming people might laugh at me, they will pass their sympathy or can be judgmental, which i never wanted to face so i decided to heal myself with my own efforts. I connected myself to every spiritual path i came to know, i had tried yoga, meditation, followed some spiritual gurus, listened many spiritual speakers like Sadhguru, Gaur gopal guru and many more, started chanting and i am still doing. Somewhere it all worked like a miracle in my life, just as i wanted, it was like a rebirth for me in the same life. We all have problems and many of us don’t know how to deal with ourselves when we are in such situations, forget about how you gonna deal with others, if you don’t know how you gonna heal yourself. Unless you are fine and your mind is working well you can handle anything. So never be ashamed to accept that you have a problem, remember more stronger people are the ones who accept that they have problems and they take the full responsibility of themselves to handle and to change the situation. Appreciate yourself : Real Celebrities are the ones who know how to celebrate their life, no matter where they are,what they have become, in which background they are coming from, if they have more money or not, bigger houses, luxurious life etc. To appreciate yourself you don’t need any of these. If you have, that’s great but if not then simply appreciate that you are alive, healthy, that you have resources so that you can read a blog like you are reading now, many of us don’t have a good health, many people we know who have passed away, They didn’t get enough time to live and we are here still living, many people do not even have cellphones, so always be grateful for everything you have or got instead of being sad about what you didn’t get or can’t have. Always keep working to get what you desire. but do not forget to appreciate yourself and your present life . Be Grateful: Its not always easy to be grateful all the time, but living alone happily is possible only when you know how to be grateful. Grateful to God for creating you, to people who helps you in someway on your daily life, grateful to your parents to raise you and give you a life so that you can be the part of this beautiful world, your teammates, the organisation you are working in so that you got so many different opportunities to learn, most importantly grateful to your self for being the person you are right now. I am not the person who born with silver spoon but i always believed in me and my abilities, so even if sometimes my life is a total mess, i still want to help people, listen their problems and support them with all my potentials and that is what makes me grateful about myself. Start fresh: No matter, in what situation you are right now there is no perfect time to start again and bounce back. Do not wait for anybody to come and save you, you are your own savior, don’t just survive but be a warrior and win your battle. This world is a greater place for the fittest not for the weakest. Being alone is not a curse, it’s a blessing for people like us who know how to love their selves, how to pamper their selves and how to appreciate and celebrate their life. So start now, and show the world your strength of being alone, and enjoy it fully before its gone, you know what i mean

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Budapest, M&J’s 2 and a New Lion’s Head

Budapest, M&J’s 2 and a New Lion’s Head
Posted by Arthur | May 5, 2019 | 0
A sign in the window saying “Authentic European Bistro” appeared at 650 Washmill Lake Dr. under further investigation I found the name is Budapest Bisztro (so we can assume Hungarian influences)
A couple weeks ago I mentioned Guelph, ON based chain Ren’s Pets was opening in Dartmouth Crossing but they are also opening in Bayers Lake as well
The folks at Roll the Dice are splitting up part of their Quinpool Road location and opening Naan-N-Curry Indian Cuisine
A second M&J‘s Eatery is now open inside of Menz & Mollyz on Gottingen. Their first location is in the Esquire Plaza on Bedford Highway.
Metro Deli in Young Tower has closed and some of its menu is being integrated into a return to North End Halifax for Pizzatown this June
The Velos Pizza on Dutch Village Rd appears to have closed, doors locked during regular hours and no answer (phone is still active). I have heard a new name will be opening there soon. Velos has be a name in Halifax pizza for decades.
I guess Halifax wasn’t up for a Country Bar in the city After 13 months Ruby’s Rhinestone has closed it’s doors. I hear in the coming months an “Asian restaurant ” will be taking over the space
Ripsters Halloween Shop has closed its year rounds shop in Lower Sackville.
Construction on the new Lion’s Head begins this week right on the corner of Demone and Robie. The current location will stay open until new one is ready.
One of my favourites is closed for a while, Staggers suffered water damage after the nearby construction site broke their buildings roof with fallen debris. They will be reopening in the coming weeks once everything is repaired.
The Wendy’s on Kempt Road has reopened after a 5 month complete makeover.
The former Exchange on Hollis reopened as The Mercantile Social
I think I forgot to post that location two of Bi-One had opened at 1030 South Park. But now I’ll mention that the original Bi-One on Quinpool is moving across the street to the former Jixiang
Alex Lee and Joe Dunford opened Cortado Tasting Room on Gary Martin Drive in Bedford in 2016 and now they are set to open Sine Coffee Labs on the Barrington Street level of the Maritime Centre.
The coffee labs will be located inside of the recently expanded entrepreneurial hub, Volta Labs.
Sine Coffee Labs will feature espresso, drip and pour-over coffee. It will have coffee beans that are roasted at both Cortada and Java Blend. It will also offer rotating coffee roasts from all over the world, as well as partnerships with other local vendors to provide a few food options, including baked goods and light lunches like wraps and salads.
Lee told me that the Lab’s namesake comes into play in the afternoons and evenings when they will use the space for coffee education. All of their employees will start at a lower wage, and then go through a training and certification process to help them develop their skill set.
“The purpose of this place is to train baristas to go into competition and to get into other aspects of the industry,” said Lee. He added that being a barista is often seen as a part-time or a temporary job, and they “really want to change that.”
Lee recently traveled with staff to attend the five-day Specialty Coffee Expo in Boston where they attended seminars about coffee, as well as the World Barista Championship. They are now looking at building the barista-competition culture here.
Lee and Dunford are set to open Sine Coffee Labs by the end of May.
Open City is back for it’s 8th year! Great to see my little idea continue to happen! See The Full List Here But lots of Backdoor Takeouts and discounts all around the Peninsula and Downtown Dartmouth
The Curio Collective at 1566 Barrington St. May 11 & 12 Halifax’s first ALL vintage show feat 25+ vendors! Come for some free popcorn and shop the curated collections of the city’s top vintage and antique sellers! $2 admission Sat 10-7 Sun 10-4 Share:

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I love all cuisines, including Indian cuisine. I think food made with love and thought can transport us to places and to memories. I have fond memories of growing up in Mumbai/Bombay.

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Yeah the spice thing is annoying. I mean, don’t get me wrong Indian cuisine is fantastic, can never go wrong with Indian food. But there are other cuisines out there too that are great in their own way. And a lot of them aren’t as spice focused as India food. So when someone orders a plate of spaghetti or something and bitches to the water/waitress about it being not spicy and bland, I feel like you should have a more open mind about what you are ordering. Or just stick to the food you like which a lot of Indian people do seem to do. I have noticed that a lot of Indians who go abroad will do all they can to not touch non Indian food. Which is your right when you do it yourself, but don’t go into an Italian restaurant and complain the food isn’t Indian enough.

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What Do Victorian Cyclists and Punjabi Muslims Have in Common?

What Do Victorian Cyclists and Punjabi Muslims Have in Common? Posted on by geschenke2015
What do English Victorian-era cyclists and Punjabi Muslims have in common? I know it sounds like a “….walks into a bar” joke. No, it’s not colorful, skin tight spandex. It’s not super-long handlebar-y moustaches or facial hair. It’s actually a drink used for hydration that both seemingly unconnected groups have been drinking since the 1870s – milk and soda water. Or they’ve been drinking variations on that theme, milk and mineral water, or sweet cream and tonic, Vichy, or sodas.
I know what you’re thinking, “That sounds nasty – who would ever think of mixing milk and soda water.” But if you think of the properties of milk – soothing to the stomach and protein rich; and soda water, healthy, clean and refreshing. Also consider this drink the grandfather to the American phosphate soda, the ice cream soda, the brown cow (and other cows), and finally the ice cream sundae.
In Pakistan and Punjabi regions of India, Muslims observe an all day fast during the month of Ramandan. Man, Catholics think they have it bad to observe meatless Fridays during Lent. But imagine not being able to even drink water during the day! Talk about been Hangry and even Thangry (angry thirsty). So observant Muslims have devised a drink they call doodh soda , which mixes either 7 up or Sprite with milk in about a 50/50 ratio that they drink at sundown to quench their thirst from the day’s fast. Sprite and 7 up are considered digestive aids in Pakistan and India. Some mix the cream or milk with a regional bright green, super sweet citrusy-vanilla cola called Pakola. Think of the Pakola doodh as a Green Cow. Aside from quenching the Ramandan thirst, these drinks are served to help cool the spiciness of Punjab cuisine outside of the holy month. And Indians and Pakistanis alike consider doodh soda healthier than just plain soda.
It was thought that the lassi, probably the world’s first smoothie, was the grandfather to this Pakistani tradition, which was developed centuries ago in Punjabi regions. It’s a creamy drink made of yogurt, spices like coriander and ginger, fruit juices or fruit pulps, and sometimes water. It can be savory or sweet, but either is delicious. Mango lassi is popular in Indian restaurants in the U.S. My neighborhood Indian cafe, – Baba in Oakley – whose cooks are Punjab, serves up mango lassis.
There’s another Indian drink related to the lassi, called chaas (and other names regionally) which uses a thinner yogurt – dahi – without the butterfat, and adds water to dilute with spices. This is probably more similar to the doosh soda of Pakistan than the lassi.
But Pakistani food writers like Majid Sheikh, have connected the doodh soda’s heritage to their English colonial oppressors and their love of cycling. Aha – another food of oppressors like the Franzbrotchen of northern Germany. (see https://dannwoellertthefoodetymologist.wordpress.com/2018/01/02/the-franzbrotchen-a-pastry-of-northern-germany-born-from-napoleonic-occupation )
After a grueling race, Victorian era cyclists would cool off with a beer, but found the result a feeling of heaviness. So doctors recommended they drink carbonated water. Some were put off by the taste of soda water so they added milk or sweet cream and found a drink that became wildly popular. When they brought it to India during the colonial period, the Indians already were familiar with their creamy lassis and chaas, and loved the carbonation. As modern sodas were created regionally and brought from the West in the late 1940s in India and Pakistan, the doodh soda became more like what we might call a “Cow” in the U.S., although without ice cream.
All the origin stories of the birth of the ice cream soda in the U.S. start with a milk or cream based drink and phosphate soda. After the Civil War soda fountains started popping up all over the U.S., and doctors touted the benefits of phosphate and soda waters. Soda jerks mixed phosphate or soda water with fruit pulps and syrups to create refreshing drinks. I always loved a raspberry phosphate at Graeters – where the acidic phosphate literally burning your tonsils with its ph of 2, created a refreshing sensation.
The man credited with inventing the ice cream soda at an exhibition in Philadelphia in 1874, Robert Mccay Green, was said to have run out of sweet cream at his soda fountain, but had access to ice cream, and started serving customers what became the ice cream soda.
Then march in the Temperance folks. When pharmacists like Dr. John S. Pemberton were formulating new American soft drinks like Coca-Cola (with cocaine originally), they touted them as tonics to cure headaches, fatigue and other ailments. The Temperance movement thought that those consuming large amounts of soda water or soft drinks were at a moral failing, using them as ‘medicine’. So, soda jerks would not sell sodas on Sunday, the Lord’s day. But they didn’t want to lose sales of ice cream, so they created a dish without the fizz, but will all the syrups and toppings – something even more decadent – and called it the ice cream sunday – later spelled sundae.
And then, when soft drinks became the mainstream soda jerks and ice cream parlors started mixing them with ice cream to form the family of colored ice cream “cows” or soda floats we all love- the brown cow (ice cream plus root beer), pink cow (red cream soda), black cow (coke), purple cow (grape soda), orange cow (Orange Crush), the Boston cooler (Vernor’s Ginger Ale), the green cow (Mountain Dow or other green cola) and even our local Nectar soda (ice cream plus nectar syrup, or nectar soda, in New Orleans).
So the next time you enjoy a float, a sundae, a phosphate, or a lassi, you can thank a sweaty dehydrated English cyclist with a curly handlebar moustache. Advertisements

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