Bell Blvd Food & Music Fest (Restaurant Stroll) 2019 Tickets, Sun, May 19, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Eventbrite

Bell Blvd Food & Music Fest (Restaurant Stroll) 2019 Tickets, Sun, May 19, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Eventbrite

Refunds up to 30 days before event Event description Description
The second Bell Blvd Food and Music Fest is on May 19th, 2pm – 6pm. It will take place on Bell Blvd between 38th and 43rd Aves as well as on 41st Ave.
Explore over 35 of Bayside’s best restaurants for under a $1 per restaurant! Online tickets are $30 for adults and $12 for children under 12 years old.
Food
Cuisine options include American, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, French, Spanish, Irish, Greek, Indian, Korean, Columbian, Cajun, Vietnamese, Japanese and Tex Mex and more. New styles of food, as well as traditional favorites, are on offer. Some of the bars and pubs will feature signature cocktails and special beers. MusicWith live music on every block, the diversity of music almost rivals the array of food and drink. Rock, Jazz, country, American Songbook, Kpop to name a few.
Fun
Skee ball, minigolf, shuffleboard and beach ball volleyball in the middle of the street (which will be closed to vehicles). A new 8’ wide spirograph built by the Bayside HS Key Club and NY MakerSpace will also make its debut at the event and be available for play.
Restaurants
New restaurants like Spanglish and Mahjong Cafe will join fab favorites like Bourbon Street, Papazzio and Maria’s Mediterranean. Some of the restaurants include: Aperitif Bistro, Avli Cafe, Avli Little Greek Taverna, Bayside Dumpling, Bourbon Street, Fiamma 41, The Supper Room, Hatfields, Krave It, Kung Fu Tea, Local Bar and Grill, Masala Box, Monahan & Fitzgerald, Nippon Cha, OSP, Papazzio, Pizzeria Uno, Pour House, Press 195, Red Mango, Sangarita’s,Taverna Kyclades, Taco Han, Tanko, Thai 101, Uncle Jack’s Steakhouse, VIPizza, New Golden Wine & Liquor and more
TICKETS

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Wien – Natraj – Indian Cuisine – Well worth a visit

Posted on April 14, 2019 by Hector Yes Marg and Hector went to the – Zoo. It’s a Marg thing. Thereafter it was a case of choosing a Curry House in the vicinity of The Brick Makers where we had a particularly good time last night. It’s a Bier thing. Natraj – Indian Cuisine (Neustiftgasse 50, 1070 Wien Österreich) was one of half a dozen possibilities, it was chosen because many of the photos on other sources featured drier looking Curry. Arriving at 19.40 the main room was busy. The Chap who would serve us asked if we had a reservation. We were shown to a small table in the back room. A family were just finishing, we would then have this to ourselves for the duration. The Menu was weird, page after page of Drinks. A 700ml bottle of Sparkling Water (€5.00) was marginally cheaper than ordering the equivalent in bier. On reaching the food section of the Menu, there were plenty of Chicken Dishes to choose from, but few Lamb. Lamm Chitnadu (€10.90) was there, too many Lamb Dishes featured the dreaded – Green Ballast – or Coconut Milk. Beef Vindaloo (€10.50) was considered, I decided to test the Chef. Marg was having similar problems, she could have gone down the Chicken route but now also feels that Chicken is simply – Meat Ballast. Lamb Biryani (€13.90) was her surprising choice. Brian, Mein Host at Brick Makers may have planted the notion after our lengthy discussion about Curry last night. That this Biryani came with – Yogurt salad – allayed her fear about being served something too dry as happened at Dum Pukht (Tunis). Mein Host came through to take the Order: Can I have Bhunna Gosht (€10.90) without the Paprika? He went away to check, all was well. Marg’s Biryani was ordered, Hector added Vegetable Pulao (€2.50) and the Sparkling Water. Spice Level was then discussed, Natraj offer a range of four levels, Marg chose – Medium , Hector – Spicy . There was no need for – Very Spicy. There was a sense of the adjacent busy room emptying though one large group remained. In all I estimated that Natraj could accommodate around thirty diners. The décor was simple, a few wall hangings. I felt I blended in with my yellow t-shirt. Lamb Biryani A mound of Rice with Meat and Vegetables buried within, a Biryani . A large cooked Tomato topped this. Peas and Carrots were the featured Vegetables, Herbs and a Clove were encountered too. Almonds and Cashew Nuts were in there also. Marg found large pieces of Lamb accompanied by large slices of Onion. It’s uncanny how large pieces of Onion are drawn towards Marg, or is it the other way about? Tangy – was the first comment. The Cucumber in the – Yogurt salad – confirmed that this was – Raita. Marg put this to good use, adding a bit more moisture to her Dish, though she did find the Rice to have its own moistness. Marg asked if it was silly to say she could taste the – Lamb. A new dish for me, I’ve only only eaten one before. Large pieces of tender lamb which I cut up to spread the meat though the rice. An interesting flavour in the rice with all the vegetables. It was completed by the lovely creamy Raita. A very enjoyable dish with no need for bread. I managed to finish it. The Vegetable Pulao had the same Vegetables as the Biryani , a Clove emerged from this too, same pot? The portion size was sensible, I hate seeing an excess which I know will never be eaten. Bhunna Gosht Again, there was a cooked Tomato sitting atop the Curry. The Masala was Creamy but not such that it approached Tikka Masala levels. The hoped for viscosity was there. When was I last served a really – Dry Bhuna ? I decanted eight large pieces of Lamb, each would be halved, plenty of Meat. The Bhuna was well Spiced, a good – Kick , nothing silly. I noted the Seasoning as being – Fine , however as I ate on I felt it was below the – Hector ideal. With Herbs strewn through the Masala there was plenty of Flavour coming across. I too could not help be impressed by the Flavour from the Lamb itself. I appeared to have been eating essentially the same Dish as Marg but with a Masala included. This used to be – the Glasgow way – to serve Biryani . Mein Host asked in passing how we were enjoying our food. He then came back to ask more formally. On both occasions we were very positive. The Curry was very good, not sensational, we both enjoyed our meals. Every grain of Rice was eaten, at the end, all that was left on each plate was a solitary Clove. The Bill € 32.30 (£27.76) I doubt if we will find better value than this in our four days in Wien. The Aftermath The Calling Card was well received, Mein Host took the Huawei to study the Blog. You have been to India – he remarked scrolling through the list of countries down the right column. Our appreciation was expressed once more. The staff were keen to pose for the parting photo. Natraj , well worth a visit. Menu – extracts

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Satis Shroff on Literature

SATIS SHROFF ON LITERATURE
I could see Madame Defarge knitting the names of the noblemen and women to be executed. Dickens was a great master of fabulation. I was ripe for those stories and was as curious as a Siamese cat I had named Sirikit, reading, turning page for page, absolutely absorbed in the unfolding stories.. The person Satis Shroff has various faces, of a singer, author, poet, medical lecturer, artist. Which face is near to your heart? I like writing which means sitting down and typing what you’ve thought about. Writing is a solitary performance but when I sing with my croonies of the MGV-Kappel it is sharing our joy and sadness and it’s a collective song that we produce and that makes our hearts beat higher during concerts. When an idea moves me for days I have the craving to pen it. I get ideas when I’m ironing clothes and listening to Nepali songs or Bollywood ones. When I don’t have time, I make a poem out of it, for poetry is emotion recollected in tranquillity. When I prepare my medical lectures I’m transferring knowledge from my university past and bringing them together verbally, and I realise it’s great fun to attain topicality by connecting the medical themes with what’s topical thereby creating a bridge between the two. That makes a lecture interesting, which is like a performance, a recital in which you interact with the audience. At school I was taught art by a lean, bearded Scottish teacher who loved to pain landscapes with water-colours. Whenever I travel during holidays, I keep an ArtJournal with my sketches and drawings, and try to capture the feelings, impressions of the place and people I meet, and it’s great fun to turn the pages years later and be reminded how it was then. I like doing all these things and they’re all near to my heart. What does literature mean to you ? Literature is translating emotions and facts from truth to fiction. It’s like a borderline syndrome; between sanity and insanity there’s fine dividing line. Similarly, non-fiction can be transformed into fiction. Virginia Woolf said, ‘There must be great freedom from reality.’ For Goethe, art was art because it was not nature. That’s what I like about fiction, this ability of transforming mundane things in life to jewels through the use of words. Rilke mentioned one ought to describe beauty with inner, quiet, humble righteousness. Approach nature and show what you see and experienced, loved and lost.
3. Normally a scientific mind and literary heart do not go together. How do you manage that? (since you were student of zoology, botany and medicine) At school I used to read P.G.Wodehouse (about how silly aristocrats are and how wise the butler Jeeves is) and Richard Gordon (a physician who gave up practicing Medicine and started writing funny books). For me Richard Gordon was a living example of someone who could connect literature with bio-medical sciences. Desmond Morris, zoologist (The Naked Ape, The Human Zoo) was another example for me. He has also written a book about how modern soccer players do tribal dances on the football-field, with all those screaming spectators, when their team scores a goal. That’s ethnological rituals that are being carried out by European footballers. Since I went to a British school I was fed with EngLit and was acquainted with the works of English writers like Milton, Shakespeare, Dickens, Hardy, Walter Scott, RL Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling, HG Wells, Victor Hugo, Poe, Defoe, Hemingway, and poets like Burns, Keats, Yeats, Dante, Goldsmith. Since we had Nepali in our curriculum it was delightful to read Bhanu Bhakta, Mainali, Shiva Kumar Rai and other Nepali authors. At home I used to pray and perform the pujas with my Mom, who was a great story teller and that was how I learned about the fantastic stories of Hindu mythology. At school we also did Roman and Greek mythology. My head was full of heroes. I was also an avid comicstrip reader and there were Classics Illustrated comic with English literature. I used to walk miles to swap comic-books in Nepal. It was mostly friends from the British Gurkhas who had assess to such comics, gadgets, musical instruments they’d bought in Hong Kong, since it was a British enclave then. Science can be interesting and there is a genre which makes scientific literature very interesting for those who are curious and hungry for more knowledge.
In Kathmandu I worked as a journalist with an English newspaper The Rising Nepal. I enjoyed writing a Science Spot column. One day Navin Chandra Joshi, an Indian economist who was working for the Indian Cooperative Mission asked a senior editor and me: ‘Accha, can you please tell me who Satis Shroff is?’ Mana Ranjan gave a sheepish smile and said, ‘You’ve been talking with him all the time.’ The elderly Mr. Joshi was plainly surprised and said, ‘Judging from his writing, I thought he was a wise old man.’ I was 25 then and I turned red and was amused. As I grew older, I discovered the works of Virginia Woolf, DH Lawrence, Aldous Huxley, Authur Miller, Henry Miller, Doris Lessing and James Joyce. The lecturers from the English Department and the Literary Supplements were all revering his works: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, Finnegans Wake. His works appealed to be because I was also educated by the Christian Brothers of Ireland in the foothills of the Himalayas, with the same strictness and heavy hand. God is watching you.. Since my college friends left for Moscow University and Lumumba Friendship University after college, I started taking interest in Russian literature and borrowed books from the Soviet library and read: Tolstoi, Dostojewskije, Chekov and later even Solzinitzyn’s Archipel Gulag. I spent a lot of time in the well-stocked American Library in Katmandu’s New Road and read Henry Miller, Steinbeck, Faulkner, Thoreau, Whitman. Favourite books and authors: Bhanu Bhakta Acharya’s ‘Ramayana,’ Devkota’s ‘Muna Madan,’ Guru Prasad Mainali’s ‘Machha-ko Mol,’ Shiva Kumar Rai’s ‘Dak Bungalow,’ Hemingway’s Fiesta, For Whom the Bells Toll, Günter Grass ‘Blechtrommel,’ Zunge zeigen, Marcel Reich Ranicki’s ‘Mein Leben,’VS Naipaul’s ‘ ‘Joseph Conrad’s ‘Heart of Darkness,’ James Joyce’s ‘Ulysses, Stephan Hero, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Faust I, Faust II’, Leo Tolstoy’s ‘War and Peace,’ Rainer Maria Rilke’s ‘Briefe an einen jungen Dichter’ Goethe’s ‘Die Leiden des jungen Werther,’The Diaries of Franz Kafka’ Carl Gustav Jung’s ‘Memories, Dreams, Reflections,’ Patrick Süskind’s ‘Perfume,’ John Updike’s ‘The Witches of Eastwick,’ ‘Couples,’ Peter Matthiessen’s ‘The Snow Leopard,’ Mark Twain ‘A Tramp Abroad,’John Steinbeck’s ‘The Pearl,’ Rushdie’s ‘Midnight Children,’ Jonathan Franzen’s ‘The Corrections,’ John Irving’s Last Night in Twisted River. Position of Nepali as world literature in terms of standard: Nepali literature has had a Cinderella or Aschenputtel-existence and it was only through Michael Hutt, who prefers to work closely with Nepalese authors and publishes with them, under the aegis of SOAS that literature from Nepal is trying to catch the attention of the world. We have to differentiate between Nepalese writing in the vernacular and those writing in English. Translating is a big job and a lot of essence of a language gets lost in translation. What did the author mean when he or she said that? Can I translate it literally? Or do I have to translate it figuratively? If the author is near you, you can ask him or her what the meaning of a sentence, certain words or expression is. This isn’t the case always. So what you translate is your thought of what the writer or poet had said. I used to rollick with laughter when I read books by PG Wodehouse and Richard Gordon. I bought German editions and found the translations good. But the translated books didn’t bring me to laugh.
Tribhuvan University has been educating hundreds of teachers at the Master’s Level but the teacher’s haven’t made a big impression on the world literary stage because most of them teach, and don’t write. Our neighbour India is different and there are more educated people who read and write. The demand for books is immense. Writing in English is a luxury for people who belong to the upper strata of the Nepalese society. Most can’t even afford books and have a tough time trying to make ends meet. The colleges and universities don’t teach Creative Writing. They teach the works of English poets and writers from colonial times, and not post-colonial. There are a good many writers in Nepal but their works have to be edited and promoted by publishers on a standard basis. If it’s a good story and has universal appeal then it’ll make it to the international scene. Rabindra Nath Tagore is a writer who has been forgotten. It was the English translation that made the world, and Stockholm, take notice. Manjushree Thapa and Samrat Upadhya have caught the attention of western media because they write in English. One studied and lived in the USA and the other is settled there. Moreover, the American publishing world does more for its migrant authors than other countries. There are prizes in which only USA-educated migrants are allowed to apply to be nominated, a certain protectionism for their US-migrants. (The lecturer with his Creative Writing students in Freiburg) Motivation to write: The main motivation is to share my thoughts with the reader and to try out different genres. Since I know a lot of school-friends who dropped out and joined the British Gurkhas to see the world, it was disgusting to see how the British government treated their comrade-in-arms from the hills of Nepal. On the one hand, they said they are our best allies, part of the British Army and on the other hand I got letters from Gurkhas showing how low their salaries are in the Gurkha Brigade. A Johnny Gurkha gets only half the pay that a British Tommy is paid. Colonialism? Master-and –Servant relationship? They were treating them like guest-workers from Nepal and hiring and firing them at will, depending upon whether the Brits needed cannon-fodder. All they had to do was to recruit more Brigades in Nepal. This injustice motivated me to write a series on the Gurkhas and the Brits. I like NatureJournaling too and it’s wonderful to take long walks in the Black Forest countryside and in Switzerland. As a Nepalese I’m always fascinated and awed by the Alps and the Himalayas. A Specific writing style?
(Satis Shroff with his Creative Writing students from the University of Freiburg) Every writer in his journey towards literature discovers his own style. Here’s what Heidi Poudel says about my style: ‘Brilliant, I enjoyed your poems thoroughly. I can hear the underlying German and Nepali thoughts within your English language. The strictness of the German form mixed with the vividness of your Nepalese mother tongue. An interesting mix. Nepal is a jewel on the Earths surface, her majesty and charm should be protected, and yet exposed with dignity through words. You do your country justice and I find your bicultural understanding so unique and a marvel to read.’ Reviewed by Heide Poudel in WritersDen.com.
(Satis Shroff with the Bundespräsident Gauck & the Landesvater Winfried Kretschmann) My suggestions to readers: I might sound old fashioned but there’s lot of wisdom in these two small words: Carpe diem. Use your time. It can also mean ‘seize the job’ as in the case of Keating in the book ‘Dead Poets Society.’ When I was in Katmandu a friend named Bindu Dhoj who was doing MBA in Delhi said, ‘Satish, you have to assert yourself in life.’ That was a good piece of advice. In the Nepalese society we have a lot of chakari and afnu manchay caused by the caste-and-jaat system. But in Europe even if you are well-qualified, you do have to learn to assert and ‘sell’ and market yourself through good public relations. That’s why it’s also important to have a serious web-presence. Germany is a great, tolerant country despite the Nazi past, and it’s an economic and military power. If you have chosen Germany, then make it a point to ‘do in Germany as the Germans do.’ Get a circle of German friends, interact with them, lose your shyness, get in touch with German families and speak, read, write and dream in German. If you like singing then join a choir (like me), if you like art join a Kunstverein, if you like sport then be a member of a Sportverein. If you’re a physician, join the Marburger or Hartmann Bund. Don’t think about it. Do it. It’s like swimming. You have to jump into the water. Dry swimming or thinking alone won’t help you. Cultural exchange can be amusing and rewarding for your own development. Current and future projects: I always have writing projects in my mind and you’ll catch me scribbling notices at different times of the day. I feel like a kid in a department store when I think about the internet. No haggling with editors, no waiting for a piece of writing to be published. I find blogs fantastic. Imagine the agonies a writer had to go through in the old days after having submitted a poem or a novel. Now, it’s child’s play. Even Elfriede Jelenek uses her blog to write directly for the reading pleasure of her readers. The idea has caught on. In a life time you do write a lot and I’m out to string all my past writings in a book in the Ich-Form, that is, first person singular and am interested in memoir writing, spiritual writing, medical-ethno writing and, of course, my Zeitgeistlyrik . Georg F. Will said: A powerful teacher is a benevolent contagion, an infectious spirit, an emulable stance toward life. I like the idea of being an ‘infectious spirit’ as far as my Creative Writing lectures are concerned, and it does your soul good when a young female student comes up to you after the lecture and says: ‘Thank you very much for the lecture. You’ve ignited the fire in me with your words.’ I love to make Creative Writing a benevolent contagion and infect young minds with words. To my Readers: Be proud of yourself, talk with yourself as you talk with a good friend, with respect and have goals in mind. If your goal is too high you must readjust it. My Mom used to say, ‘ Chora bhayey pachi ik rakhna parchha. When you’re a son you have to strive for higher goals in life. I’d say a daughter can also adopt this. Like the proverbial Gurkha, keep a stiff upper lip and don’t give up. Keep on marching along your route and you’ll reach your destination in life. But on the other hand, be happy and contended with small successes and things. We Nepalese are attributed with ‘Die Heiterkeit der Seele’ because we are contented with small things which is a quality we should never lose. Keep that friendly Nepali smile on your face, for it will bring you miles and miles of smiles; and life’s worthwhile because you smile. On literature: When you read a novel or short-story, you can feel the excitement, you discover with the writer new terrain. You’re surprised. You’re in a reading-trance and the purpose of literature is to give you reading experience and pleasure. Literature is not the birth-right of the lecturers of English departments in universities where every author of merit is analysed, taken apart, mixing the fictive tale with the writer’s personal problems in reality. The authors are bestowed with literary prizes, feted at literary festivals and invited to literary conferences and public readings. Literature belongs to the folk of a culture, but the academicians have made it their own pride possession. Would like to hear Hemingway telling you a story he had written or an academician hold a lecture about what Hemingway wrote? I’d prefer the former because it belongs to the people, the readers, the listeners. In India and Nepal we have story-tellers who go from village to village and tell stories from the Ramayana and Bhagavad Gita. Story-telling has always appealed to simple people and the high-brows alike, and has remained an important cultural heritage. The same holds for the Gaineys, those wandering minstrels from Nepal and Northern India, with their crude violins called sarangis. They tell stories of former kings, princes and princesses, battles, fairy tales, village stories, ballads accompanied by the whining, sad sound of the sarangi. Literature has always flown into history, religion, sociology, ethnology and is a heritage of mankind, and you can find all these wonderful stories in your local library or your e-archive. My first contact with a good library was the American Library in Katmandu. A new world of knowledge opened to me. I could read the Scientific American, Time, Newsweek, the Economist, The New York Times, National Geographic, the Smithsonian, the Christian Science Monitor. The most fascinating thing about it was , you only had to be a member and you could take the precious books home. OMG! It was unbelievable for a Nepalese who came from a small town in the foothills of the Himalayas. Nobody bothered about what you were reading: stories, history, new and old ideas, inventions, theories, general and specific knowledge. The sky was the limit. I had a voracious appetite, and it was like the opening of a Bildungsroman. Historical novels tell us about how it was to live in former days, the forms of society involved that the writer evokes in his or her pages. In ‘A Year in Provence’ Peter Mayle makes you almost taste the excellent French food and wine, and the search for truffles with a swine in hilarious, as well as the game of bol. On the other hand, James Joyce evokes a life-changing experience with his protagonists Leopold Bloom and Stephan Daedalus in Dublin on June 16, 1904. Ulysses is a modern interpretation of Homer’s Odyssey, an inner monologue recalled as memories of places, people, smells, tastes and thoughts of the protagonist . The Bhagwad Gita is a luminous and priceless gem in the literary world, possesses world history character, and teaches us the unity in diversity. It is a dialogue between the hero Arjuna and Krishna, who is the chariot-driver. Krishna is an incarnation of the Hindu God Vishnu. The Mahabharata alone has 18 chapters and the epic has 18 books with legends, episodes and didactic pieces that are connected with the main story. It is a fascinating reading about the war between relatives, written in the 4th and 3rd centuries before the birth of Christ. He who reads knows better than to be indoctrinated, for he or she learns to think, opening new worlds and lines of thought. In my school-days I read Charles Dickens’ ‘A Tale of Two Cities’ and it became alive when I went to the Bastille Museum in Paris with a fellow medical student. My memory of A Tale of Two Cities took shape there, as I peered at the old, historical exhibits and the guillotine. Later in the evening my friend Peter’s sister, who was married to a Parisian said, ‘Oh, Satish, there are so many things to see in Paris than a museum the entire afternoon.’ For me it was like time-travelling to the times of the French Revolution, because I’d soaked up the story in my school days. I could see Madame Defarge knitting the names of the noblemen and women to be executed. Dickens was a great master of fabulation. I was ripe for those stories and was as curious as a Siamese cat I had named Sirikit, reading, turning page for page, absolutely absorbed in the unfolding stories. Time and space and my personal demands were unimportant. It was the story that had to be read, even with a midnight candle when the local hydroelectric power supply failed. That happened to me when I read ‘The Godfather’ (Der Pate) while visiting a friend from Iceland. I couldn’t put the book down. I felt sad when a 14 year old computer-crazy schoolkid said: ‘Who reads books these days? Everything’s in the internet.’ The question is: do kids read books on their laptops and eReaders? School websites, Facebook and You Tube and their whatsapp, other apps have added new hobbies for children who’re growing up. Does the cyberspace-generation have only time for games? I tell them they should use: Google Scholar, Pubmed etc. to gather knowledge and learn to transfer it.
* * * On Galvanizing Social Progress Through Literature: Satis Shroff
Sharing Lit at the Fair (Satis Shroff) Writers from across Europe at the Frankfurter Book Fair 2016 were of the opinion that literature cannot move mountains, but does have the ability to galvanize social progress. The annual book fair in Frankfurt is a place for dialogues and exchange. Europa! Was the motto of this year’s reception for it was also a cultural and political platform. Flanders and the Netherlands are a cultural and language region and these two countries, together with Germany, have the North Sea in common. This is where barriers disappear and common denominators replace them; where literature, belief in freedom in the word and the exchange of ideas and the friendship of nations take over.
References and differences: Mercedes Monmany, the author of ‘Through Europe’s Borders, a Trip Through Narratives from the 20 th and 21st centuries introduces readers to European literature. She shows that the borders, at present guarded zealously by Frontex, are permeable. Her plea is the Europe should not only be an economic idea and zone, but a cultural and spiritual one. She’s of the opinion that we should think about common references and not differences. One thing we have in common is literature. To enjoy culture in the form of literature, we don’t need any visa or passport. Just buy a book from the nearest bookshop or borrow from the next library, eh? Seeing further than Europe: Paola Soriga comes originally from Sardinia and her novel La Stagione che verral (The Season That’ll Come) deals with the lives of three Italians born in 1979, who live in a European world, a generation that speaks several languages, benefits from the Erasmus Exchange Programme, low cost flights and enables travels to most European countries. Paola Soriga quotes a fellow Sardinian writer Sergio Atzeni, who is on record as having said: ‘ I am a Sardinian, Italian and European. We are European, but we should also see further than Europe.’ What’s happening in Europe? Stormy days ahead with the influx of refugees from North Africa, Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, the lack of cooperation among the EU countries about the fair distribution of people seeking asylum, incapable bureaucrats in Brussels and the resulting In Germany is has become normal to curse alien-friendly politicians, burn asylum homes, bash refugees and talk about national socialism. Hoyerswerda and Mölln have been outdone in recent times and racism is gathering momentum. Neighbour Britain is bent on Brexit because they are fed up of the almost dictatorial demands of the bureaucrats from Brussels. Quo vadis Europa? Brexit: Britains exit from the European Union is the theme that is discussed in politics and economics not only in Brussels, but also in the streets and pubs in Continent and the UK. As a visitor to the Fair, you can experience the cultural exchange in engaged, provocative and thought-provoking debates, especially talks with the central theme: how can we live together in Europe? Some of the others themes were: publishing in France, Literary Migration in Europe? The Turkey and Europe: How about my freedom of speech and art? Gehen, Kam, Geblieben—Flucht und Migration als historische Normalität, European Crisis and the intellectual debate—in the deadend? The Jungle: The refugee camp called ‘the Jungle’ in Calais (France) has been dismantled and some refugees set the abandoned tents on fire as a symbol. Most of the desired to go to England. The refugees have been whisked away in buses by the French police to other refugee camps in France, where they can apply for asylum. On the one hand the EU says it has a major problem with refugees, a crisis. On the other hand, the EU invests billions of euros in development aid in African countries. There is yet another important reason why Africans head towards Europe to make a living. Fishing flotillas from China, Russia and European Union countries have been robbing the means of existence in the coasts of West Africa and elsewhere. An African activist put it aptly when he said: ‘The EU says, we give you development aid and destroys at the same time our fishing-industry.’ A Germany-based Weltspiegel report reveals the situation in Kayar, a fishing town in Senegal. EU countries like Spain use the fishing-license of the Senegalese government and use mega-trawlers to plunder the African resources. Through this sort of illegal fishing West African countries lose 1,2 billion euros per annum. If the world doesn’t stop plundering the livehood of West African and other poorer countries, it will be the children who won’t find jobs in their countries and will dream of new lives in Europe across the English Channel or other points of entry to the so-called prized, rich Continent.
A Cultural Mixed Literature: Shumona Sinha, who comes originally from Calcutta (Kolkota), is the author of ‘Let’s Beat Up the Poor!’ in French (2012) She admits she had Europe in her head even when she grew up in West Bengal’s capital. Writing in French liberates her from her original Bengali culture and from the weight of being a woman. Reminds me of Jhumpa Lahiri (The Lowland), who lives like Donna Leon in Italy and has started a second writing career in the Italian language. Shumona Sinha says her literature is a cultural mix. She says she has become another person due to the French language and European culture, and has high hopes for literature and its place in the world.
It is a fact that not only Europeans but also diverse cultures from the former colonies and immigrants from other countries have been living in Europe since decades and the new European generation learn to live together, despite diversity and in spite of rightists in Europe. The very idea of the European Union was to get rid of man-made barriers, manned or unmanned. Although the staunch and big Berlin Wall and the Stasi check-posts with their inhuman automatic guns have been removed, countries like Hungary still build walls and profess European democracy, which is indeed a farce, as far as European rights are concerned. The common cultural values through literature and music which are precious, have to be cherished and not allowed to be undermined by rightist-thinking Europeans. Toronto’s Annick Press has brought out a book ‘Stormy Seas—Stories of Young Boat People Refugees.’ It is aimed at young people so that they can understand the images of refugees that are shown across the world’s TV channels. The book is written by Mary Beth Leathurdale and Eleanor Shakespeare. A tale of children who have fled persecution or warzones on boats during the 20 th century till now. There is the story of 18 year old Ruth, a Jewish girl, who fled Germany for Cuba in 1939 on the steamship St. Louis. Another story is about Mohamed 13, who fled from the Ivory Coast in 2006 and landed in Italy in 2010. There are tens of thousands of such youth who are unaccompanied migrants, like Mohamed. Children travelling alone, sans parents, sans guardians. Nujeen’s odyssey: refugee from war-torn Aleppo Nujeen Mustafa brought her dramatic story to the world stage in Frankfurt with the help of Christina Lamb, who is the co-writer of ‘I am Malala.’ Nujeen Mustafa crossed eight miles of sea between Turkey and the Greek island of Lesbos in a refugee boat. They’d paid $ 1,500 each instead of the usual $ 1,000 to board a dinghy with her family. A 3,500 hundred mile journey in a wheelchair. She had cerebral palsy. The countries crossed? Turkey, Greece, Macedonia, Serbia, Hungary, Slovenia, Austria and finally Germany. What an odyssey. Nujeen Mustafa said: ‘ I love writers because they are very deep people who love expressing and writing down ideas.’ Sea Poems: This is what they shared. You shouldn’t be surprised of someone comes to you and whispers a poem in your ear. In case this happens to you, you’ll be asked if you’d like to experience it again. If it hasn’t happened to you, you’ll be obliged to choose one of nine sea poems from Flanders, the Netherlands and Germany. Sit back and relax in the ‘whisper chair’ and travel to the sea in your imagination. That’s what I did and it was so fascinating. Perhaps that’s because my favourite North Sea isle is Sylt. In the reading mirror tent on the Agora you could hear poets from the new generation read from their works: Charlotte van der Broeck and Thomas Möhlmann. Two established poets Annecke Brassinga and Oswald Egger read from their anthology ‘VERschmuggel’ which means a smuggling of verses, Polderpoesie (Junge Lyrik aus Flandern und den Niederlanden) was presented by Stefan Wieczorek and Bas Kusakman. This was a work with various poets from Germany, Flanders and the Netherlands. * * * European Culture: Culture, Wine & Olives in Crispiano (Satis Shroff) COME with me to Crispiano, a lovely town with fragrances and flowers from the vineyards and olive trees in the Masseria, where the sun smiles all day. I never met such amiable people as the people in Crispiano and Taranto. Dolche vita and amore mio, Crispiano. It lies in the region Ampulia in the province of Taranto in the Southern Italian Zone, and has a population of 13,809 . The people are called Crispianesi and the saint of the town is: Madonna della Neve.
The flight from Zürich to Brindisi was pleasant, even though the jet was full. I had a window seat on the left side of the Finnish jet and the personnel spoke German with a distinctly Swiss accent. It was fascinating to see Lake Constance (Bodensee) and the Swiss lakes reveal themselves only to be hidden by clouds, akin to those I’d often seen on Tibetan thankas.
Clouds of all shapes and sizes marked the journey and suddenly you noticed, as we left Venice behind, we were flying over the Adriatic Sea. The islands strewn along the Adriatic coast looked lovely. The endless blue of the sea, and beyond, towards the east lay the Dalmatian Alps and to the south Albania, Greece and Crete in the Mediterranean Sea. Flying over Lake Zurich, past the Canton Schwyz and Klöntaler lake over the Glaner Alps. To the east the Albula Alps and Engadin, overflying St. Moritz and the bernine mountains to the east and Oberhalbstein to the west. Crossing Bellinzona and over Lake Como and the town of Chiasso on our way to Italy. We left Lake Maggiore, with its lakeside towns Ascona and Locarno, behind. It was fascinating to note that the jet took course over the Adriatic Sea, where you could see myriads of islets. The water was glistening like diamonds caused by the reflection of light on the blue water surface. An amazing natural phenomenon as the jet descended on its way to the airport of Brindisi on the east coast of the Italian boot, behind Sicily. * * *
Here I am on my way to Crispiano to attend the Neruda Awards 2017. How did it happen? I was happily writing articles and when I didn’t have much time I’d write poems or prose poems. I’ve been writing for internet websites since decades. Some websites exist still and some like the American Chronicle and gather.com have been sold and gone commercial. However, Blogspot.com and WordPress.com are still marching on and now you have Facebook, Twitter, Tumbler, Boloji.com and a host of others. My experience is not to put all your eggs in one basket so that if one goes defunct, the others are still there. Prof. Saverio Sinopoli, Director e Il Presidente Neruda Association, Poetess Leyla Isik (Turkey), Direttrice Letteraria Dr. Maria Miraglia and Amy Barry (Ireland) and Dichter, Dozent Satis Shroff (Germany)
One day an Irish poetess, Amy Barry, chatted on FB and she introduced me to Maria Miraglia from the Neruda Associazione Lit Club and soon I asked to be the Director for Germany of the Writers International Foundation under the leadership of Preeth nambiar, based in South India. Two German newspapers Freiburg’s Badische Zeitung and Kirchzarten’s Dreisamtäler picked up the story and I was interviewed by Anja Bochtel and Christine van Herk regarding the nomination for the Pablo Neruda Award 2017.
German reporters are very critical and sceptical about prizes for literature other countries and Ms. Anja Bochtel asked particularly about the standard of the poems in the internet. Sometimes, I do admit the standard of the poems aren’t up to the mark because some poets don’t bother to double-check their poems and are poorly edited at times. At other times, there are painstakingly edited and re-edited verses which are a delight to read. Didn’t someone say journalism was literature in a big hurry? Hope this doesn’t hold for poetry in general.
I appreciate the work that is involved in organising such a big poetry and cultural festival in Crispiano this year, and in Taranto last year. This time there are five international poets and poetesses and the others protagonist, as they are called in Italian, are from Italy itself. Behind the scenes there are a lot of translations being done, which is a great contribution to world literature. The world literature has gone digital and it’s time that internet writers are taken seriously. Whether you publish on Amazon, neobooks.com , Lulu.com , Kindle or any standard publisher, the books are now offered online as cheaper e-books or standard paperbacks. Not only the internet publishers do it but also the traditional publishers to reach more people. Much like Neruda Lit Club, Pentasi B based in Manila and others like Roula Pollard and Dimitris Krakaitios based in Larissa (Greece), there are a good many websites that have been contributing towards the dissemination, popularity and popularity of literature around the world. * * *
Here was I, originally a Nepalese, resident in the Schwarzwald town of Freiburg, on my way to Italy at the invitation of the Assoziazione Pablo Neruda in Crispiano to be presented the Neruda Award 2017. What an honour and delight after all those years of teaching Creative Writing at the University of Freiburg (ZfS) and poetry at the University of Education as well as the Volkshochschule in Freiburg and Dreisam Valley (Kirchzarten) and other workshops on Creative Writing for International Writers in Zähringen. It’s really amazing how it really began. At school in the foothills of the Himalayas, I’d had English language and literature taught by the Christian Brothers of Ireland. It was a boarding school and was like a fortress, a state within a state, with the principal as the chief. The Brothers never told us which part of Ireland they were from though they’d make jokes about the Protestants and say: ‘What are they protesting about anyway.’ The Brothers knew everything about us school-kids but never talked about themselves. You couldn’t be warm with them and they wanted to keep it that way. In the days of the East India Company it was master-and-servants and in the school it was masters-and-charges, who paid for their schooling. No protests were tolerated and the school-kids had to stand like soldiers during the early morning inspection in impeccable school uniforms a hand stretched out with a clean, ironed handkerchief. If someone didn’t come up to the standards set the Irish principle could say to him in a gruffy, whiskey-driven voice and beef-red face: ‘Come to the office!’ That meant benders: whacks on his bottom with a leather strap. If you went out of bounds for even a second you were obliged to get benders. I had my share of it. All the books we used came from England, even the science books. In the lower classes we did adventure stories like Robinson Crusoe and Moby Dick, King Solomon’s Mines and the Lake District poets. At home my Mom used to recite and read from the Ramayana and Bhagavad Gita and in school we did ‘Tess’ by Thomas Hardy and ‘A Tale of Two Cities’ by Charles Dickens, Shakespeare’s ‘Macbeth,’ ‘Julius Caesar’ and ‘As you like it’ and lots of poems by British and a few American authors. The Christian Brothers expected us to recite poems, which was actually a good thing. I loved reading and reciting and doing questions from the context, writing essays, précis and analysis of stories. The final years at school went fast and suddenly there I was with a certificate from the University of Cambridge (and an Indian equivalent) in the hand and no more sitting on the hard old bench, do-da-do-da-day. After school I went to Kathmandu for my further studies. I’d applied to the Amrit Science College in Thamel, and one fine day I received a positive reply letter from the principal of the college, a certain Mr. Joshi, with a PhD in Physics. We had to do a subject called ‘Panchayat’ which was mostly about the glorification of the Nepalese Royal family and how the Panchayat system from the Vedic times suited Nepal in every way, because Nepal was made up mostly of villages. It was a system about the five elders of each village in Nepal and the national religion was Hinduism, with the King and Queen holding the executive, legislative and judiciary powers. King Birendra and Queen Aishwarya of Nepal in Bonn’s La Redoute Satis Shroff with Gauri KC, Radio Nepal at the Graf Zeppelin Hotel
At my second school St. Joseph’s, North Point, I met Prince Dhirendra Shah and he was in my batch. I and my friend Tek were doing our Bachelors in Zoology, Botany and Geology and Prince Dhirendra his BA in Geography at the Tri Chandra College. Later, I went to Germany for higher studies and Prince Dhirendra moved to the Britain. His elder brother Birendra Shah became the King of Nepal after the demise of his father King Mahendra. King Birendra had a tough time with the Congress at the beginning of his reign and later the Maoists began overrunning the police and government check-posts. The movement started in western Nepal, later moving to central and eastern Nepal. Demonstrations and strikes were staged in all parts of the Nepalese Kingdom. After I’d done my Bachelors I worked in a so-called English Medium School. In the prospectus they mentioned a lake but it was jsut a greenish, dirty pond with algae. The two headmasters were out to make money and I pitied the students. Some of them were Gurkha children and their fathers were doing service as soldiers and guarding the Sultan’s palace in Brunei, Malaysia fighting against the communists in the jungles of Kalimantan and in North Borneo. But the kids made the best out of the situation. One day a dear friend’s father advised me to go over to The Rising Nepal’s editorial department. I went and was met by a guy named Josse who also had a public school background. He asked me which school I’d attended. The language was English and not the lingua franca of Nepal, which is Nepali. He said he’d gone to St. Augustine in K’pong. Then he stared me in the eyes for a few seconds. I didn’t blink because this was a game I’d played often with my neighbour’s lovely daughter. We’d just play this staring game. And I’d always win. She’d either lower her eyes or blink. I remember a similar situation in Doris Lessing’s ‘The Second Hut’ in which a Major Carruthers hires an Afrikander named Van Herdeen. Did the editor look at the width of my eyes, the shape of my skull and how my legs were apart? How I stood there, a young guy fresh from college and stared at him in his eyes. He must have thought: this bloke’s okay, good character, good public-school-product, a gentleman. ‘Okay, you can start tomorrow,’ he said. So I started working with the Rising Nepal, writing the second editorial and letters to the editor when there weren’t any, correcting articles written and submitted by Nepalese and foreign residents of Catmandu Valley. Josse had said: ‘You’ll reach more readers that your school class.’ He was right. I started writing a regular science spot column every Thursday and one day a Mr. Pandey from the External Service of Radio Nepal came to the office and said: ‘I read your ‘Bustle of Basantapur’ article and really enjoyed it. Would you like to write commentaries for Radio Nepal?’ I felt delighted. I thought for a second about the development issues but you really didn’t have much choice but to give the Royal Palace’s views in the editorials. Can I make it different with culture, perhaps? So I started writing commentaries on Nepal’s development and culture which were read by Gauri KC in the evening programme.
You can imagine my surprise when I met Gauri KC, Shyam KC and other journalists at the Graf Zeppelin Hotel in Stuttgart. They’d accompanied King Birendra and Queen Aishwarya on a state visit to Germany. I’d received an invitation for the official reception at La Redoute in Bonn and also in Stuttgart. Frau Margot Busak was so kind to drive with me in her black Mercedes car. She died shortly thereafter.
In Freiburg I started learning at the Goethe Institute and reading Medicine. It was at the university that I attended Prof. Bruce Dobler’s Creative Writing semester. We did poems and Bruce was the one who got me interested in poems. At school poems were the works of exalted literary personalities, almost gods. Nobody taught us to write poems. We were obliged to learn English poems by heart. That was all to literature. No Irish Brother was interested in Creative Writing. It didn’t exist in their minds. We did write a good many letters, essays and précis though. There was a prize for performance in science but none for literature. It heartens me to note that in the German Gymnasiums the school-kids learn Creative Writing and prizes are given not only for science but also for music and literature. Creative Writing has come to the Continent from the USA. British universities have also introduced Creative Writing in their syllabus. In Germany you can do Kreatives Schreiben in a few universities in Hildesheim and Saxony. The Frankfurter and Leipziger Book Fairs attract thousands of authors, readers and publishers from all over the world. * * *
Since the sea is a bit far away from Crispiano its inhabitants cannot gather the frutti de mare, they have made use of the fruits of labour of the earth. The people of Crispiano grow wheat, grapes, vegetables, olives and make bread, wine and paste with their hands as ‘ chiangaredd’ or ‘ frucidd .’ The vegetables and fresh seasonal fruits are brought to the Italian table. There are many kinds of bread to be found in the Italian table. Bread could also replaced by legumes like peas and beans, which developed into excellent food in various dishes such as ‘ncapriata’ together with other vegetables boiled and sautéed with stir-fried onions. On festive occasions the dishes are richer as ‘ tien, ’ meat and potatoes and, of course, ‘ fecha scchet .’ This involves baking figs in the oven, additionally with toasted almonds and laurel. A typical speciality from Crispiano is the liver called ‘ gnummredde ,’ which is made from the entrails of lamb such as liver, heart and lungs, wrapped in a net and tied with guts, strewn with salt. It reminded me of the time I was invited by a family Moosmann in the Black Forest to a Schweineschlacht. Kurt Vonnegut Jr.’s ‘Slaughterhouse-Five is another matter with an eloquent anti-war message. In this case also, nothing was thrown away and big boxes of spices were used to make the meat tasty. The smell of clover, cardamom, paprika and salt emanated from the schlachthaus (butchery) to our nostrils. Even the blood was cooked with bacon to make Blutwurst. The person who kills the animal is called the ‘ Schlächter ’ and the butcher has a Meisterbrief and many years of training in his trade and an examination behind him. ‘The Agrigentiner (farmers) eat as though they would die the next day, and they build as they would live forever’ said Empedokles. But when it comes to the fancies of our palate, we must leave it to Hippocrates, who said: ‘The tongue tastes the food, as though it were music.’ No question is more popular than that of Marco Polo (1254-1324): did the Venetian bring the noodles from China to Italy or was it the other way round? The spices come from the countries of the four currents of Paradise: the Nile, Ganges, Euphrates and Tigris. Legends tell us the bird phoenix burns in a cinnamon (zimt)-nest, and one promises oneself that the balsam-spices have life-extending qualities. The Masseriamita with biologically produced olive oil and excellent wine. ‘I think, one finds in people who’re born near good wine are much happier,’ said Leonardo da Vinci. This is the impression I had of Saverio, Ariel, Egidio and Adriano. All jolly men in the middle of their lives, which they lives with gusto. It was no other than Nietzsche (Ecce Homo) who said: ‘The best cuisine belongs to Piemont. I’d say the Italian cuisine in Crispiano and Taranto was second to none. This was a place where they love music, food and wine. The olive is reaped later in Autumn but you could, nevertheless, eat olives and tartufi (truffles) served with tasty risotto rice and delicate sea-food. You felt like a god, waking up in the beautiful ambient of Villa Marina in Crispiano, a short drive away from the town. You could bathe in the history of lovely Crispiano and the harbour town of Taranto, as told by my dear friends Maria and Saverio.
Maria is a cosmopolitan poetess based in Crispiano. You notice immediately that she loves meeting people from other cultural backgrounds. She told me she’d been to India last year and her question was: where is the spiritual India of yore? In Europe you always hear about India as the Lands of Spirituality with its gurus, pundits, sadhus and rishis. People in the streets of India tended to be business minded. She’d visited Jaipur and Delhi and knows a well-known poet from India. I told her living in a subcontinent with such a big population isn’t easy. I was thinking about a book review I’d written about ‘The White Tiger,’a book about modern India. The German poet Günter Grass also wrote his subjective views about Calcutta.
Maria’s literary works have been translated into: Spanish, Turkish, Macedonian, Albanian and Azerbaijan languages. In the forward to her anthology of poems ‘Dancing Winds’ Yawchien Fang, a Taiwanese academic poet and writer, describes her book as a ‘modern classic with a magnificent poetry collection by one of the finest poets of contemporary literature.’ Further, he writes: ‘In many poems we can read the poet’s heart that wishes for a world united in love.’ Saverio Sinapoli grew up in Taranto, a town with big mansions and two bridges and a seaside restaurant with a magnificent backdrop of the Adriatic Sea. The sun was going down under the horizon of the golden sea and the Gulf of Taranto when we went for dinner and a promenade. Further southwards below Italy’s boot lay the Ionian Sea. * * *
Journey Back: Ah, the sun is going down with a scarlet glow along the horizon, with greyish-blue clouds which look like the brush strokes of Monet and Cezanne on the heavenly canvas. The sun is setting behind the blue mountains as we reach Wettingen at a steady speed. The sun is becoming fainter and fainter and the scarlet hue has disappeared, now becoming yellowish with more bluish-grey clouds appearing and covering the sky above the horizon. Lights have started appearing in the townships that fleet by. One of the many long tunnels appears and suddenly there’s more light outside. Blue mountains appear in the horizon as we head for Basle Brugg.
My thoughts go to the burly Egidio Ippolito, the mayor of Crispiano, a gentleman with a positive Mediterranean approach to life. He’s interested in making Cispiano a great place to live in, and his deep interest in culture, not only of his Heimat but also cultures beyond the Mediterranean. I never met a more positive, cosmopolitan and sympathetic mayor in my life. He not only manages the administration of the town but indulges successfully in creative design. He invited us to try out his fantasy costume in the town council of Crispano.
Before going to Italy I sent a request per e-mail to the mayor of Freiburg for a small symbolic gesture for his Italian counterpart (I had an exchange of the emblems of Freiburg and Crispiano in mind) but didn’t receive a reply. So I rang up his ‘ Vorzimmer Dame ’ and she congratulated me on the Neruda Award but said: ‘ Wir machen so was nicht. ’ That was it. My heart sank to my feet. I had a strange feeling because this so-called Green City professes to be world open (even the Dalai Lama was greeted and feted by Freiburg City) but it did have its limits. So I went to town and bought souvenirs on my own. Andere Länder, andere Sitten. We, Germans, are know as stiff people. In comparison to my hometown Freiburg im Breisgau, the town of Crispiano and its mayor were magnanimous towards the poets who were invited and treated as special guests of the Neruda Award 2017. Grazie Egidio Ippolito. Grazie Crispiano

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How To Make Classic Scotch Eggs For Easter

How To Make Classic Scotch Eggs For Easter 1 406.media
There’s a great deal of debate over the origins of this salty snack, with tales of the very first Scotch egg appearing everywhere from Whitby to the polished streets of the capital. One thing is for sure though – they’re definitely not Scottish!
If the Fortnum & Mason tale is to be believed, Scotch eggs were once a luxury food only available for the upper classes. Conceived as a travelling snack, the delicacies were available around Piccadilly for the rich to purchase as a light refreshment to enjoy on their way to their country houses. They were designed to be neater and more discreetly scented than traditional hard-boiled eggs, offering a convenient snack for the wealthy.
Contrary to this tale, many others believe that the egg’s origins are in fact rooted in the coastal Yorkshire town of Whitby. Named after the establishment that invented them, William J Scott & Sons are said to have invented the ‘Scotties’ – the original eggs were covered in a creamy fish paste rather than sausage meat, before being covered in breadcrumbs. The sausage meat replaced the fish when the eggs began to be sold in big food shops, as it was easier to package. Variations of the original fish-covered eggs can still be purchased on the East Yorkshire coast.
Another contradictory tale suggests that the recipe of the egg is rooted in Indian cuisine exported from the British Raj. Nargisi kofta is essentially a spicy meatball containing boiled eggs inside; a dish not too dissimilar to the Scotch egg. If this story is to be believed, however, then it has to be asked why all of the spices were taken out of the recipe.
In celebration of Easter, Chef Ranjan Rajani, from Hotel Sahara Star has shared his secret recipe for Scotch Egss. Classic Scotch Eggs

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3 restaurateurs’ views on amping up QSR catering sales through social media

3 restaurateurs’ views on amping up QSR catering sales through social media April 15, 2019 | by Elliot Maras
As social media has become a more important tool for brands in general, the stakes are especially high for high-profit services such as catering. Hence, a panel during the recent Restaurant Franchising Innovation Summit in Louisville explored ways to fine-tune social media programs for catering.
Chris Grundell, vice president of sales at SOCi, a social and reputation management platform, served as moderator.
The panelists agreed that as online and social media have become popular methods of placing orders, foodservice establishments have had to “up their game” and be able to respond to changing customer expectations.
“Consumer behavior changed considerably,” said Zaid Ayoub, founder and CEO of Sajj Mediterranean, a San Francisco restaurant that has grown to nine stores and two food trucks.
Shown left to right: Chris Grundell of Soci, Zaid Ayoub of Sajj Mediterannean, Brittany Warren of Networld Media Group, Sebastian Van de rijt of Bamboo Asia and Stacey Kane of Mahana Poke and Firenza Pizza discuss social media. Photo by Willie Lawless.
Online ordering, according to Ayoub, has empowered consumers to expect service on a much shorter notice. Sajj Mediterranean went from requiring a 48-hour notice for catering to a four-hour notice.
Before social media emerged as powerful marketing tool, Sajj Mediterranean used what Ayoub called “old fashioned guerilla marketing” to promote its catering service — having sales people knock on doors. Ayoub said his company now lists its recipes online since customers nowadays want more information about their food.
Stacey Kane, chief marketing officer, Mahana Poke & Firenza Pizza based in Ashburn, Virginia, agreed that catering services must be capable of executing on demand.
“Catering is not easy,” said Kane. “It’s not something you can just press the button on.”
Kane said it is important to offer visual images in social media content for catering. Two types of images — pictures of what the food looks like and lifestyle pictures to give context to the food, such as pictures of a tailgating party, are both needed.
“You have to have both kinds of imagery nailed down,” she said. How to manage customer reviews
It didn’t take long for the discussion to move to responding to customer reviews.
Kane said a qualified marketing person should respond to reviews since owners who take reviews personally can make the situation worse by not responding properly. Having an effective response plan in place can be especially difficult for franchise organizations, she said.
Yelp presents a challenging channel since foodservice providers have no control over Yelp reviews. But Kane said she has nonetheless used Yelp to promote her company’s catering by taking a proactive approach and sending content to Yelp, which the channel usually posts.
“It (sending Yelp content) allows you to control the message,” Kane said.
Sebastian van de Rijt, owner of Bamboo Asia, a San Francisco restaurant which specializes in Indian and Vietnamese cuisine, said he tries to respond to all reviews on Facebook and Instagram.
“It (social media) has taken word-of-mouth (marketing) to a whole new level,” he said. Social media tools evolve
Measuring the effectiveness of your social media is important, the panelists agreed. Fortunately, the social media channels have improved the analytics reports they offer to users, said Brittany Warren, director of content marketing, Networld Media Group, owner of the Restaurant Franchising Innovation Summit.
Warren said companies need to know their cost per click for their social media orders, a metric she said is available from social media platforms. Companies also need to be able to connect brands’ social media marketing to actions that can be tracked, she said.
Social media platforms also offer targeting tools that can be very effective, Warren said, referring to tools that allow companies to target specific groups of customers.
“Use the tools the social platforms have put out there to your advantage,” she said.
These tools are available for a fee, she said, and they require a certain amount of testing.
Ayoub, who concurred that the data provided by social media programs today is helpful, said he wants to know who ordered what through what marketing channel.
Companies also have to know what their social media programs are trying to accomplish, Warren said.
“What are the problems you are trying to solve for your audience?” she asked.
Warren urged listeners to involve local people in social marketing posts, since consumers like to do business with people as opposed to products. She also said it is important for a company to be authentic in their social media messages.
Kane agreed, noting that customers like it when a business posts their pictures on Instagram.
“The (marketing) content has to be cool,” Ayoub said. Franchise issues
Franchise operations sometimes have unique challenges with social media programs, several of the panelists agreed.
Van de Rijt said he looks for ways to make it fun for franchisees to participate in social media programs.
Kane said her company’s franchisees have become far more supportive of the company’s social marketing program since they’ve learned how important it is to their success.
While everyone agreed that social media is important for improving catering sales, the panelists were not sure when asked if the company should have a separate web page for catering. Kane said it could work for a company that does not have franchisees, but for franchise organizations, she thinks it would be problematic.
Feature photo: iStock

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PIFF 2019 (TOP): Experience The True Taste of Penang

PIFF 2019 (TOP): Experience The True Taste of Penang Have you REALLY had a taste of Penang? Thexeilia Yeap 1 hour ago 3 minutes read
Have you ever wanted to try every single hotel’s delights but never got the chance to? Now you can! In conjunction with Penang International Food Festival’s major event: Taste of Penang (TOP), an extensive line-up of all the delicacies from renowned hotels across Penang are available at your fingertips! This means you’ll get to savour all the hotels’ signature items right at one place. Is this awesome or what? Here are the participating hotels: 1. G Hotel
Everyone knows that G Hotel is renowned for its tea time delights which include several unique pastries that are tasty as well as Instagrammable. During this event, foodies would be enthralled at selections such as Cempedak Cheesecake, Coconut Moussecake, Crunchy Crab Cake with Wasabi Aioli as well as Pan Fried Gyoza with Sesame Soy Dipping Sauce. 2. Jazz Hotel
As a newly established hotel, Jazz Hotel offers multi-cuisine delicacies that range from Japanese to International. Making an appearance in conjunction with Taste of Penang, drop by this booth to experience a surprising serving of this hotel’s delicacies. Photo: @JazzHotelPenang (Website) 3. Iconic Hotel
Iconic Hotel offers delicious Nyonya and Thai cuisines and since they will be making an appearance during this major event, the delicacies served by this hotel is guaranteed to hit very close to home if you’re looking to have a taste of authentic Nyonya and Thai cuisines.
Offering a plethora of eateries from different cultures, Iconic Hotel will take you on a tour around the world.
4. Vouk Hotel Suites
Vouk Hotel Suites is renowned for its multi-cuisine inspiration from Oriental, Western, Japanese and Malay where patrons could savour on smoked salmon, teriyaki unagi, grilled satay, Char Koay Teow, Hokkien Mee, and you’ll also be able to feast on pasta as well as a variety of fresh seafood. Bring your friends and family to Vouk Hotel’s booth to see what they have to offer! 5. Royale Chulan Penang
Savour all the delicacies from Chef Kamarullizard Bin Hassan, the executive chef at Royale Chulan Penang during this event. You will get this rare opportunity to feast on the hotel’s renowned dishes as well as witness before your very own eyes how Chef Kamarullizard elevates your every day, ordinary dishes into ones that are of restaurant quality. 6. Olive Tree Hotel
Are you guys ready for classic Oriental themed delicacies? If you’re up for it, don’t forget to pay Olive Tree Hotel’s booth a visit during PIFF 2019! You’ll be able to find crispy snacks such as fried beancurd and plenty more.
7. Lexis Suites
Themed Shell Out, Lexis Suites will be serving a wide array of seafood selections such as oysters, squids, prawns, scallops, mussels and many more! Be prepared to savour fresh catches from the sea during this event and if you claim yourself as an avid seafood lover, stop by this booth to take up the challenge.
8. Double Tree by Hilton Penang
Double Tree by Hilton Penang is renowned for their seafood themed buffet with specialities like Kanava Madras which essentially is squid stuffed with mint seafood and Indian spices, served with tomato chutney (talk about creativity and a fancy name). Patrons are willing to pay up to RM 100 ++ for a single visit to their hotel buffet and in conjunction with Taste of Penang (TOP), you’ll be able to enjoy all the renowned delicacies that are in Double Tree’s menu. Photo: @Doubletreepg (Facebook) 9. Hard Rock Hotel Penang
Aside from the legendary guitar and The Beatles’ sculpture as memorabilia for Hard Rock Hotel, did you know that the buffalo sliders and Honey Sriracha Wings are just as legendary? Stop by at Hard Rock Hotel’s booth to experience delicacies inspired by America in which the buffalo sliders are sauced in either Blue Cheese Dressing or Ranch Dressing. If you’re a fan of chicken wings, the Honey Sriracha Wings is not to be missed for its perfect garnish of sesame seeds and green onions. 10. The Light Hotel
The Light Hotel’s booth includes serving Soft Roll Shrimp Pocket and Paratha Peanut Roll, delicacies that may be ordinary but with a unique rendition. A fluffy bun with shrimps instead of a typical chicken patty and peanut roll with chocolate dipping loudly announces that the eats served by this hotel is one-of-a-kind. What are you waiting for? Bring your family along for a special culinary experience.
Be sure to involve your friends, neighbours, partners and also yourselves during PIFF’s major event: Taste of Penang (TOP) on the 20th and 21st of April from 5 PM to 11 PM so that all you foodies can enjoy the extraordinary Taste of Penang. See you guys there! PIFF 2019 (TOP): Experience The True Taste of Penang
We would like to invite you to join our New Private Community Group! Here you are free to ask questions, share your love for food, and explore the Penang community! We will also regularly post about casual promos and latest findings. Click on the button below and hunt good food with us today! Tags

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EatNow India – Local Food Delivery

-Get Special deals and Discount -Pay by cash or Online Transaction -Live tracking once order is picked We’ve got so many cuisines to choose from;Indian,Arabic,Italian,Chinese plus many more you don’t even need to get up from the couch! Ordering with EatNow app is simple: 1.Search – Enter your favourite restaurant or food 2.order-Select your favourite food from the menu and place an order Version 1.0

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How to Travel as a Vegan in India: An Expert’s Advice for Vegan India Travel

What’s the best way to contact you to ask questions or book the trip? Vegan India Travel
Should you travel to India if you follow a vegan diet? Absolutely! You can certainly find vegan food in India. If you’re looking to travel as a vegan in India, you should consider joining me on a vegan India adventure trip in September 2019. You’ll be joined by myself and vegan India travel expert, Prachi Jain of Escape To… by Fairkonnect . Prachi has kindly answered some questions that I had about vegan India travel, sustainable tourism in India, ecotourism in India, and her tourism companies in India. You’ll learn more about the vegan movement in the country, how our tour will support sustainable enterprises, how to combat over-tourism, and how her trips are perfect for both the first time visitor and seasoned traveler to India. Want to join us? Here’s how you can travel to India with me in September 2019! Click here for all of the details! How is the vegan movement growing in India? There is a lot of growth in the vegan movement in India, especially in the cities like Bengaluru, Mumbai, Goa and Pondicherry. What seemed like a fringe movement a decade ago is now moving into the mainstream. Vegan start-ups have worked really hard, and there are many vegan home makers who are catering meals. It’s really awesome to see India focused on dishes that are unique to its culture and traditions instead of only focusing on mock meats. Folks are turning vegan as they see the health benefits. As a country with one of the highest rates of dairy consumption, Indians are starting to realize that the dairy they are consuming is laced with chemicals and hormones. Avoiding dairy also means avoiding a lot of sugar, which is important for a nation impacted by some of the highest rates of diabetes . What are some challenges a vegan traveler might face in India?
I have found North India to be a bit more challenging than South India as a vegan in India. It’s important to always ask if the dish has ghee (clarified butter), regular butter, milk or milk cream or yogurt in it. However, a recipe that you may have had in one restaurant can be totally vegan and at another restaurant, they might add ghee to it.
When I first turned vegan, it was really hard for me to resist chai because it is delicious and there are really cheap stalls all over the country selling chai for 10 rupees (which is like 10 cents). As a vegan traveler, it’s always good to be prepared so you can still enjoy all the local food and drink. You can go to many chai stalls and ask for the masala tea without milk and then just add in your own vegan milk if you are carrying a small pack of it.
I suggest always asking the restaurant to not cook your food in ghee or add butter, milk or yogurt. Use Google Translate to make sure you repeat it a few times in different ways. When in doubt, go to an Indo-Chinese restaurant and have veggie momos, gobi manchurian and veggie fried rice. Those are never cooked with dairy products. If you order a thali, ask them to hold the yogurt and any dessert dish with milk. What kinds of food will we eat on our vegan tour to India?
So many! Honestly, India is a colorful mosaic of cultures and we want to share that on the trip through food. We’ll be tasting local Karnataka food (like akki roti) which many people probably have not tasted outside of India. We’re going to try vegan versions of Indian favorites like palak paneer (made of tofu) and payasam made of coconut milk.
Since we’re traveling to the South India, we can expect a lot of dishes to contain ragi which is an ancient grain of South India and coconut milk and cream. We’ll also try some modern vegan cuisine – my favorite is a creamy broccoli soup done by one of my favorite vegan restaurants in the city. Lastly, I can’t wait for people to try some of my favorite drinks with alternative dairy options like buttermilk with savory spices and pink chai with saffron. From my experience with past vegan tours, we will eat almost nonstop. Beyond eating delicious food, what kinds of things will a traveler experience on our vegan trip?
We really want people to come away with a feeling that they’ve traveled and tread lightly in India after the trip is over. That means that we’re going to experience elements of zero-waste travel, slow travel in which you are not jumping from one city to the next but really soaking in one place at a time (we don’t actually cover a large geographical area in 10 days), meeting local change-makers and feeling more connected to the vegan startup movement around the world.
Also, apart from this…we are going to travel to one of the most unique places on Earth . It feels like you are on a completely different planet when you first get there. So from a travel standpoint, we’ll see two very different kinds of India – urban and cosmopolitan to rural and ancient. What made you want to start a travel company focused on vegan and sustainable travel?
I started our company back in 2010. We started hosting international volunteers and interns who wanted to live in India and do meaningful work on a long-term basis. My goal is to make it easier and safer for travelers to experience India, while learning from amazing initiatives by local Indians. I always encourage my travelers to not eat meat or dairy in India due to health reasons (avoiding food poisoning).
I was really compelled to make this shift after attending the Responsible Tourism Summit in New Delhi. Tourism is contributing to wildlife endangerment, plastic and waste pollution, and over-tourism. As I started learning about how tourism can be a force for good in the world, I became much more intentional in the experiences we offered in India.
It wasn’t enough for us to just say that travelers could come and experience Indian culture. We are committed to making sure that no animals are harmed. This means no elephant/camel rides, no consumption of animal products, and not buying clothing and souvenirs made of animals. We are as plastic-free and zero-waste as possible as we travel. Furthermore, we’ll help grow the vegan movement in the places we visit.
With many tour companies wanting to do good, I decided that experiencing local culture wasn’t enough. We had to inherently change the way people travel from what they eat and drink to how they shop and what businesses they support while they are on the trips. Ultimately, I think this is not just the way I particularly like to travel, but how I like to live everyday. I wanted to translate my own lifestyle into an interesting travel experience that benefits everyone. What makes your trips different from other tourism companies in India?
We are not a typical tour company, and this sets us apart from other tourism companies in India. 365 days of the year, we host international volunteers and interns who stay with us in India for 2 weeks to 6 months. We design an experience that is beyond the surface level of typical tourist activities.
Our own clients tell us secrets and gems that they’ve discovered while living in India with us for 6 months. So, when we do actually host group trips (usually no more than 5 times a year), we offer experiences that are only possible after living in India for quite some time. This could mean the most ordinary of things that locals do. It might be riding a bus and going shopping for fruits. It could also be attending a panel discussion put on by local startups.
Also, we showcase all of India from the very under-resourced to the very luxurious. Some people want experiences of India that only show them what they have already seen – slum tours, underprivileged schools, etc. However, India is also a nation of entrepreneurial energy, art and fashion, and incredible amounts of innovation across all industries. We hope our travelers see all facets of the country. You’ll leave knowing that India is a much more diverse and complex country that can’t be summed up in only 10 days. How does your tour company combat over-tourism and support sustainable enterprises?
We are really conscious of over-tourism and always create an itinerary that doesn’t always include the most popular places or the sort of “Instagram-famous” places. I’ve recently found out that some travelers want to visit places simply because they saw an Instagram influencer visit there once. We try to educate our travelers about the significance of visiting a particular place that we’ve chosen to be on the itinerary. We don’t always pick the places that are the prettiest to photograph.
Instead of only sightseeing, we do a lot of workshops on our trips. We help our travelers meet local entrepreneurs in the vegan field to forge meaningful connections. Hopefully, they’ll bring those ideas back with them when they go home. If we do have something more tourist oriented on the trip (for example, the Taj Mahal) we offset that by going to a place around it that supports some kind of sustainable initiative in veganism or fair trade. We give advice to our travelers about where it would be most helpful and meaningful to shop. How are your tours ideal for the first time traveler to India (and the repeat visitor)?
We offer a really great taste of what makes up India. The old, ancient and unchanging to the new, energetic and innovative spirit. You are usually traveling in a small group of 8-12 people. This allows for some incredible bonds with people from around the world. For those that have visited India before, it will almost feel like you are going one step beyond the surface of what your first trip may have been like. It’s like getting in a little deeper into the spirit, past and future of the country. In what ways are your tours eco-friendly?
We try to limit our plastic water bottle usage so that we are filling up water bottles at our hotels rather than constantly buying them outside. We ask travelers to bring their own toiletries instead of using ones from the hotel that may be packaged in plastic. Sometimes we eat with our hands in the Indian way, and we provide silver utensils and metal straws so that we are not using plastic cutlery. We try our best to use public transportation like metros whenever possible. For clothing and souvenirs, we suggest places that our travelers can buy sustainable materials (for example, scarves with natural dyes, upcycled accessories, non-plastic souvenirs, etc.). What’s the best way to contact you to ask questions or book the trip?
Please . I’d love to discuss more about the trip , answer any questions or hash out any ideas. Side note: Feel free to also if you have any questions, too!
Thank you so much, Prachi, for talking about such important issues of vegan travel, ecotourism, over-tourism, and sustainability. We should definitely consider these issues in all of our trips as we travel around the world. There are so many ecotourism places in India that you can visit. Traveling on an eco-friendly tour that’s carefully planned by a local is the easiest way to ensure that you’re contributing positively as a traveler. I’ll be traveling to India with Prachi and Escape To… from September 21st – October 1st, 2019. I’d love if you could join us on this vegan adventure in India. You don’t need to be vegan to join. Come with an open mind and an appetite for delicious local cuisine. However, if you are vegan, you’ll be guaranteed to have no issues finding plant-based meals in India. We’ll be eating them nonstop. For more details on the itinerary and booking information, please check out the official website . PIN one of the above images to Pinterest to save this article for future reference. Do you have any questions about traveling as a vegan in India? Comment below! 0 shares

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Native Dish

Video
CB has teamed up with the creators of “Native Dish: United Flavors of NYC,” NYC Media’s new food TV series, to offer a behind-the-scenes look at some of the New Yorkers featured in these short videos. The series, which aims to celebrate New York City immigrants from all over the world, focuses on one individual and one dish at a time as a means through which to explore the myriad cuisines represented in the city and the people who make them.
While each episode features a general overview of the participant’s life story, particularly as it relates to food, we are expanding that narrative by providing the full interview transcript, albeit condensed and lightly edited. It’s their story, in their own words. This month we are spotlighting Isha Sumner, a Garifuna immigrant from Honduras who runs a catering business called “Weiga/Let’s Eat” with her mother, Sara Martinez, and has a cookbook of the same name forthcoming. The mother-and-daughter team share their recipe for durudias, tortillas made with coconut milk and brown sugar.
My name is Isha Sumner, I’m from Honduras, and I’ve been living in New York for the past 20 or so years – I’ve been kind of all over the place, Queens, then East Harlem, now West Harlem and Cape Cod. I’m a mom, and I’m married.
In Honduras, I remember life being very colorful, being surrounded by a lot of nature, and I remember the ocean, which was my very favorite thing growing up. Back then, we would go fishing, gather wood and yucca, things that were fun but were also work that you had to do to help sustain the family.
Life was completely different because in Honduras, you have more of a communal lifestyle: you know everyone in the neighborhood, and everybody knows your name. You take your time doing things. Life happens to you rather than you making life happen. Here in New York, you have to be on the hustle, you have to be on the go. Everything is already set up, and you have to accomplish those things that have been set up before you.
For most of the families that come from Honduras, the objective is for the parents to go first to the United States and then their kids can follow, and it’s always looking for a better life, or a better opportunity to live an abundant life. It doesn’t come easily – each and every one of us has to work for that [abundant life]. But once you’re in America, chances are that you will have the opportunity to make that life happen one way or another.
Being Garifuna
I come from a Garifuna family, and I kind of know where I stand as far as my ethnicity and my nationality. And I think it’s very important to know these things, just because the more you know about yourself, the more confident you become about who you are. Ultimately we’re all humans, but knowing your history is very important.
For me, being Garifuna means being a survivor, a fighter, someone who is resilient and doesn’t give up easily; it means someone who has dreams and is consistently looking for a home or a place to call home. I would say, loosely speaking, that’s the definition of being Garifuna.
Historically speaking, Garifunas are descendants of Arawak Indians and West Africans, people that were exiled from the island of St. Vincent by the English and came to the coast of Honduras and started rebuilding their lives.
The origins of the Garifuna language are West African, supposedly from the tribe of Yoruba. And also, there’s a mix of French and some English words, because, you know, we intermingled as well with the French and the English before they turned on us. But the language evolves as it goes to different places, so now that we’re in Honduras, in Belize, in Guatemala, in Nicaragua, you can also hear some Spanish in the language.
The kitchen becomes a communal area whenever someone is cooking in the Garifuna culture.
I think Garifuna people would agree that we are an adaptable people. We go to a place, we adapt to a certain culture, we make it our own by adding other elements to it. And I think this is case when it comes to food. Take tortillas, which are common in Honduras, made by the Mestizo women. We have adopted tortillas from the Honduran culture to our Garifuna culture, and we have incorporated certain elements like coconut milk [in the tortillas] to make them our own. I love the fact that we get other foods from different cultures. We go to a grocery store, we’ll buy something and it’s not necessarily Garifuna, but we’re going to make some Garifuna food out of it.
Creating a Cookbook and Catering Business
I learned how to cook mostly from my mom, because the kitchen becomes a communal area whenever someone is cooking in the Garifuna culture. Women – it doesn’t matter how old you are – are always welcome into the kitchen and they will find something for you to do.
In general, she’ll say, “Oh come on! You can do it!” She has a fun way of approaching it so that she doesn’t make you nervous about learning or wanting to try something new in the kitchen.
The cookbook came about because of a need to share our food and also a desire to be part of the eclectic food industry in New York City. I was sitting down one day eating with my niece, and we started reminiscing about foods from Honduras and the desserts, and all these things, and I was like, “Wait a minute. Is there a cookbook?” And I went online to check if there was a Garifuna cookbook, and I did find a couple of books but I don’t know, I didn’t identify them as Garifuna.
And sometimes there wouldn’t be pictures with the recipes. I love cookbooks and every time I’ve bought a cookbook, it’s because I’ve seen the pictures, and they have given me the necessary step-by-step instructions to make the recipe. It could be from Jerusalem, it could be from Turkey, but if the cookbook is allowing me to cook by showing me pictures and steps, then that cookbook most likely came home with me. So I wanted to create something like that for Garifuna food.
Mom and I went into catering because as we started working on the cookbook, we would do tasting parties and food events in parks. People would come to us and say, “I have this event. Is there anyway that you guys could make this for us?” And we would be like, “Yeah, totally we can make this.” People seem to really love the flavors of Garifuna food, so we decided to start telling people that we can cater events and cook for them. The name of the catering business is the same as the cookbook: it’s “Weiga,” which means, “Let’s Eat.”
The Importance of Family Gatherings
My mom is the backbone of the family – she holds everything together. She cooks and then she brings everyone together [around the table]. Nobody ever says, “No, I don’t want any food.” So she utilizes food to keep the family together and bring us under the same roof to have fun, which is something really special because you could easily lose that here in New York.
Gatherings are very important because it’s a way of bringing people together and exposing others to the Garifuna culture. Our kids get to learn that we’re the kind of people that like to share and socialize with others, and they can learn about other peoples’ cultures. When we’re sharing with others, I believe that we become better people. And one way we can explore and enjoy other cultures is through food. Bringing my friends over to the house and celebrating and gathering is all about exposing them to the Garifuna food culture.
We are actually in my mom’s kitchen, in Woodside, Queens. We got together today to enjoy some delicious food and then we’re going to listen to music and then everyone’s going to go home happy.
Today’s Meal
Today we’re having tortillas (which are my favorite), fried fish, steamed fish with coconut milk, fresh beans, refried beans – the food is very reminiscent of either breakfast or dinner in a Garifuna village in Honduras.
The tortillas are called durudia in the Garifuna language. When walking around Honduras, you will see vendors with their stoves on the side of the street selling baleadas , a tortilla with refried beans, cream, cheese and you could add eggs, or you could add chorizo, or you could add chicken, or you could add meat. So this is our version of that dish, because we added fried fish and we added coconut milk to the [tortilla] mix.
For the tortilla, we use brown sugar, baking powder, salt and oil. And then, we were able to mix it in the flour and the main ingredient I would say is the coconut milk, because that’s what gives it a different flavor from your regular tortilla.
Traditionally the tortillas are done by hand. I know that there are machines out there to help you flatten the tortilla, but there’s also this feeling when you’re making it, like you’re providing and caring [for others]. It’s therapeutic, making this thing. I think the whole machinery part takes that away.
I learned the skill of making the little balls in the palm of your hand, kind of rubbing it, pinching it, making a perfect circle with it. It’s learned. You’ve got to practice it.
I think it’s important to keep home traditions [like this] alive because they are the only way that we as people, as foreigners, as immigrants can actually feel like we’re back home – as much as we love America, we miss home. And the only way we can get the feel for that is when we gather, it’s when we share food, it’s when we share the music.
What I want New Yorkers to know about the Garifuna culture is that it’s very vibrant, colorful, welcoming, loving, creative. It’s full of amazing people and amazing food, and I want people to experience that. I want people to say, “Let me give it a chance. I want to try this food.” Because it’s delicious, and I stand by this food. February 19, 2019

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Commis

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