Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line Unveils New Vegan, Exotic Food Menus

Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line Unveils New Vegan, Exotic Food Menus

Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line Unveils New Vegan, Exotic Food Menus Grand Classica (Photo: Cruise Critic) Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line Unveils New Vegan, Exotic Food Menus Save Editor February 11, 2019
(4:30 p.m. EST) — Vegan cruisers, as well as fans of Indian and Chinese cuisine, sailing on Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line can now order from three new dedicated menus. The budget-friendly cruise line , which offers daily departures to Grand Bahama Island from the Port of Palm Beach, has rolled out the menus to both its ships, Grand Celebration and Grand Classica.
The new menus are available only at dinnertime in the main dining room; they do not bear any additional costs.
Anyone interested in ordering from the new menus must request them in advance, either when making their reservation or on embarkation day, at the ship’s front desk. Once onboard, passengers can view the menus and place their orders with the main dining room staff.
Vegan menu items include crispy hearts of palm cakes; caramelized parsnip and coconut soup; confit of fennel and orange quinoa salad; zucchini lasagna; Thai green curry; and green lentil, potato and mushroom burgers.
Among the choices for Chinese food lovers are Hunan-style crispy whole red snapper, crispy tangerine beef and Sichuan eggplant. Meanwhile, the Indian menu contains dishes like paneer tikka masala, tandoori chicken and pan-seared prawns with chili kokum curry.
Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line’s new menus follow a slew of other value-added amenities introduced in recent months; they have included free fitness and yoga classes; budget-friendly cruise-and-land resort packages; and active shore excursion-and-cruise bundles.

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Know How Haldiram Became 3 Billion Dollar Empire

Know How Haldiram Became 3 Billion Dollar Empire By February 15, 2019 292
The world’s second-largest snack food company, Kelloggs is preparing to invest in Haldiram, a leading Indian firm that started the business from Bhujia. Starting from a shop in Bikaner, Rajasthan in 1937, the business of Haldiram is currently worth around $ 3 billion dollars.
With a deal with Kellogg , Haldiram is opening three different food divisions. Two out of them are Haldiram Ethnic Foods of Delhi and Haldiram Foods International of Nagpur. They sell in North, West and South India. The value of these two businesses is estimated to be around $ 3 billion (about Rs 20,000 crore). It does not include the cost of the restaurant business .
Haldiram’s business , which became a popular brand across the country was started in Bikaner in the year 1937. Ganga Bhisan Agarwal, who was called “Haldiram” by his mother, learned the recipe of Bhujiya from his aunt. Ganga Gusen used aunt’s trick on the stall of the family located in Bhujia Market, Bikaner and prepared Bhujiya.
Haldiram started his business from a very small level. He went to Kolkata to attend a wedding where the idea of this business came to his mind that a snack shop should open here. This was the first expansion of the business of Bikaner Bhujia. His second generation could not expand this business very much, but his sons Manohar Lal and Shiv Kishan greatly boosted the business greatly and took it to a whole new level. They took this business to Delhi and Nagpur.
Compared to traditional Bhujia, it was a bit thin and crunchy in taste. As a result, this Bhujia became famous in the market. In the name of Dungar Singh of Bikaner, he kept it ‘Dungar saave’. With his new brand, he separated himself from Grandpa’s business and got new heights of business .
Even after many family and business disputes, Haldiram’s business continued to grow spontaneously and started becoming popular in different parts of the world. They took this snack business to Delhi and Nagpur. The shop is located in Chandni Chowk, which is considered as the root of the business . After this, the brand went spreading not only to India but to spread around the world.
Climbing the ladders of success, the country’s well-known food brand Haldiram is known for its pure vegetarian snacks and food. Now the company has brought French cuisine for the Vietnamese people. Haldiram Bakers have purchased the franchises of French famous bakery Brioche Doree.

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Good hotel in the middle of town

Stayed there about couple of hours, as I had to visit Port for ship inspection. Food is normally Indian cuisine. No other type of cuisine was available. Wanted have spa, but not yet commissioned. It is a new property.

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[EXCLUSIVE] The Local Pizzaiolo Westside Shutters, Food Terminal to Arrive Soon

The Westside location of The Local Pizzaiolo has closed and been sold . In place of the pizza restaurant, Amy Wong and Howie Ewe, co-owners of Food Terminal , plan to open a second location of their popular Malaysian restaurant. The original Food Terminal debuted March 2017 along Buford Highway in Chamblee. The Local Pizzaiolo Westside, originally intended to be the first of a multi-unit chain, opened in January of 2018 and like its sibling location in Toco Hills – which opened in May 2018 – was put up for sale this past November . [Two additional locations planned for Sandy Springs and Reynoldstown were called off entirely.] The 2,700 square foot restaurant has been a number of things over the past few years including Bellwoods Social House before the pizza shop, and Swit Bakery & Cafe before that.
Food Terminal, the latest concept from the team that launched both Top Spice and Sweet Hut, seems best suited to find success in the space. The current Food Terminal on Buford Highway has been very well received by nearby residents and foodies alike and its cuisine -,Malaysian,- is not something readily found on the Westside. The new Food Terminal will be slightly smaller than the current Buford Highway outpost.
The restaurant’s Malaysian fare which is a mix of Chinese, Indian, Singaporean, and Thai flavors, features such items as “Cheese N’ Cheese”: tomato-braised rice, egg, cheddar cheese, mozzarella cheese, smoked bacon, grilled spam, fresh corn, red onion, fried shallots, spring onions, and bell peppers over hot cast iron and “Kari Chicken Noodle Soup” with “curry noodle base, infused with coconut milk, served in a bed of Food Terminal’s signature thin noodle, chicken thigh, fish cake, fried shallot, and hard-boiled egg.” Located at 1000 Marietta Street in The Brickworks development, Food Terminal stands to benefit, at least in the short run, from the upcoming closure of 5 Seasons Brewery , given the two restaurants share the development’s patio and parking.
According to the offering for the business, the restaurant features “two $38,000 Marra rotator gas pizza ovens that will be removed by seller if requested.” Given Food Terminal would have no use for the oven and The Local Pizzaiolo is pursing an expansion in the Washington D.C., perhaps they will be transported to our nation’s capitol.
Steve Josovitz and Irving Jacobson of The Shumacher Group, Inc. represented both the buyer and the seller in the Westside transaction and continue to market the Toco Hills location for lease, now reduced from $325,000 to $285,000, with some owner financing.
Food Terminal Westside is expected to open later this summer.
Are you excited for the addition of Food Terminal to the Westside? Are you surprised that The Local Pizzaiolo did not make thrive in Atlanta? What would you like to see open in The Local Pizzaiolo in Toco Hills?
Please share your thoughts below

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Food book: Skip takeaways and make Indian food that’s good for you

Chetna Makan gets to the point. And that goes for her recipes – which are brilliantly brief and require very few ingredients – as well as her conversation; there’s no faffing.
So with her new cookbook, Chetna’s Healthy Indian, the former Great British Bake Off contestant is immediately insistent that this is absolutely not a health book, and definitely not a diet book. Not at all.
“I am no expert,” says Makan, 40, over glasses of chai and bowls of crackly, spiced okra fries. “I don’t have the right knowledge for a health book.”
Rather, this recipe collection, her third, is a considered, flavour-fuelled response to a question she finds herself asked repeatedly: ‘If you bake so much, why are you not the size of a house?’
Makan’s frank about having never dieted (“I just can’t deal with it”), and even when she was training to run the London Marathon last year, rather than tumbling into a pasta-only vortex of carb-loading, she “just carried on as normal” and continued to eat her usual quota of homemade cake. And yes, she did complete the 26.2-mile route: “I’m still here!”
Chetna’s Healthy Indian explores the “carried on as normal” part of her eating habits, and while she really does “love cake”, the India-born cook says with a laugh: “My everyday food is really, really good for me, and that kind of balances it out – otherwise, it would be disastrous.”
Dinner at Makan’s house features the likes of chana dal with roasted aubergine, black eyed beans with cavolo nero, tamarind fish curries, spicy chicken and chickpea curry bakes, fried rice loaded with green veggies, and zingy chutneys and pickles. They’re dishes that also neatly and tastily debunk the idea that the word ‘curry’ only accounts for what you order in on the weekend.
“That is a big problem,” says Makan of the perception held by some, that Indian is purely takeout food – and, as a result, delicious but probably bad for you. “People think, ‘Oh, let’s treat ourselves, have a curry on a Friday night’, which is absolutely ridiculous.”
“That’s not how it should be,” she adds, noting that when you’re making one from scratch, rather than relying on a delivery, curry can work any night of the week. And if you’re still itching to place an order come the weekend, look in the fridge instead. “It is the best part, having little Tupperwares of leftovers from the whole week,” buzzes Makan. “On Saturday, take everything out – it works perfectly.”
Chetna’s Healthy Indian then offers short, snappy meal ideas that rely on fresh produce (“You can find okra anywhere now”) and easy-to-procure spices (“If I can find it in Broadstairs [where Makan lives with her husband and two children], everyone can find it”).
Pats of butter, puddles of cream, slicks of oil and lengthy ingredient lists just aren’t her style. “I am in the kitchen with all the ingredients, but there are people who aren’t,” she explains. “I try and keep it to the minimum and don’t over-complicate.”
And there’s no need to huff at the idea of stocking up on brand new, obscure spices – you’re highly likely to have Makan’s staples tucked away somewhere in the cupboard, no matter their age. “I’ve got spices that are really old,” she admits. “I bought a massive, massive bag of really good cinnamon – I don’t know what I was thinking – and cardamom, I use a lot of cardamom, from a Delhi spice market three or four years ago, and they’re half gone, but they’re all right. Still strong and powerful.”
Not only is Makan’s food light on faff and effort, her recipes are also largely accessible for the whole family, kids included. And while it isn’t a cookbook aimed directly at vegans and vegetarians, by dint of it exploring Indian cuisine (and putting a twist on traditional dishes), many of the recipes – from red kidney bean curry and potato and coriander soup, to sprouted moong sabji – just happen to be entirely plant-based.
“If there’s no meat or fish in it, it’s usually vegan, because there’s no dairy [in a lot of Indian cooking], or you can take it out,” notes Makan.
She has considered going vegetarian herself – although is slightly held back by her “weakness for chilli chicken” – but says she’d struggle to switch wholly to veganism.
She is a baker, after all: “Eggs would be the biggest loss, I can’t do without eggs!”
Chetna’s Healthy Indian by Chetna Makan, photography by Nassima Rothacker, is published by Mitchell Beazley priced £20 (octopusbooks.co.uk). Available now.

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It’s always interesting seeing what recommendations bubble to the top when people ask. You’re always going to get the Italian, French, Asian/Japanese and Downtown influence, but you miss out on a lot of what makes Toronto unique, which is how multicultural it is.
Where are you staying and do you have a car? When giving recommendations, I try and give recommendations that are wide ranging in terms of cuisine and cost, but the challenge you’ll run into is how spread out the recommendations are.

Some random comments or tips not covered by other posters:
I think the Reddit list /u/redkulat linked to is great. Probably a really great starting point Suresh is a gem. He contributes occasionally on Reddit and is CBC’s but his focus is on the burbs. Great food coverage and great recommendations. http://sureshdoss.com/cbc-food-guide/ If you want trending and instagrammable food like charcoal ice cream just follow BlogTO and they’ll have you covered. ​
West Indian and Indian Food! Go get some! I’m downtown biased, so I honestly don’t know many great places, but /u/strokeybill hit on some good spots like Randy’s and Gandhi’s . If you can’t make it to Randy’s, go to Crumbs which is downtown. Get a stuffed patty for the experience. You’ll probably hit Kensington, so Rasta Pasta , is solid Mexican and Latin Cuisine. Kensington is a central place with a bunch of spots. if you’re looking for tacos, I think of 7 Lives , El Nahual , and Good Hombres . Though, depending on where you’re coming from, maybe you skip this part. Filipino Cuisine. Had? or continuing to have its moment. Tinuno for a $15 Kamayan Feast, or BB’s Diner for some hipster brunch in an instagrammable spot. On the fancier end, Mineral might be open (skews fancy/bougie) and Lamesa is going strong. ​
Go to at least one of Leemo Han’s joints, so Seoul Shakers , Pinky’s Ca Phe , OddSeoul , Han Moto , or Juan Moto (Cold Tea) . The joints he opens are just great and he gets things right. Cold tea is less of that experience but still great food. Grey Gardens is a great joint I don’t see recommended much and speaking of Momofuku alum, Donnas seems to really be getting a lot of favourable reviews. Dundas West/Ossington would be a great spot for the evening and bar hopping. I really do like Imanishi , and Sakai Bar is dope too (with Black Dice next door). Depending on the vibe you’re going for, Paris Paris and Super Point are fun spots. I’m honestly surprised at how favourably SoSo’s food is rated The best Chinese is in the burbs, and Fishman Lobster Clubhouse is the one place I always see that visitors love (I haven’t been) If you’re getting Poutine, get Poutini’s and don’t go to Smoke’s (although, Rudy’s ,which is a great burger joint, apparently has the best poutine in the city) ​

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Singapore: A Wealth of Opportunity for Restaurants

Senior Research Manager (Global), Technomic, Inc. January 23, 2019 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.
The 2018 romantic comedy, Crazy Rich Asians , celebrates and satirizes an extreme version of the Singapore lifestyle.
Not everyone in Singapore is rich, but disposable income is such that the city has one of today’s hottest restaurant scenes. It’s an extremely competitive market, but promising for expanding international dining chains.
That’s one of the findings Technomic uncovered in its recent report on Singapore’s food service industry. The research firm offers a 360-degree view of the market that combines operator and consumer data with expansion developments, menu trends and economic indicators.
A diverse market
Located at the tip of the Malaysian peninsula, Singapore is one of the globe’s wealthiest nations, with a GDP of over US$90,000 per capita (purchasing power parity), generated by trade, transport, finance, tech and tourism.
Singapore is renowned for its diversity. Its 5.6 million citizens and residents include an ethnic Chinese majority, plus others of Malay, Indian, other Asian and European origin.
Malay, Mandarin, Tamil and English are all official languages, with English the lingua franca of business, government and education.
Food service in Singapore lifestyles
The island’s urban congestion—with most residents crowded into high-rises—makes both formal restaurants and street food important to daily life.
Technomic’s survey found that 92 per cent of Singaporeans visit a restaurant or other food service outlet at least once a week, well above the global average.
Consumers here source about two-thirds of their lunches and snacks, half their dinners and almost four out of 10 breakfasts away from home.
Usage of street foods and limited-service restaurants is also higher than the global average.
Singaporeans may also frequent restaurants to relax or meet friends. More than half of food service occasions are dine-in restaurant meals. But with hurried lifestyles, convenience demands and growth of delivery, the proportion of takeout and delivery orders is likely to rise. And when ordering takeout or delivery, tech-savvy Singaporeans are more likely than residents of other countries to place their order via app, computer or in-store kiosk.
More than consumers in other countries, Singaporeans express interest in high-tech ordering amenities like order tracking, saved favourite orders, artificial intelligence ordering assistance, chatbots, even self-driving delivery robots.
When dining outside the home, the residents enjoy a variety of global cuisines, particularly those of Asian nations.
These cuisine preferences are likely related to Singaporeans’ fondness for spicy foods—about half like their food “very spicy”—well above the global average.
Asked what specific foods they would order from food service, the top answer was pizza. Burgers, chicken, pasta and seafood are also ordered at least occasionally by around half of Singaporeans—not too different from global patterns.
Almost half of consumers in Singapore order rice dishes from restaurants and food service outlets on occasion.
Singapore residents were also asked what beverages they would order from food service. Half chose fruit juice—same as the world average—and four out of 10 named hot or iced tea—above global averages, but in line with other Asian markets.
Bottled water, coffee, soda, beer and wine are less likely to be food service orders in Singapore than elsewhere. The relatively low popularity of adult beverages in restaurants is likely related to religious observance, at least for some.
Singapore’s restaurant scene
Technomic data pegs food service in Singapore as a US$9.1 billion industry, with 7,000-plus commercial restaurants and bars, representing more than two-thirds of the total annual take.
The biggest restaurant chains in Singapore skew American, with the likes of McDonald’s, Starbucks, Subway, KFC, Pizza Hut and Burger King all in the top 10.
The top 25 brands include a number of Singapore companies as well. These players include Old Chang Kee, purveyor of curry puffs; bakery cafe BreadTalk; Bengawan Solo and Polar Puffs, coffee cafes Ya Kun Kaya Toast, Killiney Kopitiam and Fun Toast, and full-service brands Crystal Jade, PastaMania and Astons.
The top 25 also include operators from other parts of Asia, primarily Japan.
Recent industry news shows that numbers of international restaurant companies have recognized the promise of the hot Singapore market.
Yum China’s Little Sheep and South Korea-based Mom’s Touch both signed deals with local franchisee No Signboard Holdings to build their brands in the market.
Australia-based Mad Mex Fresh Mexican Grill sold a 50 per cent stake in its business to the Singapore-based 4Fingers Group to expand in Singapore and Southeast Asia.
US-based Fatburger signed with local partner Deelish Brands to enter Singapore, while Shake Shack, also from the States, plans to debut in the market in 2019.
The Philippines-based Potato Corner, South Korea-based Isaac Toast and Australia-based chicken chain Oporto all recently entered Singapore.
Additionally, Malaysia-based Oldtown White Coffee launched a new concept store in technology-loving Singapore, featuring a facial-recognition ordering system along with an expanded menu of local foods and drinks.
What makes the Singapore market so competitive is not just the international chains and investment money pouring in, but also constant innovation in trends and fads on the part of existing restaurants.
More from Entrepreneur Kathleen, Founder and CEO of Grayce & Co, a media and marketing consultancy, can help you develop a brand strategy, build marketing campaigns and learn how to balance work and life.

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Craving Indian? Check out these 3 new Los Angeles spots

Craving Indian? Check out these 3 new Los Angeles spots SHARE:
Photo: Curry Bowl Indian Express/Yelp SHARE By Hoodline 10:18AM If you’ve got Indian fare on the brain, you’re in luck: we’ve found the freshest Los Angeles eateries to quell your cravings. Here are the newest places to check out the next time you’re in the mood for Indian food. Salomi Indian and Bangladesh Restaurant 11009 Burbank Blvd., Suite 116, North Hollywood Photo: Salomi Indian and Bangladesh Restaurant/Yelp Salomi Indian and Bangladesh Restaurant is an Indian spot.On the menu, look for tandoori chicken wings, papadam, dal soup, mango curry, lasoni, vindaloo, jalfrazi, mixed tandoori and more.Salomi Indian and Bangladesh Restaurant currently holds 4.5 stars out of 10 reviews on Yelp, indicating good reviews.Yelper Debbie D., who reviewed Salomi Indian and Bangladesh Restaurant on Feb. 10, wrote , “The new location is big, bright and cheery with a parking lot right out front. The service was warm, friendly and attentive.”Yelper Arthur C. wrote , “The food was amazing. The service was excellent. The new location has lots of space and is very clean.”Salomi Indian and Bangladesh Restaurant is open from 11 a.m.-10 p.m. daily. Curry Bowl Indian Express 8504 W. 3rd St., Beverly Grove Photo: Curry Bowl Indian Express/Yelp Curry Bowl Indian Express is an Indian spot.The new restaurant offers an extensive menu that features samosas; pakoras; vegetable, lamb, chicken and seafood curries; biryanis; fried rice; tandoori specials and Indo-Chinese and Himalayan dishes.Curry Bowl Indian Express currently holds 4.5 stars out of 23 reviews on Yelp, indicating good reviews.Yelper Amy H., who reviewed Curry Bowl Indian Express on Jan. 13, wrote , “Everything on the menu is absolutely delicious! The food is fresh, hot, and flavorful beyond belief. It was a pleasure to dine in and smell the aromatic fragrances.”Yelper Richard P. wrote , “Fast and friendly service! The food was delicious, mild in heat because it is prepared for the masses, but full of flavor. If you’re a vegetarian, you have to give it a try.”Curry Bowl Indian Express is open from 11 a.m.-10 p.m. daily. Swagatham Vegetarian Cuisine 22950 Vanowen St., Suite B, West Hills Photo: Felix L./Yelp Swagatham Vegetarian Cuisine is a vegetarian, Indian and vegan spot.On the menu, look for a variety of uthappam, a South Indian dish that is a thick pancake with ingredients cooked in the batter. Other Indian specialties include paneer butter masala, dal palak, tamarind rice, rava upma and chapathi.Swagatham Vegetarian Cuisine currently holds 4.5 stars out of 42 reviews on Yelp, indicating good reviews.Yelper Kedar D., who was one of the first users to visit Swagatham Vegetarian Cuisine on Jan. 16, wrote , “This is the best South Indian food in LA. Only a handful of restaurants in LA sell vada pav, so it’s cool that Swagatham offers it. The veggie kothu parotta was awesome.”Joanne A. noted , “They have an amazing menu that is all vegetarian with some vegan options. The aromas waft through the busy and energetic restaurant with friendly, professional staff. The samosas are beautiful, filled to the brim, freshly made and hot with chutney and sauces.”Swagatham Vegetarian Cuisine is open from 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. and 5:30-9:30 p.m. on Tuesday-Thursday, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. and 5:30-10 p.m. on Friday, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. and 5:30-10 p.m. on Saturday, and 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. and 5:30-9:30 p.m. on Sunday. (It’s closed on Monday.)

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The Deeper Message of Harvard’s Dining Hall Food | Opinion | The

Photo: Awnit Singh Marta
Though Harvard is one of the top schools in the nation, its dining services leave a lot to be desired. During my first semester here, I’ve heard more freshmen complaining about campus dining than about bad WiFi, all-nighters, and harsh professors combined. This is an entirely reasonable concern to have, since food plays a prominent role in student life here on campus and home-cooking for many is thousands of miles away.
But personally, I don’t think that Harvard dining is all that bad.
The major concerns with Harvard’s dining services seem to center on issues of quality and scarcity. In Harvard’s dining halls, breakfast is kept on a weekly schedule, with various forms of potatoes and breakfast meats swapped out daily, while lunch and dinner have rotating entrees, starches, and vegetables.
Many students’ main area of concern is the quality of the food we are served. The meals are distributed in lukewarm trays that are wrapped in plastic until they’re brought out and, many times, the food doesn’t have much flavor. It definitely isn’t five-star worthy. But, logically, this makes sense, since the dining halls have to serve upwards of about 6,000 students.
Nevertheless, having such limited options per meal that aren’t the best quality makes it much more likely that people won’t enjoy even one part what is being served. Harvard’s dining halls contain fewer choices than many other universities in the area, such as Boston University or Northeastern University, which have stations for pizza or stir fry, providing a constant option for students if they don’t like the food on a certain day. At Harvard, there is always an array of raw vegetables at the salad bar, and the grill is always open, but there seems to be a lack of focus on having options that remain the same for students to enjoy every day.
Yet, in my opinion, it’s exactly this trait of having only a few options per meal that makes Harvard’s dining experience meaningful. This choice serves as a reminder to students of the greater values in education that Harvard wishes to put forth.
One of Harvard’s main focuses in student experience is diversity and inclusion, which I think the food system really emphasizes. Harvard University Dining Services incorporates in their menu an array of dishes from places not only across the U.S. but the entire world, offering a new kind of food to test at every meal. You can go from pad thai and Japanese oven-braised pork at lunch to fried buttermilk chicken and eggplant parmesan at dinner.
These dishes might not be people’s first choices, but they introduce a new opportunity for students to appreciate the various nationalities and ethnicities represented in the student body. I’m fortunate enough to come from Boston, where I’ve had the opportunity to try cuisines from around the world. However, in the dining halls, even I can experience dishes like south Indian Mulligatawny soup or central European pierogies. This kind of dining allows students not only to feel represented by the food they’re familiar with at home but also gives those who may not have tried these foods the opportunity to experience new cuisines. The fact that HUDS devotes itself to these purposes while also serving a large student body is remarkable and respectable, especially considering the array of recipes and time needed to prepare these dishes from around the globe.
I do see the flaws in the way that Harvard dining works. I (often) get sick of some of the fairly tasteless dishes and just want that good old slice of pizza. I also feel a little gross when I find on my plate a sloshy spaghetti or an admirable attempt at culturally accurate dumplings (which, to be fair, I am rather used to as a Chinese-American). But, ultimately, I see the less-than-ideal dining experience as a justifiable price to pay for promoting the importance of diversity and offering new experiences.
So, the next time you consider complaining about measly mac and cheese or a waffle-gone-wonky, I hope you feel somewhat sated by taking advantage of the opportunities to explore and appreciate different areas of the world — all from the comfort of your home away from home.
Jonathan Yuan ’22 lives in Thayer Hall. His column appears on alternate Thursdays.
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A Taste of Wellbeing Indian Cuisine Cooking Class Tickets – Whole Foods Market – March 21, 2019 – Miami New Times

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