Baby Café Hong Kong Style Cuisine Latest to Ink Lease at Public Market Emeryville

Baby Café Hong Kong Style Cuisine Latest to Ink Lease at Public Market Emeryville

Published On February 5, 2019 | By Rob Arias | Food & Drink , In the Neighborhood , Local Businesses
Public Market Emeryville’s tagline is “travel the world one bite at a time” which captures their ambitions of having a selection of purveyors from across the globe.
Their food court currently contains representatives of at least a dozen types of cuisine including Peruvian, Japanese, Indian and Korean. Missing though since the days of Crispy Fry is a solid Chinese food option. This is about to change. Baby Café’s original location is on 11th and Webster in Oakland’s Chinatown District.
The Public Market recently inked an agreement with Oakland’s Chinatown-born ‘Baby Café’ to open a stall in their ever-growing food hall. Baby Café serves Hong Kong style Chinese food “with a touch of Western culture.”
“If you think Hong Kong style Chinese cuisine is all about dim sum and fried rice, think again,” they note on their website. In addition to noodle and rice plates, their extensive menu includes tea and deserts. ADVERTISEMENT
“We’re excited that Baby Café has chosen Public Market for its next location,” said Public Market owner CCRP president Mark Stefan. “Their fusion approach to Chinese cuisine that includes desserts and specialty teas will be a great addition to the Food Hall.”
Baby Cafe is rapidly expanding in the Bay Area with establishments in Downtown Oakland, Alameda and Union City. They also have locations opening up in Newark and Hayward.
Baby Café will be located in the stall adjacent to Pig in a Pickle, directly across from Minnie Bells. They are targeting mid-2019 for their grand opening.
Browse their menu on babycaferestaurants.com . Share this:

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Low-Fat Butter Chicken Recipes – PC’s Blue Menu Indian Cuisine is Accessible to Restricted Diets (TrendHunter.com)

References: independentcitymarket Beloved affordable food brand President’s Choice releases a low-fat butter chicken dish as part of its Blue Menu. The product is frozen and can be prepared by oven or microwave. It features generously seasoned chicken breasts on a bed of Indian basmati rice and topped with “creamy tandoori tomato sauce.” The PC brand has two versions of the beloved Indian dish — one that is traditional and the second one which is catered to individuals who have to be careful of their fat intake. The Blue Menu option of President’s Choice frozen product contains 35% less fat than the original, as well as 21 grams of protein and only six grams of sugars. The low-fat butter chicken is ideal for a quick mid-week dish for when one is too busy to do meal-prep work.

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2 days in Lima, Peru

Peru is the first South American country we visited together.
Before we landed in Lima a friend had recommended us what to see and most importantly what to eat, after all it’s a food destination with a lot of variety.
If you’re looking for a budget friendly destination Peru is a great option, make sure to research diligently so you’ll find great prices for housing and food, it all depends on what you’re looking for; hostels, airbnb, popular local food places and such.
Tuk Tuk in Lima Public Bus in Lima Traffic in Lima To get around the city we used the public bus system, very cheap and easy to get around with. You can also use Uber or taxis, still affordable.
Día 1 We got out to explore Lima around noon, our airbnb host was super nice and chatty so we just spent the morning indoors.
Barranco The first area of Lima we explored happened to be Barranco.
Barranco Graffiti Barranco Barranco Barranco means ravine in Spanish, so the name of this district is descriptive of its scenery; houses and establishments around a ravine near a cliff.
Church in Barranco Church in Barranco Church in Barranco It’s considered as the city’s most romantic and bohemian area, where artists find inspiration for their work.
Barranco Barranco Barranco Our first real meal in Lima was at a Chifa , a restaurant were they sell Chifa, a mix of Chinese and Peruvian cuisine.
Today it’s one of the most popular types of food in Peru, of course it is since it’s delicious and affordable!
Puente de los Suspiros (Bridge of Sighs) This is a favorite spot for couples, artists, composers and writers looking for inspiration.
Parque de los Suspiros Parque de los Suspiros It’s normal to see a lot of couples here.
Near Puente de los Suspiros Near Puente de los Suspiros Church in Barranco Near the ‘Puente de los suspiros’ there’s a walkway to the sea that runs through Barranco, called the Bajada de los Baños , that connect to the beach bellow .
Bajada de los Baños Near Puentes de los Suspiros Near Bajada de los Baños Miraflores One of the most popular districts and main tourist attractions in Lima.
Miraflores Miralfores Next time we definitely have to paraglide over Miraflores, the view must be spectacular.
Paragliding in Miraflores Paragliding in Miraflores Paragliding in Miraflores
Larcomar Larcomar is a shopping center built into a cliffside in Miraflores, how cool is that?
Larcomar No wonder a lot of tourists and locals make a stop here, the cliffside view is very impressive.
Larcomar Larcomar Mall
Parque de los enamorados (Lovers’ Park) This park was inaugurated the 14th of February, 1993, Valentine’s day).
Parque de los Enamorados Parque de los Enamorados In the center of the park there’s a large sculpture, called “El Beso” (The Kiss). Around the park you’ll also see love passages or romantic quotes written on walls.
Parque Kennedy de Miraflores A city park with a bunch of street vendors, a good spot to get affordable souvenirs.
Parque Kennedy Parque Kennedy There’s also snacks being sold, don’t miss out on Picarones if you’re craving something sweet, they’re really delicious.
Día 2 We started our second day sightseeing in Lima by taking a bus bound to the Historic Centre.
Lince District Lima Public Bus Lima Walking in Lima While walking towards the bus stop we saw some amazing some street art and walked the Arequipa Avenue which is filled with colours, obviously we couldn’t resist to take pictures here and there.
Arequipa Ave Arequipa Ave Arequipa Ave
Historic Centre In the square kilometer that makes up the historic centre in Lima there are colorful buildings with Spanish colonial architecture.
Historic Center Lima Historic Center Lima Historic Center Lima Historic Center Lima Plaza Mayor or Plaza de Armas The most popular spot in the Historic Centre is Plaza de Mayor de Lima, the heart of Old Lima.
Historic Center Lima At the entrance of the Government Palace there’s a changing of the guard ceremony each day at noon.
Historic Center Lima Historic Center Lima While taking pictures and appreciating the scenery in the Plaza de Armas we got interviewed by a local TV program, they asked us about our time in Peru, football and beer, so we were on TV in Peru, we just don’t know the name of the program nor where to find the footage, unfortunately. Maybe they cut us out .
Chinatown At Walking distance from the centre of the Historic District you’ll arrive to a Chinatown, it’s impossible to the miss all the Chifa restaurants here.
Chinatown Lima Chinatown Lima In this area you can find so many shops selling all kinds of things from electronics and gadgets to lingerie, fabric and clothing.
Plaza de los Hereos navales One of the outer parts of the Historic Centre.
paseos de los Heroes paseos de los Heroes The ‘Paseo de los Hereos navales’ is a walkway filled with sculptures, and flowers. It was built in the 1920s.
Parque los Heroes Navales Parque los Heroes Navales Parque los Heroes Navales We wanted to stop at the ‘Reserve Park’, which is a picturesque park known for its fountains and laser light show, but unfortunately we planned it on the wrong day since it closes on Mondays, so keep that in mind, same goes for the museums.
Miraflores Indian Market Before we left Lima we wanted to find locally made trinkets and pieces that represented Peru.
Indian Flee Market Indian Flee Market Indian Flee Market Indian Flee Market Indian Flee Market Indian Flee Market Don’t be scared to bargain for better prices.
Of course our last meal in Lima had to be ceviche, the national dish.
Lima truly is a great city to visit if you love art and history, the colorful surroundings are bound to inspire you.
Lima Lima Lima
Next stop: Cusco, Peru
-12.046373 -77.042754

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03:00 PM: Lucky Chow

Visit the program’s official website
LUCKY CHOW travels across the United States to explore Asian cuisine’s impact on American food culture. The un-hosted six-part series explores a wide variety of Asian food and drink – from a famous Japanese noodle dish to Korean kimchi to Chinese fusion – while meeting the new generation of chefs and entrepreneurs dedicated to keeping the traditions alive. Chinatown, Reimagined (#106H) Duration: 27:47 STEREO TVG This episode introduces Olivia Wu, designer of the original Asian restaurant concepts on Google’s “campus.” Go behind-the-scenes at Google’s first sit-down restaurant, as the assembly line churns out 2, 000 servings of the Indian fried rice dish, biryani. A visit to Google’s purveyors showcases the ethos of the Bay Area food culture – local, seasonable and sustainable. After a career in Silicon Valley, two retired Japanese executives returned to their ancestral farming roots and constructed an indoor vertical farm which services some of the top restaurants in the Bay Area. The episode ends at a now-mainstream tofu factory. KQED Plus: Tue, Feb 5, 2019 — 3:00pm Episode #302H Duration: 26:46 STEREO TVG KQED 9: Sat, Feb 9, 2019 — 6:30pm Remind me Trending Japanese (#201H) Duration: 27:38 STEREO TVG Japan has mesmerized American foodies for generations and a new wave of Japanese culinary culture continues to intoxicate us. Exploring American manifestations of otaku, the Japanese trope that combines cutting-edge pop culture with fetishistic obsession, Danielle visits New York’s first cat cafe; a Brooklyn izakaya run by a Frenchman in thrall to Japanese anime and manga; and a California suburban mom who’s a star on the international bento-box circuit. On a more traditional note, Danielle gets in the sumo ring with a 600-pound opponent and then helps him make chanko nabe, the sumo wrestler’s staple meal. KQED Plus: Tue, Feb 12, 2019 — 3:00pm Remind me Asian Farm to Table (#202H) Duration: 27:38 STEREO TVG Asian cuisine is increasingly the engine driving the growth of the American food industry. Danielle talks to three Asian-American entrepreneurs about the secrets of their success: Tim Wildin, the young Chipotle executive whose Thai aunties’ recipes contribute to the menu at Shophouse; Lynda Trang Dai, once known as the Vietnamese Madonna and now the queen of banh mi sandwiches in Orange County’s Little Saigon; and Charles Phan, the ground-breaking chef whose Slanted Door was named best restaurant in the country by the James Beard Foundation. KQED Plus: Tue, Feb 19, 2019 — 3:00pm Remind me Food of the Gods (#203H) Duration: 27:38 STEREO TVG The rise of China has meant the rise of Chinese culinary traditions in America. Danielle checks out an industrial kitchen where traditional “confinement meals” are made for new mothers across the country; an underground Manhattan cocktail den whose main ingredient is the fiery liquor baijiu, the world’s most heavily consumed spirit; and a wedding in the heart of San Francisco’s Chinatown where old world and new meet at the banquet table and on the dance floor.

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One of the most influential and powerful endorsements for plant-based diets by the Lancelot Medical Journal to save the planet and feed the earth’s population. Yes, we’re on the right track!
Seven dietary changes to protect your health – and the planet
Consider a diet that can prolong your life and, at the same time, feed a growing global population without causing further damage to the environment.
That’s just what 37 scientists from 16 countries (the EAT-Lancet Commission) did for two years. Their findings resulted in recommendations for a healthy diet that can feed the world’s population from sustainable food systems and were published on Thursday in the medical journal The Lancet.
They recognize that food production needs to nourish human health and support environmental sustainability; currently, our food systems are threatening both. Strong evidence indicates that livestock farming is one of the biggest drivers of climate change, biodiversity loss, land degradation, water use and chemical pollution.
The “planetary-health diet,” largely plant-based and low in red meat and sugar, is estimated to feed 10 billion people by 2050 from sustainable food systems. The researchers also believe it will prevent 11 million premature deaths a year caused by an unhealthy diet.
WHAT’S IN THE DIET?
Daily protein comes mostly from plants including beans, lentils, soy and nuts. Whole grains, not refined, are included, and fruits and vegetables fill half of your plate at meals.
The recommended 2,500-calorie diet doesn’t completely eliminate animal foods. It can include, each day, one half-ounce of red meat, one ounce each of fish and poultry and one cup of milk or yogurt. One to five eggs can be eaten a week.
Plant-based oils are substituted for animal fats and added sugars are limited to 31 g a day, in line with the WHO recommendation for sweeteners.
IS IT FEASIBLE?
The planetary-health diet is a huge shift from the way we eat. But eating this way isn’t completely foreign.
The traditional Mediterranean diet of the early 1960s was largely plant-based and contained only 35 g of red meat and poultry combined each day. Many traditional diets (e.g., West Africa, India, Mexico and parts of Asia) contain lots of plant protein and little meat or dairy.
Some people, though, feel that achieving this global diet isn’t feasible.
Not today; that’s for sure. Reaching these dietary targets by 2050, the EAT-Lancet Commission points out, will require policies that encourage healthier food choices, agriculture sustainability, stricter rules around governing of land and oceans and reducing food waste.
TRANSITIONING TO A SUSTAINABLE DIET AT HOME
In the meantime, there are small steps you can take on an individual level to move toward the planetary-health diet.
Replace meat with pulses. Substitute cooked brown or green lentils for half of the ground meat in meatloaf, meatballs, burgers, shepherd’s pie, stuffed peppers and marinara sauces.
Replace some of the meat in tacos and burritos with black beans or pinto beans. Reduce the amount of meat in chili and add extra kidney beans or chickpeas. Eventually, replace all of the meat with beans or lentils.
Replace cheese in sandwiches with hummus.
Use nuts to replace meat. Add almonds or cashews to a vegetable stir-fry instead of beef or chicken. For lunch, have a nut-butter sandwich instead of ham or turkey.
Boost plant protein at meals by tossing toasted nuts or pumpkins seeds into greens salads.
Set a target. Determine how many meatless meals you’ll eat each week and then build on that. Vegetarian chili, tofu stir-fry, salad with edamame, bean burgers, chickpea curry and lentil soup are protein- and nutrient-packed lunches and dinners.
Include plant-based breakfasts, too. Try a smoothie made with fruit, greens and soy or pea milk, whole grain toast with almond butter, oatmeal topped with nuts and berries, quinoa or millet porridge or scrambled tofu.
Pack in produce. Eat a mix of fruits and vegetables, at least five servings a day (one serving is one-half cup of cooked or raw vegetables, a half-cup of berries or one medium fruit). One-half of each meal should consist of these foods.
Consider your snacks. Making snacks 100-per-cent plant-based is an easy step to take. Choose fruit and nuts, homemade trail mix, vegetables and hummus, whole grain crackers with nut butter, soy/pea milk smoothies or soy lattes.
Rethink restaurants. You’ll find a variety of plant-based options at restaurants that specialize in ethnic cuisines such as Indian, Middle Eastern, Mexican, Japanese and Chinese.
Or, pick a plant-based restaurant near you and when travelling.
Reduce food waste. Shop for, store and repurpose foods to minimize waste at home. Avoid buying in bulk; purchase only what you need whenever possible.
Buy “ugly produce,” misshapen fruits and vegetables often thrown away by farmers and grocery stores. Use vegetable scraps to make soup stock.
Store leftovers at the front of the fridge so you don’t forget them; eat within three or four days.
sauce https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life…_Ppz3dDaAe3buE

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Dining out of Valentine’s Day: Houston

Not in the mood to cook for Valentine’s Day this year? No problem! Here’s a list of places you can dine at or order to-go on the 14th in Houston. Be sure to make reservations and call ahead!
Photo Credit: Artisans Artisans Restaurant
Opt for something a little French this year at Artisans. The $140 seven-course Saint Valentine’s Day menu features dishes like Smoked Corn and Leek Chowder, Beef Wellington and a Chocolate Mousse Cake Macaroon. Book your reservations between 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Website , 713.529.9111
B&B Butchers & Restaurant
Celebrate your Valentine’s lunch or dinner at B&B Butchers with their regular menu from 11 a.m. – 1 a.m. or skip the crowds and order their 3-course Valentine’s Day meal-to-go for $130 complete with chocolate dipped strawberries. Choose your appetizers like Lobster Bisque and B&B Meatballs with entrees such as Filet Mignon and, of course, desserts. Pick-up is from Wednesday, February 13 – Saturday, February 16th so you have all weekend to wine and dine your loved one in the comfort of your own home. Website , RSVP: 713.862.1814, Orders: 832.767.4828
Caracol
This year, let Caracol take care of your Valentine! On Valentine’s Day, they’ll have a special menu from $85 per person along with live music by Ikaru. Can’t make it the day of? No problem. During the week, they will be offering a special couples menu priced at $110 per couple from February 8th-13th & 15th-17th. Both menus feature selections like Wood-roasted Gulf Oysters, Trio de Ceviche and Pork Shank. Website , 713.622.9996
Photo Credit: Fielding’s Local Kitchen + Bar Fielding’s Local Kitchen + Bar
Bring your loved one and celebrate Valentine’s Day with Fielding’s Local Kitchen + Bar! On the 14th, they are preparing a special prix fixe menu for the evening and will have live music from local performers, Yelba’s Variety Band, from 6 – 9 p.m. Can’t make it out for the day of? They are offering a three-course prix fixe menu alongside their full menu the weekend after Valentine’s Day. Website , 281.351.2225
Helen Greek Food & Wine
Go Greek this Valentine’s Day at Helen Greek Food & Wine. Both of their locations will be offering special dinners for the special day from 5-10 p.m. At the Rice location, they have a special menu, and at the Heights location a three-course prix fixe menu. Details on menus can be found on their website. Website , Rice Village: 832.831.7133, Houston Heights: 832.582.7146
Kiran’s
For your Valentine’s Day dinner, dine on traditional Indian cuisine at Kiran’s at 3 special seatings at 5 p.m,, 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Treat yourself and loved ones to options like Chilean Sea Bass, Lamb T-bone or Saffron Panna Cotta for $95 per person. Website , 713.960.8472
Photo Credit: Dailey Hubbard via La Table La Table
This Valentine’s Day, La Table will offer two romantic dining experiences. Guests can enjoy a special a la carte menu featuring selections like Butter Poached Maine Lobster and Crescent Duck Duo available downstairs in Marche. Additionally, couples looking for a more elegant dining experience can indulge in a four-course prix fixe menu with the same offerings as Marche available upstairs in Chateau for $125 per person. La Table will also feature their Tableside Classics for two in Chateau: Texas Long Bone Akausi Ribeye and Heritage Chicken. Website , 713.439.1000
Le Colonial
Enjoy a three-course dinner of French Vietnamese Cuisine at Le Colonial. They will be only offering their $75 per person menu with a choice of small plate, large plate and dessert. They will be offering daily specials as well. Alcohol, tip and tax is extra. Make your reservation today! Website , 713.629.4444

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An Eater’s Guide to Portland

Portland with Mount Hood in the background Shutterstock An Eater’s Guide to Portland The word on the street on where to drink and eat in the City of Roses Flipboard In the rough and tumble city of foraged fine dining, whole-animal butchery, and bacon-topped maple bars, there are a lot of opinions around what to eat. This guide slices through the designer flannel to help you find the best Portland food and drink out there. Welcome to the Land of Craftsman Cuisine Straight up, Portland has something most other cities do not: the natural bounty of the Willamette Valley, somewhat unblemished by pollution. This gives Portland chefs a huge arsenal of ingredients to play with—whether the cuisine of choice is regional Thai food or modernist Spanish tapas . In particular, you’ll find innovative chef’s counter dining at its best, inspired by everything from foraging to veganism to author Haruki Murakami’s love of jazz . And of course you have to eat doughnuts, from the Portland-weird to the Portland-classy . Regarding single item food experiences, don’t miss Ike’s Vietnamese fish sauce wings at Pok Pok , barrel-aged cocktails from their birthplace at Clyde Common , “Herring Under a Fur Coat” with a side of house-infused horseradish vodka at Kachka , foie gras dumplings or bourbon at Canard , and that incredible, humble Thai chicken and rice from Nong’s Khao Man Gai . Where to Start on Eater Portland’s Top Maps As you know, Eater publishes and updates a rather massive database of maps —each focusing on one of the city’s signature foods or dining trends, from tacos to fried chicken . For those who want to get to Portland’s culinary heart through its ribcage, we’ve compiled the crème de la crème, the top one or two listings, from each of these maps here: The White Stag sign in Portland’s Old Town. [Photo: Shutterstock ] Essential Restaurants: If you need to narrow down the Essential 38 , start with a decadent stack of compote-smothered rye pancakes or unforgettable croque madame at Coquine ; for something lighter, a French-Scandinavian toast or polenta clafoutis at Maurice luncheonette will do just fine. For lunch, head straight to Foster-Powell for rotating bowls of layered, fragrant Vietnamese noodles at Rose VL Deli — go on Saturday to try itsbreathtaking cao lau . Hit up Beast for knockout wine pairings and highly seasonal cuisine. Remember Ox for its signature grill treatment, which encompasses steaks, seafood, and vegetables. And for the best meal you’ll eat in a backyard, order a pile of fried chicken, noodles, and dumplings from Korean mainstay Han Oak . Hot Restaurant s : Bullard , one of the most anticipated Portland restaurants to open last year, finally fired up the grills at the Woodlark Hotel in December 2018. Top Chef finalist Doug Adams’ dinners are behemoths, piles of pork belly and beef ribs served alongside stacks of warm, blistered tortillas, followed by puckered Baked Alaska and ultra-creamy alba truffle root beer floats. Also, 2019 is becoming the year of the pierogi, from the posh potato-truffle pierogi at Delores to the homey mushroom-gravy-smothered dumplings at Anchor End . For those looking for something higher-end but thoroughly Portland, new super-sustainable tasting menu restaurant Erizo is serving everything from invasive purple sea urchin to dry-aged rib-eyes from retired dairy cows — plus, a portion of each bill goes straight to The Ocean Cleanup and the Zero Foodprint initiative . Iconic Dishes : Portlanders have never been good at fitting into boxes — or sticking to a permanent menu. Rather than search for restaurants by food style or cuisine, you should probably check out The 25 Iconic Dishes and Drinks of Portland . Perhaps the most iconic dish of Portland now is Bonnie Morales’ dramatic Herring Under a Fur Coat , but you could also head to Hat Yai for its show-stealing shallot-fried chicken with a side of curry and roti. Food Carts: Portland is known for its many food carts , from the captivating pastas at Gumba to the hangover-cure-worthy bibim boxes at Kim Jong Grillin’ . Downtown, the cart du jour is likely Stretch the Noodle , a head-turner for hand-pulled noodles and jianbing stuffed with andouille sausage. For one-stop shopping, head over to Prost Marketplace for some insane piles of Texas barbecue or intoxicatingly delicious pineapple-topped pastor tacos . For a quintessentially Portland cart, nothing captures this locality-obsessed city like the new-ish Wild North , with its menu of Dungeness crab cakes and rabbit bolognese dotted with pickled wild mushrooms. Doughnuts: Portland has copious creative doughnut shops, but the true fried-dough fanatics bypass Voodoo Doughnut and mainline the upscale brioche-style doughnuts at Blue Star or the fried-to-order mini creations at Pip’s Original . Vegans should check out Doe Donuts for birthday cake and french toast doughnuts — all animal-product free. Coffee: Not five years ago, no one went to work in this city if not for coffee. Today, rising rents keep everyone busy. Stumptown remains tried and true, even after the corporate switcheroos , but lovers of fine coffee need to make the effort to visit Either/Or , which offers well-paced flights with clever food pairings. Ice Cream: In an absurd land where Oregon smoked ham is a flavor of soft serve, Salt & Straw reigns supreme. If you can’t handle the lines, try your luck at the other ice cream hotspots , especially Fifty Licks . Sandwiches: This city’s top sandwich shops excel at the artisan sandwich, and the king is definitively Lardo . The underdog on its tail would probably be Stacked or Sammich . Beer: With a wild number of breweries , Portland-base brewers come close to perfecting the art of craft beer, but the brewpub you absolutely cannot miss, both for its food and its beer, is Breakside Brewery . A newer spot turning the heads of brett fans is Little Beast . Brunch: Brunch here is a blood sport, and you really don’t want to know why unless you have to. If you’re a gambler or particularly patient, you could try your hand getting a table at Gabriel Rucker’s Canard for his Duck Stack — a tower of duck fat pancakes, dripping with house duck sausage gravy, topped with a duck egg and optional foie gras; Coquine is also a lovely (but highly sought after) spot for a leisurely champagne brunch. The impatient should get a reservation at a place like Beast . For more recommendations, check out our one-stop shop for breakfast maps, recommendations, and news. Others: Portland is a national hotspot for Southeast Asian cuisine, from Thai to Vietnamese ; it is absolutely essential to visit Hat Yai , Pok Pok , or Rose VL Deli while in town. Portland fares rather well for ramen and for burgers , and Eater has those guides covered. Booze hounds should hit Portland’s craft cocktail bars; you can either trawl the hits or find something new . Oh, and of course, those who abstain from meat will be well-fed in Portland ; find somewhere for a vegan dinner or even brunch . Portland Food ‘Hoods to Know Portland is broken up into five general neighborhoods—North, Northeast, Northwest, Southwest, and Southeast—but the city is defined by its many small neighborhoods within these five larger neighborhoods. Here are the key food ‘hoods of Portland: Ankeny Ally in Downtown Portland. [Photo: Flickr/Katie Wheeler ] DOWNTOWN: Do I really have to eat a Voodoo Doughnut? That depends on what you’re looking for. Voodoo Doughnut’s creations are simultaneously trashy and artwork-quality. So if you want to eat a doughnut topped with Oreos named Ol’ Dirty Bastard, this is the place. If you’re looking for gourmet fried dough, you have better options—without standing in that line. So short answer, probably not. Portlanders have only recently started hanging out in the business district, and this means top restaurateurs have moved in. The godfather of Portland chefs today, Vitaly Paley , opened Imperial , a top spot for brunch and wood-fired Pacific Northwest cooking. Top Chef finalist Gregory Gourdet serves his sexy mix of sweet and spicy Pan-Asian dishes at Departure —its patio one of the best bird’s-eye views of the city. The man who took Portland brunch into overdrive with Middle Eastern and African influences, John Gorham , opened Tasty N Alder , and if you’ve ever wondered (or even if you haven’t) what classic French food would taste like if made by a chef who adores fast food, Gabriel Rucker ‘s Little Bird Bistro will hit the spot. There’s also the illustrious cocktail program at Clyde Common , with food to match, and the most twee bakery with attitude you’ll ever see, Maurice —good for breakfast or lunch. Street art along SE Division Street. [Photo: Flickr/Britta Heis ] SOUTHEAST DIVISION/CLINTON: Pok Pok kicked it all off in a shack in 2005, and now nearly every restaurateur in the city has jockeyed for a spot on SE Division Street (so much so that the growth has spilled out a couple block south on SE Clinton Street, too). Here, between the reckless construction, you’ll find crucial spots like Bollywood Theater , specializing in Bollywood soundtracks and little-known, regional Indian dishes with a Portland twist; the exceptional Ava Gene’s , where humble, vegetable-forward Italian cooking shows off the best of Pacific Northwest ingredients; Palomar , a Cuban cocktail bar with a nationally celebrated bartender and shockingly meticulous frozen daiquiris; Xico , for big, fresh Mexican flavors given the DIY touch (all tortillas are made with corn milled onsite); and SE Wine Collective , where you can try wines from 10-plus urban wineries with seasonal dishes ideal for pairing. The adorable Northwest/Alphabet District. [Photo: Flickr/Victor Capa ] NW/ALPHABET DISTRICT: The tree-and-boutique-lined streets of Northwest are in the midst of a shake-up: Suddenly, several new restaurants, bars, and cafes are all eyeing Portland’s upper left neighborhood for expansions and openings. The latest include new gastropub tavern Bantam , as well as the aforementioned Indian restaurant Bhuna and breakfast bar Hunnymilk . The longtime standbys include Vitaly Paley’s iconic Paley’s Place , which serves as the benchmark for seasonal and local cooking in Portland, as well as the always astonishing and rewarding Ataula tapas bar. Hit Bamboo Sushi for the “first certified sustainable sushi restaurant in the world,” or its counter-service poke bar Quickfish for an on-the-go bite. For a funky wine list and an unforgettable trout crudo, hit up Arden Wine Bar , just a touch farther south in the Pearl District. Flower gardens in Buckman’s Ladd’s Addition. [Photo: Flickr/Sandy Richard ] BUCKMAN/CENTRAL EASTSIDE: The Central Eastside neighborhood is spread out, so don’t expect to walk between these dining hotspots. Don’t miss the deeply researched Italian dishes at Nostrana bolstered by local grains; the revolutionary vegan fine dining at Farm Spirit ; the historic, regional Thai dishes inside of the hidden restaurant, Langbaan ; Nodoguro ‘s themed Japanese dinners and “Hardcore” Sushi nights, with 20 or so courses; and Olympia Provisions , the game-changing charcuterie producer. This area is also home to many of Portland’s iconic restaurants: French chef’s counter Le Pigeon , Slavic dinner hall Kachka , and fine dining mainstay Castagna — the bar next door is an absolute must-visit for natural wine nerds. One of Alberta Street’s many stylish businesses. [Photo: Flickr/Mike Rohrig ] NE ALBERTA/KILLINGSWORTH: It’s a journey from the city center, but the NE Alberta and Killingsworth neighborhood has its own artsy style and dining scene to match. It’s home to Beast , no-joke cocktail bar Expatriate , and the original Bollywood Theater location; Hat Yai and Breakside Brewery aren’t far away. You’ll also find one of the largest mezcal selections on the West Coast , a great Mexican brunch , and an ornate Iraqi restaurant . Oh, and don’t forget to fill up on Georgian food and orange wine at the new-ish Kargi Gogo . Olympia Oyster Bar Dina Avila/EPDX N MISSISSIPPI: A local favorite, North Mississippi is a pseudo-bohemian wonderland of food carts, whiskey, and super-fresh Oregon seafood . The previously mentioned Prost Marketplace is home to Portland’s best brisket, found glistening with fat at the humble Matt’s BBQ cart; just down the street is the exact opposite food, Olympia Oyster ’s raw-on-the-half-shell with pickled serranos. Oregon isn’t exactly known for its pizza, but Lovely’s Fifty-Fifty is a worthy stop for morel-topped pizzas and sour cherry ice cream. Start your day at Sweedeedee with dukkah-seasoned porridge made with locally grown polenta, and end it drinking bourbon on the rustic back patio of Interurban . Gregory Gourdet, executive chef at Departure. [Photo: Nicolle Clementson] Portland Glossary of Terms Gregory Gourdet: This is Portland’s standout chef from BravoTV’s Top Chef and the executive chef of Departure . In Season 12, he was one of the final two competitors, ultimately losing the title of Top Chef to Mei Lin . James Beard: The “Dean of American cookery” was born in Portland, and he attended the one-time Washington High School, now home to the Revolution performance hall and Marthas Cafe . Today, perhaps the most widely acknowledged food awards in the United States bear his name. Naomi Pomeroy: Portland’s best-known chef is a powerhouse in the kitchen and built her reputation on an adoration for DIY everything. With Beast , she turned an under-the-radar supper club into one of the city’s most iconic restaurants. Grab brunch at Pomeroy’s flagship restaurant or her second bar, Expatriate . Northwest Bounty: This is the annoying term that everyone seems to use to describe what makes food in Portland different. What makes it annoying is that it’s true: bigger and better ingredients come from the Pacific Northwest, thanks to its soil , rain , and wild waterways . Taste it, and you will understand. Pods: When a group of food carts or trucks form a group and stay in one place, they become a food cart pod. Vitaly Paley: Barely known outside of the city, Paley is the glue holding much of the Portland food scene together. The chef community tends to be defined by a truly collaborative, rather than truly competitive, atmosphere, and Paley has been carrying the torch since opening Paley’s Place in the ’90s. Reservations to Make in Advance LANGBAAN: You’ve almost certainly never had Thai food like this before. Langbaan serves historic regional Thai dishes—some from ancient royalty’s cookbooks—and is perhaps the hardest Portland restaurant to get into. It’s a hidden restaurant inside of PaaDee and books out six months in advance. Make your reservation now to taste an incredibly well designed prix fixe menu. MAE: Maya Lovelace ’s hyper-regional, storytelling-based Southern pop-up pairs three-fat, skillet-fried chicken with stories of the Husk alum’s childhood and her grandmother’s kitchen, as well as details and history surrounding Appalachian foodways. Throw yourself on the email list for reservations, and quickly nab a spot when they go on sale via newsletter update. You can also cross your fingers for a last-minute opening via Tock . NODOGURO: This Japanese restaurant started as a virtual pop-up and now has supporters like Questlove, drummer for The Roots, so competition for seats can be fierce. Nodoguro releases several weeks’ reservations at once, so check the website now to see what’s available. OX: Ox is easily one of the city’s hardest restaurants to get into, and it doesn’t accept reservations. The key remains arriving before 6 p.m. on a weekday (but the pro move is to use these inside tips from Ox’s GM). POK POK: Another spot that doesn’t accept reservations is the original Pok Pok on SE Division Street; getting into the original spot is always a hassle, thanks to those killer fish sauce chicken wings and other traditional, little-known Thai and Vietnamese street foods. Solid alternatives are Pok Pok Noi , Pok Pok’s smaller, Northeast Portland location, and Pok Pok NW , a full-scale location that opened in 2017 with one major upgrade: Pok Pok NW is the only Pok Pok in Portland that does accept reservations. Follow the News Eater Portland is updated multiple times every weekday with breaking news stories (restaurant openings, closings, etc.), maps, features, and more. Here are a few ways to stay in the loop: Keep an eye on the Eater PDX homepage . New stories will always appear near the top and flow down toward the bottom of the page as they get older, while important recent stories will stay pinned right at the top. Also, check out our big sister, Eater.com , for national and international food news. Subscribe to our newsletter , which goes out twice weekly and includes links to top stories. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for updates on new stories and more throughout the day. Interested in upcoming restaurant openings? Follow our Coming Attractions tag to see what’s in the works from the city’s restaurateurs. One of Downtown’s many food cart pods. [Photo: Flickr/John M. ] Get in Touch Have questions not answered here? Want to send in a tip or a complaint or just say hello? Here are some ways to get in touch with the Eater Portland staff: Email us at Send us a tip, which can be anonymous if you choose, over our tipline . Talk with us on Facebook and Twitter . Matt’s BBQ Is Opening a Taco Cart on SE Hawthorne These Portland Restaurants Have Closed or Delayed Opening for the Snow [Updated] A Huge New Food Cart Pod Is Opening on SE Madison Loading comments…

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Affordable Car Rentals In Hilo

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49 incredible Indian women who are creating legacies across the globe

49 incredible Indian women who are creating legacies across the globe by Vogue India February 5, 2019 From actors to entrepreneurs, writers and designers, these women are inspiring people around the world with their empowering stories Image: Lilly Singh. Photograph by Kreerath Sunittramat
Documenting the lives of cocoa farmers in South America ; fighting for the rights of restaurant workers; creating binge-worthy television shows that capture the zeitgeist; bringing together people and celebrating the art of gathering; teaching 90,000 girls how to code—these are just a few of the day jobs of Indian women across the globe. Ahead, we bring to you 49 of the brightest actors, entrepreneurs, writers and designers who are creating powerful legacies. These are their incredible stories. Influencers Author, poet and illustrator, Toronto
Image: Nabil Shash
“The complexities that Indian women face are present in my writing, because that’s my entire DNA,” says Instagram sensation Rupi Kaur about her dual identities—the Indian girl at home and the Canadian girl when she steps out. ‘The Queen of Insta-Poets’ is what Rolling Stone calls her, designers are all eager to dress her and the reaction to her often sold-out shows is not unlike one at a rock concert. With her pithy words, Kaur has managed to bring poetry to a new audience. The writing, she says, was completely unplanned, and the response an incredible surprise. An obsessive reader, she started writing at a young age. “In middle school, I wrote on boys I had crushes on, in high school it became a political act; I wrote about the changes I wanted to see. In university, it was a lot more reflection.” So as a cultural poster girl for the millennial generation, what advice would she give them? “Take it from me: the internet, although great, isn’t always great for your soul. Reach into your inner self and do the things you fear. Take the risks.” —Priyanka Khanna Lilly Singh YouTuber & actor, Los Angeles
Image: Kreerath Sunittramath
A bestselling book, collaborations with Michelle Obama and Priyanka Chopra, cameos in films and TV, and a production company called Unicorn Island Productions later, it’s hard to think that Lilly Singh’s launchpad was a YouTube channel titled ‘Superwoman’ in 2010. Now, nine years in, her videos, which tackle everything from gender stereotypes to last-minute Halloween costumes, rack up to 2 billion views and 14 million subscribers. The Indo-Canadian Sikh who grew up in Ontario had just wrapped up a degree in Psychology from York University, Toronto, when she started vlogging her first confessions. She was intrigued by the simplicity of online video—“literally, just being human on camera”—and moved to Los Angeles to further her career. Apart from highlighting her heritage in videos like ‘When it’s your birthday, but you’re brown’, Singh also started #GirlLove, a campaign to wipe out cyber bullying and girl-on-girl hate, proceeds of which were donated to primary schooling for girls in Kenya and the Malala Fund. —Akanksha Kamath Diipa Khosla Social media influencer and entrepreneur, Amsterdam/London
Any given week of any given month, Delhi-born Diipa Khosla will be jetting off to anywhere up to three continents. In September alone, she covered India, where she got married to her Dutch boyfriend (the virtual wedding got 13 million views); New York, for the Victoria’s Secret show (“I met Alessandra Ambrosio before she did her last walk after 25 years as an Angel”); and back to Europe (where she lives between Amsterdam and London). “I was studying international law and my first internship was at the International Criminal Court in the Hague,” she says. This was before coming to the realisation that influence comes in various forms. “It was 2013 and there were no Indian influencers on the global scene doing luxury fashion and lifestyle. I figured this would fit me perfectly, and three-and-a-half years later, here we are.” The ‘here we are’ being billboards at Piccadilly Circus for Maybelline’s diversity campaign, working closely with UN Women and UNFPA and considering co-owning a cruelty-free makeup line. —Akanksha Kamath Deepica Mutyala Founder of Tinted, California
Image: Lauren Listor
How often do you find someone who’s broken the internet with 10 million views on a single YouTube video? Meet Deepica Mutyala, whose contouring videos are correcting the under-representation of brown women in the American beauty industry. Her pet project, Tinted, began when her obsessive love for makeup found zero tutorials relevant to her skin colour. “Growing up, I had dyed my hair blonde and wore blue contacts because that was considered beautiful. So, when a video I filmed on my iPhone using red lipstick to hide my dark circles went viral last year, I quit my job!” But garnering likes on social media is one thing and turning it into a full-blown business quite another. “My father wanted me to live the American Dream (read: become a doctor like the rest of my family). I eschewed the tradition for a newer definition of the phrase—one that means being a game changer and shattering glass ceilings.” What’s followed is collaborations with beauty giants like M.A.C and L’Oréal and a growing #TintFam of 500K followers and counting. —Akanksha Kamath Entrepreneurs Kavita Shukla Designer, inventor and entrepreneur, Washington, DC
“Freshpaper actually began as my middle-school science project based on a home remedy my grandma gave me to drink while I was visiting her in India,” says the Harvard grad and CEO and founder of The Fresh glow Co. Kavita Shukla was born in Germany, and lived in Finland and India before moving to the United States. As a young girl, Shukla spent most of her spare time tinkering with science experiments and art projects in the garage. One of those led to a simple innovation that reduces food waste (over 25 per cent of the world’s food supply is lost to spoilage), the spice-infused Freshpaper, which inhibits bacterial and fungal growth and keeps food fresh for longer. Her journey involved selling batches at the local farmer’s market, and Freshpaper is now available in over 180 countries. “The last few years have been a series of pinch-me moments—speaking at the Nobel Prize Dialogues in Stockholm about the future of food, testifying in Congress about our unlikely entrepreneurial journey, and being named in Time ’s “5 Most Innovative Women in Food” list. The most surreal moment was winning the Index: Design to Improve Life Award, previously awarded to Apple and Tesla.” —Priyanka Khanna Monica Royer CEO and founder 0f Monica + Andy, Chicago
“I always thought I would end up in medicine,” says the woman behind chic childrenswear label Monica + Andy. After a decade working in the pharmaceutical industry, her brother’s experience launching Bonobos sparked her entrepreneurial spirit. After the birth of her daughter, Royer became conscious of the lack of high-quality, organic clothing for children. The result was Monica + Andy, a thoughtful childrenswear label strong on the digital platform and now with ‘guide shops’, as they refer to them, in Chicago and New York. There are three really exciting parts of the job. “The first is working with and building a team. Then meeting our customers and their little ones. And of course, watching it all through the eyes of my daughter. She is the inspiration behind everything I do.” —Priyanka Khanna Seema Bansal Co-founder, Venus et Fleur, New York
For 27-year-old Seema Bansal, co-founder of Venus Et Fleur, the idiom ‘to stop and smell the roses’ has a dual meaning. After receiving a terrible delivery of Valentine’s Day flowers from her now husband Sunny Chadha, they decided to create a luxury rose atelier in 2015. In just a few years, they’ve become the go-to florists for the Kardashians (millennial validation, if there ever was one), found their spot on the Forbes 30 under-30 entrepreneur list, and rang the NASDAQ bell. Oh, and the estimated growth of their business stood at an astounding 226 per cent last year. “The most exciting part is seeing my designs come to life in our products. I love innovating,” she says, adding that Sara Blakely’s success with Spanx has been a big influence. When it comes to her personal style, she veers towards neutral classics. “Being put-together and feminine is very important for me.” Shoes are her go-to, with Saint Laurent and Stuart Weitzman topping the list. For her wedding last month, she observed all the Sikh traditions, and wore looks from Anita Dongre. “I’m Punjabi and my love for Indian culture runs deep, from the food to Bollywood movies and of course, the fashion! I embrace it all!” —Priyanka Khanna Supriya Lele Fashion designer, London
Image: Getty
Supriya Lele’s initiation into fashion was her mother’s large collection of saris that travelled with her from India to England long before Supriya was born. Today, in her eponymous label, which held its first solo presentation at London Fashion Week, drapery styles of the six-yard staple can clearly be seen. Born to two doctors in a small village in the UK’s West Midlands, Lele’s grown up in a British-Asian generation that constantly curates the contrasting forces of East and West. “I am of Indian heritage and I am also British. I want to create a modern feminine dialogue between two cultures that focuses on the female body and has an openness and lightness within it,” she told Vogue.com of her mix-and-match aesthetic. “I did my BA at Edinburgh College of Art and then completed my MA at the Royal College of Art in London,” says the designer, who briefly studied architecture before turning to fashion. “I think the three disciplines cross over a lot. My interest in architecture informs my minimalist aesthetic.” —Akanksha Kamath Rosh Mahtani Founder, Alighieri, London
“I’ve always felt like a hybrid character; as a kid I felt quite lost whenever someone asked me where I was from,” says Rosh Mahtani, whose grandparents were displaced during Partition and moved to Zambia. “I loved writing, photography and telling stories. I started making one piece of jewellery for every poem in Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy so that I could create a narrative through fashion.” The result is over 60 international stockists including Matches and Net-a-Porter. Her mantra is simple: “I don’t believe there is a set formula or way of doing things. Follow your instinct and don’t try to follow a set path.” —Priyanka Khanna Akansha Seth Jewellery designer, London
The Goldsmiths graduate credits her yearly trips to hometown Indore for shaping her design ethos. “The colours and inspirational forms, along with the narratives, form the backbone of my current jewellery collections,” says Sethi. In 2018, just a year after floating her own brand, AS by Akansha Sethi, she participated in London Fashion Week. “After 10 years of the designer showrooms started by the British Fashion Council, it was a pleasant surprise when, on the last day of the Week, Her Majesty the Queen made an impromptu visit. It was a privilege to show her my jewellery and explain the story behind each collection,” says Sethi.— Sheree Gomes Gupta Fashion + Jewellery Designer, Hong Kong
Image: Ken NAGN
In March last year, Saloni Lodha celebrated 10 years of her London-based eponymous label. Her choice of destination, Udaipur, and the theme, Holi. “Of all the festivals in India, I hold Holi closest to my heart. It is the most dramatic expression of life, full of colour and fun,” says the designer who was born to a traditional Marwari family in Nashik and now lives in Hong Kong. To encapsulate the spirit of Saloni, what played out was a three-day unabashed party speckled with colour and familiar faces from the fashion fraternity including Giambattista Valli , Caroline Issa, Aquazzura’s Edgardo Osorio, and Peter Dundas. Her universally flattering tea dresses have found favour among everyone from Queen Maxima of the Netherlands to Lily James, the Duchess of Cambridge and Deepika Padukone. “I always keep my Indian heritage in mind while designing but without translating it literally into our clothes. Our way of bringing the Indian soul into collections is through bold colours and patterns.”— Akanksha Kamath Shilpa Shah Co-founder, Cuyana, San Francisco
“Less is more” is a mantra Shilpa Shah and her partner Karla Gallardo live and work by. A lack of fulfilment in the relentless consumption that the fashion industry demands, led them to launch Cuyana, a range of women’s essentials that fall between fast fashion and luxury goods. “We believe that you can have amazing quality and curated design, and it can still be accessible. We have travelled the world to find the best materials and the most passionate craftsmen out there. Each product we create is carefully considered from beginning to end,” she says. The daughter of Punjabi parents, she says, “Being Indian is part of everything I do. It has formed the foundation of my work with Cuyana. My love for textiles comes from growing up around the rich fabrics of Indian clothing. We wanted to make materials mean something again.” —Priyanka Khanna Ami Sheth Actor, New York
Image: Anna Zareba Oda
On the AMC show Dietland , the series with a dark comedic perspective on women’s issues, Ami Sheth plays an artist and acid attack survivor. “Sana is strong, sensitive and has devoted her life to helping other women. Getting to transform into her physically was also a new challenge for me,” says Sheth, who underwent hours of prosthetics for the role. “I’ve been acting my entire life but never thought I could make my living doing it,” says the New Jersey-born and -raised actor who studied to be a veterinary doctor at Boston University and has also had a role on the show Blindspot . Not surprisingly, she lists Priyanka Chopra as a woman she admires. “The strides she’s made help the other Indian actresses trying to succeed,” she says.— Priyanka Khanna Meera Menon Filmmaker, Los Angeles
Image: Getty
Raised in New Jersey by Indian immigrants who moved to New York from Kerala in the 1970s, Menon’s passion for filmmaking was ignited early on. “My father, realising there was nowhere to see Malayalam films in New York, began screening films and bringing artistes from South Indian cinema over to the US for performances,” she recalls. At 19, she learnt how to shoot and edit. “I bought cameras with part-time jobs, shot short films with friends in my apartment,” says the director whose résumé boasts a Bachelor’s degree in Art History from Columbia University and a Master’s in Film from USC’s School of Cinematic Arts. Recent career highlights include attending a writers’ lab at the Sundance Institute with partner Tanuj Chopra to work on their new television project, a contemporary Indian American adaptation of Devdas . “Being able to write stories for the South Asian diaspora and have those stories recognised in Hollywood is a true career goal.”— Sheree Gomes Gupta Sangita Patel TV personality, Toronto
Image: Katherine Holland
Patel, who grew up idolising media mogul Oprah Winfrey and star reporter Connie Chung, volunteered at a television station at night whilst pursuing an Engineering degree. “This is what steered my path to working in television and storytelling,” she says. Currently an entertainment reporter for ET Canada and the host of Home To Win on HGTV Canada, her style changes with her roles. “From weather presenter, lifestyle and entertainment host to mother, wife, fitness influencer and philanthropist…I experiment with fashion for my many roles, especially when it comes to Canadian designers. In my busy day, leggings are a staple.”— Sheree Gomes Gupta Entertainment VP – content acquisition, scripted co-productions/original TV and unscripted originals, Netflix, Los Angeles
Image: Getty
How many people can list a career highlight as “advocating for Mindy Kaling ’s first TV show The Mindy Project , where she was the creator, producer and star?” As the highest ranking Indian American in Hollywood, Netflix’s Bela Bajaria is probably the only one. Chances are, if there’s been a binge-worthy television show, she and her team have been involved. In her career she’s overseen shows like Master Of None, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, The Sinner, Riverdale and My Next Guest Needs No Introduction with David Letterman, to name a few. While at Universal Television, Bajaria was offered this role that sits at the intersection of Hollywood and technology. “Ted Sarandos, Netflix’s chief content officer, is creative, a big fan of film and TV, and very strategic, so when he pitched me this unique job to launch the unscripted initiative and major studios co-licensing, I took it.” She adds, “My Indian roots are also a strength and asset in storytelling. I love bringing my Indian background into work, whether that is in a show or introducing Indian food to my teams or wearing a sari to the Emmys and Golden Globes . The upbringing of community and warmth is an asset in managing teams at work, too.”— Priyanka Khanna Shruti Rya Ganguly Filmmaker, New York
Image: Emily Winiker
“Indian Annie Hall meets Katharine Hepburn—collared shirts with pyjama pants or a skirt, with white sneakers and a statement necklace,” says Oman-raised, New York-based Shruti Rya Ganguly, who runs her own production company, Honto88. It was while in class at Northwestern University that Ganguly saw Satyajit Ray’s Pather Panchali and had an epiphany. “Film combined everything I loved—art, design, culture, curiosity and music, and there was a business component to it, too.” She worked on the sets of Kaal (2005) and Chameli (2003), moving to New York to work at Island Def Jam. What followed were stints at Nylon , an MBA at NYU, and an MFA in film at Tisch, working with James Franco on films, a job at MTV Desi and finally Condé Nast, where she launched ‘73 Questions’ at Vogue . She’s now prepping to direct her first film, but her career highlight still includes being on a committee for the Obama administration. “As the only non-American, immigration, women’s rights and climate changes are things I discussed openly.”— Priyanka Khanna Zinnia Jothi Kumar Model, human attraction scientist and filmmaker, New York
Image: Jordan Walczak, hair: Mark Allan (Zinnia) , Makeup: Natalie Lopez (Zinnia), Production: Karan/Something Production
How many of us can pinpoint our career paths to an allergic reaction? Part-time model, documentary filmmaker and student on her way to bagging a PhD from Oxford University, Kumar’s career as a field conservation biologist in the Australian Outback took a turn when she became allergic to eucalyptus! The 24-year-old multi-hyphenate then began studying human evolutionary biology, with a focus on colourism. Born in Sydney, Australia, to a Punjabi father and Bengali mother, she now lives between cities—London is her current location, while New York serves as her professional base. Her wardrobe, similarly, is a cultural conflation. Think vintage meets grunge and a little bit bohemian. The one constant through it all? “I can never leave home without my Dr Martens.”— Akanksha Kamath Kumari Suraj Dancer and choreographer, Los Angeles
Image: Kumari Visionz
Born Kumari Lohar-Singh on a military base in California, Suraj’s debut on Fox’s popular dance reality show, So You Think You Can Dance , choreographing the show’s first ‘Waack’ performance in 2011, put the spotlight firmly on her individuality. She’s continued to gain recognition with her work for Dizzy Rascal, MC Hammer and Mya. Currently studying at the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising in Los Angeles, Suraj’s style reflects her Indian, African and native American cultures complimented with vintage pieces by YSL and Chanel, disco sequins and sportswear labels. Next up, a ‘queer-centric’ social media-based brand Her Drummer Her Dancer in collaboration with her fiancé, Malinder Tooray. “Our aim is to continue inspiring and supporting other queer desi and interracial couples,” says Suraj, an active member of the LGBT community.— Sheree Gomes Gupta Madame Gandhi Musical artist, New York
Image: Anna Maria
An electronic music producer and drummer whose mission is to “elevate and celebrate the female voice,” Gandhi regards herself as an artist and activist. “My parents were always invested in giving back.” When the family moved to New York, Gandhi, then eight, was aware of how privileged she was. “It was about not writing a cheque, but about getting involved in the community in a hands on way,” says Gandhi, who recently hosted a voting awareness programme at her home for 500 people. Touring with rapper M.I.A during her first semester at Harvard Business School was a high point for Gandhi. “Another highlight was running the London Marathon on my cycle and starting a conversation about how we treat menstruation in various cultures,” says Gandhi. “I want to become the best version of myself; I put out a song called ‘Bad Habits’ [it rose to No 8 on the viral US top 50 Spotify charts], which is a sort of an accountability anthem.” She’s a firebrand even when it comes to her dressing, with red, yellow and orange being her preferred palette. “Mae Studio and NorBlack NorWhite give an update to traditional Indian patterns. I do that, too, in my activism and in my music.”— Sheree Gomes Gupta Vidya Iyer Musician, Los Angeles
Music wasn’t always on the agenda for Chennai-born LA-based artist Vidya Iyer. “It’s been the longest road to get here. While I may have grown up learning Carnatic music, I studied Psychology and Pre-medicine and was firmly on the path to becoming a doctor,” says Iyer. A collaboration with American composer and clarinetist Shankar Tucker is what triggered the transition from aspiring doctor to YouTube star. “I toured with Shankar’s ensemble when I was in college and after graduating. Then I came to Mumbai to immerse myself in learning music. After two years, I moved in with my mom in DC, started my YouTube channel and here we are.” Today, her cross-continental journey has influenced both her viral mashups and sartorial sensibilities. “My style motto is: What if Coachella came to Rajasthan? So, you’ll find lots of big oxidized jewellery, Indian prints in Western silhouettes, my mom’s and grandmom’s old saris and pyjamas!”— Neharika Manjani Charlotte Emma Aitchison (Charli XCX) Singer, London/Los Angeles
Image: Getty
“Technically, I spend half my time living in London and half my time living in Los Angeles, but in reality I’m mainly living out of a suitcase, constantly on tour,” says Aithchison, better known by her stage name Charli XCX and as the voice behind popular hits like ‘Boom Clap’ and ‘I Got It’. Born to an Ugandan-Indian mother, she is yet to visit India but says growing up in her grandparents’ home has given her a strong understanding of traditions. At 14, she was contacted by a London promoter to perform and ever since there’s been no looking back. “I was very inspired by party culture from a young age. I’ve been making music for 10 years now and I also write songs for other artists, including Icona Pop, Iggy Azalea and Selena Gomez .” She left school soon after, and in the last decade has grown as an artist and a performer. “I think becoming more confident with who I am and letting go of the fear of what people will think is a personal highlight. I have found what is unique to me and I’m very proud of that.”— Priyanka Khanna Zara Martin DJ, model, influencer, actor, London
Image: Getty
Born and raised in London to an Indian mother and British father, Zara Martin’s striking looks and rock ‘n’ roll image first helped launch her career as a model and TV presenter when, during an unpaid internship at MTV she convinced her bosses into putting her on screen to host her own segment. Her passion for music—hip hop, in particular—eventually led her to deejaying. Today Martin is one of London’s leading DJs on the fashion and private party circuit. She has worked with global fashion and tech brands, including the likes of Chanel, Samsung, Estée Lauder, Tom Ford and Versace, and collaborated with British high-street favourite label Skinny Dip to create a line of headphones sold in Topshop and ASOS. Next up for this multitasker is a film with Freida Pinto, releasing later this year. More than just a pretty face, Martin, an Economics graduate, is also an ambassador for Women For Women International, a charity dedicated to helping female survivors of war rebuild their lives and choose their own futures.— Malika Dalamal Rekha Elizabeth Luther Singer and writer, Los Angeles
Image: Perla Maarek
“I grew up in Melbourne with my Australian (Scottish and Prussian) mother and Indian father. I always felt a little different. It wasn’t until the first time I visited India that I realised I was truly a mix, a clash, a balance of both East and West. All my deep interests, subtle quirks, curiosities that seemed a little different from the average Australian seemed to make sense,” says Luther, who has been moving addresses since she was 19. For her, a job is not a static, desk-bound scenario. It’s studying human rights, acting and theatre, modelling, singing and a side hustle concocting perfumes using natural Ayurvedic ingredients. Right now, though, modelling gives her the financial freedom to explore the world, while music is her creative outlet. “I have been writing songs since I was 10 and now I’m recording my first album in Los Angeles.” When off-duty, she wears a uniform of all-black. “I’m usually preoccupied, so black is simple. And I love anything vintage from the ’60s. Most of the time I live in well-loved cashmere sweaters.”— Akanksha Kamath Tiya Sircar Actor, Texas
Tiya Sarcar was born to professor parents and holds a degree in Business but don’t let her academic background fool you. The 36-year-old (you might recognise her as the Twilight fan in The Internship or as the real Eleanor in The Good Place ) traces her love for performing back to her toddler years— the Texas-born actor began training in dance when she was only two and a half years old. At the age of 18 she landed in LA and promptly bagged her first role in an episode of Disney ’s Hannah Montana . Since then she has made appearances in a slew of binge-worthy series ( Vampire Diaries and Master Of None , to name a few) and lent her voice to Star Wars Rebels . Fun fact? The multihyphenate is also multilingual—Sircar can speak Bengali, French, Spanish and Italian.— Neharika Manjani Aparna Nancherla Comedian and actor, Washington DC
Ever since her breakthrough performance in 2013 that won her the ‘New Face’ award at the Just For Laughs Festival in Montreal, Nancherla’s rise has been meteoric. In the last five years, she’s written for several successful shows, including Late Night With Seth Meyers , appeared on Inside Amy Schumer , got her own half-hour special on Netflix’s The Standups , and starred in A Simple Favour , with Blake Lively. Having suffered depression and anxiety, Nancherla’s signature performances include her humorous take on mental health disorders without trivialising the issue. In fact, she’s so committed that she created ‘Blue Woman Group’, a podcast that aims to help “overcome issues facing modern depressives.” Exciting times are ahead for Nancherla—Disney Junior recently announced a new animated show Mira, Royal Detective with an all-South Indian cast including Kal Penn, Aasif Mandvi, Freida Pinto and Nancherla, to be launched next year. It’s no surprise then that the Indian-American has garnered a massive fan following in just a few years.— Sheree Gomes Gupta Finance + Tech Kinjil Mathur Chief marketing officer, Squarespace, New York
“I was one of only a handful of Indian American students. However, I was fortunate that my parents were part of a strong Indian community in Dallas that kept me connected to the culture,” says Kinjil Mathur, who now as the chief marketing o­fficer of tech start-up Squarespace counts herself in the 3 per cent of women of colour who are C-level executives in the United States. “Sharing my experiences as a first-generation Indian American woman and fighting the good fight to change the ratio is part of my everyday,” she says. This year, the 37-year old, along with her team, galvanised feminist customers, including the likes of Gloria Steinem, to raise awareness around pay equity between men and women. On any given day the girl boss gravitates towards monochromatic dressing but the devil lies in the details. “It’s how I express the day’s mood—curious with unexpected embellishments, strong with structured fabrics and playful with interesting cuts.”— Neharika Manjani Sonali De Rycker Partner at Accel, London
If Sonali De Rycker penned an autobiography, it would probably have a chapter called ‘Around the world in envy-inducing jobs’. “I was raised in Mumbai. My father worked in a public sector job, and from an early age I understood I had to control my own destiny,” says De Rycker, who moved to the US after scoring a scholarship at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania, kick-started her career with Wall Street giant Goldman Sachs and is now partner at London-based venture capital firm Accel. “We invest early in technology-enabled businesses like Facebook, Flipkart, Dropbox, Slack, Spotify and Supercell,” she adds. Despite her hectic schedule, De Rycker routinely takes trips to Delhi and Mumbai to see family and friends. So, it comes as no surprise when she reveals Michelle Obama is her role model. “She’s whip-smart, inspirational and it never seems to come at the expense of her family commitments.”— Neharika Manjani Reshma Saujani Founder and CEO of Girls Who Code, New York
“On January 14, 1973, my parents arrived in the United States, five dollars in their pockets, and carrying bundles of used clothes,” says Reshma Saujani, who has clearly inherited their survival instinct. After three attempts, she got into Yale Law School. She interned at the Clinton White House, ran for Congress and lost, but that didn’t deter her from setting up Girls Who Code, which, in just a few years, has touched the lives of 90,000 young girls. “Every time I hear about a girl building a website to save the bees or a microchip to keep our communities safe from gun violence, I remember the importance of our work. We’re closing the gender gap in tech—imagine a future where all our girls are able to build and create with code,” she says. What’s been her biggest influence? “I’ve always admired women in history who have taken their power—whatever they could find, whatever was given to them, and whatever they found within themselves—to work for change.” She has a toddler at home, so what does she hope to pass on? “Do the things that scare you. You’ll never get ahead if you’re holding yourself back out of the fear of imperfection. It’s time to be brave, not perfect.”— Priyanka Khanna Sangeeta Bhatia Glympse Bio founder, MIT professor and diversity advocate, Boston
Image: Geordie Wood
Before she found her calling at MIT, Boston-based Sangeeta Bhatia worked the watch counter in a department store, the dressing room in a clothing store and even taught step aerobics for a free gym membership. “I had a long line of unglamorous jobs before I found my passion at 30,” says Bhatia. Now, the mother to two girls is the founder of a biotech start-up that focuses on the use of nanotechnology to detect diseases and deftly juggles two roles at MIT (she’s a professor and diversity advocate), all while raising style stakes—stilettos are a staple. “The students joke that they can hear me coming,” she says. The ardent multitasker, whose parents immigrated from India to the US over five decades ago, turns to social media to stay in touch with her scattered family. “My husband is also originally from India. Each of us has a sister and 30 first cousins across the globe!”— Neharika Manjani Anjali Sud CEO of Vimeo, New York
Anjali Sud embarked on her journey of disparate experience gathering early on. At 14 she swapped the comforts of home in Michigan (her parents migrated to the US in the 1980s) for boarding school. A degree at Wharton, and a rainbow of gigs, including investment banking and toy buying at Amazon , followed. “Each experience taught me a different skill set and helped me become a better decision maker,” she says. She landed at the video hosting site in 2014 to lead the marketing team, and was named CEO last year. “Having my teammates stand up to welcome me into the role was a moment I will never forget,” she says. Also last year, in another instance of life coming full circle, Vimeo opened their first Indian office in Bengaluru, and visiting was a highlight for this first-generation American who is “fiercely proud” of her Indian heritage.— Parizaad Khan Sethi Anjula Acharia Early stage investor and Priyanka Chopra’s manager, San Francisco
Image: Shutterstock; Blouse and lehenga: Falguni Shane Peacock
“As Indian women, this is our time!” Anjula Acharia should know. She’s made it her mission to promote South Asian talent, most famously, through our country’s most well-known exports, our cover girl Priyanka Chopra. As one of the few South Asians in Buckinghamshire, England, the lack of representation around her and in the media angered Acharia, “I knew that whatever I did professionally would need to give a voice to those who for too long had been ignored,” she says. After college she co-founded Desi Hits with record producer Jimmy Lovine, and they brought Bollywood to Hollywood and vice-versa—Lady Gaga, 50 Cent and Britney Spears came to India, and she famously launched Chopra in America. She also calls herself an accidental investor. In 2013, she wrote Payal Kadakia of ClassPass her first check. Today ClassPass has raised US$255 million and partners with more than 10,000 fitness studios in 50 global markets. Other companies that have benefited from her mentorship include The Muse, Thrive Causemetics, Yumi, Bulletproof Coffee, Pop & Bottle.“There’s nothing as thrilling as finding talent and nurturing it. My advice is to always think big. If your vision and dream don’t scare you, you’re not thinking big enough. Also, hustle and hustle hard, and don’t ever feel sorry for yourself.”— Priyanka Khanna Rachna Bhasin Chief business officer of Magic Leap, Dania Beach
Born in Gwalior, India, and raised in Wellington, New Zealand, Bhasin’s first job was at DST international, an investment banking software company. “I eventually attended Harvard Business School.” Over three years ago Bhasin joined Magic Leap, the spatial computing company building the world’s next computing platform, leading all strategic business and corporate development. “The most exciting part of my work is the unpredictability of my day. A call to Europe with a creative partner, work on an M&A deal in the afternoon and end the day having dinner with a filmmaker.” A career highlight, she says, was sharing Magic Leap demos with the world last year at L.E.A.P.—the company’s first-ever conference focused on all things spatial computing. “It was wonderful to see the diversity of experiences—from Shakespeare with the Royal Shakespeare Company to surgery with BrainLab,” she recalls.— Sheree Gomes Gupta Priya Parker Conflict resolution facilitator, businesswoman, and author of The Art Of Gathering: How We Meet And Why It Matters , New York
Image: Mackenzie Stroh
“I actually lived in India when Vogue launched, so I always ask my friends to carry back issues for me,” says Bulawayo-born Parker, who, after time in Africa and South East Asia as a result of her parents’ careers (her mother is an anthropologist), lived in Arizona and Northern Virginia, and now calls Brooklyn home. Her bio is quite the mouthful, so what exactly does Parker do? “I’m trained in the field of conflict resolution, and have worked on race relations on American college campuses and on peace processes in the Arab world, southern Africa, and India,” she says. At Thrive Labs, she helps create transformative gatherings, and she used those learnings to write her book, The Art Of Gathering: How We Meet And Why It Matters . “I followed my passion and natural talents and I made sure to get the skills I didn’t have,” she says. Best advice? “Read the newspaper. Develop a craft and set of skills. Gathering is a form of power; learn to bring people together well and intentionally. Seed conversations with your peers about the world. Develop a deeper understanding of structural power. Don’t quit your job to plan your wedding—do both.”— Priyanka Khanna Scaachi Koul Senior culture writer for Buzzfeed News and author, Toronto
“I was born and raised in Calgary, Alberta, best known for their beef and white people. I now live in Toronto, Ontario, best known for considering itself the only city in Canada,” quips the popular author of One Day We’ll All Be Dead And None Of This Will Matter . “It was like the childhoods of many first-generation kids, an education in being different from everyone else, from how I looked to the way my mom talked to me (screaming, usually, as is her wont) to what we ate.” In Koul’s trademark humour, she describes life as a writer as a little bit of luck and a big dose of foolishness. “I work really hard and I hate meeting new people, which means I’m a perfect candidate for sitting in front of a computer and writing about the crippling despair that is human existence!” Advice for young millennials looking for a voice? “If anyone is foolishly interested in my advice, it’s this: Moisturise, don’t start smoking, call your folks and not just when you need money, be nice to yourself, when you realise someone you thought was your friend actually sucks, don’t waste time giving them chances. And never, ever get bangs after you get dumped.”— Priyanka Khanna Writers/Editors Writer, reporter and fellow at Institute for Food and Development policy, Oakland
Image: Cem Ersavchi
If out-of-office messages are an indicator of exciting jobs, Simran Sethi’s would top the list. Currently, it reads: “I am visiting cocoa farmers in South America and will not be consistently online.” But for Sethi, who was named environmental messenger by Vanity Fair , and is in the process of relocating to Reggio Emilia, Italy, for a book she is writing on Punjabi farmers based in the Po Valley, it’s all in a day’s work. Sethi, who launched the news department for MTV India in the late ’90s, also has the distinction of having spoken on five different continents and lectured at institutions ranging from Harvard University to the Sydney Opera House. She’s also the author of Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The Slow Loss Of Foods We Love. “Getting to share the stories of people who are underrepresented,” is what drives her, and she lists a career highlight as “spending time in Ethiopia with the farmers who are sustaining the diversity needed to sustain the coffee crop.” In her quest to tell stories across the world, she’s adamant to keep the rest of her life simple. “I travel a lot, so I am now tending toward a capsule collection of black and white blouses and trousers. My friends think it’s a little dull but I try to make it interesting with jewellery and other accessories.”— Priyanka Khanna Parul Sehgal Critic at The New York Times , New York
“I miss my writer friends in Delhi, my family in Mumbai, Kolkata’s bookshops, Chandigarh’s rose gardens…,” says Parul Sehgal, who has lived in DC, Manila, Budapest and Delhi. As the book critic at the Gray Lady, she covers fiction and non-fiction, a gig, she says, she got thanks in part to her obsessive reading! What keeps her excited? “I feel the typical answer for a critic is to say the excitement comes from identifying the new—a new voice or some new energy or orientation in the culture. I love that. But the deeper pleasure for me is to come to a writer’s defense, to parse the work of someone who might have been misunderstood or dismissed as too difficult or narrow. It’s been an honour to write about Mary Gaitskill this way—and Marguerite Duras, Clarice Lispector and Machado de Assis,” she ends.— Priyanka Khanna Samhita Mukhopadhyay Executive editor, Teen Vogue , author, New York
Image: Hannah Choy
“I had a fraught relationship with my South Asian identity, but have embraced it later in life. I’m very close to my family, and I think that roots are what you identify with, not necessarily your ethnic identity.” It’s this frankness that’s made Mukhopadhay, who grew up between upstate New York and the city, and started her working life as a volunteer environmental educator at AmeriCorps, a strong voice in the cultural space. Currently the executive editor at Teen Vogue , she honed her skills at Feministing, Mic.com and is also an author. “My two books, keynotes and the young women I meet who are activists and aspiring writers that are inspired by what we do at Teen Vogue … that’s the real highlight,” she says, naming Anna Wintour, who she works for, as one of the women she admires.— Priyanka Khanna Michelle Ranavat Founder and CEO of Ranavat Botanics, Los Angeles
Ranavat’s year-old beauty brand is what keeps her anchored to her heritage. “One of the biggest reasons I started Ranavat Botanics was to continue my connection with the country. I was inspired by the beauty of ancient India,” she says. Her commitment to a career in beauty was preceded by a stint at Lehman Brothers, at her father’s business and even as an extra in Bollywood films. “My dad is a chemist and my mother an interior designer, so I have both a scientific and creative side,” says Ranavat, whose Indian roots are interspersed not only in her career choices but also her closet—an interesting mix of basics from Everlane and James Perse finished with heirloom-worthy jewellery from Haati Chai. “I love my Haati Chai ‘Anna’ coin pendant because it was inspired by the founder’s grandmother and looks like the ancient Indian currency. They find this incredible way to blend our heritage into our modern lives.”— Neharika Manjani Anita Kaushal Creative director & co-founder, Mauli Rituals, London
Image: Space NK
A spiritual pilgrimage to India reminded British-born and -raised Anita Kaushal of the healing powers of India’s age-old holistic traditions and provided the inspiration for Mauli Rituals, the organic skin, hair and bodycare brand she founded with her husband in 2014. Hair oils, radiance exfoliants, serums, Himalayan bath salts and lotions are all made harnessing ancient Indian principles that she learnt from her father-in-law, an Ayurvedic doctor. Deeply connected to her Indian roots, Kaushal’s brand combines her unique take on two worlds—Ayurveda wisdom and a sense of British refinement. The handcrafted formulas are created in limited batches and are currently stocked in high-end retailers including Space NK, The Conran Shop, Net-a-porter and most recently the Bulgari Hotel Spa in London and Milan. But Kaushal’s holistic philosophy runs much deeper than the ingredients in her products—Mauli Rituals donates £1 from every sale to children’s charities and dedicates a page on their website to give gratitude to those who helped build the business (including her cleaning lady). Her advice to the younger generation? “Work hard but know that in the end it’s work, it’s not your life. Don’t lose sight of what truly matters.”— Malika Dalamal Beauty Nitasha Goel Owner of The Cure Apothecary, Toronto
A computer networking degree, jobs in fashion at Holt Renfrew and Levi’s, and now an all-natural personal care boutique, The Cure Apothecary, with the goal for each client to love themselves and their skin—Nitasha Goel’s career trajectory is unlike any other’s. “The Cure Apothecary grew from a passion project—my craving for natural personal care to be easily accessible to everyone. It was hard to find clean, natural beauty products in Toronto, so I took my knowledge from my retail buying background, and sourced the most beautiful natural personal care brands that aligned with my vision.” The brand is only four years old, but Nitasha is conscious of supporting other local businesses and brands in her daily life. Her personal style is a little tomboy with a feminine twist. “On any given day you can find me in high-waisted jeans paired with a bodysuit and denim jacket draped over my shoulders, coincidentally called the Canadian Tuxedo.”— Priyanka Khanna Leila Janah Social entrepreneur, California
“Being able to increase a woman’s wages means she invests 90 per cent of it back into her family and community’s well-being. We see an immediate improvement in health, education, housing and food for the entire family,” says Janah, who was named among Fortune ’s Most Promising Entrepreneurs in 2014. The CEO of Samasource and LXMI—two companies that aim to give work to the underprivileged around the world using cutting-edge social enterprise models in technology and luxury skincare respectively—has been strongly influenced by Melinda Gates, American philanthropist and founder of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Then, in 2017, Penguin Random House published her book Give Work: Reversing Poverty One Job At A Time. “I’ve learned so much from the communities we serve and source from. Maybe the biggest highlight for me has been living closer to people, plants and nature—we, in the West, are so often trapped in our little boxes of concrete,” says the Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum.— Sheree Gomes Gupta Social Welfare Saru Jayaraman Organiser, attorney, academic & author, Oakland
If you watched the Oscars last year, you would have spotted an attractive Indian woman walking the red carpet with actor Amy Poehler. The woman in question was UCLA, Harvard and Yale Law School graduate Saru Jayaraman, the founder of Restaurant Opportunities Centers (ROC) United. “My parents’ struggles with discrimination as immigrants and my classmates’ families’ struggles as working people and people of colour is what drove me to fight for low-income people of colour nationwide. After 9/11 I founded Restaurant Opportunities Centers (ROC) United with restaurant workers displaced from the World Trade Center,” she says about her organisation that’s grown to 1,30,000 restaurant workers, restaurant owners and consumers fighting together for better wages and working conditions. It’s mobilising and elevating the voices of these workers that is the most exciting part of her job. When President Trump tried to pass a law making tips the property of owners, 4,00,000 restaurant workers fought back and won a bipartisan bill. “The attention my work has received over the last year thanks to the Times Up movement and other high-profile events I was invited to forced me to go shopping,” she says about how life has changed. “My good friend, actor and activist Jane Fonda, was kind enough to share some fashion pointers. At the end of the day, I want my clothes to be forgettable; I only want my voice lifting up women, especially women of colour, and my work to be remembered.”— Priyanka Khanna Gargee Ghosh Global policy and finance for Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Washington, DC
Image: Maryan Morrison
Let’s take a minute to trace Ghosh’s career trajectory. She graduated from Oxford University with a Master’s in Economics, interned on the 37th floor of the United Nations during Kofi Annan’s tenure as secretary general, and currently leads the international policy team for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. It’s a résumé that would stand out in even the heftiest stack. “One of my personal career highlights is working with Gavi, the global alliance for immunisation. We raised four billion dollars for life-saving vaccines around the world!” she says. With a mother from Darjeeling and father from Kolkata, Ghosh recalls a childhood shaped by holidays to India. Today her travel-intensive role continues to take her back to the country, commanding a closet that’s adaptive to adventures. “I can be in India or rural Africa one week and a London boardroom the next. I’m also a mom of two kids. So, I need a wardrobe that’s functional and flexible.”— Neharika Manjani Amika George Student and founder of #­Freeperiods, London
Last year, London saw its first mass protest for making the conversation around periods stigma-free. The 19-year-old Cambridge student behind mobilising 2,000 millennials via her #FreePeriods movement describes the scene: “We braved the December chill, holding banners with the cleverest period puns, to collectively shout for change.” Soon after, the government pledged to give a portion of the tampon tax fund to tackle period poverty, and in October she was recognised by the United Nations and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. A personal highlight, though: sneaking a selfie with Ed Sheeran and meeting Emmanuel Macron! Her inspiration and also her conduit to feeling connected to her roots (apart from polishing off a bowl of Kerala fish curry) is her great grandmother’s legacy as a women’s rights advocate. Her message to others from the Insta-generation? “Don’t be afraid to be disruptive. We have the best tool at our disposal—social media. Why not use it to see the change we want?”— Akanksha Kamath Art CEO and co-­founder, Absolut Art, New York
Image: Roberto Chamorro
“My career path is more of a jungle gym than a ladder,” explains Geneva-born, New York-based Nahema Mehta. She’s referring to her stints on Wall Street, Sotheby’s and even the Supreme Court of the US. In her free time Mehta also managed to launch Art Remba, a “Net-a-Porter for the art world.” This venture caught the attention of vodka giant Absolut, who bought her out and led her to co-found Absolut Art, a globally curated artist-to-consumer e-commerce site. “I wanted to address the art-buying gap between posters and Picassos,” explains Mehta. Her work takes her around the world, from Hong Kong to Sweden and everything in between—a familiar feeling from her childhood years, when she shuttled between Belgium and Kenya. For her travels she swears by Maria Cornejo wrinkle-proof jumpsuits that look good enough for a meeting after a long-haul flight. She also packs Brunello Cucinelli separates, Prada metallic brogues and Anamika Khanna for post-8pm events.— Rishna Shah Chitra Ganesh Visual artist, New York
Image: Getty
The year 2018 saw Ganesh work on two large-scale projects. The Scorpion Gesture, a suite of animations commissioned by the Rubin Museum of Art in New York, was transformed into an immersive installation for the 2018 Kochi-Muziris Biennale. The second, a multi-part print project inspired by Sultana’s Dream , a feminist utopian text written in 1905, culminated in a solo exhibition, Chitra Ganesh: Her Garden, A Mirror . “I draw inspiration from a variety of visual languages, from Surrealism and Expressionism to Islamic architecture, comics and sci-fi,” she says.— Sheree Gomes Gupta Devina Seth Director, media operations at Dazed Group, co-owner of Gunpowder restaurants, London
Image: Twitter.com/sarujayaraman
“The closest thing to home for me is food and films,” says Devina Seth, who opened her second restaurant with husband Harneet Baweja in London this August. “The first Gunpowder we started was in Spitalfields, where we upcycled an old ‘curry house’ and opened shop in 2015.” Beyond moonlighting as a consultant at her husband’s restaurant, Seth is a publishing marketing magnet. She spent six years at Vice , where she witnessed the team grow from 40 to 500, and now as the future of print comes under speculation, she finds herself at the Dazed group, testing and integrating new products for online. The dress code her job demands? “I always ask myself: How would Phoebe Philo want me to dress? So, I go clean and understated—smoking jackets, overcoats, a few well-cut suits and a lot of shirts. I reserve my smock dresses for date night with my husband at the restaurant.— Akanksha Kamath Garima Arora Chef, London
When Garima Arora opened GAA in Bangkok in April 2017, little did she imagine that in less than two years it would be awarded a Michelin star. Before opening her own restaurant, she worked at the legendary Noma in Copenhagen. “My biggest takeaway from Noma was to tap into my own culture. To see them do amazing things with such limited produce they have in Scandinavia was eyeopening,” says Arora. The nouvelle cuisine at GAA doesn’t fit any label—Thai produce, Indian flavours, and international techniques come together to create unexpected plates. Arora runs a packed dinner service seven nights a week, so her wardrobe is primarily her chef uniform. “When I do take a day off, I just want to be as comfortable as possible. My personal style is very casual; I basically live in jeans and sneakers outside the kitchen,” she says.— Prachi Joshi Also read:

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Excellent and Memorable Stay at ShangriLa Dubai – Review

Shangri La Dubai is an amazing hotel and the staff are superb. We stayed as a family with my wife and my daughter at the Shangri La Dubai last Sept. 2018 for 8 nights. We had wonderful room with beautiful amenities on a high floor on the Horizon Club. The only downside was that the Horizon Club floor was undergoing construction at the time of our visit in Sept 2018, however, we were given access to the Presidential Floor lounge instead. This was a special treat. The Shangri La Dubai is a brilliant 5 star hotel with an amazing ambience, superb décor, and wonderful staff who go out of their way to please the customers. There are so many positives about our stay at Shangri La Dubai: • Early check-in which was an added bonus was for us after a long trip • Excellent breakfast buffet at the Dunes Café with a vast array of foods, ie. Continental, Chinese, American, Arabic and Indian. • Superb Shang Palace Restaurant – has superb cuisine and special thanks to to the Host who was excellent customer service • Wonderful, friendly and courteous staff at check-in, Dunes Café, doorman, etc. • Great shuttle service to Dubai Mall • The Hotel had excellent views of the Burj Khalifa and Dubai Skyline • It’s close to the airport, Dubai Mall, Burj Khalifa, and World Trade Centre and may more landmarks. Bravo! Shangri La Dubai, Thanks for an outstanding vacation experience. Our stay at your hotel in Dubai was a memorable experience for our whole family. Lastly, I am happy to say that we are planning return trip back to Shangri La Dubai again this Sept. 2019. Excited and eager to come back. Amin K, Canada

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