Atul Kochhar to launch Kanishka next month in Mayfair

Atul Kochhar to launch Kanishka next month in Mayfair

Durham City Centre project secures £120m funding Atul Kochhar to launch Kanishka next month in Mayfair Atul Kochhar, the first Indian chef in the world to receive a Michelin star, is set to launch Kanishka on Mayfair’s Maddox Street this March. His first venture with Tina English, another recognised innovator of London’s Indian dining scene, Kanishka aims to explore lesser known regions of Indian food, showcasing cuisine from the country’s more remote territories and borders. Kochhar first hit the London spotlight upon winning a Michelin star at the acclaimed Tamarind of Mayfair in 2001. He left to open Benares in 2002, which was awarded its own Michelin star four years later. Now a celebrated restaurateur, television personality and cookery book author, Kochhar attributes his success to his use of regional Indian flavours alongside the best British produce, a practice which he will develop further in his latest venture. Kanishka will showcase the cuisine of territories previously unexplored by London’s restaurants, particularly the Seven Sister States in the most easternmost region of India. Kochhar’s menu will explore the flavours, ingredients and cooking methods of the states, as well as the influences had on these by neighbouring countries such as Nepal, China, and Bangladesh. Using seasonal and locally sourced British produce where possible, signature starters will include the likes of Kachela Maas, a Sikkim inspired venison tartare with mustard oil mayonnaise, naan crouton and onions, with mains such as Samundri Khazana Alleppey, a dish of pan seared seafood, Alleppey sauce and smoked cabbage poriyal. To finish, desserts will continue to showcase unique Indian flavours with the likes of a Chocolate rasmalai, a milk-based dessert popular in eastern India and neighbouring Bangladesh and Pakistan. Not to be overlooked, drinks will be a key element in Kanishka’s offering, with expert mixologists at the bar creating standout serves that make it a destination in its own right. Signature cocktails include the likes of the Roast Banana Old Fashioned, made from Tandoor roasted banana with cinnamon, orange and pecan bitters, maple, and the more savoury Ingrita, made from Mezcal served alongside a chilled lightly spiced tomato broth. Meanwhile, ‘Kanishka’s World of Imagination’ puts the mixing in the hands of the drinker, allowing customers to create their own highball drink from a menu of herb and spice distillates, mixed with a choice of naturally flavoured tonic waters and their spirit of choice. For something stronger, Kanishka’s extensive whisky menu showcases over 50 types of whisky, with a unique selection sourced from India. Named after King Kanishka, an emperor of the Kushan dynasty in the second century, Kanishka is inspired by the ruler’s use of Buddhist values, including kindness, fairness, honesty, humbleness and a sense of equality. These themes are explored through the interiors, designed by Fabled Studio with the aim of creating a nostalgic sense of ritual and tradition. Guests will be greeted by whimsical topiary elephants and an antique front door, whilst inside will feature verdant foliage against calming shades of blue and intricate beaded details. Split across the ground and basement floors, the 127-cover space includes a bar, a terrace at the front, and an intimate, 12-cover garden room downstairs. Kochhar and English are delighted to be working together, bringing their wealth of knowledge in the Indian dining sector to the new site. Speaking of the opening, Kochhar said, “Kanishka is a very exciting project for us – it’s a great opportunity to continue to showcase Indian flavours alongside quality British produce, but also introduce London’s diners to the unique flavours of territories previously unexplored by Indian cuisine in the UK.”

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BBQ Pork: Asian-Style at Northpoint City

While Johnson Duck is best known for its roasted duck (obviously!), it’s pork dishes are a hit too. From my observation, the char siew rice and noodle dishes are popular among customers.
Char siew is the Asian version of barbequed pork, with a Chinese-style marinade. I couldn’t wait to taste it as soon as I saw the dish in real life, however, a gastronomic journey is incomplete without customary foodie photos to capture the moment. While I was happily snapping my photos, I was thinking of how delicious the pork looked. Not to mention, the portion was good too!
The char siew was delicious on its own from the flavours of the marinade. The chilli sauce (warning: it’s spicy!) adds a kick to the char siew and rice combination. The sauce also reduces dryness from the meat. There is a clear soup that accompanies this dish at no additional cost – but as I don’t typically fancy soups, I opted out. Soups are common accompaniments with some Asian dishes – including the famed chicken rice. The dish also came with sides of cucumber slices and cooked peanuts.
If you’re travelling around Asia (or specifically Singapore/Malaysia), char siew is a must-try if you’re someone who loves having some pork on your fork. If you’re searching for a local experience, be sure to visit the food courts. Not only are food from these places less expensive, there’s also a variety of cuisines (Singaporean & Malaysian food primarily comprises of Chinese, Malay and Indian influences) and dishes to choose from under one roof.

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Raffles Singapore Unveils New Culinary Concepts with Celebrity Chefs

February 7, 2019
Singapore (Singapore) – February 6, 2019 ( travelindex.com ) – Raffles Singapore unveiled today its new line-up of dining experiences, which combine the hotel’s much-loved culinary traditions with contemporary dining concepts by renowned celebrity chefs. Each dining concept promises to tantalise the senses and has been carefully selected to enhance the famed ‘Raffles Experience’ for the local community and the discerning travellers.
Gourmets and gourmands, discover the Best Restaurants for Fine Dining in Singapore only at Top25Restaurants.com/singapore
“For more than 100 years the dining venues at Raffles Singapore have been recognised as an integral part of the vibrant and ever changing local bar and dining scene, exciting the local community as well as city guests alike. Continuing with our tradition and commitment of the highest level of friendly, engaging and anticipatory service, we are more than excited to introduce concepts with partner chefs, who have a reputation of operating successful venues around the world, while at the same time, creating culinary experiences that are new and distinct to Singapore,” said Christian Westbeld, General Manager, Raffles Singapore.
New Celebrity Chefs Dining Concepts In 1899, Raffles Singapore was the first hotel in the city to hire a French chef, introducing travellers and Singapore to authentic French flavours. Fast-forward almost 120 years, and the Grand Dame is once again at the forefront of a culinary renaissance. The following are a series of culinary ‘firsts’ that Raffles Singapore will be introducing when the iconic hotel reopens.
BBR by Alain Ducasse Bar & Billiard Room (BBR) continues to evolve with a new chapter by acclaimed Chef Alain Ducasse, who will be presenting his first Mediterranean sharing and grill concept in the world, titled BBR by Alain Ducasse. The unique concept takes customers on a culinary journey along the Mediterranean coast, complemented by a modern and vibrant ambience. In true Bar & Billiard Room fashion, dining at the restaurant will also be accompanied by a lively bar scene that is fun, relaxed and perfect for social gatherings.
Alain Ducasse said, “I could not dream of a better location than the landmark Raffles Singapore to bring the Ducasse restaurant experience for the first time to Singapore. My team and I look forward to adding another culinary destination for Singapore’s varied international clientele.”
Seduced by the flavours of the Mediterranean at a young age, Monsieur Ducasse reveals the essence of Portugal, Spain, Italy and France in BBR by Alain Ducasse. It is a modern, energetic, vibrant and accessible gathering place to meet, exchange and discover the culinary traditions of this region.
With the new concept, the 122-year-old restaurant, which started as a club during British colonial rule, will continue to be the social gathering space of choice for travellers and the local community alike. Serving sharing plates and regular-sized dishes, this bar and restaurant is convivial and cosy – the perfect place to meet with friends. It features a high energy open kitchen with charcoal grills and wood-fired pizza ovens as well as a lively bar and lounge that will serve a selection of spirits, cocktails, beers, wines and wine cocktails. Additionally, the highly anticipated Raffles Sunday Brunch with a reputation of being one of the city’s most indulgent Sunday experiences will be returning when BBR by Alain Ducasse opens.
Gourmets and gourmands, discover the Best Restaurants for Fine Dining in Singapore only at Top25Restaurants.com/singapore
La Dame de Pic One of the world’s top female chefs with three Michelin stars, Anne-Sophie Pic, will debut her entry into Asia with a remarkable restaurant in Raffles Singapore. The restaurant, La Dame de Pic, Raffles Singapore invites guests to discover the world of Anne-Sophie’s culinary identity, which reflects her search for aromatic complexity, combinations of flavours and powerful tastes that evoke emotions. The restaurant’s drinks menu presents an elaborate and diverse collection of pairings to add both intensity and harmony in the delicate art of tasting; consisting of wines, cocktails, whisky, sake, tea, coffee, dashi, broth and consommés. The wine list in particular offers a wide international base that leans towards the French regions, with a particular focus on Anne-Sophie’s birthplace, the Rhône Valley.
Located in the hotel’s dining room at the Main Building, the contemporary chic restaurant is beautifully designed with a graceful and soft palette that is reminiscent of Anne-Sophie’s favourite colours and materials: pastel shades and natural decorative elements such as leather or wood. The renowned chef is also a third-generation Michelin starred chef, following the footsteps of her grandfather and father, perfectly reflecting Raffles Singapore’s rich heritage.
“Making our debut in Asia at Raffles Singapore is a very natural choice for me. Like Raffles, the Pic family’s culinary heritage spans more than a century. Just like this beautiful hotel that will become one of our overseas residences, we are storytellers and constant seekers of excellence. Together, we share the vision to provide distinctive experiences to our guests, delivered with innovation that combines both tradition and change,” said Anne-Sophie. “It is my personal belief that to ensure our guests are happy, it is essential to be anchored in the present while not forgetting our roots and to be creative in order to imagine.”
yì by Jereme Leung Helmed by one of the most influential chefs in the modern Chinese culinary movement, celebrity MasterChef Jereme Leung returns home to Singapore with yì by Jereme Leung. The contemporary Chinese restaurant will be located on Level 3 at the newly restored Raffles Arcade. yì, which stands for art in the Chinese language, awakens your appetite and senses. Alluding to the fine art of Chinese dining, it references centuries of culinary mastery woven into the intricacies of Chinese cuisine presented in the restaurant.Fr om Cantonese classics to adaptations of China’s ancient delicacies, Jereme will be using single sourced and seasonal ingredients with a contemporary approach to deliver refinement and sincerity.
The restaurant is designed with modern sophisticated detailing and a soft white palette amidst the colonial architecture. Guests can also explore an immersive multi-sensory dining experience in the Experience Room with poetic dishes curated to evoke all five senses. For the hosting of private affairs, intimate private dining rooms are also available.
Jereme said, “While I have lived abroad for most of my career, the formative years which I spent working in Singapore and Hong Kong were so important to defining my approach and style of cooking. Opening yì by Jereme Leung at Raffles Singapore is an honour and I am excited to be able to work with some of the best minds in the Singapore industry and present my personal take on Chinese cuisine. These dishes reflect what I believe the future of Chinese cuisine should be 20 years from today. It is not fusion, not ‘east-meets-west’; rather, it is about capturing the essence of provincial ethnic Chinese cuisines. With careful focus being placed on healthy and seasonal food produce, it will create authentic taste profiles that are enhanced by modern culinary techniques.”
Butcher’s Block The refreshed Raffles Arcade will also see an introduction of a vibrant steakhouse, Butcher’s Block. Here, the focus is on the world’s finest cuts of single sourced meats, showcased in The Vault, a glass meat cooler situated next to the Open Kitchen where the chef’s butcher block is and where meats are prepared and cooked to perfection. Guests are given personal recommendations by our resident meat specialists, based on their individual tastes. Seated amidst a lively ambience set with cobalt blue hues complemented with dark wood panelling, the restaurant features communal tables for exceptional gatherings, complete with a wine library that houses more than 100 different wine labels.
Refreshed Signature Dining Experiences Return to Delight
Signature dining experiences that over the years have come to be synonymous with the hotel make their return to delight, with many of these returning favourites incorporating subtle tributes to the hotel’s 130-year history and heritage.
Tiffin Room A part of Raffles Singapore’s history since 1892, Tiffin Room continues to celebrate the heritage and flavours of North India with our resident Indian Chef. The restaurant offers an evocative dining journey across the North Indian palate, from Rajasthan to Punjab to Lucknow through a refreshed semi-buffet lunch and ala carte dinner. Authentic specialties served in the eponymous tiffin boxes are prepared with perfectly balanced spices, paired with classic Indian brews and beverages. The restaurant will also present an interactive dining experience with tableside service by chefs, complete with freshly ground spices to elevate the experience.
The restored interior décor of the restaurant includes reinstating the wooden floorboards in Tiffin Room to bring back features from the early 1900s based on research by our heritage consultants. Intricately patterned wood and mirror wall panelling add richness and create a signature visual language while colourful displays of Tiffin boxes are imbued with historical notes but modern in feel.
Long Bar Home of the Singapore Sling for over a hundred years, the Long Bar’s plantation-inspired décor will be refreshed, and the famous Long Bar counter restored. Long Bar continues to be the heritage bar for visitors to Singapore to enjoy the most iconic cocktail of the city.
The Lobby The classic Raffles Afternoon Tea experience will be served at a new location – the iconic Grand Lobby of the Raffles Singapore. Guests can indulge in one of the hotel’s great traditions – a truly unique and refined Afternoon Tea with a distinct sense of heritage – in the newly restored lobby. The Raffles Afternoon Tea is perfect for sophisticated and elegant celebrations, serving classic sandwiches, home-baked scones and cakes as well as seasonal indulgences, complemented by a curated collection of exquisite teas and Champagnes.
Writers Bar Established as a tribute to famous writers that have come through the doors of Raffles Singapore over the years, Writers Bar will be expanded to a full bar with bespoke craft cocktails, wines and spirits. Decked in luxuriously appointed furnishings, lovingly curated mementos and books, referencing the literary legacy of Raffles, the bar will be a sophisticated and serene refuge kept exclusive to residents and restaurant patrons; keeping this a place for discreet elegance and intimate conversations.
Raffles Courtyard Exuding a garden style and welcoming vibe, Raffles Courtyard is the city’s social space in a lushly landscaped alfresco venue at the Raffles Arcade. This friendly bar and lounge is open all day, offering guests a garden respite against a colonial architectural backdrop, complete with refreshing shared summer drinks and a selection of Southeast Asian small plates, including authentic Singaporean delights.
Ah Teng’s Café Raffles’ new takeaway café is named after a famous local baker of the same name, who used to own a shop in the neighbourhood back in the 1900s. Ah Teng’s Café serves visitors, the surrounding community and travellers alike with freshly made cold beverages, a selection of premium coffee, tea and homemade bakery, pastries and artisanal ice-creams for takeaway.
Pierre Burgade, Executive Chef, Raffles Singapore, who oversees the Hotel’s culinary landscape portfolio, said, “It is an incredible privilege to be given the opportunity to update these time-honoured Raffles signatures while also curating the stellar line-up of celebrity chefs for this iconic hotel. The deliberate and careful curation of the new dining concepts aims to elevate Singapore’s culinary landscape and makes our hotel an all-in-one gastronomic journey for guests and visitors alike.”
“We are pleased to embark on the meticulous restoration of Raffles Singapore, a distinctive hotel that is emblematic of Katara Hospitality’s commitment to create extraordinary experiences on the backdrop of iconic heritage hotels and provide unsurpassed service to our esteemed guests,” said Mr. Hamad Abdulla Al-Mulla, Chief Executive Officer of Katara Hospitality, a globally recognised hospitality owner, developer and operator who is also the owner of Raffles Singapore.
“Since opening its doors in 1887, Raffles Singapore has maintained a lasting legacy as a landmark hotel, hosting some of the world’s most famous and elite personalities. As a National Monument of Singapore and one of the few remaining 19th century hotels in the world, the hotel’s restoration is a testament to our continued pursuit in preserving portraits of historic charm, while growing Katara Hospitality’s portfolio of iconic properties in key travel destinations. Raffles Singapore is no exception, with its carefully implemented restoration programme that is poised to unveil contemporary charm and elegance; reminiscent of the luxurious splendour of Katara Hospitality hotels,” added Mr. Al-Mulla.
About Raffles Singapore Opened in 1887, Raffles Singapore is one of the few remaining great 19th century hotels in the world. Till today, its architecture is perfectly preserved both inside and out, giving it an intoxicating blend of luxury, history and classic colonial design. Within its walls are more than a hundred expansive suites, framed by polished teak verandas and white marble colonnades, clustered around lush tropical gardens. Each is serviced by the legendary Raffles butlers and offers every modern convenience necessary.
Raffles Singapore is currently undergoing a careful and sensitive restoration that is being carried out in three phases. The hotel is now fully closed with a grand reopening planned in the first quarter of 2019. The Raffles Gift Shop continues to be in operation at its temporary location on 3 Seah Street, around the corner from the hotel.
The restoration of Raffles Singapore is designed to ensure that we retain what is so special about Raffles – the ambience, the service, the charm and the heritage of the hotel. It is also designed for Raffles Singapore to stay relevant and distinctive by moving with the times and with its guests and adapting to the changing needs of the well-travelled and Singapore’s community

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Indian restaurant in downtown Stamford goes beyond the Naan

Gobi Manchurian Dry at Navaratna in Stamford.
Gobi Manchurian Dry at Navaratna in Stamford.
Photo: Ken Honore / For Hearst Connecticut Media Group Buy photo Photo: Ken Honore / For Hearst Connecticut Media Group Image 1 of / 14 14 Gobi Manchurian Dry at Navaratna in Stamford.
Gobi Manchurian Dry at Navaratna in Stamford.
Photo: Ken Honore / For Hearst Connecticut Media Group Buy photo Indian restaurant in downtown Stamford goes beyond the Naan 1 / 14 Back to Gallery When I first heard about this restaurant, I could not picture what it would be like. There are many Indian restaurants in our part of the state, but I had yet to hear of an authentic Indian restaurant that was both completely vegetarian and was certified kosher.
It wasn’t until I had lunch there a few days ago did I realize this claim was true and the key to myriad dishes I had never sampled. As far as the kosher claim, I was the only patron not wearing a yarmulke. This was the real deal.
At Navaratna, you will not find the same tired old Vindaloos and Tikki Marsalas. Instead, you can try the fabled street foods of Bombay (Mumbai) or challenge yourself with a Dosa (a yard-long paper-thin crepe filled with chick peas, potatoes and garlic). This was the first time I have seen Uttapaam listed on the menu. I had no idea what it was and could not figure out how to pronounce it. Uttapaam is a thick rice pancake with sambar and chutney, topped with chilis, onions and cheese or any other toppings you request.
This far-reaching menu is served in a small clean space in downtown Stamford. It is a modern-looking eatery with a distinct downtown feel (i.e., it is hard to park). The service is a bit cool in terms of a big gushy welcome, but otherwise very fast and very professional. When a customer orders many dishes, often the waitstaff is flummoxed and as they bring out the new foods, they leave the old dirty dishes on the table. I have a personal dislike for this shortcoming because I always feel I am sitting among the debris from previous customers.
The waiters here have figured out a way to bring us a large selection of what we ordered in stages so the new foods were hot and crisp and the old dishes were whisked away. Aesthetically, Navaratna has their act together.
I started my feast with a sweet Mango Lassi. If you never tried one, just imagine a thick fruity apricot colored milkshake with yogurt as the binder. Indian food can be very hot and something magical happens when I start a meal with a Lassi. It acts like plush stomach carpeting, so no scalding hot peppers faze me.
More from Jane Stern Enchanted Szechuan lives up to its name on Norwalk’s restaurant row Jane Stern: After Gordon Ramsay, bullied owners do their best Jane Stern: Ikea Restaurant is worth the trip Jim Barbarie’s original restaurant is nice and normal ‘Sunday Supper’ thrives at Roseland Apizza in Derby It’s OK to fill up on the bread after a trip to Wave Hill I am not a vegetarian, but the lack of meat dishes here was not in the slightest a drawback. In fact, it made me respect Indian cuisine even more. How can there be so many luscious dishes to choose from that depend solely on the chef’s imagination and his skill with stuffed breads, exotic salads, samosas and regional curries from both northern and southern India.
In addition to these showstoppers, there are eight unique dishes featuring rice. I have eaten biryanis at Indian restaurants and often thought that this yummy rice-and-vegetable hodgepodge was the scope of rice adventuring. Here I went crazy over a whole array of a platters of rice prepared as I had never seen before. I swooned at coconut-flavored rice dotted with tiny astringent mustard seeds, curry leaves, peanuts and cashews. From there I segued to tamarind rice and lemon rice, both as bright and sharp as the fruits they honored and laced with savory nuts. The lemon rice was one of the best dishes I ordered and the bright citrus tang brought back my appetite, rather than erased it.
With some difficulty, I forced myself to stop ordering side dishes and moved on to try a Mumbai street food called Baingan Chaat. This is a batter-fried tiny eggplant with a sauce of tamarind chutney. Absolutely terrific as is the South Indian curry called Enni Kathrikini a more sophisticated pairing of eggplant, tamarind, peanuts in a sesame seed gravy. I am embarrassed to say I kept eating. I felt I had already consumed enough to feed a small village in Indian, but there were now eight breads that caught my eye.
Years back when I first fell in love with Indian food I always ordered Poori bread (deep-fried whole wheat bread that looks like a balloon when it hits the table and then slowly deflates like a sigh.) Along with the Poori, one should order the yogurt-based cucumber and mint raita used to dip the warm bread into.
I have made whole meals of a Mango Lassi with Poori and Raita. There are few things I find more satisfying than this simple combination.
Photo: Connecticut Post Photo: Connecticut Post Image 1 of / 10 10 Photo: Connecticut Post Top Yelp-reviewed Indian food in southwestern Connecticut 1 / 10 Back to Gallery But let me lodge a small complaint against almost all the Indian restaurants in Connecticut that have become so lazy they only serve Naan and maybe a Paratha bread if you are lucky. In the “Bread Corner” of Navaratna’s menu there are two kinds of Poori, plain and stuffed with potato marsala, a gentle Bhatura which is a deep-fried soft bread, Chapathi (a whole wheat soft bread) and Parathas stuffed with cashews, raisins and coconut or chickpea curry.
Navaratna 133 Atlantic St., Stamford
navaratnact.com
Rice and Breads are the cornerstone of the Indian meal for good reason. I knew I had to sample the Aarambams (appetizers), again a rarely seen selection. I adored the Lentil Doughnuts with onion ginger and green chili, and the Gobi Malligai, deep fried cauliflower with mint and cilantro. Brilliant!
I lost track of my orders after a while. Stuffed as tight as a paratha bread my mind wandered to the miracle that in Fairfield County I would be sitting in a kosher vegetarian Indian restaurant. I marveled at the team of waiters who managed to understand my slaughtering of the Indian language. Somehow, they figured out my pathetic pronunciation of Vaarual, Bahara, Thayir, Aloo, Huliyana and Chettinad. I did my best trying to form the words I saw on the menu. If they had a good laugh in the kitchen at my expense they deserved it, and four stars to them for never bringing a dish I did not ask for even in my mangled version of their beautiful language.
At my first dining experience at Navaratna, I might have seemed a happy idiot, but I was the best fed happy idiot around. I am fine with that.
Jane Stern, a Ridgefield resident, co-authored the popular “Roadfood” guidebook series.

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Food preference:Eateries go for Odia cuisines

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BHUBANESWAR: Odia cuisines are not just limited to Mahaprasad and Bhog. In fact, there is a distinctive identity of homemade Odia delicacies which are rarely found at eateries. However, some eateries have tried to change this narrative by serving genuine Odia delicacies.
Kanhu Tripathy, food researcher, said, “Odia cuisines are 15-20,000 years old and it hardly contains any elaborated spices or oil.” Orissa Post interacted with some foodies and restaurant owners of the city to delve deeper into the subject.
Pratik Mohanty, an avid Odia cuisine lover, said, “Due to our fast-paced lifestyle, we hardly get time to cook authentic Odia meals. In fact, in my village at Sunabeda, my mom serves me Odia delicacies including Besara, Patar Poda, Chuiin Tarkari( Drumstick curry), Chakuli and Usuna Bhata among others. For such items, I often visit Ballaree at CRPF square, Bhubaneswar.”
Sisira Kumar Rana, Cook, Ballaree, said, “One can hardly get a seat at our outlet these days. The favourite dish of Odias Pakhala along with Manja Poda, Jahni Poda, Chhatu Poda, Chingudi poda, Machha Besara, Saga Bada, Chuiin sorisa and Ambula Rai is the best selling dish.”
Odisha Hotel owner Rajiv Swain said, “The timeless combination of Usuna Bhaata, Kolatha Dali, Khasi Mansa, Saga Bhaja, Ambula Rai, Mahuralli Machha tarkari, Khakharu Phoola Bhaja (Pumpkin flower fritter) and Aloo Bharta is always on demand. Besides Dahi Pakhala with Baigan Poda, Jahni Poda, Badi chura, tomato poda is our most selling cuisine.”
Supervisor of Odisha Hotel, Dipti said, “We fail to offer seats to our guests as the hotel is always jam-packed. Not just Odias, even foreigners come to our outlet frequently.
A particular dish that has tickled the gastronomes of denizens is Manja Poda. The procedure to prepare this age-old delicacy is intricate. At first, turmeric and salt is added to chopped manja pieces and squeezed. A paste is then prepared of Mustard seeds, garlic and green chilly. The pieces are then boiled after extracting the juices with little salt, turmeric and water and then cooked.The vessel is then heated with oil. When hot, phutan and dry chilly are added along with chopped tomato. When half cooked, mustard paste is added to it along with some more salt and turmeric. The dish goes well with plain rice and Dahi Pakhala.
Dalma Restaurant at Unit-4 also serves authentic Odia food like Nadi Dalema, Khakharu Bara, Pariba Choppa Bhaja, Tomato Badi Poda, Pita Saga Rai, Chuna Machha Rai and Lembu Dala among others.
Nutritionist Anjana Tripathy of Kalinga Hospital said, “It’s not surprising that Odia cuisine is regaining its lost glory. People might eat North Indian, Chinese cuisine for a few days, but nothing matches the nutritional value of Sajana Saga bhaja, Usuna Bhata and Kolatha dali. Our climate is typically hot. Hence, these typical Odia cuisines have been designed by our ancestors to keep our body cool, healthy and fit. Therefore, Odia cuisines are making a huge comeback into the plates of each and every denizen.”

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Munch India Does Awesome Non-Naans

Munch India Does Awesome Non-Naans Munch India Does Awesome Non-Naans The popular pop-up has a brick-and-mortar outlet now that spotlights 40 regional Indian breads. By Anneli Star Josselin Rufus Published: February 7, 2019 Photo by Lance Yamamoto
If the phrase “Indian bread” makes you think instantly and only of naan, Nick Ahmed and Diana Afroza would like a word with you.
Several words, actually. For instance, rumali roti. Also luchi, puri, lachha paratha, and dozens more. But especially rumali roti, because it’s Afroza’s favorite.
Popular in the Punjab region that straddles northern India and eastern Pakistan, made from well-kneaded wheat-flour dough flattened into a 33-rpm-size circle then cooked on both sides to golden-brown, bubble-pocked perfection on the bottom of an overturned wok-like pan called a kadai, it’s a limp and almost translucently thin wheat-flour flatbread whose name, in several northern Indian languages, “means handkerchief, because you fold it like a handkerchief” before dipping it into dal or saucy dishes and eating it, said Afroza, who with her husband and fellow chef, Ahmed, helmed the popular Munch India food truck, then launched a brick-and-mortar Berkeley restaurant by the same name last fall.
“The breads that are popular in specific regions depend on the staple grains of those regions — wheat, rice, or whatever,” said Afroza, who has also authored a cookbook, Flavors of Mirch Masala.
They also depend on regional baking styles.
“Making naan requires a tandoori oven that can reach 700 degrees,” Ahmed said. Such ovens do not inhabit every corner of the Indian subcontinent.
Folded over once, then again to effect the proper handkerchief shape, “rumali roti is especially prevalent in Old Delhi, where every three blocks you’ll find someone making it — on the street and in all the very plush hotels,” Ahmed said.
It’s one of some 40 regional breads spotlighted on Munch India’s constantly rotating menu.
Another is puffy white-flour luchi. Deep-fried in ghee and traditionally eaten for breakfast with tangy-sweet spiced potatoes, “it’s very quintessentially Bengali,” Ahmed said.
Sourcing many ingredients from the Berkeley Bowl, the South Berkeley farmers market, and nearby farms, the pair — who live in Berkeley — buy herbs and spices whole, then grind them freshly to optimize each dish.
“Indian restaurants in America completely misrepresent India and have given a bad name to its food — which in reality is incredibly complex, and when prepared by authentic, true chefs is on par with French and Japanese cuisine,” Ahmed said.
“We’re trying to demonstrate that Indian food is much more than just tikka masala and naan.”
Munch India, 3105 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley, 510-847-6043, MunchIndia.com.

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Grand Hacienda Mexican Cuisine

Sabores Del Mar ( Seafood ) Desserts We came for a dinner, and my wife had been here before, and the place was slam packed with servers, busboys, and managers running around, trying not to run into a chair backed against another tables chair, or people standing around waiting because the bar was even full, and it was too humid outside to wait. We managed to get a cocktail table in the bar, but the server had many tables and was crazy busy. Being in the industry we understood, and enjoyed our time people watching and have a conversation in between the times she came by to deliver food and beverage or to check-in. The menu was pricey, which at first made me think that they were using high-end ingredients which would be a good change from a typical Mexican restaurant or mom and pop, but overall, in the end, it was very typical to what you get at other places. Like most Mexican restaurants the complimentary chips and salsa arrive as soon as you sit down. My wife had a Patron cocktail while I had a Dos Equis Amber. Though Corona is one of the top-selling Mexican beers, I’m not big on that beer and prefer more traditional cerveza. We started with a cheese dip cup to go with the chips and salsa For entree’s my wife had the grandma Maria chicken soup made with homemade chicken broth, chicken, rice, pico de gallo, sliced avocado, and topped with tortilla strips. The broth had a good aroma, flavors and spice were lite then spicer on the finish, making it a decent tasting soup. Grand Hacienda / Grandma Maria Soup We then shared an Esquite side dish of Mexican shaved corn, seasoned with butter, queso fresco, lime chili piquin peppers, and a chili mayonnaise which is an ancient traditional Aztec dish. To me the corn lacked flavors I would expect from recipes I’ve tasted before, a little bland, with less spice than expected, but the cheese was good flavor making up for the lacking of items mentioned for it go down. Grand Hacienda / Esquite For my entree, I was trying to decide between a few items but narrowed in on the huarache after getting a nod of approval from our server. This is a traditional dish from the state of Michoacán , one of thirty-one sovereign Mexican states. Huarache is also the name of a leather-thonged sandal, originally worn by Mexican Indians. Though the dish funny enough is similar in shape to the sandal and traditionally consists of a fried masa dough base with a topping, typically salsa, potato, meat and/or cheese. The dish comprises of an oval home-made corn tortilla deep fried, filled with beans, steak, and tomatillo sauce. The chimichanga style tortilla is then topped with lettuce, chopped onions, tomato, queso fresco, and sour cream. The dish comes with a side of rice, and though the corn tortilla was crunchy with flavor from the fry, the steak inside like the Esquite lacked the flavors I was expecting. Michoacán cuisine is defined as a complex layering of delicious flavors like the more popular cuisines from Oaxaca and Puebla according to an NPR article , but its dishes seem to be a bit more comforting and use fewer ingredients. The steak in the huarache was not on the level of comfort, and though there are fewer ingredients, the taste was not exciting and did not send my pallet on an adventure for the price points. Grand Hacienda/huarache on this visit but a review from Creative loafing Food Critic Jon Palmer Claridge wrote that the white chocolate key lime mousse is a frozen wedge that’s nearly impossible to eat, and shows that it came from a Sysco truck instead of being house-made and though the flan is made in-house Mr. Claridge writes that it was gelatinous and grayish. Tex-Mex and Mexican cuisine articles or Grand Hacienda: Tex-Mex is a fusion of United States cuisine and Mexican cuisines, deriving from the culinary creations of Tejanos. It has spread from border states such as Texas and others in the Southwestern United States to the rest of the country as well as Canada. Tex-Mex is most popular in the state of Texas. Benji’s Cantina An Innovative approach to Tex-Mex cuisine in Austin, Texas Besito Mexican Restaurant Creative Mexican-blend eats chain; reviewed in Tampa, Florida Güero’s Taco Bar Landmark Mexican restaurant on Congress Ave. in Austin, Texas Hablo Taco Mexican-blend joint known for tacos and margaritas in Tampa, Florida Texas Chili Parlor Local eatery for Tex-Mex, chili, and American cuisine in Austin, Texas See St. Petersburg restaurants, A Fusion of Thai and Mexican Cuisine Better food than years ago + fun

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Wedding – Review

When i was first told its a wedding on a beach and this was the venue ,i was really happy, its layout is such that its open to the sea ,and very breezy. Its my first time that the wedding party were the only guests and the hotel was ours! Each event had different cuisines,chaat, Japanese, Italian and some Indian comfort food, the service was excellent, the food superb, the chefs were are all at hand , fixing our plates, explaining the food. The rooms are spacious and comfortable, I totally recommend this venue for weddings, as well.

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Kanishka: Michelin chef behind Tamarind to bring 'unexplored' taste of India to London with new opening

Daniel Hambury/@stellapicsltd
The Seven Sisters states are Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland and Tripura.
Typical food of the region includes dumplings, air-dried meat, fermented bamboo shoots and soya and smoked dishes, not often found in the rest of India.
The restaurant will also serve two Tibetan-influenced dishes, one made of bread and the other featuring sausage.
Both are usually made with yak meat but will be adapted to the British palate with lamb and venison instead. The main drink of the region, rice beer, will also be on offer.
The 127-seat restaurant is the first new opening for Mr Kochhar since a row last summer when he tweeted that followers of Islam had “terrorised Hindus over 2,000 years”.
He quickly deleted and apologised for the comment but it cost him a contract at the JW Marriott Marquis hotel in Dubai. Shortly afterwards, he parted company with the Mayfair Indian restaurant Benares.
Mr Kochhar said: “Kanishka is a very exciting project for us — it’s a great opportunity to continue to showcase Indian flavours alongside quality British produce, but also introduce London’s diners to the unique flavours of territories previously unexplored by Indian cuisine in the UK.” The best Indian restaurants in London 19 show all The best Indian restaurants in London 1/19 Hoppers There’s a reason this place still has hour-long waits on for tables on a daily basis, and its not slow service. This beautiful little restaurant offers delicious Sri Lankan street food at extremely affordable prices, with favourites including the mutton rolls and bone marrow varuval alongside the marinated tamarind and ginger chicken wings – all of which are available on the set menu for £30 per person. The star of the show at this Soho spot is the dish the restaurant is named for – the egg hopper – a fried bowl-shaped beauty made with fermented rice and coconut milk, with a perfectly contained yolk in the middle. Once again, the Sethi family (the group behind Bubbledogs, Gymkhana and Trishna) prove they’re an unstoppable force leading London’s Indian restaurant revolution. 2/19 Bombay Bustle Step inside Bombay Bustle and you’ll be transported to a colonial-era railway carriage – first class, naturally. Inspired by the Dabbawalas of Mumbai – men who traditionally travelled across the city by train to deliver home-cooked meals – Bombay Bustle captures the essence of a rich and vast culinary tradition. Follow the station-style signage to navigate between the bar and dining areas and take a seat in one of the coach-style booths. There you’ll tuck in to some of Mumbai’s most celebrated dishes: opt for the small plates and share as many as you can. Top picks include the rarah keema pao, a richly spiced lamb mince served with a buttered bun, and the masala akuri – spiced scrambled eggs gleaming atop a truffled naan. Save room for the tandoor dishes: the cardamom-spiced murgh malai chicken is a triumph. 3/19 Indian Accent Despite decidedly unassuming appearances – it really just looks like another faintly dull spot for bored Mayfair types – this is an extraordinary place, turning out gorgeous, intensely flavoured plates of food. The first signs of genius come early on, with the tiny bite of blue cheese-filled naan (we asked for a second plate), which are remarkably memorable and impossible to over recommend. The place is full of food that manages to be both earthy and elegant at the same time, at times dazzlingly inventive, other moments reliably comfortable. Portions are small, service is friendly if fussy, but by God the food is delicious. Even their puddings are exceptional and their brunch is likely the most interesting in London. Neither of these things is usual for an Indian restaurant – but then Indian Accent isn’t usual; it goes beyond than that. A delight. 4/19 Jamavar Mayfair’s Jamavar is another that proves that Indian fine dining in the capital is fiercely good. Much like its contemporaries, the venue has a colonial gentlemen’s club feel to it and offers delicately-spiced plates that pack a punch. Highlights include the juicy scallops Bhel with a tamarind and date chutney and the slow cooked Jamavar dal with black lentils. Familiar favourites can be found on the menu too, like the moreish old Delhi butter chicken. 5/19 Cinnamon Bazaar There’s a reason Vivek Singh is one of the capital’s most celebrated Indian chefs and the proof is in the pudding. Everything here from food to decor is built to resemble the vibrancy and energy of ancient and modern bazaars located along old trading routes. Something that follows through in the food, which fuses both east and west with dishes such as a lamb roganjosh shepherd’s pie and Vindaloo of ox cheek with masala mash. 6/19 Dishoom Dishoom is rightly regarded a staple of London life, even though just eight years have passed since its first Bombay Cafe opened in Covent Garden. The group’s monopoly of the casual, quality dining scene spans five London branches and another two in Edinburgh and Manchester. Be sure to try the mahi tikka (grilled, marinated fish) and okra fries as part of a sharing-plate meal. Meanwhile the chole poori (puffed, fried bread with chickpea curry) makes a cheap and hearty lunch for one. The real standouts are the black daal and the breakfast bacon naan, both of which have achieved legendary status and have the lamb chops too, which deserve to be similarly revered. Dishoom 7/19 Darjeeling Express This place has come a long way since serving Indian food to 12 supper club guests in Wood Green. Six years on, the location may have changed – they now boast a permanent site in Kingly Court – but the food is as good as ever. None of the team are trained chefs, instead all being amateurs-turned-professionals who learned to cook perfecting long-standing family recipes. This eccentricity might just be why it all works as well as it does. Chef patron Asma Khan’s ever-changing menu has a homely feel to it but no means is lacking in finesse: the Calcutta-Hyderabad-Rajput cooking is all boldly spiced, vigorously flavoured and served in generous portions. It is a bold, lively place where it’s fun to drink up and tuck in. There are stories here; fortunately, you can still book up to hear them. Hear them first hand before next year, when Khan becomes the first British chef to appear on Netflix’s Chef’s Table. Daniel Hambury/Stella Pictures 8/19 Quilon Another star of the capital’s Indian food scene. Chef Sriram Aylur shows consistency is forte as the food is vibrant and delicate with a home-style to it. Standout dishes include their signature fish curry with tender halibut and a creamy-with-a-kick coconut and chilli sauce, as well as the perfectly spiced Mangalorean chicken. 9/19 Cinnamon Kitchen Battersea The Cinnamon Club’s younger, laid back sister offers an alternative set up to its fine dining sibling. The restaurant is the baby of the family and much like its sister branches, chef Vivek Singh has worked wonders with its vibrant menus. The dinner offering is on the meatier side, with a hearty selection of grilled meats and dishes such as the clove-smoked lamb ramp and the fiery rump steak with masala chips. There’s also a plethora of breads to mop up any excess sauce, including four different types of naan; plain, garlic, peshwari and a chicken tikka and cheese. 10/19 Jikoni Granted, this spot isn’t just an Indian restaurant. It specialises in flavours from other parts of Asia too, offering twists on traditional poppadoms and bhajis, but largely boasts a variety of Indian-inspired triumphs. Small plates include the clove-smoked venison samosas with beetroot chutney and larger plates deliver too, like the mutton keema, which is sandwiched between two toasted brioches to form a wildly indulgent Sloppy Joe. Much like the food, the decor is comforting, with mismatched tablecloths and cushions, giving it a relaxed, homely feel. 11/19 Gunpowder Husband and wife team Harneet and Devina Baweja opened this spot back in November 2015 with the help of Mumbai-born head chef Nirmal Save, formerly of Tamarind and Zaika. Nearly three years on and there’s no stopping them: not only did the team launch a cookbook earlier this year but Gunpowder was recognised by Michelin with a Bib Gourmand in 2018, which it retained at the 2019 awards. The the menu offers rich, well-executed, belt-loosening plates that will leave you feeling wholly satisfied and wanting to do it over again. Standout dishes include the charred lamb chops and the chettinad pulled duck. 12/19 Benares “No Indian restaurant in London enjoys a more commanding location or expansive interior,” said the Michelin Guide’s 2019 inspectors, as the place held onto its star for the twelfth year in a row. Expansive, perhaps, but Bernares doesn’t look especially ravishing either inside or out. Still, its polished interior can house up to 300 guests and encompasses four private dining rooms, bar, a main dining room and a lounge, where guests are greeted by a pool of floating flowers. Food here is an inventive blend of quality British ingredients, traditional Indian recipes and contemporary techniques. 13/19 Trishna Unlike some of its competitors, which tend to have a more meaty focus, Trishna celebrates the coastal cuisine of southwest India. The food on the menu pays close attention to coconut and tamarind, and accordingly dishes are fragrant without being overpowering, though they’re brazen with the spice – expect to have your socks very soundly blown off. The tandoor offers a selection of seafood from charred scallops to salmon tikka. 14/19 Gymkhana Gone are the days when Indian restaurants were stereotyped as budget-friendly, BYOB haunts. The capital’s Indian fine dining scene is booming and Mayfair’s Gymkhana is a testament to that. It’s hardly a surprise too, considering the Trishna and Hoppers team are behind it. The venue pays homage to colonial India’s gymkhana clubs – spaces where members of high society would socialise, dine, drink and play sport. Menus here capture the intensity and depth of flavour that north Indian cuisine has to offer, with dishes such as the guinea fowl Tikka and wild muntjac biryani. Bold flavours are the name of the game here, but classics like the chicken butter masala are still on the menu and do not disappoint. No wonder this place has kept its Michelin star four years in a row. 15/19 Kricket It’s always nice to see a pop-up given a permanent site. It’s even nicer to see a former pop-up given a permanent site and then get the recognition it deserves. From humble beginnings of a shipping container in Brixton to retaining its Bib Gourmand twice in a row, Kricket has come a long way and picked up plenty of fans in the process. Its menu is often updated but it remains all about small, seasonal sharing plates and India-inspired cocktails. That said, there are some regulars – the bhel puri and samphire pakora are going nowhere, neither is the keralan fried chicken, all with good reason. The bar serves a rotation of six cocktails, all of which feature delicate, oriental spices; anything with spiced jaggery syrup or darjeeling Bourbon is going to be a hit. 16/19 Brigadiers Inspired by the army mess bars of India, this up-market Indian barbecue joint draws a crowd with its range of entertainment, beers on tap, sports screenings and, most importantly, its small plates. Once you’ve finished playing pool in its art-deco “social hub”, or downed your last pint in the Tap Room tavern, sit down in Brigadiers’ dining room to pour over its extensive menu – their are 16 sides alone. Grill-lovers should try the sikandari kid goat shoulder and the BBQ chicken wings, while those looking for something lighter will enjoy the delicately spiced Indo Chinese chicken lettuce cups. There are plenty of well-crafted vegetarian options, too, such as the gently charred wood fired mushroom methi malai naan and the smoked aubergine missi rotis. If a restaurant can attract crowds to Bank on a weekend, it must be doing something right. Matt Writtle 17/19 Masala Zone Sisters Camellia and Namita Panjabi have decades of research behind them, which rubs off on their authentic food. The menus boast a selection of Indian all-stars from grills, tandoors and curries to vibrant street food. The paneer tikka made with fresh fenugreek leaves and yellow chilli proves that veggie curries can be just as flavoursome and rich as their meaty counterparts. Likewise, the familiar korma gets an upgrade, with saffron infused into it. The thalis, however, are the stars of the show here — various small dishes are served on a circular tray, creating a colourful platter of vegetables, dal, chapati, rice, salad and pickles. With seven different branches across the capital, each site has its own identity and brings something different to the table. The Covent Garden restaurant has puppets hanging from the ceiling while the Bayswater branch has eye-catching graphics plastered over the central dining room pillars. 18/19 Indian Zing This longstanding favourite in Hammersmith offers modern, dynamic Indian food. It’s another fine-dining spot that’s popular with locals and celebs alike (even the late Michael Winner was a fan). A real knowledge of India’s regional cooking shines through at this place, thanks to Mumbai-born chef-patron Manoj Vasaikar. The chicken shatkora lives up to the restaurant’s name with herbs and spices balanced by a punch of zesty citrus, and the lamb dhansak, a speciality of the Mumbai Parsi community, combines traditional flavours with seasonal produce. This restaurant packs out on a regular basis, but the service always remains calm and attentive — the sign of a true gem. 19/19 Chakra This little known Kensington spot is all too often overlooked in lists like these. It’s a fabulous neighbourhood place and appropriately upmarket for Kensington, tucked away opposite the excellent Elephant & Castle. They’ve recently refurbished but the real draw is the terrace space; sit out and tuck into their delicious little bites. It’s the sort of place to order a few glasses of wine while tucking into the likes of truffle Kulcha (addictive bites of wild mushroom & black truffle naan) or monk fish marinated beautifully with kasundi mustard paste. The Lucknowi lamb kebab is a must too. Service is the quiet, friendly type. David Clack 1/19 Hoppers There’s a reason this place still has hour-long waits on for tables on a daily basis, and its not slow service. This beautiful little restaurant offers delicious Sri Lankan street food at extremely affordable prices, with favourites including the mutton rolls and bone marrow varuval alongside the marinated tamarind and ginger chicken wings – all of which are available on the set menu for £30 per person. The star of the show at this Soho spot is the dish the restaurant is named for – the egg hopper – a fried bowl-shaped beauty made with fermented rice and coconut milk, with a perfectly contained yolk in the middle. Once again, the Sethi family (the group behind Bubbledogs, Gymkhana and Trishna) prove they’re an unstoppable force leading London’s Indian restaurant revolution. 2/19 Bombay Bustle Step inside Bombay Bustle and you’ll be transported to a colonial-era railway carriage – first class, naturally. Inspired by the Dabbawalas of Mumbai – men who traditionally travelled across the city by train to deliver home-cooked meals – Bombay Bustle captures the essence of a rich and vast culinary tradition. Follow the station-style signage to navigate between the bar and dining areas and take a seat in one of the coach-style booths. There you’ll tuck in to some of Mumbai’s most celebrated dishes: opt for the small plates and share as many as you can. Top picks include the rarah keema pao, a richly spiced lamb mince served with a buttered bun, and the masala akuri – spiced scrambled eggs gleaming atop a truffled naan. Save room for the tandoor dishes: the cardamom-spiced murgh malai chicken is a triumph. 3/19 Indian Accent Despite decidedly unassuming appearances – it really just looks like another faintly dull spot for bored Mayfair types – this is an extraordinary place, turning out gorgeous, intensely flavoured plates of food. The first signs of genius come early on, with the tiny bite of blue cheese-filled naan (we asked for a second plate), which are remarkably memorable and impossible to over recommend. The place is full of food that manages to be both earthy and elegant at the same time, at times dazzlingly inventive, other moments reliably comfortable. Portions are small, service is friendly if fussy, but by God the food is delicious. Even their puddings are exceptional and their brunch is likely the most interesting in London. Neither of these things is usual for an Indian restaurant – but then Indian Accent isn’t usual; it goes beyond than that. A delight. 4/19 Jamavar Mayfair’s Jamavar is another that proves that Indian fine dining in the capital is fiercely good. Much like its contemporaries, the venue has a colonial gentlemen’s club feel to it and offers delicately-spiced plates that pack a punch. Highlights include the juicy scallops Bhel with a tamarind and date chutney and the slow cooked Jamavar dal with black lentils. Familiar favourites can be found on the menu too, like the moreish old Delhi butter chicken. 5/19 Cinnamon Bazaar There’s a reason Vivek Singh is one of the capital’s most celebrated Indian chefs and the proof is in the pudding. Everything here from food to decor is built to resemble the vibrancy and energy of ancient and modern bazaars located along old trading routes. Something that follows through in the food, which fuses both east and west with dishes such as a lamb roganjosh shepherd’s pie and Vindaloo of ox cheek with masala mash. 6/19 Dishoom Dishoom is rightly regarded a staple of London life, even though just eight years have passed since its first Bombay Cafe opened in Covent Garden. The group’s monopoly of the casual, quality dining scene spans five London branches and another two in Edinburgh and Manchester. Be sure to try the mahi tikka (grilled, marinated fish) and okra fries as part of a sharing-plate meal. Meanwhile the chole poori (puffed, fried bread with chickpea curry) makes a cheap and hearty lunch for one. The real standouts are the black daal and the breakfast bacon naan, both of which have achieved legendary status and have the lamb chops too, which deserve to be similarly revered. Dishoom 7/19 Darjeeling Express This place has come a long way since serving Indian food to 12 supper club guests in Wood Green. Six years on, the location may have changed – they now boast a permanent site in Kingly Court – but the food is as good as ever. None of the team are trained chefs, instead all being amateurs-turned-professionals who learned to cook perfecting long-standing family recipes. This eccentricity might just be why it all works as well as it does. Chef patron Asma Khan’s ever-changing menu has a homely feel to it but no means is lacking in finesse: the Calcutta-Hyderabad-Rajput cooking is all boldly spiced, vigorously flavoured and served in generous portions. It is a bold, lively place where it’s fun to drink up and tuck in. There are stories here; fortunately, you can still book up to hear them. Hear them first hand before next year, when Khan becomes the first British chef to appear on Netflix’s Chef’s Table. Daniel Hambury/Stella Pictures 8/19 Quilon Another star of the capital’s Indian food scene. Chef Sriram Aylur shows consistency is forte as the food is vibrant and delicate with a home-style to it. Standout dishes include their signature fish curry with tender halibut and a creamy-with-a-kick coconut and chilli sauce, as well as the perfectly spiced Mangalorean chicken. 9/19 Cinnamon Kitchen Battersea The Cinnamon Club’s younger, laid back sister offers an alternative set up to its fine dining sibling. The restaurant is the baby of the family and much like its sister branches, chef Vivek Singh has worked wonders with its vibrant menus. The dinner offering is on the meatier side, with a hearty selection of grilled meats and dishes such as the clove-smoked lamb ramp and the fiery rump steak with masala chips. There’s also a plethora of breads to mop up any excess sauce, including four different types of naan; plain, garlic, peshwari and a chicken tikka and cheese. 10/19 Jikoni Granted, this spot isn’t just an Indian restaurant. It specialises in flavours from other parts of Asia too, offering twists on traditional poppadoms and bhajis, but largely boasts a variety of Indian-inspired triumphs. Small plates include the clove-smoked venison samosas with beetroot chutney and larger plates deliver too, like the mutton keema, which is sandwiched between two toasted brioches to form a wildly indulgent Sloppy Joe. Much like the food, the decor is comforting, with mismatched tablecloths and cushions, giving it a relaxed, homely feel. 11/19 Gunpowder Husband and wife team Harneet and Devina Baweja opened this spot back in November 2015 with the help of Mumbai-born head chef Nirmal Save, formerly of Tamarind and Zaika. Nearly three years on and there’s no stopping them: not only did the team launch a cookbook earlier this year but Gunpowder was recognised by Michelin with a Bib Gourmand in 2018, which it retained at the 2019 awards. The the menu offers rich, well-executed, belt-loosening plates that will leave you feeling wholly satisfied and wanting to do it over again. Standout dishes include the charred lamb chops and the chettinad pulled duck. 12/19 Benares “No Indian restaurant in London enjoys a more commanding location or expansive interior,” said the Michelin Guide’s 2019 inspectors, as the place held onto its star for the twelfth year in a row. Expansive, perhaps, but Bernares doesn’t look especially ravishing either inside or out. Still, its polished interior can house up to 300 guests and encompasses four private dining rooms, bar, a main dining room and a lounge, where guests are greeted by a pool of floating flowers. Food here is an inventive blend of quality British ingredients, traditional Indian recipes and contemporary techniques. 13/19 Trishna Unlike some of its competitors, which tend to have a more meaty focus, Trishna celebrates the coastal cuisine of southwest India. The food on the menu pays close attention to coconut and tamarind, and accordingly dishes are fragrant without being overpowering, though they’re brazen with the spice – expect to have your socks very soundly blown off. The tandoor offers a selection of seafood from charred scallops to salmon tikka. 14/19 Gymkhana Gone are the days when Indian restaurants were stereotyped as budget-friendly, BYOB haunts. The capital’s Indian fine dining scene is booming and Mayfair’s Gymkhana is a testament to that. It’s hardly a surprise too, considering the Trishna and Hoppers team are behind it. The venue pays homage to colonial India’s gymkhana clubs – spaces where members of high society would socialise, dine, drink and play sport. Menus here capture the intensity and depth of flavour that north Indian cuisine has to offer, with dishes such as the guinea fowl Tikka and wild muntjac biryani. Bold flavours are the name of the game here, but classics like the chicken butter masala are still on the menu and do not disappoint. No wonder this place has kept its Michelin star four years in a row. 15/19 Kricket It’s always nice to see a pop-up given a permanent site. It’s even nicer to see a former pop-up given a permanent site and then get the recognition it deserves. From humble beginnings of a shipping container in Brixton to retaining its Bib Gourmand twice in a row, Kricket has come a long way and picked up plenty of fans in the process. Its menu is often updated but it remains all about small, seasonal sharing plates and India-inspired cocktails. That said, there are some regulars – the bhel puri and samphire pakora are going nowhere, neither is the keralan fried chicken, all with good reason. The bar serves a rotation of six cocktails, all of which feature delicate, oriental spices; anything with spiced jaggery syrup or darjeeling Bourbon is going to be a hit. 16/19 Brigadiers Inspired by the army mess bars of India, this up-market Indian barbecue joint draws a crowd with its range of entertainment, beers on tap, sports screenings and, most importantly, its small plates. Once you’ve finished playing pool in its art-deco “social hub”, or downed your last pint in the Tap Room tavern, sit down in Brigadiers’ dining room to pour over its extensive menu – their are 16 sides alone. Grill-lovers should try the sikandari kid goat shoulder and the BBQ chicken wings, while those looking for something lighter will enjoy the delicately spiced Indo Chinese chicken lettuce cups. There are plenty of well-crafted vegetarian options, too, such as the gently charred wood fired mushroom methi malai naan and the smoked aubergine missi rotis. If a restaurant can attract crowds to Bank on a weekend, it must be doing something right. Matt Writtle 17/19 Masala Zone Sisters Camellia and Namita Panjabi have decades of research behind them, which rubs off on their authentic food. The menus boast a selection of Indian all-stars from grills, tandoors and curries to vibrant street food. The paneer tikka made with fresh fenugreek leaves and yellow chilli proves that veggie curries can be just as flavoursome and rich as their meaty counterparts. Likewise, the familiar korma gets an upgrade, with saffron infused into it. The thalis, however, are the stars of the show here — various small dishes are served on a circular tray, creating a colourful platter of vegetables, dal, chapati, rice, salad and pickles. With seven different branches across the capital, each site has its own identity and brings something different to the table. The Covent Garden restaurant has puppets hanging from the ceiling while the Bayswater branch has eye-catching graphics plastered over the central dining room pillars. 18/19 Indian Zing This longstanding favourite in Hammersmith offers modern, dynamic Indian food. It’s another fine-dining spot that’s popular with locals and celebs alike (even the late Michael Winner was a fan). A real knowledge of India’s regional cooking shines through at this place, thanks to Mumbai-born chef-patron Manoj Vasaikar. The chicken shatkora lives up to the restaurant’s name with herbs and spices balanced by a punch of zesty citrus, and the lamb dhansak, a speciality of the Mumbai Parsi community, combines traditional flavours with seasonal produce. This restaurant packs out on a regular basis, but the service always remains calm and attentive — the sign of a true gem. 19/19 Chakra This little known Kensington spot is all too often overlooked in lists like these. It’s a fabulous neighbourhood place and appropriately upmarket for Kensington, tucked away opposite the excellent Elephant & Castle. They’ve recently refurbished but the real draw is the terrace space; sit out and tuck into their delicious little bites. It’s the sort of place to order a few glasses of wine while tucking into the likes of truffle Kulcha (addictive bites of wild mushroom & black truffle naan) or monk fish marinated beautifully with kasundi mustard paste. The Lucknowi lamb kebab is a must too. Service is the quiet, friendly type. David Clack

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Food Truck Takeover: Battle Of The Allstars 3 Features 30 Trucks

Sent on Thursday afternoon so you can plan your weekend dining Email Address
The third annual Battle of the Allstars is happening THIS Saturday, 2/9, at a new location, and 30 of your favorite local food trucks are battling it out for bragging rights as the grand champion….and YOU get to choose the winner! This year’s event is taking place at Regency Square Mall directly in front of the JSO substation from 11-4pm, and with this lineup of trucks is sure to be a sell out! Get there early and in your stretchy pants, it’s going to be a great day for eating! There will be an expanded kids play zone, local vendors, and more family friendly fun as well! Check out the lineup of trucks below and RSVP on the Jax Food Truck Food Court’s Facebook page for more event details.
The Happy Grilled Cheese : Multiple time People’s Choice Winner for best food truck in all four major Jacksonville publications, The Happy Grilled Cheese is one of Jacksonville’s OG heavy hitters! Take it cheesy with their signature Daddy of the Mac and loaded cheese fries. Plus, Pro Tip: you can add mac and cheese to any sandwich if you’re feeling decadent! Our favorite is to add it to the California melt! You’re also not going to want to miss their sweet, decadent, chocolate laden S’more melt!
Cuban Fire Grill : Authentic, slow cooked, homemade cuban cuisine featuring Cuban sandwiches, lechon asado, ropa vieja, and flan for dessert. Their steak sandwich is ridiculously good for all the meat lovers out there! We’re also very appreciative that they serve their Cuban sandwiches with potato sticks, it’s such a nice touch! They were recently named best Cuban Food in Jacksonville by Jax Restaurant Reviews readers, so you’ll want to eat here for sure!
What’s the Catch : Some of the best, most flavorful, and delicious seafood tacos are coming off What’s the Catch food truck. You can find their vintage Airstream at festivals around Jacksonville and beyond, but we are happy to see them as often as possible here in Jax for our taco fix! We can’t do without their ahi tuna. The best part about What’s the Catch is it’s bringing truly local flavors to the locals – most tacos are inspired by what’s freshly available in Jacksonville. Multi-time award winners for Best Taco in events throughout the city, they’re a dream come true for coastal flavors! What’s The Catch
El Mariachi Loko: This truck is upping the street food game with gourmet Mexican tacos, tostadas, quesadillas, pupusas, and more! You can taste that each element is homemade and prepared with exceptional care. Their specials are mind blowing—think grouper tacos with aioli and black bean salsa, spicy shrimp tacos, or mahi! Whether you’d prefer traditional al pastor or something more out of the box, El Mariachi Loko will have you covered.
Team Love Seafood: Get your souls ready for this amazing Southern style truck! Specializing in all things comfort food, Team Love Seafood serves up fresh fried or grilled fish, shrimp, fried pickles, hush puppies, gumbo, etouffee and more! They’ve got the flavors of the South on lock, so come out and try the most flavorful fried seafood this side of the Mississippi! Whether you go poboy, deep fried deviled eggs, or pound cake cookies for dessert — you won’t be disappointed!
Cajun Cravins 2 Go: Have you been looking for the best cajun food in Jax? This is it! Chef and owner AJ is a Louisiana native who can insert the soul of Creole cooking into any dish! His gumbo, etouffee, red beans & rice, and jambalaya are all spot on authentic and his shrimp or catfish poboys will have you doing a second line dance through the Takeover! Stop by and eat one of everything!
Funnel Cake Queen: These aren’t your average funnel cakes people, so buckle up and get ready for the best one of your life! Get your daily serving of fruit with these sweet as pie caramel apple funnel cakes, or try one loaded with chocolate for a richer treat. If you’re a traditionalist, there are sugar coated originals that stand alone as the best in Jax even without toppings!
Twisted Okie: Yall ready for some Midwestern BBQ and Tacos? This Oklahoma BBQ will definitely be some of the best you’ve tasted! He’s best known for his signature spare ribs, but his tex mex tacos are also fan favorites. Protip: Look out for his mile high piled sandwiches, in particular the Baker Mayfield special! You’ll want to grab plenty of his delicious homemade sauces too!
Latin Soul Grille: This truck’s fusion of Puerto Rican and BBQ makes for an irresistible menu. Their tender, flavorful chicken thigh tacos with fresh pico de gallo and delicious wings are addictions of ours. Their speciality empanadas are made with just as much care! They run amazing specials like the featured Mofongo. If you wanna try it all– go for the Latin Soul Bowl! Plus, we think their customer service is some of the best in town. It’s hard not to fall in love with Latin Soul!
Mr Potato Spread: Not a single person on this planet can turn down a massive loaded potato. Mr Potato Spread is fulfilling this great need in Jax with over the top potatoes and loaded fries that will carb load you right into heaven. Want it topped with broccoli and cheese? Go for it. Want it loaded down with meat? They’ve got you covered. Want it covered in CRAB BOIL?! Your dreams have come true. Named Best Food Truck by First Coast News, and multi time winner of Food Truck Championships, Mr Potato Spread is not to be missed! Mr. Potato Spread- Crab Pot Potato
Le Petite Cheri Cupcakery: Who doesn’t love cupcakes? Le Petite Cheri raises the bar with seasonal flavor combinations and fresh toppings. Their desserts are rich and decadent, just how we like them! Also don’t miss their fresh made raspberry lemonade which is the perfect food truck rally treat! They’ve been experimenting with some new treats lately, so check out theri specials boards and don’t miss the newest items! They’ve won countless awards for their amazing cupcakes, so take home one or twelve!
Chubby Burrito: One of the most popular Mexican trucks in Jacksonville, Chubby Burrito specializes in authentic Mexican style street food. All food is freshly prepared daily and focuses on simple, authentic flavors. The carne asada street tacos and chicken tinga burritos are can’t miss orders. Oh, and did we mention there are churros?! Multiple time winner of Best Global Tacos, Chubby Burrito satisfies your need for all your Mexican comfort food favorites. Chubby Burrito
Rocco’s Pizza: Feast your eyes on the best New York Style pizzeria on wheels! Aside from mouth watering, cheesy, soul fulfilling pizza they also feature delicious buffalo wings. One owner was a GM in a major chicken restaurant chain before and she brings her talents and experience to making her own unique flavors. Go ahead and get pizza AND wings, you know they’re a match made in heaven! They’ve also got garlic knots and zeppolis to enjoy too!
Blazin Azn: Bacon fried rice is all we really need to say, but there is SO much more to love at Blazin Azn. Spring rolls, egg rolls, and incredibly tender teriyaki shrimp and chicken are all worth ordering. Want a real treat? Enjoy the only sushi or sushirito coming off a food truck in Jax with plenty of signature rolls! Chef Gus loves to surprise us with over the top rally specials too, including his multi award winning Tuna Tataco! There’s a fusion of flavors at Blazin Azn so we have faith there is something that everyone will enjoy!
Guanabana: This Jax favorite expanded from their iconic tricycle that you’ve grown to love at RAM every week to a full truck and the menu grew right along with it! They still integrate their beloved popsicles, but also now offer macaron ice cream sandwiches, fruit bowls, smoothies, and more! If you’re looking for a healthy, delicious, yet indulgent treat this should be on your list! Their multiple award winning dessert is their Meregnon — think of a dessert that’s impossibly light and decadent all at the same time. Guanabana Passion Fruit Macaron Ice Cream Sandwich
Front Porch Kettle Corn: Start your food truck Takeover adventure here for an appetizer! Fresh made sweet and savory popcorn, mouth watering spicy pork rinds, and the best southern sweet tea south of the Mason-Dixon line. Made with a secret recipe and very special water, this tea is unparalleled! Take home a few popcorn and pork rind containers to snack on later – you will thank us! There was a reason this popcorn was the featured snack of Jacksonville baseball for several years running–it’s amazing!
Kona Ice : Every flavor of shaved ice under the sun plus fresh ice cream equals a crowd pleaser for sure. Kona has become particularly popular with the kids in Jacksonville with their frequent appearances at schools, so expect for them to recognize this brightly colored truck and run to pick out their favorite flavor! Stop by and cool off with the perfect shaved ice!
Sweeto Burrito: Always say yes to burritos from SWEETO BURRITO ! It’s easy to see why Sweeto is one of the most sought after trucks in Jax– their burritos are some of the best in town! Be prepared to share, these are HUGE! The White Chick, Buff Chick, and Rise and Shiner are our personal recommendations! Plus, tater tots in a burrito, need we say more? This is definitely flavor worth fighting for.
JammasJax: One of the newer additions to the Jax food truck scene, Jammas is new business of Chef Julio Gonzales who began fan favorite El Mariachi Loko. He’s delved into Asian cuisine now with amazing chicken satay, freshly prepared noodles and rice in his wok you can watch him cook on in the truck window, and flavorful egg rolls and ribs. We love his pad thai, and what better to warm you up in chilly weather than curry? This is a truck you won’t want to miss. Jammas Jax
Wurstbusters: Traditional German cuisine on a food truck? Yes, please! Knockwurst, currywurst, spaetzle, German potato salad, cucumber salad, and more await you from Wurst Busters! We’ve had quite a sampling of their menu and we love their spaetzle covered with grilled onions and their amazing sauerkraut with a currywurst! This is simple German food done right, and we couldn’t be more appreciative that they moved to Jax to serve it! They’ve recently debuted their massive chicken gyro, and it is absolutely a can’t miss item.
Treemendous BBQ : Voted Best BBQ in Florida at Food Truck Wars, several time People’s Choice Winner, regularly featured on River City Live and News 4 Jax , and nine year brick and mortar veteran with MULTIPLE food trucks, Treemendous does not mess around with big flavors! Using everyone’s favorite low and slow technique, this truck offers up mouthwatering turkey, pork, ribs, chicken, and more! Who doesn’t love huge portions of smoked to perfection meats with homemade sides?!
Cackylacky’s : This truck just keeps on winning awards, and it’s with great reason! They’re fusing gourmet flavors with meaty comfort food and knocking their presentation out of the park every time! Their current fan favorite burger uses a datil key lime aioli with goat cheese and orange marmalade for Florida flavors you can’t beat! Like it spicy? Poblano mayo will kick it up a notch on any burger! Want the best hot dog in town? They’ve got those too! They’re hand pattying their burgers for freshness and authenticity you can’t find many other places. Cackylacky’s goes the extra mile for you, so definitely swing by this truck and see why they say they’ll make your momma happy!
Son of a Butcher : A Jax legend, and Jacksonville’s best authentic philly, Son of a Butcher prepares fresh sandwiches, poboys, tacos, and more absolutely loaded with meats and cheeses. Looking for a hearty meal? This is your choice! We cannot get enough of their garlic parm fries. Go ahead and get two orders, you’ll thank us. They’re also known for their secret menu takeover items, so keep an eye out for a delicious taco! Don’t pass up on their healthy option either — their chicken caesar wrap is our favorite in town!
Fusion Food Truck : Chef Ashley Amin (winner of top Indian chef in San Diego and best chef in Jacksonville) brings us the best Indian cuisine in the city from her truck, proven by being recently named one of the top 50 food trucks in the United States! They were also named Best Food Truck by First Coast news, multi time Jax Truckie’s Food Truck Champion, and People’s Choice Award winning! We highly recommend their award winning banana curry and tikka masala paired with a decadent Thai tea. If samosas are on the dessert menu, you’ll definitely want to have one or ten! Really, we love everything on Fusion’s menu, so order liberally. Fusion Food Truck
Island Dream Food Truck will be cooling off at our Takeover, will you? ​Florida weather = Italian Ice everyday! Island Dream features creamy and unique Italian ice flavors and lemonades. The flavors change often, but they’re always refreshing and flavorful across the board. We’ve recently fallen head over heels with their Arnold Palmer flavor. Pro tip: their Oreo Funnel Fries are the perfect choice for anyone with a sweet tooth, they are delightful!
Back to the Grind: Coffee, milkshakes, smoothies, and more! Back to the Grind is a heavenly choice for your caffeine or sugar fix! They source their coffee from a local roaster exclusively to ensure you’re getting the freshest product every time. They extend those high quality ingredients to their smoothies too, even offering superfood add ins to refresh you and power you throughout the day! They’re one of our new personal favorites, because really, how can you turn down a peanut butter milkshake?

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