Asia's 50 best restaurants in 2019

Asia’s 50 best restaurants in 2019

Asia’s 50 best restaurants in 2019 Karla Cripps, CNN • Updated 27th March 2019 Facebook Twitter Email For the first time in five years, there’s a new “best restaurant” in Asia. The “Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants” awards were handed out at Macau’s Wynn Palace Tuesday night. The glitzy ceremony, sponsored by S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna, is considered by many to be the Oscars of fine dining in Asia, bringing together top chefs from around the largest continent to celebrate food and drink . The list, now in its seventh year, is compiled based on votes from 300 industry insiders, including food writers, critics, chefs and restaurateurs. Odette restaurant in Singapore walked away with the top prize, knocking Bangkok’s four-time winner, progressive Indian restaurant Gaggan, into second place. Related content World’s 50 best restaurants for 2018 Led by chef Julien Royer, Odette is located in Singapore’s National Gallery and serves Asian-inspired modern French cuisine. “What to say? It was not expected and we are very thankful to all the people who just love our food, our cuisine, our restaurant,” Royer said in his acceptance speech. “It’s been an incredible four years for us (since we opened the restaurant). It’s not just about food, it goes beyond that. Tonight is a very special moment for us. We are extremely happy and thankful.” Odette’s rise up the “Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants” ranks has been swift. Named after Royer’s maternal grandmother, it received the “Asia’s Highest New Entry Award” in 2017 before rising to the number five spot in 2018. Last year, it debuted on the “World’s 50 Best Restaurants” list at No. 28. In total, Singapore ended the night with seven restaurants on the list, including Burnt Ends (No. 10) and Jaan (No. 32). Japan leads the night But it was Japan that had the most venues in the top 50 this year — 12 to be exact. Tokyo’s Den took the No. 3 spot, making it Japan’s best restaurant for a second consecutive year. Three other restaurants in Japan also cracked the top 10: Florilège (No. 5), Narisawa (No. 8) and Nihonryori RyuGin (No. 9). Related content Chef Arora: India’s first woman with a Michelin star Meanwhile, the “Highest New Entry Award” went to Bangkok restaurant Gaa, which snagged the No. 16 spot on the “Asia’s Best” list. Located on the same tiny street as Gaggan, it’s led by executive chef Garima Arora, who was named Asia’s Best Female Chef 2019 and last year became the first Indian woman to win a Michelin star. A total of 10 new entries appear on the 2019 “Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants” list. Here’s the full list of winners for 2019:

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Eater Chicago Continues Live Event Series at Ace Hotel

This fish at Bixi Beer shows the evolving face of International cuisine in Chicago. Barry Brecheisen/Eater Chicago Eater Chicago Continues Live Event Series at Ace Hotel What’s the future of Chicago international culinary scene? Flipboard Eater Talks: How has international cuisine evolved in Chicago? Thursday, April 18 — 6:30 p.m. Eater Chicago and the Ace Hotel will continue its ongoing restaurant industry discussion series in April, with a new moderator and topic: How has Chicago’s international cuisine evolved in Chicago? Panelists from across Chicago’s restaurant industry will join moderator Ashok Selvam for a conversation on the emergence of first- and second-generation chefs, perceptions of the city, and how Chicago has learned to embrace different flavors. In short: A new wave of restaurants, many spearheaded by American-born children of immigrants, is changing the landscape of Chicago dining. Korean, Filipino, and Indian food — to name a few — are spreading beyond the city’s traditional immigrant enclaves, challenging Chicago’s long-standing segregation. Chefs like Diana Dávila ( Mi Tocaya Antojeria ), Jennifer Kim ( Passerotto ), Ed Kim ( Mott St ), Louie Alexakis ( Avli Taverna ), and Jimmy Papadapoulous ( Bellemore ) are offering the city new flavors — and most are doing so without the benefit and backing of a large restaurant conglomerate. Join us for an honest conversation with some of Chicago’s top culinary names as they talk about the city’s rapidly evolving food scene. This new Eater Chicago x Ace Hotel discussion goes down on Thursday, April 18 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tickets run $25, and include one drink ticket. Panelists will be announced closer to the event date, but know that seating is limited, and it’s best to make reservations now. Eater Chicago Sign up for our newsletter. Enter your email address Subscribe By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy and European users agree to the data transfer policy.

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Netflix Canada in April 2019: What’s coming and going

Spring has officially sprung. And you know what that means? It’s time to toss those clunky winter boots to the back of your closet, stock up on some Cadbury mini eggs and fire up your Netflix account. If you’ve already binged the new season of Queer Eye and don’t know what to do with your free time, here is everything coming (like Season 2 of The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina and a rom com starring everyone’s internet boyfriend Noah Centineo ) and going (like our favourite British drama Downton Abbey ) to Netflix Canada this month.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 1 Ultraman (Netflix Original anime) Synopsis: With aliens once again threatening Earth, young Shinjiro must now don the metallic ultra-suit to become Ultraman—like his father before him.
Annie Synopsis: A foster kid, who lives with her mean foster mom, sees her life change when business tycoon and New York City mayoral candidate Will Stacks makes a thinly-veiled campaign move and takes her in.
Boyz n the Hood Synopsis: Follows the lives of three young males living in the Crenshaw ghetto of Los Angeles, dissecting questions of race, relationships, violence and future prospects.
Fifty Shades Darker Synopsis: While Christian wrestles with his inner demons, Anastasia must confront the anger and envy of the women who came before her.
The Perfect Date (Photo: Netflix Canada) Les Misérables (1998) Synopsis: Jean Valjean, a former criminal, has atoned for his past and now finds himself in the midst of the French Revolution, avoiding a law-obsessed policeman hell-bent on capturing him.
Memoirs of a Geisha Synopsis: Nitta Sayuri reveals how she transcended her fishing-village roots and became one of Japan’s most celebrated geishas.
Monty Python Best Bits (Mostly), Season 1 Synopsis: This series is presented by self-confessed Python nut Hugh Bonneville, each show with a group of five famous comedians remembering their favourite Python moments. Each guest chooses a sketch (or two) and it’s played with their comments.
Monty Python: The Meaning of Live Synopsis: Uniquely intimate documentary following the stars of Monty Python as they reunite for a final time to stage a marathon ten shows of Monty Python Live (Mostly) One Down Five to Go at The O2, London in July 2014.
Resident Evil: Extinction Synopsis: Survivors of the Raccoon City catastrophe travel across the Nevada desert, hoping to make it to Alaska. Alice joins the caravan and their fight against the evil Umbrella Corp.
Someone Great (Photo: Netflix Canada) Snatched Synopsis: When her boyfriend dumps her before their exotic vacation, a young woman persuades her ultra-cautious mother to travel with her to paradise, with unexpected results.
Split Synopsis: Three girls are kidnapped by a man with a diagnosed 23 distinct personalities. They must try to escape before the apparent emergence of a frightful new 24th.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 2 Kevin Hart: Irresponsible (Netflix Original comedy) Synopsis: Kevin Hart brings his sold-out comedy tour, Kevin Hart: Irresponsible , to a global audience for his first original Netflix standup special. The one-hour special was filmed in front of a sold-out live audience of over 15,000 people at the O2 Arena in London, England. Hart touches upon his friends, family, travel… and a year filled with irresponsible behaviour.
Sleepless Synopsis: A cop with a connection to the criminal underworld scours a nightclub in search of his kidnapped son.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 3 Billy Elliot Synopsis: A talented young boy becomes torn between his unexpected love of dance and the disintegration of his family.
Kevin Hart: Irresponsible (Photo: Netflix Canada) Hulk Synopsis: Bruce Banner, a genetics researcher with a tragic past, suffers an accident that causes him to transform into a raging green monster when he gets angry.
Suzzanna: Buried Alive (Netflix Original film) Synopsis: After a pregnant woman is murdered, her spirit seeks revenge against her increasingly terrified killers, who are determined to finish her off for good.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 4 Pope Francis: A Man of His Word Synopsis: Pope Francis travels the world speaking to those in need and delivering a message of hope.
Star , Season 3 Synopsis: A trio of women form a musical group in Atlanta.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 5 Chilling Adventures of Sabrina , Part 2 (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: Part 2 finds Sabrina exploring her darker side , curious to learn more about her heritage, while struggling to maintain her friendships in the mortal world. Romantically, Sabrina is caught in an unholy love triangle with between sexy warlock Nicholas Scratch and salt-of-the-Earth mortal Harvey Kinkle. Meanwhile, The Dark Lord, Madame Satan and Father Blackwood continue to conjure chaos in the Spellman household and the town of Greendale. And they aren’t the only ones trying to raise hell. Everything is in question—relationships, identity, true intentions—when the devil’s work is at hand.
Persona: Collection (Photo: Netflix Canada) Our Planet (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: Exhilarating visuals and stunning footage of rarely-seen animals mix with somber truths about humanity’s impact on the planet’s habitats and species.
Persona: Collection (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: An eclectic exploration of different personas in a collection of four short films directed by critically acclaimed Korean directors.
Roman Empire: Caligula: The Mad Emperor (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: Once beloved by the troops and people alike, Caligula shocks Rome by ruling with the cruel depravity and debauchery that make him infamous.
Spirit Riding Free , Season 8 (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: Big changes lie ahead for Lucky and her friends in an eventful final season—from new babies at home to a faraway boarding school.
Tijuana (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: When a prominent politician is murdered in cold blood, intrepid local journalists risk their lives to uncover the truth.
Unicorn Store (Photo: Netflix Canada) Unicorn Store (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: Kit ( Brie Larson ), a twenty-something dreamer, receives an invitation that would fulfill her childhood dreams.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 8 The Oath Synopsis: In a politically divided America, a man struggles to make it through the Thanksgiving holiday without destroying his family.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 9 Trolls: The Beat Goes On! , Season 6 (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: The trolls face a day without a holiday, Biggie accidentally starts a fun-tastic new dance craze, and Guy turns a camping trip into a “glamping” trip.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 10 You vs. Wild (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: In this interactive adventure series, you’ll make key decisions to help Bear Grylls survive, thrive and complete missions in the harshest environments on Earth.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 11 Black Summer (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: In the dark, early days of a zombie apocalypse, complete strangers band together to find the strength they need to survive and get back to loved ones.
A Land I Imagined (Photo: Netflix Canada) What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 12 A Land Imagined (Netflix Original film) Synopsis: A cop in Singapore investigates the disappearance of a Chinese migrant construction worker who spent sleepless nights playing a mysterious video game.
Colette Synopsis: Colette is pushed by her husband to write novels under his name. Upon their success, she fights to make her talents known, challenging gender norms.
Huge in France (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: After moving to LA to reconnect with his son, comedian Gad Elmaleh must learn to live without the celebrity perks he’s accustomed to in France.
Mighty Little Bheem (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: An innocent toddler’s boundless curiosity—and extraordinary might—lead to mischief and adventure in his small Indian town.
The Perfect Date (Netflix Original film) Synopsis: To save up for college, Brooks Rattigan ( Noah Centineo ) creates an app where anyone can pay him to play the perfect stand-in boyfriend for any occasion.
The Silence (Photo: Netflix Canada) The Silence (Netflix Original film) Synopsis: When the world is under attack from terrifying creatures who hunt their human prey by sound, 16-year old Ally Andrews (Kiernan Shipka), who lost her hearing at 13, and her family seek refuge in a remote haven. But they discover a sinister cult who are eager to exploit Ally’s heightened senses. The Silence is directed by John R. Leonetti ( Annabelle ) and stars Shipka, Stanley Tucci, Kiernan Miranda Otto, John Corbett, Kate Trotter and Kyle Breitkopf.
Special (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: A young gay man with cerebral palsy branches out from his insular existence in hopes of finally going after the life he wants.
What They Had Synopsis: Bridget returns home at her brother’s urging to deal with her ailing mother and her father’s reluctance to let go of their life together.
Who Would You Take to a Deserted Island? (Netflix Original film) Synopsis: On their last night together, four longtime flatmates’ lives are suddenly upended when a secret is revealed during the course of an evening celebration.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 15 Happy Feet Two Synopsis: Mumble’s son, Erik, is struggling to realize his talents in the Emperor Penguin world. Meanwhile, Mumble and his family and friends discover a new threat their home—one that will take everyone working together to save them.
Who Would You Take to a Deserted Island (Photo: Netflix Canada) Luis Miguel – The Series , Season 1 Synopsis: The series dramatizes the life story of Mexican superstar singer Luis Miguel, who has captivated audiences in Latin America and beyond for decades.
No Good Nick (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: A family finds their lives turned upside down when a young, street-smart grifter appears on their doorstep, claiming she’s a distant relative.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 16 Super Monsters Furever Friends (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: On the first night of spring, the Super Monsters and their families gather for food, fun and games in the park—and meet their adorable monster pets!
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 18 My First First Love (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: Due to various personal reasons, a group of Yun Tae-o’s friends move into his house, where they experience love, friendship and everything in between.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 19 A Fortunate Man (Netflix Original film) Synopsis: A gifted engineer flees his austere roots to pursue wealth and success among Copenhagen’s elite, but the pride propelling him threatens to be his ruin.
A Fortunate Man (Photo: Netflix Canada) Brené Brown: The Call to Courage (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: Best-selling author Brené Brown discusses what it takes to choose courage over comfort in a culture defined by scarcity, fear and uncertainty.
Cuckoo , Season 5 (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: Ken thinks he’s hit the big time when he discovers a wealthy half sister he never knew he had, but her fortunes and his hopes are soon reversed.
Music Teacher (Netflix Original film) Synopsis: Burned by his past, an emotionally troubled, small-town music teacher risks everything he has to reconnect with a now-famous former student.
Rilakkuma and Kaoru (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: Karoru leads a mundane life, but she gets to go home and find comfort in Rilakkuma, her endearingly lazy roommate who happens to be a fuzzy toy bear.
Samantha! , Season 2 (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: The series follows the story of a former child star from the ’80s, Samantha! (Emanuelle Araújo) who desperately clings to the fringes of celebrity. Together with her husband Wound (Douglas Silva) and their children Cindy (Sabrina Nonato) and Brandon (Cauã Gonçalves), she delights with hare-brained schemes to launch herself back into the spotlight.
Brené Brown: The Call to Courage (Photo: Netflix Canada) Someone Great (Netflix Original film) Synopsis: Aspiring music journalist Jenny ( Gina Rodriguez ) has just landed her dream job at an iconic magazine and is about to move to San Francisco. Rather than do long distance, her boyfriend of nine years (Lakeith Stanfield) decides to call it quits. To nurse her broken heart, Jenny gathers up her two best friends Erin (DeWanda Wise) and Blair (Brittany Snow) for one outrageous last adventure in New York City. From writer/director Jennifer Kaytin Robinson (creator of MTV’s Sweet/Vicious ) Someone Great is a hilarious and heartfelt story of friendship, love and what it means to let go of your twenties and enter adulthood.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 20 Grass is Greener (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: It lit up jazz and hip-hop—and ignited a war on drugs steeped in racial injustice. Experts explore America’s complicated relationship with weed.
Weed the People Synopsis: Patients suffering from cancer, and their families, struggle against mean-spirited legislation, and the proclaimed goal of Attorney General Jeff Sessions to roll back marijuana reforms in states such as California.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 22 Pinky Malinky , Part 2 (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: Pinky Malinky is on a roll! Catch up on this joyful hot dog boy’s continuing adventures as he spreads fun and positivity with best friends Babs and JJ.
Selection Day , New Episodes (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: Manjunath Kumar, 14, knows he is good at cricket—if not as good as his elder brother, Radha. He knows that he fears and resents his domineering and cricket-obsessed father, admires his brilliantly talented sibling and is fascinated by the world of CSI and by curious and interesting scientific facts. But there are many things about himself and about the world that he doesn’t know. When Manju begins to get to know Radha’s great rival, a boy as privileged and confident as Manju is not, everything in Manju’s world begins to change and he is faced with decisions that will change both his sense of self and of the world around him.
Selection Day (Photo: Netflix Canada) What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 23 I Think You Should Leave with Tim Robinson (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: In this new sketch show, Tim Robinson and guests spend each segment driving someone to the point of needing—or desperately wanting—to leave.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 24 Bonding (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: A New York City grad student moonlighting as a dominatrix enlists her gay BFF from high school to be her assistant.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 26 The Protector , Season 2 (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: Facing formidable odds against the resurgent Immortals, Hakan and the Loyal Ones must forestall sinister plans to destroy the city —and all humans.
ReMastered: Devil at the Crossroads (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: Robert Johnson was one of the most influential blues guitarists ever. Even before his early death, fans wondered if he’d made a pact with the Devil.
She-Ra and the Princesses of Power , Season 2 (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: Adora and the Princess Alliance train to get stronger, but Catra and the Horde are on the move. As Hordak pushes for victory, She-Ra faces a new test.
Bonding (Photo: Netflix Canada) Street Food (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: From the creators of Chef’s Table , Street Food takes viewers to some of the world’s most vibrant cities to explore the rich culture of street food all over the globe. The first season explores nine countries in Asia, from the hawker stalls of Singapore to the food carts of India, the stories of perseverance and culture bring life to the cuisine of each city.
Yankee (Netflix Original series) Synopsis: A young man from Texas crosses the border into Mexico and becomes an infamous drug lord.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 28 Little Women (1994) Synopsis: The March sisters live and grow in post-Civil War America.
What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 29 Burning Synopsis: Jong-su bumps into a girl who used to live in the same neighbourhood as him, who asks him to look after her cat while on a trip to Africa. When back, she introduces Ben, a mysterious guy she met there, who confesses his secret hobby.
Wonder Woman Synopsis: When a pilot crashes and tells of conflict in the outside world, Diana, an Amazonian warrior in training, leaves home to fight a war, discovering her full powers and true destiny.
My First First Love (Photo: Netflix Canada) What’s coming to Netflix Canada on April 30 Anthony Jeselnik: Fire in the Maternity Ward (Netflix Original comedy) Synopsis: Everyone knows there is no topic Anthony Jeselnik can’t conquer, and he doesn’t disappoint in his second Netflix original comedy special. Following his 2015 special Thoughts and Prayers , the comedian’s critical and biting style weaves through societal taboos without hesitation.
Baki , Part 2 (Netflix Original anime) Synopsis: A convict himself, bounty hunter Biscuit Oliva is dispatched to Tokyo to apprehend the escaped inmates and thwart them from unleashing further chaos.
Ingress: The Animation (Netflix Original anime) Synopsis: After scientists discover a mysterious substance that can influence human minds, two factions wage an all-out battle to control its awesome power.
Last call! Here is everything leaving Netflix Canada in April: April 1: Downton Abbey , Seasons 1 to 6
The Gift
April 3: Dawn of the Dead
April 7: Star Wars: The Clone Wars , Seasons 1 to 5
Star Wars: The Clone Wars: The Lost Missions
April 21: Captain Phillips
April 24: Big Eyes
Captain America: The Winter Soldier
April 29: Ocean’s Eleven

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Culture, Cuisine and Clothes

by Danya Gil
Organizations, universities, work and other environments tend to say they value freedom of expression and diversity, but then turn around and tell an African-American woman her natural hair is not professional or do not provide the resources to help an individual grow and learn. Weber State is not like them. Carl Moore preforming a Native American Hoop Dance. (Marissa Wolford / The Signpost)
Weber and the International Student and Scholar Center embraced cultural expression and diversity, hosting the International Student Banquet on March 23 in the Shepherd Union Ballrooms.
Besides teaching WSU students, faculty and the Ogden community about a myriad of cultures and their traditions, attire and cuisine, the ISSC had a goal to raise $27,000 for an international student scholarship. Money raised would go toward a year of one international student’s tuition, mandatory health insurance and living expenses. The group UT-ARIRANG preforming a drum dance. (Marissa Wolford / The Signpost)
During the 2018 school year, Weber was home to 348 international students representing 59 foreign countries, according to WSU Reports and Publications.
Various cultures believe it takes an entire community’s involvement to raise and educate a child. International students leave the community they know, go to unfamiliar territory and face uncertainties that domestic students do not have to think about.
According to the WSU undergraduate cost estimate for 2018, a nonresident will pay a yearly total of $26,480. This amount includes $15,260 in tuition and $8,400 in room and board.
Chukwuebuka Odu, WSU international student senator, said every year he has attended WSU, naira — Nigerian currency — has gone up. Students cannot control currency inflation occurring in their countries, and they live with the anxiety of not being to afford their education.
“Weber State is trying to make sure that a student will not have to go back home because they cannot provide for their education,” Odu said. “The international office is trying to see if there’s a way to help a student that is doing well in their education, but they cannot afford it anymore.”
John Simmons, a WSU student who adopted Russian children, said three-fourths of Russian boys in Soviet orphanages would become criminals and two-thirds of girls would turn to prostitution. Only one out of 10 of these children would get a job and contribute to society.
“For one of 10 of these children, the resources and mentors are there,” Simmons said. “When those resources aren’t there, these children often decide that their beliefs are wrong and their faith in humanity was unjustified, and they decide they can no longer live in a world like this.”
Simmons said WSU and the ISSC help students who have worked hard their whole life but cannot show it through SAT or ACT scores. The international student program, according to Simmons, has reached out to at-risk students and encouraged them to attend WSU. The institution provides an English-as-a-second-language program.
“We can’t allow people who put in an effort to continue to fail,” Simmons said.
When not discussing scholarships and the hardships international students face, attendees celebrated and grasped a deeper understanding of the countries and cultures students came from.
International students served attendees food from their native countries. Dishes included Colombian cheese arepas, Japanese tofu yaki udon, Korean bulgogi and kimchi and Saudi Arabian lamb kabsa. Student volunteer dressed up in her costume while serving food. (Marissa Wolford / The Signpost)
While dining, attendees watched cultural performances from various countries.
UT-ARIRANG Korean Traditional Dance Team consists of seven amatuer Korean folk dancers. The team organizer assembled the group in 2013 to spend quality time with friends, build relationships through dance and promote traditional Korean culture to Utahns.
The team performed Buchaechum, a Korean fan dance. The traditional dance derived from ancient rituals thousands of years ago. The dance is seen as a worship ceremony to the gods of Korean Shamanism.
Katie Sheen Abbott, Jake Abbott, Julie Sheen and Sandy Meek have brought traditional and modern flamenco across Utah for the past three years through dance and instrumentation. Sheen Abbott recently lived in Spain, studying flamenco from masters. The group currently teaches dance to people ranging from ages 4 to 74, instilling technique, rhythm and culture within their students.
Accompanied by Abbott and Meek on guitar and Sheen on cajón, a box-shaped percussion instrument, Sheen Abbott’s black and purple ruffled dress flowed as she performed intricate hand, arm and body movements.
Divya Narayanan, a triple scholar recipient for traditional Indian classical dances, performed a classical and Bollywood dance. She has over 25 years of experience performing, choreographing and teaching.
Wearing traditional clothing from their native countries, students closed the banquet with a fashion show.
Representing Jalisco, Mexico, students donned escaramuza dresses. These dresses consist of ribbons, long skirts, large ruffles and vivid colors. Students from Saudi Arabia wore thobes, a long, ankle-length, robe-like, white garment. Korean students wore a hanbok, a dress made of a slim top and wide bottom aimed to flatter the wearer by hiding the movements of the lower body.
WSU President Brad Mortensen said he was looking forward to next year’s international banquet already and thanked students for sharing their culture with banquet attendees.
“When folks ask me what has impressed me most in the time I’ve been president, I honestly tell them that I’m overwhelmed by the power of our international community here at Weber State, both with our students who have come from all over the world and the work that our faculty is doing around the world,” Mortensen said.
Keila Rios, an Ogden High School student, attended the event with her family. Rios said she enjoys learning about people’s perspective of the world and thought the banquet would be an opportunity to educate people and empower minorities.
“We still have a mentality that the white man is up there,” Rios said. “Any other color is looked as second class. This program helps us open our minds and be better.”
With the creation of the international student scholarship and the continuance of the banquet, WSU and the ISSC attempt to aid a student financially and seek to share the stories and cultures of its students.
“This is exposure for the community for them to understand that they’re not the only one on Earth there are other cultures,” Odu said. “It’s good to expose people to things.” Share:

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Singapore Airlines Further Invests in Catering for World’s Longest Flight – AirlineGeeks.com

March 28, 2019 Will Lee News A Singapore Airlines Airbus A350-900 XWB departing from San Francisco. (Photo: AirlineGeeks | Parker Davis)
Furthering its reputation as a passenger-oriented airline, Singapore Airlines has upgraded its food and beverage experiences to entice the passengers. The airline has developed a new scheme called “From Food to Plane” in partnership with AeroFrams, the world’s largest vertical farm, to source better and fresher food for its flights.
Based in Newark, the western terminus of the airline’s historic Singapore-Newark nonstop flight, AeroFarms’ produce is grown indoors without soil, pesticides or sunlight, using AeroFarms award-winning technology. The technology allows food to be grown independent of season or atmospheric conditions, bringing more flexibility to onboard offerings while maintaining and even improving quality.
Yeoh Phee-Teik, Senior Vice President Customer Experience, Singapore Airlines said, ”As vertical farms are not weather dependents but operate under a controlled environment, crops can be grown year-round, thereby increasing the amount of sustainable produce to support more of the Airline’s needs.”
“Imagine boarding a plane and enjoying a salad harvested only a few hours before take off,” Antony McNeil, Food and Beverage Director, Singapore Airlines said.
Aerofarms is expected to provide fresh produce the flight for Newark to Singapore flights from September. The flight, known for holding the title as the longest flight in the world, offers three meal courses with options specifically designed for the ultra-long-haul flight.
In addition to food, the airline will also enhance its wine selections in the future. Already employing a wine panel established in 1989, the airline keenly focuses on which wines and champagnes are offered onboard. The wine consultants on the panel visited vineyards around the world to discover a range of wine for suitable passengers. 47 labels will be provided to premium cabin passengers, a six-fold increase from last year, and the choices will be the most extensive among all airlines.
“We are able to ensure a well-planned rotation of wines to keep the palates of our frequent flyers continually excited,” said Betty Wong, Divisional Vice President Inflight Services and Design, Singapore Airlines. Customers can soon look forward to a new and exciting label delivered on board every two months.”
Singapore Airlines has been introducing new meal types for its flights, including the new child meal program that offers three different cuisines such as Asian, western and vegetarian. Also, the airline has carried out research on Indian vegetarian and Muslim meal, to further meet the needs of a wide array of passengers.

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New airport retail hub buzzing

Going to Kempegowda International Airport (KIA) is no longer just about picking up and dropping off your guests.
The visitors’ area, where entry is not restricted, now houses a brand new shopping cluster, with a host of tastefully curated shops.
The cluster opened a little over two months ago, and has already become a hangout for people en route to Nandi Hills, and couples going on a quick drive out of the city.
Called The Quad by BLR, the shopping area has a sit-out with benches, and is done up in bright colours—pink, red and blue.
Quad presumably stands for quadrangle, and the shopping area was formally inaugurated on February 19. Some outlets had opened business ahead of the inauguration, on Jan 1.
The airport authorities have taken care to make the space greener than before, adding vertical and flower gardens. The hut-shaped shops, made of bamboo, sell perfumes, jewellery, clothes, bags and toys. Among the other attractions are gourmet food and craft beer.
Brands like Superdry, Hidesign, Toyport by Lego, Auromonde, and Gajet Plaza have also set up shop here. Auromonde sells essential oils, incense sticks, stoles and such other gifting options from Auroville.
If you are looking for city souvenirs, you could try Bengaluru, a shop selling customised T-shirts, badges, books, pens and stationery.
The Quad is designed both for both shopping and dining, so it houses a host of restaurants: Barley & Grapes Café, Windmill Craftworks, Café Azzure, House of Kebabs, The Wok Shop, Burrito Boys, Doner & Gyros, Frozen Bottle, Great Foods of India, Wine Vault by Living Liquidz and Gourmet Food, Haagen-Dazs, Smoor, and Café Coffee Day. An MK Ahmed store stocks organic and gourmet products.
You can get a decent meal for two for about Rs 700, Metrolife found on a visit to The Quad.
The shopping area offers good variety: Among the 20 outlets, there are around 10 food and beverage outlets along with nine gift, souvenir outlets, and 1 gadget store. It also encourages flea markets, and has set aside a space for live performances.
A hexagonal structure in the middle of the quadrangle is mounted with five LED screens. The airport plans to use them for flight updates, promotions, and sports events.
The Quad is a lively sight at night but doesn’t have enough shade for people on sunny afternoons.
India’s No 3
Bengaluru’s KIA is the third busiest airport in India—after Delhi and Mumbai.
What you get
Organic products Toys, bags, gifts Gadgets and gizmos Bengaluru souvenirs Food and drink Craft beer, snacks Stoles, fashion items Accessories Perfumes, incense sticks Green cover 60 percent
To retain the city’s green reputation, 60 percent of the land is dedicated to gardening and only 40 percent used commercially, he says. Most shops have gone eco-friendly by using discarded containers and bamboo in the construction. Paikray says the shopping area project took BIAL just three months to execute. “About 300 labourers worked day and night,” he says.
Stores are on short contracts
Why have some establishments, such as south Indian restaurant Maiyas, closed down?

“Maiyas had a contract of five years and since that was done, they had to shut down,” he says.
For those looking for southern cuisine, a place called Ooru Canteen is coming up soon, according to Paikray.
It’s a temporary bazaar
Pravat Paikray, assistant vice president, commercial development, Bengaluru International Airport Ltd, says the shopping area is temporary and has come up in space meant for a second terminal. “Since the construction is estimated to take around 18-20 months to begin, we decided not leave the place idle,” he says.
Not just for air passengers
The new shopping area is not just for travellers. The main aim is to attract people from the city, he explains. “We have many people coming in from Electronics City just for an outing. Since it is the IPL season, we air matches on the LED screens,” he says.

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Jimi Famurewa reviews Island Social Club: Straightforward and rough-edged, but probably London's best roti

1 Colombo de poulet £9.50
2 Roti £6
1 Cornbread and ice cream £6
2 Sauces £2
2 Rum Old Fashioned £20
2 Jinga beer £16
1 Rotishop Wednesday discount -£13
Total £75.50
Island Social Club, 258 Kingsland Road, Haggerston, E8 (020 7254 4945; islandsocialclub.co.uk ) The spiciest dishes in London – In pictures 5 show all The spiciest dishes in London – In pictures 1/5 The Cinnamon Club This upmarket Indian restaurant from chef Vivek Singh has a dirty secret. Among their myriad inventive, experimental dishes, you can also find the Bombay Burner – a lamb mince curry that has been hailed the hottest in the world. If you’re going to order it, you need to give The Cinnamon Club 48 hours notice so that they can source the various chillies used to make it, which includes the Dorset Naga, one of the hottest in the world. Oh, and you have to sign a legal disclaimer to even taste it. 2/5 Veeraswamy With Indian cuisine mustering an impressive roster of Michelin stars across the capital, you might think many such an establishment would sneer at a good old vindaloo. Not Veeraswamy – the oldest Indian restaurant in the capital, and one of the most recent to earn a Michelin star, serves its vindaloo with a half a roasted barbary duck, in a Goan recipe sauce, combining richness with a fiery finale. 3/5 Hutong A trip up 33 floors of the Shard to visit Hutong is already a dizzying experience, but it’s an even wilder ride once you’ve sat down. The Sichuan restaurant specialises in producing dishes authentic to the region, and that means oodles upon oodles of Sichuan peppers. The Ma La beef tenderloin dish turns up the heat to the ma, served with bell pepper chillies and a black sauce, and takes its name from the phrase for “numbing and hot”. 4/5 Tonkotsu Ramen isn’t traditionally meant to be spicy, but one of the best dishes on the menu here is the Chilli Chicken Ramen. On its own, it’s a gloriously nasal-clearing experience that is tasty as heck too. However, if you pay a £1 supplement to add a drizzle of Tonkotsu’s new Extra Hot version of their signature “Eat the Bits” chilli oil, it becomes one of the most explosive dishes in the capital. Seriously, add the oil drop by drop – that stuff is nuclear. Paul Winch-Furness 5/5 Red Dog Saloon This meal is so spicy it’s actually a food challenge. If you want to prove your chilli pepper prowess then the Red Dog Saloon in Hoxton is the place to do it. The Naga Viper Hot Wings is as scary as it sounds – six hot wings covered in a sauce made from Naga Viper chilli, a pepper which is around 500 times as hot as Tabasco. 1/5 The Cinnamon Club This upmarket Indian restaurant from chef Vivek Singh has a dirty secret. Among their myriad inventive, experimental dishes, you can also find the Bombay Burner – a lamb mince curry that has been hailed the hottest in the world. If you’re going to order it, you need to give The Cinnamon Club 48 hours notice so that they can source the various chillies used to make it, which includes the Dorset Naga, one of the hottest in the world. Oh, and you have to sign a legal disclaimer to even taste it. 2/5 Veeraswamy With Indian cuisine mustering an impressive roster of Michelin stars across the capital, you might think many such an establishment would sneer at a good old vindaloo. Not Veeraswamy – the oldest Indian restaurant in the capital, and one of the most recent to earn a Michelin star, serves its vindaloo with a half a roasted barbary duck, in a Goan recipe sauce, combining richness with a fiery finale. 3/5 Hutong A trip up 33 floors of the Shard to visit Hutong is already a dizzying experience, but it’s an even wilder ride once you’ve sat down. The Sichuan restaurant specialises in producing dishes authentic to the region, and that means oodles upon oodles of Sichuan peppers. The Ma La beef tenderloin dish turns up the heat to the ma, served with bell pepper chillies and a black sauce, and takes its name from the phrase for “numbing and hot”. 4/5 Tonkotsu Ramen isn’t traditionally meant to be spicy, but one of the best dishes on the menu here is the Chilli Chicken Ramen. On its own, it’s a gloriously nasal-clearing experience that is tasty as heck too. However, if you pay a £1 supplement to add a drizzle of Tonkotsu’s new Extra Hot version of their signature “Eat the Bits” chilli oil, it becomes one of the most explosive dishes in the capital. Seriously, add the oil drop by drop – that stuff is nuclear. Paul Winch-Furness 5/5 Red Dog Saloon This meal is so spicy it’s actually a food challenge. If you want to prove your chilli pepper prowess then the Red Dog Saloon in Hoxton is the place to do it. The Naga Viper Hot Wings is as scary as it sounds – six hot wings covered in a sauce made from Naga Viper chilli, a pepper which is around 500 times as hot as Tabasco.

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Art has multiple ingredients

Search Art has multiple ingredients
Ray Fox’s work evolves from his N. Ontario experiences, reflections on wildlife and medicines of his Anishinaabe ancestry More from Patricia Baker 4:08 PM EDT
Ray Fox with examples of his handiwork. Wildlife often serves as art inspiration. Patricia Baker/Special to The Star Share Adjust Comment Print Ray Fox has always shared an inherent interest for art, and he remembers, quite vividly, the spark that helped him evolve into an artist of note in his own right. The chef at Shabby Motley Handcraft and Café in Sault Ste. Marie was in Grade 7 when he leafed through an art magazine and came across a painting, The North American Iceberg, by well-known Indigenous artist and fellow M’Chigeeng resident Carl Beam. “That painting shook my entire world as an aspiring native artist,” said Fox, 32, originally from Wikwemikong Unceded Indian Reservation on Manitoulin Island, moving with his family to M’Chigeeng, formally known as West Bay, when he was five. “I was so impressed, I couldn’t believe it, I had to see more, I had to meet this man.” But Fox did not know that this man he had come to admire so much was also his neighbour in M’Chigeeng. As it turned out at the time, a meeting with Beam was as simple as a walking across the street and that is how it all happened. Accompanied by his mother, Donna, the youngster enjoyed a tour of Beam’s studio where the artist showed them huge canvases, some 20 feet in length. Other paintings were on giant sheets of paper, but many of the creations were displayed on the lawn as Beam talked about his art. These connections influenced the boy in a big way and laid the groundwork for him to get out and see the world. At the same time, he was creating his art in a style uniquely his, yet outside the box of the woodland style of art. Another memory from this encounter that has left an indelible impression on Fox was that Beam and his own mother would speak to each other in Ojibway. Language is such an intricate part of one’s culture and to watch his Mom and Beam conversing in their Ojibway language was life changing on so many levels and very inspiring. Share Fox’s Handiwork Fox’s parents had noticed and fostered their son’s interest in art by enrolling him in art classes around the Island. His uncle, Doug Cooper, an established Anishinaabe artist from Wikwemikong, had suggested enrolment at H.B Beal Secondary School in London Ont., where Fox could be introduced to fine art specialities. His mother and father, Parker Debassige, did not want him to go so far away to school at such a young age, but they would settle for a school closer to home in Sudbury. He could come home every weekend with his sister Lynda who was studying at Cambrian College. So off he went, on a journey that would take him off the reservation for the first time. It was culture shock to a kid who talked differently and was missing his cultural roots back in Manitoulin. But he got into the art program which he said was fantastic because he got training that wasn’t available back home. Nonetheless, trips back and forth to Manitoulin were the norm until he knew he was old enough to go farther. “I made my case and was going to London for Grade 11,” Fox said. He found the school to be like a hidden gem, the perfect introduction to art education because of the opportunities available to students. There were live models, print making presses, ceramics and commercial studies. It was like nothing he had ever seen, but after graduation he returned to Manitoulin. Things were different, everyone his age had moved away, and it was hard to connect with people. He was bored. But an article Fox wrote to the Manitoulin Expositor, which was published, brought some unexpected responses to his musings. As a young adult, Fox had memories of the Christian day camps held in various Indigenous communities on Manitoulin each summer. The people came from Toronto, Ottawa, London and areas in the south, to set up these camps. It didn’t seem right to him and was a reminder of the residential schools of the past where Indigenous children were taken from their families and boarded in these institutions. The legacy of emotional, physical sexual abuse, cultural genocide and second-class citizen status has left generations in turmoil and hopelessness. Fox made a connection of sorts with the Christian day camps. In his article he asked the leadership on the reserves as to why they would allow this to take place. Why wouldn’t these communities have their own programs where the children would be taught about traditional life including medicines and history? The existence of these day camps within his traditional territory also brought to mind his own parent’s experience in the residential school system. His mother went to the Spanish school along with her siblings, his dad went to the Indian Day School in M’Chigeeng. They were memorable times, but not for any of the right reasons. So, the article went in and got published. The responses were for and against his opinions, with some communities no longer accommodating these camps. But an interesting call came from a man in Toronto, who identified himself as Dr. Paul Morgan, a dental surgeon. He had a fly in camp north of Elliot Lake and after he had read the article, he told Fox he wanted to meet up with him in Espanola to talk about it. “So, mom and I drove to Espanola and met up with Morgan. He had initially thought I was a writer, but he was also impressed with my art work,” said Fox It turns out Morgan was a benefactor for Indigenous youth in the arts. He was not of Indigenous ancestry but was orphaned and adopted by an Indigenous family who raised and educated him. Morgan’s way of giving back to his adoptive family was simple; help Indigenous youth succeed in all forms of the arts. His northern camp was for doctors and their families to relax and youth to come hone their artistic aspirations. Fox was invited to go up there and the experience was life changing. He met an amazing artist named Michael Robinson who identified as Metis. Robinson was from Peterborough, Ont., and his art was inspired by nature. Once Fox got back home, he contacted Morgan, who invited him to come south and check Toronto out. He loaned him an apartment to do his art and armed with paints and canvases, he produced some large impressive works. “I really got into it by being left alone in my space to just do it,” said Fox. When he returned to Manitoulin, some new initiatives awaited. His aunt, Mary Pheasant, had applied to participate in an exhibition at the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian in New York City. She had received an offer to show her art at their winter market and asked her nephew to accompany her, help with driving and running her booth. It was an amazing experience with him saying he wanted to move to New York City. He got some jobs, saved money and, because he was a North American Indian born in Canada, the Jay Treaty gave Fox the inherent rights to work in the United States. He bought a bus ticket to New York City and lived and worked there for about a year. It was, of course, very expensive; he had to have two or three jobs, but the experience was life changing. On return to Manitoulin Island, he worked and saved and ended up moving to the Jersey Shore coastline, which was near NYC. He had friends in New York, but living in New Jersey was much cheaper for them with fantastic summers and a very robust tourist industry to work in. After a summer there he moved to Toronto where he began working on putting his portfolio together for admission to the Ontario College of Art (OCAD). “It was a crazy time, I was literally using a hair dryer to dry the paint on some of my works the night before my interview.” There were a lot of potential applicants there awaiting their turn to present, but once Fox was called into a room, he got set up with some of his paintings, drawings and some pottery. An interviewer came over, looked at his work in what he felt was a very distant, brief and uninterested manner. When she told Fox that she was done and then just walked away, he took that as a very bad sign. But then a fellow came over and looked at his work in about the same way the previous interviewer had. When he finally spoke, Fox was overwhelmed and got the chills. The second interviewer told Fox that he was not having a good day, but the initial interviewer had told him to look at Fox’s work because it will make your day a lot better. This was an accomplishment that went to the core of his work. Fox not only got accepted to OCAD, but he was approved for advanced status which meant he could bypass first year foundations. Fox did not complete his degree, because he wanted to learn more about the business of art, how to sell himself and promote his work. It wasn’t happening where he was. Even though many of the faculty pushed him hard and at times he thought this was unfair, they made it clear they were doing this because they knew he could excel. But he left and found work. He met his partner, Sean Meades who was completing his residency at York University in linguistics. Since Fox was from Manitoulin and Meades from Sault Ste. Marie, they decided to move back north to the Sault. It was so expensive in Toronto and both enjoyed the north, so they got a place here and moved back. Fox has been a chef at Shabby Motley, where he bakes, creates menus, caters and Meades is director of research at the Nordik Institute. Two years ago, and in earnest, Fox got back to work with his pencils, drawing bears, developing wildlife and portraits. These new works are based on childhood memories and photos. His work evolves from his experiences here in Northern Ontario, his reflections on wildlife and the medicines of his Anishinaabe ancestry. He’s had exhibitions at Café Natura, the Arts Council and LopLops. He also had his first appearance in Sylvan Circle where he had a booth at the Desbarats Community Centre last September. Just recently he was a vendor at the Gathering at the Rapids powwow at Algoma University. He was gratified by the responses to his work. He plans on applying again for acceptance into Sylvan Circle, an annual multimedia show which is a destination for many of the visitors. He very much enjoyed meeting so many people as well as the other vendors. He has gotten into selling prints of his work which is created on varying sizes of paper. Some are quite large. But prints are more affordable too and if they are available, they sell. So, the obvious next step was to enrol as a fine arts student at Algoma University specializing in printmaking, lithography and screen making. Fox also admits it is a very tough medium to grasp, but that he is having fun and it will help him achieve success in the business of art. Spending more time at his studio space at 180 Projects on Gore Street is part of his journey. He is on the board there and creates there. Using more charcoal, gathering from nature to accentuate his drawings with its raw materials in abundance. Using charcoal made in Algoma from natural offerings is something Fox would like to nurture. Using the environment to accentuate the drawing or painting a client has commissioned, best helps them to tell their story through the works others will see on their wall and then appreciate what looks back at them. Going out onto the land and gathering natural elements to incorporate into his work is very important aspect of the whole experience of making art. Even in his work at Shabby Motley, Fox is baking, creating dishes and looking to Indigenous fusion cuisine. The possibilities that exist in the culinary arts are endless and hold a really tempting avenue of expression for him. “It’s like a business, you know, really cool in using local ingredients or Indigenous fusion foods,” Fox said. “It’s another idea as there isn’t anything like that here really. I love the idea of open fire cooking.”

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Grocery Business for sale in Preston, VIC Darebin Area – Preston | 1214010685

BRAND NEW BUSINESS. BRAND NEW FITOUTS. ASSETS worth $140,000
Looking for a niche business with no competition ?
Looking for the highest exposure site you can get ?
Looking for excellent mark up on the items you sell ?
Looking for a business which you can take to the next level ?
Looking for something simple, with systems and products in place, something you could duplicate, or just wanting to get started in business.
Consider this exclusive business opportunity proudly presented to the market for the first time.
Mr India is a specialty grocery and spices retailer operating from the highly sought after Northland shopping Centre. With a strategic location in the fresh food section, this is the go to location for all things Indian when it comes to cuisine. Current vendor has done an exceptional job, now its time to hand over to someone who can take it to the next level.
Run as it is or change it to suitable other business like Asian grocery or Nut shop or somethinig else.
Selling due to family and personal committments.
Contact for more details…

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Junior Chellapa @ Old Malaya

Address: 4, Lorong Raja Chulan, Kuala Lumpur, 50250 Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Hours: Mon – Sun 12PM–12AM
It is with high hope I want to take a look at this Old Malaya – a heritage colonial building nearing its 100 th year mark. It is about 10 minutes walk from Verdant Hill Hotel along Changkat Raja Chulan. What a better way then to have dinner at one of the restaurants – Junior Chellapa, an Indian restaurant.
As expected, the décor of Junior Chellapa is very colourful. Quite a small dining area. I believe there is upper floor dining area too.
Read that the onion pakoras (MYR9) is a must order, we decided to try. No regret. Deeply fried with strong flavours of many spices. It is a good starter.
Prawn Varuval (MYR33) was so good I would just come back just to have it again. I could taste ginger, cumin, tamarind, turmeric, garlic and chili. The masala curry was creamy and rich with spices though the prawns were small.
Palak Paneer (MYR18) was very refined with small chunks of cheese. Fish Tikka (MYR21) was nicely grilled but a little too much salt. The fish was a little dry too. Tried the Nandu Rasam (MYR12). A kind of spicy flower crab soup. Did not like the taste of it.
Also ordered the Marina Meen Kolumbu (MYR23). It is the fried fish cooked in curry gravy. Just did not hit the spot with me because the curry was a little diluted.
To go with the dishes, we ordered garlic naan (MYR6) and plain briyani rice (MYR10). Basmatic rice is fluffy and fragrant. Naan is ordinary.
Love the masala chai (MYR7). Rich and creamy but not too sweet. My unsweetened lime juice (MYR9) was refreshing. Daughter had the traditional lassi (MYR8).
Service was good. The captain who took our order was very helpful. Price was reasonable. It helps that the menu has pictures of food for guests who are not too familiar with Indian cuisine.

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