An Insight on The Popular Namkeen Products That Are Available Online

An Insight on The Popular Namkeen Products That Are Available Online

An Insight on The Popular Namkeen Products That Are Available Online An Insight on The Popular Namkeen Products That Are Available Online 0
The modern manufacturers of these items are known to use state of the art infrastructure, they are known to use latest technology machines and skilled workforce to manufacture tasty food. The manufacturers of these food are known to provide delicious items. Such snacks manufacturers maintain business websites where they highlight the services they offer to the customers.
If you are a foodie then you must know that there are various types of bhujia that are available online.
Namkeens are Popular Among Customers
Popular Bhujia are described as follows:- Barik SevB Mixed Namkeen Garlic Sev
The namkeen and bhujia sellers sell a wide range of other spicy and salty snacks apart from the ones that are discussed above. For additional information about the various tasty items that are popular among the India customers, visit relevant businesses, online. Many of the above-mentioned food products are used as snacks with beverages. The different businesses highlight the business contact information which customers can use to get in touch with the relevant business.
Popular Brands of Snacks Available Online
There are a number of top namkeen manufacturers in the country. Many of these popular brands are quite acclaimed among the customers. The snacks are best served with other popular snacks like chaat, dahi bhalla, dahi puri, dahi vaada, bhel puri, aloo tikka, samosa chat and various other snacks. The different popular snacks that are offered by the different restaurants across the country are known to be of high-quality. Many people across the country go with vegetarian snacks and the unlimited amount of snacks that are available in the market has made such snacks popular among the people of the country.
The Indian food industry has not just become popular among the people of this country but such industry is quite popular among people in other countries. Snacks are attractively packed, they are distributed among friends during the festive season. Different occasions in this country are never complete without pakoda, samosa, burger, paneer tikka and so on. Vegetarian snacks are quite popular during occasions and celebrations, such snacks are considered ideal with various beverages. Whenever it comes to hygienic production many of the country’s popular brands are considered best for consumption.
Tips of Availing Best Food Items Online
The snacks industry has proliferated over a period of time. Therefore, during the festive seasons, sweets, snacks are considered as the best gifts to friends. The namkeen, sweets, other snacks items are manufactured by acclaimed restaurants, franchise brands. The items of the popular restaurants and brands are considered to be of high-standard, quality wise, they are considered to be tasty as well as nutritious. The various acclaimed restaurant brands also offer online ordering facilities for their customers. There are many restaurant franchises that offer online ordering facility to the customers.
Many manufacturers of snacks maintain business websites where they highlight the services and items that are offered by the business. If you are contemplating buying the right items then there are various websites from where you can get these items. However, it is advised that you as a customer compares the different websites prior to making purchases, online.
Online purchase of various items is trendy in the age of the internet. Many people across the country use the internet to purchase various types of bhujia, online. It is not that difficult to purchase items online. The prices of products are mentioned in the business websites and that simplifies the purchase of food items.
As more and more people are tasting cuisines with different types of snacks, they have grown an affinity for items. Nowadays, more and more people are investing in snacks and other food items and many of the snacks that are found in this country are often used with different types of beverages.
If you check a standard website selling items then you can find that such websites highlight various categories of these products. The various food items include the spicy mixture, super mixtures, smoothy flakes, peanut delight, and other special snacks.
Features of the Namkeen Sellers
Many of these items in this country are known to have the following features:- Such snacks are made from 100% natural products The taste of these items is spicy and crispy The different products are known to be healthy for consumption purposes The differently flavoured food items are made from natural fibres
Other important aspects of businesses that sell the snacks are that they are known to use superior quality products. Yet another thing that makes the modern namkeen products manufacturers special is that they are known to provide on-time delivery of the food items. Namkeen and other snacks are quite popular among customers. There are Namkeen products manufacturers in the country who use state of the art infrastructure, other resources to create Namkeen and snacks of different types. To check the types of snacks that are available visit relevant resources online. Rate this Article

Read More…

best south indian restaurants (Anjappar restaurant, 76,race course road, singapor)

best south indian restaurants (Anjappar restaurant, 76,race course road, singapor, Asia, World) Posted on : Thursday, 04 April, 2019 08:18 Updated On : Thursday, 04 April, 2019 08:18 Expires On : Saturday, 04 May, 2019 12:18 Reply to :
Anjappar’s humble beginnings started in Chennai more than 50 years back imparting the Chennai some typicalChettinad food. As time passed, Anjappar became a synonym for Chettinad Cuisine. Looking for the best South Indian Restaurant » in Little India Singapore? Anjappar offers a rich blend of Indian warmth & elegance. Visit Now!
for more details http://anjappar.com.sg/ »

Read More…

Indian Flank Steak Tacos

For me, fusion cuisine is something of an issue. I am a big fan of a wide ranges of cuisines, for the ingredients, the cooking processes and, of course, for the dishes produced. When one starts picking and choosing from two or more cuisines to produce a dish, that becomes a little more problematic. To be sure, there are some very good examples of fusion cuisine. But, there are also a lot of misfires.
Yet, despite all of my misgivings about fusion food, this recipe caught my attention. It involves the fusion between Mexican cuisine and Indian cuisine. The smells and flavors of Masla-marinated meat served in naan to produce what is one of the most quintessential dishes of Mexican cuisine … the taco. Perhaps it is the fact that I like tacos. Maybe it is the fact that I love Indian cuisine. Either way, I was determined to make this recipe. And, apart from the need to improve my ability to cut flank steak on a bias, the recipe got me to rethink my view about fusion cuisine.
The key to this recipe is the masala. It begins with the classic of garlic and ginger, but only chiles, vinegar, curry leaves and onions are added to complete the masala. (If you don’t have curry leaves, don’t worry, it will still turn out well.) Once the masala is prepared, then the meat must be marinated. The recipe calls for at least one hour of marination, but I would go at least two hours if not a little longer. Once the steak is marinated, a quick grilling over high heat on the grill ensures that the steak will be incredibly delicious. Just cut it on the bias to reduce the chewiness and serve with grilled naan, the onions, and the cilantro.
Maybe fusion food is not that bad after all.
INDIAN FLANK STEAK TACOS Recipe adapted from Tasting Table Serves 4
Ingredients (for the Masala): 3 tablespoons canola oil 1 large red onion, diced 1/2 cup packed curry leaves 6 garlic cloves, roughly chopped 1 serrano chile (or jalapeno chile), minced 1 three-inch piece of ginger, peeled and roughly chopped 1/4 cup soy sauce 1/4 cup white distilled vinegar 2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon kosher salt
Ingredients (for the tacos): 1 pound of flank steak 1/2 red onion, plus more for serving, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice Grilled naan, for serving Lime wedges, for serving Cilantro leaves, for serving
Directions: 1. Prepare the masala. In a 12-inch skillet, heat the canola oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions and cook until translucent and lightly golden, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the curry leaves, garlic, serrano (or jalapeno) and ginger and cook until fragrant, 2 minutes more. Remove from the heat and transfer to a blender with the remaining masala ingredients. Blend until smooth and let cool completely.
2. Marinate the meat and the onions. In a large bowl, toss the flank steak with the masala to coat. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, toss the sliced red onion with lime juice and set aside.
3. Grill the meat. Light a grill or heat a cast iron grill pan over high heat. Grill the steak, flipping once until caramelized and medium rare, 7 to 8 minutes. Let rest for 5 minutes, then thinly slice against the grain on a bias.
4. Finish the dish. Serve the steak with pieces of grilled naan, sliced red onion and lime wedges, garnishing with cilantro leaves.
ENJOY!

Read More…

Top 5 Trendy Southeast Asian Destinations for Luxury Travelers

Top 5 Trendy Southeast Asian Destinations for Luxury Travelers By 0
If you’re someone who loves to travel in style, swim in crystal clear waters, and stay at the world’s top holiday accommodations, South East Asia has all that covered. A luxury trip to the region will be one for the books. This area is home to rich cultural heritage, an abundance of natural beauties, friendly atmosphere, elegant hotels and villas, and world-class services.
Here is our list of favorite luxury destinations in South East Asia, where the combinations of perfect comfort, nature, and culture will worth all the money you spent.
Seminyak, Bali
For glitz and glamorous holiday in Bali, Seminyak is the place you want to be. It is Bali’s most stylish and upscale area, with luxurious resorts, exclusive villas, fashion boutiques, and world-class restaurants all tucked in on this small area.
Located just north of famous Kuta and Legian area, Seminyak also offers visitors with beautiful shorelines such as the Petitenget beach, renowned for the stunning sunset and cool ambiance.
The nightlife is also classier than other neighborhoods in town. Popular beach clubs such as the Potato Head have infinity pools looking over the beach. Having a glass of champagne while looking out to the beautiful Indian Ocean during the sunset doesn’t sound bad at all, right?
Don’t forget to get the world famous Balinese spa treatment. Kick back, relax and enjoy your time.
Last, but not least, you will find one of the world’s greatest collections of luxury accommodation in Seminyak – so, get ready to get impressed!
Koh Samui, Thailand Immerse in the ultimate luxury of Koh Samui. Pictured – Villa Belle by Eats & Retreats
Koh Samui is one of the most popular destinations for wealthy holidaymakers. And rightly so, fabulously styled resorts and villas are located on the beautiful white sand beaches.
The Island is the second biggest after Phuket but by no means less attractive. Koh Samui has a variety of different activities. Enjoy swimming in the warm blue waters, scuba diving, golf, yoga, even experience the local martial art of Muay Thai.
Whether you want to have a lively atmosphere or a more relaxed one, the Island has plenty of choices to choose from. Head over to Bophut or Maenam Beach for a calmer atmosphere.
When exploring the Island, especially on the northeastern coast, make sure to visit one of the viewpoints. Koh Samui is considered to have the most beautiful viewpoints in the whole of Thailand.
Your trip to Koh Samui would not be complete without experiencing its fine dining options. Beautiful restaurants and freshly made cuisines by world-class chefs will not disappoint you.
To find out more about the where to stay, check out our list of the best luxury villas in Koh Samui .
Galle, Sri Lanka
Galle is great for luxury travel addicts. Pictured: ISHQ Villa by Eats & Retreats
The seaside town of Galle is one of the most historically important destinations in Sri Lanka, situated 116 km from the capital, Colombo. The town is truly a jewel. Home to Dutch colonial forts and ancient churches and mosques, it is one of Unesco heritage sites. Galle offers picturesque beaches, rich cultural experience, and impeccable stylish hotels and villas.
Galle’s ambiance has seduced many travelers from around the globe. Wander around the street, visit the chic cafes and boutiques or explore the beautiful natural scenery that the town has in store for you.
If you’re looking to know more about the local culture, attend Galle’s fishing tours and witness the ancient traditional stilt fishing methods that is unique to the world.
You will experience luxury like no other—you’ll have the complete cultural experience while staying at one of the colonial style luxury villas in Galle or modern world-class hotels.
Pangkor Laut, Malaysia
Pangkor Laut is a secluded heaven for luxury lovers .
Pangkor Laut is no stranger to International luxury pleasure seekers. The Island is only accessible for the resort guests, making it the perfect getaway private island holiday.
The exclusive resort has everything you need from untouched nature to world-class spas and exceptional dining experience.
Pangkor Laut is located just three miles off the west coast of Malaysia in the Straits of Malacca. The Island has a total size of 300 acres, where only a small area of it is a resort, and the rest is a lush two –million-year-old rainforest.
Stay at one of the elegant villas nestled in serene nature, making it one of a kind island-style luxury holiday.
Activities include exploring the Island, kayaking, swimming or hopping to other islands using chartered luxury cruises that the resort offers. After a long day of activities, head over to Pangkor’s Spa village, where you and your loved ones can get pampered like kings and queens.
Makati, the Philippines
Plunge into the rhythm of Manila .
Makati is known as the business and financial hub of Manila. This is the place where bosses and international business people hangout. That’s why, you’ll find the top five stars hotels, exquisite fine dining restaurants, and high-end shopping malls here.
With luxury, comes comfort. Stay at the bestseller New World Makati Hotel, famed for its great location and services, or the Shang Ri La, one of the world’s leading hotels.
Although Makati has a western urban feel, you can still get acquainted with the Filipino culture by visiting the popular Ayala Museum or the Salcedo Saturday Market where you’ll find Filipino’s delicacies and gourmet food.
If you’re after for a shopping spree, head over to Ayala Center. You’ll find department stores and malls selling world famous designer’s brands. Ayala center is also a lifestyle hub where you can find many of the top restaurants fun entertainments.

Read More…

The Culture Of Singapore Cultural Studies Essay

Monday, April 1, 2019 The Culture Of Singapore Cultural Studies Essay The ending Of Singapore Cultural Studies EssaySingapore is effectively a trilingual nation. Although English is the first language of Singapore, in that love argon also a multitude of other languages spoken in the country that reflect its multiracial, multicultural and multilingual society. As of 2008, at that place argon more than 20 languages cosmos spoken in Singapore.The four official languages of Singapore argon Mandarin, Malay, Tamil and English. English is widespread and is the language which unites the various social groups. Children are taught in English at school but also learn their grow tongue to make sure they dont lose come to with their traditions. The only communication problem English-speakers are akinly to chip in in Singapore is with aged Singaporeans who did non learn English at school, though trying to show the unique patois c solelyed Singlish which uses a clipped form of English fuse with Malay and Hokkien words can be taxing. Tamil is the i mportant Indian language, though Malayalam and Hindi are also spoken.The majority of Singaporeans celeb lay out the major festivals associated with their respective righteousnesss. The variety of religions found in Singapore is a take away reflection of the variety of races living there. The Chinese are main following of Buddhism and Shenism (deity worship), though slightly are Christians. Malays are Muslims and most of Singapores Indians are Hindus there is, however, a sizeable proportion of Muslims and Sikhs amongst the Indian commonwealth.Religious tolerance is necessary in Singapore. In fact, religions a nigh deal cross boundaries and most even melt in unusual ways in this modern country. Younger Singaporeans tilt to combine a exact of the mysteries of the older generation with the realistic earth that they know of today.Religion is still an integral part of the cosmopolitan Singapore. umteen a nonher(prenominal) another(prenominal) of its most interesting buildi ngs are religious, be it old temples, modern churches, or exotic mosques. An understanding of these buildings does play a part in modify to the appreciation of their art. Taoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, and ancestral worship are combined into a various mix in Chinese temples.Most Buddhists are of the Mahayana school although there are some from the Theravada school. In Singapore, the Buddhist faith is linked with Taoism and the unimaginative doctrine of Confucianism. The Malays in Singapore are Muslims. A few of the Indians are also Muslims, but even more uncommon are the Chinese Muslims.Islam has a fundamental influence in the lives of those who follow the Prophet of Allah, Muhammad. The religion involves praying five times a day, eating only proper forage, self-control during Ramadan, and going to Mecca on the Haj (pilgrimage). Halal diet means feed that has been specially prepared as according to the religions dietary requirements. When Indian immigrants migrate to Singap ore, they brought with them Hinduism. The early temples are still the central points of ceremonies and festivals, which are held throughout the year.Christian churches were actually established with the arrival of various missionaries after the coming of Sir Stamford Raffles. together with Buddhism, Islam, and Hinduism, Christianity is con officered one of the four main religions today. There is quite a prominent number of Christians in Singapore.Minority faiths are not forgotten. There are at least two synagogues for the Jews and Sikhs. The Zoroastrians and Jains are also represented in Singapore.Food of SingaporeSingapore is the fodder capital of Asia. Chinese, Indian, Malay, Indonesian and western foods are all on offer, and some of the tastiest creations are those sold from the atmospheric street stalls. Nonya cooking is a local variation on Chinese and Malay food, mixing Chinese ingredients with local spices such as lemongrass and cocoanut cream. The popular spicy, coconu t-based soup laksa is a classic Nonya ply. Singapore is a vast place to discover tropical fruits. Some of the more unusual ones on offer include rambutan, mangos teen, durian, jackfruit, pomelo and star fruit.Furthermore, food and entertainment actually much go together standardized hand and glove. Many places offer twain excellent food and entertainment options, thus enabling you to enjoy the trounce of both worlds in one location. Indeed, all these attractions select created a food paradise like no other. Food has become some intimacy that is thoroughly comprehended by every Singaporean and visitor.The cuisine of Singapore is indicative of the ethnic diversity of the culture of Singapore, as a product of centuries of cultural fundamental interaction owing to Singapores strategic location. The food is influenced by the native Malay, the predominant Chinese, Indonesian, Indian and western sandwich traditions (particularly English) since the founding of Singapore by the Brit ish in the nineteenth century. Traces of cuisines such as Thai and Middle Eastern exist in local food culture as well. In Singaporean packman stores, for example, chefs of Chinese ethnic background influenced by Indian culture military control leader experiment with condiments and ingredients such as tamarind, turmeric and ghee, while a Tamil chef might serve a fried noodle dish.In Singapore, food is viewed as the great importance to national identity and a conclave of cultural thread Singaporean novel declares eating as a national pastime and food, a national obsession. Food is a frequent topic of conversation among Singaporeans. Religious dietary strictures do exist Muslims do not eat pork and Hindus do not eat beef, and there is also a significant group of vegetarians. People from different communities often eat together, while being mindful of each others culture and have food that is acceptable to all. There are also some halal Chinese restaurants catering to Muslim dieta ry preference.Singaporean cuisine has been nonionised as an attraction for tourists by the Singapore Tourism Board, as a major attraction alongside its shopping. The government organizes the Singapore Food feast in July to celebrate Singapores cuisine. The multiculturalism of local food, the ready availability of international cuisine and styles, and their wide range in prices to fit all budgets at all times of the day and year helps create a food paradise. The dish Singapore noodles does not exist in Singapore, as it was invented by chefs who worked and lived in Hong Kong.The cuisine is similar to the cuisine of Malaysia because of the close historical and cultural amidst the two countries. While a number of dishes are common to both countries, their preparation different between the countries, according to local taste.Singapore is a small country with a high world, land is not many resource devoted up to industrial and housing purposes. Most pfood ingredients are imported, al though there is a small group of local farmers who produce some leafy vegetables, fruit, poultry, and fish. Singapores geographical bewilder connects it to major air and sea rapture routes and thus allows it to import a variety of food ingredients from around the world, including high-priced seafood items such as sashimi from Japan.MusicSingapore has an urban musical scene, and is a center for rock, punk and other genres in the region. The 1960s produced bands like The Quests, who had hits like Shanty, Dont Play That Song, Jessamine and Mr. Rainbow as well as other pop-rock bands including The Thunderbirds, The Trailers, The Western Union Band, October Cherries and The Silver Strings. Folk music includes the ethnic Chinese, Malay and Tamil sounds.Folk musicPeranakanPop and rock musicPunk and hardcore genresHeavy metalSingaporeans EtiquettesSingapore is a small island off the brink of Malaysia and Indonesia. There are many different etiquettes, some original and some different. S ingapore is a unique country that also has many rules.Singaporeans do not usually get appetizers or any drink.Singaporeans have their meal set on the table along with all other dishes with food.When you have finished eating your meal when you are with someone, it would be polite in showing that you recognize their kindness by leaving some of your meal in the plate.Apart from other Asian culture, in Singapore it is not favored to tip after the meal, which tries to impress other people around.When at a social dinner it is not good to share your food with anyone.Singaporeans eat with chopsticks. They specifi ringy use the thin end ofthe chopsticks though when acquiring food from the big dish that is available to everyone they use the thick side of the chopsticks.You should not signalise a someone any jokes until you know them very well because the jokes might be misunders likewised.Do not bring up any ideas or start a conversation about subjects like religion or politics.No affecti ons (kissing, hugging) between couples or anyone should be show in earth areas.You should be calm and not show anger in the public areas.Singaporeans believe the head is sacred so it should not be touched, whether it is a child or an adult.To get someone to discover you and get his/her attention you should raise your hand.Singaporean stands and talks to someone their custody should not be placed on their hips because it demonstrates the feeling of anger.You should not splatter your nose and/or clear you throat in a public areas.It is considered polite and appropriate to cover your mouth with your hand as you yawn. render Giving1.People think the respectful thing to do is to decline a empower a few times before evaluate it to show that he/she is not greedy. After a couple of attempts of pressure that they take the pose you should tell them how thankful you are that they did so.2.To not reckon rude or impatient, the person who is receiving the gift should wait until the sp readr of the gift has left. Then you may open the gift.3.Some recommended gifts are chocolates, a keepsake from your country, a gift with your company logo and maybe even a brand gift. No gifts should be too pricey.4.Singapore is very against bribery. This makes it not a possibility for anyone of employment with the government to take a gift.5.As you give a small individual gift everyone should be acknowledge and treated to one.6.Gifts that are supposed to surprise the person getting the gift are not a good idea to give. It would cause an gluey reaction.7.There should be a reason and an explanation to giving a gift to someone.Business1.When asked a question you should not answer too rapidly for the reason that you might miss the correct answer. The correct thing to do is to refrain from answering for at least 15 seconds.2.In business Singaporeans are not that assertive and sometimes when they yes to something they might be feeling differently than how they answered. In other word s yes doesnt always mean, yes.3.Singaporeans are tough on things like money, or business due dates.4.When condition a compliment it is usual to humbly disagree or decline it.5.In business Singaporeans just go straight down to the main concept of the meeting. They forget make numerous decisions very quickly.6.When appointed to be at a business meeting a Singaporean should call ahead of time if they are to be late. Being late without plug-in is rude and disrespectful.7.Singaporeans expect people to deliver information, reports etc. needed when requested. address1.When shaking hands you should have a nice firm grip.2.When at a social occasion or another event with many people, it is appropriate to shake hands with everyone there.3.When shaking hands with someone, it is polite to give a generous bow (Westerners can be a little taller than Singaporeans so it is nice to bow.)4.Giving a person you business tantalize when first meeting is a proper thing to do. You must have the writing on the card facing the person and it should be given with two hands.5.As you meet you should introduce the people of higher position or status and elderly fellows.6.To be kind and courteous a Singaporean may not have direct eye contact with the person they are greeting, but instead look down. They do this to respect people of that are of older age or higher rank.7. rather of greeting with the typical How are you or Good Morning Singaporeans will usually greet by saying Where are you going or Have you eaten.8.Greetings shouldnt be said using your nickname unless you are treasured to in a special case or you know the person well and have developed a friendship.Everyday Living1.You shouldnt tell a person any jokes until you know them well because the jokes might be misunderstood or just favored.2.Dont bring up any ideas or start a conversation about subjects like religion or politics.3.No affections (kissing, hugging) between couples or anyone should be demonstrated in public. You s hould be calm and not show anger public areas.When crossing your legs it is good to put one knee over the other.Home JapanHYPERLINK http//library.thinkquest.org/05aug/00723/index_files/index_files/Page357.htmHYPERLINK http//library.thinkquest.org/05aug/00723/index_files/index_files/Page357.htms Etiquette ChinaHYPERLINK http//library.thinkquest.org/05aug/00723/index_files/index_files/Page444.htmHYPERLINK http//library.thinkquest.org/05aug/00723/index_files/index_files/Page444.htms Etiquette SingaporeHYPERLINK http//library.thinkquest.org/05aug/00723/index_files/index_files/Page531.htmHYPERLINK http//library.thinkquest.org/05aug/00723/index_files/index_files/Page531.htms Etiquette KoreaHYPERLINK http//library.thinkquest.org/05aug/00723/index_files/index_files/Page621.htmHYPERLINK http//library.thinkquest.org/05aug/00723/index_files/index_files/Page621.htms Etiquette Fun and Games Credit near UsSingaporeans are strong on things like money, or business meetings due dates.Demogra phics of Singapore4,483,900 (July 2006 est.)Age structureAgepercentage manlike0-14 years15.6%362,32915-64 years76.1%1,666,70965 years and over8.3%165,823(2006 est.) universe of discourse by residential statusResidential StatusNumberTotal Population4,017,733Citizens2,973,091Permanent Residents290,118Non-resident Population754,524(2000 est.)Population growth rate1.42% (2006)Birth rate9.34 births/1,000 populationDeath rate4.28 deaths/1,000 populationNet migration rate9.12 migrants/1,000 population(2006 est.)Sex ratioAgeat birthunder 15 years15-64 years65 years and overtotal population(2006 est.)Infant mortality rate2.29 deaths/1,000 live births (222 est.)Life expectancy at birthtotal population 81 yearsmale 79 yearsfemale 83 years Posted by

Read More…

Cultural Impacts Of Tourism In Mumbai

Cultural Impacts Of Tourism In Mumbai Cultural Impacts Of Tourism In MumbaiWhat is burnish? Lederach (1995) defines finishing as the shargond knowledge and schemes created by a narrow of people for perceiving, interpreting, expressing, and responding to the social realities around them. When we think of socialisation, comm scarcely we think traditions, nutriment, language, clothes, theology and behavior. These traits quarter transmit oer time if and when a particular carry adapts or incorporates the enculturation of another. This can either be possessed of a haughty or negative effect on the culture of that charge.Mumbai is located on the Salsette Island which lies at the m go forthh of Ulhas River off the western coast of Maharashtra India in the coastal region known as the Konkan. Mumbai is classified as a urban center of India, under the jurisdiction of the Brihan Mumbai Municipal Corporation. It consists of two distinct regions, the Mumbai urban center z nonp aril and Mumbai Suburban District. The ci ty region is also commonly referred to as the Island City by most media publications. on that point ar m all kinds of dishes that are aborigine to the state of Maharashtra. Many of which are available in roadside flying food. Other popular cuisines include Lebanese, Korean, Thai, Italian, Mexican and Chinese. Mumbai is iodin of the most devoid cities in India, embracing concepts that would be considered taboo in other split of the country. Mumbais culture has been heavily influenced by western culture which gives tourists familiarity. or so could argue that Mumbai has already lost a lot of its culture to cosmopolite culture.Climate in Mumbai is warm and humid. There are four seasons the city experiences. During the months of December to February, cool weather exists from December to February and hot weather from border district to May. The monsoon season lasts from June to September and is followed by the post-monsoon season, which lasts by Octob er and November, when the weather is again hot. periodical temperatures vary from 91 degrees in May to 67 degrees Fahrenheit in January. Annual rainfall is nigh 70 inches with an average of 24 keepring in July alone.Before touristry development, Mumbai (formerly Bombay) was originally a group of s nonetheless islands on the Konkan coastline, occupied by Koli fishermen. It wasnt until Sultan Muhamed Begada took over the islands, where Mumbai was colonized by the Hindus. A Portuguese traveller named Vasco da Gama was the first person to explore the travel plan to Mumbai which led to the discovery of the islands and the attack by the Portuguese to capture the islands in 1534.The Portuguese built a parish, several forts and churches, but realized in that respect was no value in them. In 1661, Catherine of Braganza, sister of the Portuguese King, offered these islands as a gift to Charles II of England. Having no use for the islands, Charles II lease them to the British East Indi a Company in 1661. This was the beginning of British rule. This calling company built docks, occupation posts, and forts because of its strategic location.Mumbai developed into an crucial trading post. Governer Gerald Aungier persuaded clientele concernmen from all over the country to come and settle in Mumbai. Mumbai developed into a study commercial center. In the 18th century, nation increased significantly and by the 19th century there was expression of buildings, monuments, railway stations, offices, banks. With the introduction of the Great Indian Peninsular Railways, the city authentic an improved bureau of transportation.After Indias independence from British rule in 1947, India was restructured into Bombay state. In 1960 when, Maharashtra state came to existence, Bombay, now Mumbai became the jacket.There are ordained set up touristry can have on a destination. One prototype would be the armament communities residents sharing their culture in addition to tho se see the communities. Other benefits may include the host may include fraternity pride, tolerance and a stronger sense of ethnic identity (Velachis, 2010). The other positive effects of touristry are the heathenish exchange, the resurgence of local traditions, and an intensify public figure for the community.The perception of India to westerners is of an exotic destination. Then there negative go throughs calm associated with it such as scantness, poor health, sanitation, and inferior infrastructure (Jafari, 2000). Tourism in Mumbai would have a positive effect on the community as it would break the stereotypical perception of India. Mumbai is the definition of urban India. It can be express that Mumbai the New York of India, as it is the city that never sleeps with its residents leading a fast-paced life and high rise structures.The involvement of the local communities is an important federal agent for visitor satisfaction. The hosts for tourism are the local communit y and they participate directly in the tourism experience, helping to define the sense of nursing home and atmosphere of regions (Arzeni, 2009). The support of the local community is essential in exploitation cultural experiences for tourists. Ever since the success of the film, Slumdog Millionaire, slum tourism has been a emergence attraction in India. The Dharavi slum, located in Mumbai, is the largest slum in Asia. This Slumdog view is what grew peoples curiosity. Slum tourism can have a positive preserve by introducing the positive side of the slums and dispelling the negative. Besides the obvious economic benefits it brings, it can give tourists some insight to their lives and create awareness of the situation. Despite the poverty and its bleak appearance, the people living in these slums are hard operative with a strong spirit and sense of community (Ward, 2010). It can change the preconceived notion they may have had about these slums.It can be seen as a positive that t here is a combination of Mumbai culture as well as Western culture. Many locals in Mumbai keep back both these culture. Many festivals held in Mumbai allow tourists to have a font into the Mumbai culture because they are able to celebrate along with the locals while at the same(p) time interacting with them. This mutual relation encourages a cross-cultural conference that can support understanding between the host and guests (Valachis, 2009). Residents alike are educated about the world outside without leaving their homes, while visitors require considerably about a unique(p) culture.Another positive out harvesting that tourism brings is to Mumbais economy. The entire country of India is dependent on tourism, as tourism is its largest service industry. Tourism in Mumbai has served as a tool for income and example generation, lessoning poverty and sustainable human development. It contributes 6.23% to the national GDP and 8.78% of the total duty in India (Tourism Statistics, 2008). Business tourism is quickly growing and according to the earthly concern Travel and Tourism Council, an international tourism trade organization, Indian business tourism willing contribute over $14.2 billion to the economy in 2011. non only does this benefit the economy, it will allow business traveler a glimpse of Mumbais culture and give the opportunity to explore diverse activities in juxtaposition to their business agendas.The common impacts in the destination occur from the tourist activities. These impacts include the revival or commoditization, the commercialization of traditional cultures, the deprivation of cultural authenticity, the destruction of the heritage and historical sites by the swarming of tourists.It can be argued that one of the strongest signs of such impacts is the loss of native language as a result of an invasion of tourist languages (Velachis, 2009). The official language of the city of Mumbai is Marathi with only 42% of the population who ar e fluent. Other than Hindi being one of the major languages in Mumbai, English in prevalent. As business tourism in India increases, English is astray spoken in commercial intercourse and the professional workforce (Fulton, 2009). With the major languages of Hindi and English, Bombay Hindi was developed, a pidgin that is widely spoken in Mumbai incorporating Marathi, Hindi and English. The changes in language, has been associated in addition to changes in attitudes and behavior.Other harmful impacts tourism can create are to its attractions. The rudimentary aspect as to why people travel. The Girgaum Chowpatty is one of the most notable public beaches and one of the senileest beaches in Mumbai. With the many hotels nearby, Chowpatty draws a great depend of tourists. Residents of Babulnath which faces Chowpatty, fear that the heritage, sanctity and aesthetics of the area will be damage (Thanawala, 2006). Another attraction that is in danger is the Elephanta Caves, which was d eclared a knowledge domain Heritage Site by UNESCO. Elephantas close proximity to Mumbai and international report as a masterpiece has come at an unsustainable level of tourism (Mink, 2009). There has been little effort at preserving the statues and poor crowd engage conducted by the authorities. As a result, the already damaged sculptures are in danger of further degradation.According to Mathieson and Wall (1982), one of the major impacts on culture destination is the conversion of the material and non-material structures of local culture, which are called revitalization or commoditization. The Mumbai Tourism Development Corporation has created numerous amounts of festivals specifically to get ahead tourism in the city. A number including, dance and harmony recitals are held during these festivities in order for tourists to be able to observe the culture of Mumbai. Tourism can turn local cultures into commodities when religious rituals, traditional ethni c rites and festivals are reduced and to match to tourist expectations.When tourists acquire a spend as a package, they also purchase culture as a package. Despite how ancient or composite the destination culture is, it is lessoned to a few recognizable distinctiveness. Examples such as arts and crafts, dance, music, buildings and festivals or ceremonies are supportd as a commodity (Mathieson and Wall, 1982). The Elephanta Festival in Mumbai is a cultural festival created to honor and commemorate Indian dance, sculpture and art. It is a major attraction for locals as well as the neighboring city. What is suppose to a be tribute to holy performers and an initiative to popularize Indian classical dance and heritage art form found its main conclusion in trying to promote tourism in the state, as it was form by the Maharashtra Tourism Development Corporation.Another negative impact that tourism creates in the culture of a destination is that the pull the desires and interest of t he tourist without regard to the locals who may have had families and friends that were killed. This was another way for the city to exact profit. A tragic character occurred on November 26, 2008 when the terrorist attacks destroyed monuments and injured and killed hundreds of people. This event struck a impertinent found terror tourism. (Shatterjee, 2008). Travelers congregate to the monuments of the Taj hotel, gate of India, Cama hospital and Nariman house, which were under terror attacks. Visible bullet marks on walls, windows and roofs, damaged regions and reinstated structures. There has been an increase of local tourists and foreign travelers to Mumbai because of this terror tourism. There are even tour guides and agencies that will give detailed descriptions on the events and show the various pulls that were under the siege.Although this terror tourism brought the in a set of tourist, it cant be denied the impact it had on Indias tourism industry. Not only did the attack affect leisure travel to Mumbai, it rippled through the entire country with cancellations of hotel bookings. Business travel has also affected the business tourism as many companies have asked employees to restrict travel to India. The kindle of this attack has undoubtedly impacted this destination negatively.While retaining the traditional image of cultural tourism in India, diversification of the tourism product would continue, in the main in the fields of leisure, adventure and convention, thus responding to the changing consumer needs (Menon, 1993). Mumbai blends old traditions with crude and modern culture. Mumbai is known as the business and entertainment capital and known for the exciting nightlife one can experience, but not for the historic monuments. Little effort was made in preserving the few monuments they already had. If tourists were looking for for the old India, it would deter tourists to visit other parts of India, which could hurt the image of Mumbai for bein g too commercialized. Mumbai is at the point of standardization. This means the process of fulfilling tourists desires (Arzeni, 2009). The landscape, accommodation, food and drinks, etc., must meet the tourists desire for the new and unfamiliar, they must at the same time not be too new or remarkable because very little tourists actually indigence to see completely new things.Aurangabad, another city in the state of Maharashtra was named the Tourism capital of Maharashtra. the likes of many other cities in Maharashtra, it is part of the urban sprawl that includes, Mumbai, Pune, Nashik and Nagpur. distant Mumbai which has few historic sites, Aurangabad has is tourist hub surrounded by many historical monuments and caves some of which are UNESCO heritage sites. This could create competition for Mumbai who is constantly bob uping ways to boost tourism in the city. Recently, Mumbai has introduced fort tourism (Buch, 2011). These forts will be able to attract more tourists, but have been seriously preserved and rather than being restored have been tampered with. Tourists want to be introduced to new culture. The culture of Aurangabad is still very much intact, contrast Mumbai who culture is profoundly blended with western culture.The city of Mumbai has done a poor origin at trying to preserve the few monuments they already have. These monuments are a part of their heritage, but they make it seem they no longer have any pride in their own culture. This could also be said about the food in Mumbai. As mentioned earlier, Mumbai offers cuisines from all over the world, with Chinese being most prevalent. According to the Travel Industry Association of the States and the National Restaurant Association (2008), food is central to deciding holiday destinations for at least 25% of leisure travelers. Mumbai has not made any effort to promote their food, which is an aspect of their culture.The state of Kerala, located in southwest India could also create competition. Tourist looking for sun, sea, and sand can find it in this state. Kerala was named by National Geographic Traveler as one of the Ten Paradises of the World. Mumbai does offer sun, sea and sand from its famous Juhu Beach and Chowpatty. Unfortunately, because of the heavily polluted water, it is advised not to swim. Other than being a paradise, what makes Kerala unique is its ecotourism incentives, which it is well known for. Eco-friendly places can be a deciding factor as to why people would choose one place over another. Mumbai has become the new pollution capital with the rapid population growth and increase in number of automobiles. What may make Kerala more suited is its unique culture, as it managed to remain organic and rich in its heritage.In many destinations, the cultural industries have been recognized as having an important birth with tourism. As tourism gradually shifts away from its prior attraction of landscapes and graphic resources, tourists are becoming more inte rested with the symbolic and sensory breathing in of images and ideas associated with particular destinations (Arzeni, 2009). An example would be Bollywood, or the Hindi cinema. It has become a major part of Mumbai culture. Like Hollywood is associated with L.A., Bollywood is associated with Mumbai. Mumbai is the largest film producer of Hindi film. Tour companies now offer Bollywood tour packages, which offer tours around submit City and in the studios, as well as the residents of Bollywood actors. It is not a historic site, nor is it monumental, but it is one of the most popular attractions in Mumbai. stack want to go to destinations that are linked with particular famous people, events, and they want to experience the sights and sounds. (Arzeni, 2009). Though not traditionally part of Indian culture and not found in other parts of India, Mumbai is known for its vivacious nightlife. A typical night out would be exploring one of the many bars and clubs the city has to offer. Thi s is scarce another example of how a host community fulfilled the tourist desire of familiar facilities. The fact that tourists just want a quick glance of the local atmosphere, a plan look at local life, and no awareness or even interest creates a loss in authenticity which means adapting to the render to the tourists needs and not taking the time to truly understand the locals and their culture. socialization has been defined in a number of ways, but to simply put it, it is the learned and shared behavior of a community of interacting human beings. When tourists move in to a destination, they bring their culture which is then learned and shared by the host communities. Though there is no doubt that culture and tourism are related, it can strengthen the attractiveness and competitiveness of a place and the same time hurt it. Mumbai is continually finding ways to promote tourism to their city although they have already established themselves as a popular tourist destination for both leisure and business travelers. What started out as seven islands occupied by Koli fisherman, has developed into the one of the largest and richest metropolitans in the world. Tourism is one of the largest and fastest growing global tourism markets and countries that are dependent upon it will find ways to attract tourists, even if it means altering their culture to fit the needs of the tourist. We see how negatively tourism can affect the culture of ones community, but it also has its positive aspect. fundamental interaction with the local community can change their perception about the place they had before, dispel any negative stereotypes and are able to learn something about another culture. Posted by

Read More…

Coke’s cleanse | Outlook Business

Home / Strategy / Feature / Coke’s Cleanse | MAR 15 , 2019 Vishal Koul Feature Coke’s Cleanse The Atlanta-based soft-drinks major is going all out to woo the Indian customer with a kaleidoscopic range of fruit and dairy-based drinks, with its popular offering losing fizz Krishna Gopalan “We asked ourselves, why can’t we operate like a start-up. If competition can launch a product in six to 12 weeks, we should be able to do it too —T Krishnakumar, President & CEO, Coca-Cola India & Southwest Asia Twenty five years after entering India, Coca-Cola India decided to have a celebration in Agra, the city where it all started in 1993. Bottlers and company executives turned up to be a part of the fun on December 11 and 12. True to tradition, most of the conversation revolved around sales volumes. It has been an interesting journey for the company starting with the launch of its iconic global brand — Coca-Cola — making a significant buyout, and several management changes. Now, they are pursuing a strategy that is more consumer-centric than ever in its history in India. They will no more be a one-trick pony. The brand is out for a transformation with different products for different parts of India and across categories such as dairy, hydration and fruit-based drinks, touching various price points. It is stretching the equity of the brand to bring in a set of new consumers. This will be built on its age-old strength of distribution and sales muscle. The turnaround has become essential. Growth has been hard to come by for soft-drink majors, over the last five to 10 years, with healthier options available in large numbers. Carbonated drinks, the market for which has grown slowly at 4.31% CAGR between 2012 and 2017, drive 65% of Coca-Cola’s revenue according to industry research reports. In this period of sluggish growth, the company’s share has dropped from 60.8% to 56.3%. The market share of its closest rival PepsiCo remained unchanged at around 33%. With changing consumer preferences, the soft drink major’s transition into a total beverages company began in India about 18 months ago. Before this strategy kicked in, in FY16, Coca-Cola India had clocked revenue of 17.5 billion with a CAGR of 9.77% over a four-year period. Its bottling arm, Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages (HCCB) in FY17 had a revenue of 94.7 billion and loss of 2.33 billion; for FY18 its revenue was 90.6 billion with a loss of 1.18 billion (see: Hitting a rough patch) . Responding to a query from Outlook Business , HCCB said its numbers for FY17 “were impacted on account of adverse effects of high taxation, commodity inflation, aggressive investments in manufacturing capacity and demonetisation.” In the case of FY18, it attributed it to the accounting impact of GST — excise and other tax costs subsumed under GST. With the company taking a hit on its profitability and a carbonated market that has lost almost all its fizz, a lot is riding on Coca-Cola India’s transformation plan. Hello India Coca-Cola first came to India in 1950 and was growing steadily for nearly three decades. But, it bid adieu in 1977, when the government, in line with the Foreign Exchange Regulation Act of 1973, made it mandatory for foreign companies to dilute their shareholding. In 1993, after the economic reforms, the Atlanta-based company made a re-entry. The brand’s return was marked by a high-profile acquisition of Ramesh Chauhan’s Parle for 1.8 billion — which brought the iconic Thums Up apart from Limca, Gold Spot and Maaza into Coca-Cola’s roster. These along with Coke and Fanta made for a formidable portfolio, which was ready to take on Pepsi. But, there were hiccups. Chairman of The Coca-Cola Company, Muhtar Kent, recorded in 2013 the challenges they had faced. They had trouble retaining employees, there were hard lessons to be learnt in distribution channels (for example, small corner shops were more important than large grocery stores) and innovations were needed to tackle the erratic power supply. He wrote in the commentary for McKinsey, “If you come to India with some grand, predetermined strategy or master plan, prepare to be distracted, deterred, and even demoralised.” That was the first phase of Coke in India. Two years ago, the company’s global CEO James Quincey outlined the way forward with a new model. It would stand on two key pillars. One is having a more consumer-centric portfolio, by stepping outside of its core business into brands that are more relevant to a country or region. Two is pervasive distribution. The movement towards being a “total beverage company” had truly started at least two decades ago. There has been a reasonable level of success in water, juice and iced tea, too. Jonathan Davison, beverage analyst at GlobalData cites the case of Japan, where Coca-Cola has done well in at least two businesses, including flavoured water. Asia Pacific contributes 13.5% of Coca-Cola’s overall revenue. “It has developed unique flavours of I Lohas (flavoured) water. Even in iced/RTD teas there, its Ayataka green tea brand has enjoyed sustained success,” he says. Interestingly, Japan is not a cola-driven market and Coca-Cola’s sales come from selling canned coffee (estimated to be at least 60% of its business here) and innovative products such as Real Gold, a hangover cure. This success in Japan with alternative beverages, says Jagdish Sheth, marketing professor at Emory University’s Goizueta Business School, comes on the back of one million vending machines, which are all connected by an internal network. In India too — besides growing its core sparkling beverages business — it would get into local and hyperlocal beverages, remodel sourcing-and-distribution channels, and build brands that can be taken global. Some baby steps have been taken too. Is this version 2.0 for Coca-Cola India? Gently drawing into his filter coffee at Machan, Taj Mansingh’s multi-cuisine restaurant in the capital, T Krishnakumar, the company’s president and CEO for India and Southwest Asia, smiles. He is a low-key boss who speaks the simple language of a salesman. “I am not sure (about version 2.0) but yes, it is a different version. We have to get the best of the old and also do some new interesting things,” says the bespectacled 59-year-old. On December 12, he spoke to the sales team in the streets of Agra, making his intentions clear. With a larger product portfolio, now starting at 5 (with Vitingo) and its popular Maaza mango drink in a tetrapak at 10, he said, Coca-Cola India had the ammunition to take on competition. It widened their portfolio with 46 brands relevant to the country, with 17 launches done only for 2018. Its new competitors are Amul in dairy, a host of players including Real and Tropicana in juice, and Hector Beverages for ethnic (such as panakam and thandai ). It has a good lead in market on its closest competition PepsiCo (see: Turf war) . Two brands, from Coca-Cola India, tailored for the local market was out May last year — Aquarius Glucocharge and Minute Maid Vitingo, both water-soluble powders. They were targeted at the middle class, who want affordable products with clear functional benefits. Aquarius Glucocharge, says Krishnakumar, was for the consumer looking for a rehydration drink. “This is for those people working on farms or in factories,” he explains. The water-soluble powder, created specifically for the Indian market, was launched in a 200 ml pack and priced at a very competitive 10, putting it right up against Glucon D from Kraft Heinz (the company has since then been acquired by Zydus Cadila) and Dabur’s Glucose-D. Meanwhile, Vitingo, shortened for ‘vitamin on the go’, was a brand that is sold in South Africa as an iron supplement. At 5 for a 18 gm serving, it is the cheapest brand in the company’s portfolio in India. It is after 15 years that Coca-Cola has made an entry into this price band, the last instance being Coke’s 200 ml bottle in 2003. Aquarius Glucocharge also marks a process change inside the company. It is a launch from the incubation hub, opened in Gurugram few months ago with a core team of six to eight people. The entire process of ideating to the product launch in the case of Glucocharge took six weeks and, a month later, was out in the market. Compare this to the scenario earlier when the company would take six to eight months for an exercise of this kind, with a good chance that the idea would be vetoed in the middle of it. “We asked ourselves, why can’t we operate like a start-up. If competition can launch a product in six to 12 weeks, we should be able to do it too,” says Krishnakumar, who assumed the top job in May 2017 after heading Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages (HCCB), the company’s bottling arm. Krishnakumar thinks this approach allows the company to have a limited version of the product and quietly test it in the market. All aboard The need to reach out to a larger population is what spurred the thrust into rehydration with Glucocharge and Vitingo. Simultaneously, Coca-Cola India has decided to get more out of its existing brands such as Maaza and the water business. Maaza is a 25-billion brand and water overall for the company is a 8.5-9-billion brand. This is really where the India-specific strategy gains form and shape. The company has segmented India into three — the rich, middle class and climbers. The rehydration offerings, especially Vitingo, are targeted at the climbers. Two versions of Maaza were launched in 2017. “They allow us to straddle different set of users with the same brand,” says Krishnakumar. End of that year, a thicker version Maaza Gold (with concentrate percentage at 18%, which is 10% for regular juice category) was out in a one litre tetrapak at 120. That was an aspirational product. The company also brought out Refresh (with lesser pulp percentage) in a tetrapak that hit the market at 10, clearly to take on Parle Agro’s Frooti. In water too Coca-Cola sells four brands — Kinley, Bonaqua, Aquarius and Glaceau Smartwater — across various segments and price points, with mass brand Kinley now selling fruit water as well. “Our strategy is to give a water plus offering. The trick is to move the consumer from water to some level of additional functionality and that’s where the range from Glucocharge to smart water helps,” he emphasises. According to Ramesh Chauhan, chairman, Bisleri, there is little doubt that flavoured water has taken off across the world. He does not expect the market to open up easily in India though. Here the market is small, no more than 500 million in size, growing at 20-25% each year. Consumer awareness about it is low, and people are likely to go for the basic version, he says. Rahul Narang, founder and chairman, Narang Group, who owns O’cean fruit water, admits that the trade initially did not really understand the product, which affected both placement and distribution. “To add to that, price points were a problem, since on the shelf it was compared to packaged water, but taxed at 40% like carbonated soft drinks.” To his mind, there has been a shift from carbonated to aqua drinks and lot of homes and restaurants are infusing their daily water servings with fresh cucumbers, fruits, limes and other ingredients. “Over time, these consumers will seek a more convenient packaged solution,” says Narang. At the mass end, of plain bottled water, it is a distribution game, with margins being a challenge. In this segment, Coca-Cola’s brands are up against those of Parle Bisleri, both with a market share of around 8% each. PepsiCo’s share is at around 5%. “Spending a lot on transportation (15 % to 20% of the total cost) in a low-margin business such as water means you need to get the volume right, to succeed,” says Chauhan. Being different Innovation is at the core of the strategy for Coca-Cola today. Therefore, there was no question of beating existing players at their own game. Take the instance of dairy, which has been the waterloo for many a multinational such as Danone and Lactalis who is still trying to make sense of the Indian market after its expensive buyout of Tirumala Milk Products in early 2014 for 17.5 billion. In bid to strengthen its position, Lactalis agreed to acquire Prabhat Diary’s milk business for 17 billion in January 2019. Coca-Cola’s initial dairy foray with its Vio brand in 2016, from its global portfolio, was a flavoured milk straight up against a multitude of players such as Amul and smaller cooperatives such as Mother Dairy. Launched with two flavours, almond and kesar, it came a cropper. Now the strategy, Krishnakumar says, is to do it with nutrishakes launched in 2018. The new offering has been launched with chocolate and banana variants and will be up against ITC’s dairy range Sunfeast Wonderz, where a large part is fruit-based. “We are clear there has to be a strong proposition and a way to be different. That means getting into the commodity side of the dairy business (milk and dahi ) is out of the question,” he explains. According to R S Sodhi, MD, Gujarat Cooperative Milk Marketing Federation (GCMMF), which markets Amul’s products, it will be difficult for multinationals to match the pricing power of local players, especially cooperatives. “They do not source milk from the farmers and that means a higher cost of operation,” he says. According to Sodhi, the impediment is the time involved in identifying farmers, setting up procurement and chilling centres before getting it into the market. That still is a smaller challenge compared to the real issue of margins. A company like Coca-Cola is used to a 30% gross margin on its soft drinks business, which, says Sodhi, is no more than 6-7% in the dairy business, even for value-added products. To sidestep this, Coca-Cola will identify niches and retail it through a limited number of outlets, hoping they can command a premium. That is not something that misses Krishnakumar’s attention and he speaks openly about the difficulty in taking on the cooperatives. For now, the approach is to look for specific gaps that exist in the market and then come up with a product, which may not go mass right away. Last September, the company brought in its Minute Maid Smoothie from its global portfolio and fine-tuned it for the Indian market. “We brought in a version with mango and banana, both being popular in India. The milk was made thicker since Indians like it that way,” he explains. At 30 for 250 ml, it is being sold in Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Telangana and Andhra Pradesh. On Coca-Cola’s dairy foray in other parts of the world, Richard Hall, chairman, Zenith Global, a UK-based food and drink consultancy, points to the US, where it has been selling Fairlife milk since 2015. “It’s a great example of how Coca-Cola took a commodity and added value with ultra-filtration, increased protein and calcium at the same time reducing lactose and sugar. Globally, the company’s focus is primarily on premium, lifestyle brands and it is now looking to achieve this broadly across all beverage sectors,” he says. Media reports in 2016 say that Fairlife saw sales worth $90 million. What lies ahead Krishnakumar sees a bigger opportunity in the fruit business. Apart from Maaza, still considered a part of the juice and juice drinks market, the only other presence comes in the form of Minute Maid, a brand that Coca-Cola acquired in 1960. In India, the brand is still insignificant after being around for more than a decade. In the 130-billion juices market, Coca-Cola has a 31.4% market share, with Parle Agro having a 22.5% share and PepsiCo 17.4%. That said, Minute Maid is a small player in a smaller segment of 100% juice (about 80% of the juice market is juice drinks, which is anything having more than 10% pulp). Coca-Cola’s Maaza is far more successful, which is what drives the company’s market share. The management here started to push Maaza really hard around 2002-03. After managing to strike deals to source pulp, Coca-Cola managed to create a market through the year. All of this ensured that sales numbers took off. The approach to the fruits business is slightly different and Krishnakumar calls it the “fruit circular economy.” Circular economy, according to the company, is a grove-to-glass approach — in short, being there from the nursery till the time the product finds its way into the glass/PET bottle or any other container. The company has already announced an investment of $1.7 billion over the next five years — of this, $800 million will go into the procurement of processed fruit pulp and the other $900 million will come from HCCB in setting up infrastructure for juice bottling, fruit processing plants and agricultural interventions including sourcing the fruit, processing it and getting it ready for the market. Indians, according to him, relate to fruits and milk quite easily. “Fruits in India are available only for 45 days on an average but there is demand through the year,” says Krishnakumar. Barring Africa, where Coca-Cola does some work with fruit, India is the country where the circular fruit economy will be tested. The first phase of this project is for mango, for which Coca-Cola has inked an agreement with Jalgaon-based Jain Irrigation. According to Anil Jain, vice-chairman and managing director, Jain Irrigation, a key feature of this is to use the Ultra High-Density Plantation Technique (UHDP). “The yield is 3x more using half the water,” he says. Besides, the gestation period for mangoes will be down to three years, from seven. Training the farmers and supplying the planting material will be his company’s responsibility and the first phase has 2,000 farmers across 2,500 acres. “The two partners will assure 100% offtake of the produce at the prevailing price,” he adds. Project Unnati, as the agreement is called, was extended to procurement of oranges (the deal for mangoes was signed in 2014) in the Marathwada and Vidharbha regions of Maharashtra last year. The plan is to go for the obvious fruits such mango and orange in the first phase and then customise it for each region later. “That means we can look at the specific offerings such as Kesar in Gujarat, Neelam in Tamil Nadu or Dasheri in UP,” he says. In January this year, they launched Minute Maid Colour in Tamil Nadu, a sparkling drink with the “goodness” of grape juice. Coca-Cola has been toying with localised versions of Minute Maid frozen desserts too. “Fruit gives us tremendous flexibility to increase my product portfolio. The challenge will be in getting it right on the supply chain for each fruit. This model can be taken to any country,” he says. Fruit contributes to over 30% of Coca-Cola India’s revenue. The juice market has been seeing some serious shifts, with a host of new players managing to identify a clear niche. Anuj Rakyan, founder and MD, Rakyan Beverages, the owner of the Raw Pressery brand, recalls a phase three years ago, when there was no place on the shelf for a brand like his (Raw Pressery is cold pressed juice, where a hydraulic press is used to extract juice from fruits and vegetables). He thinks there is a marked difference since then with many innovative products coming in. “From being a supply led market, it’s now demand led,” he says, adding, “our innovation was not about longer shelf life and added sugar, but instead was on cold pressing, to keep the juice fresh.” That was easier said than done with issues such as having a robust cold chain being a serious challenge. In today’s context, he does not believe juice is a low-volume business anymore. Raw Pressery is at the top-end of the market, with its 250 ml starting at 100. “There is an opportunity for a clean label, good for you, hygienic products, which give consumers a sense of origin and sourcing,” he says. It is precisely this kind of potential that convinces Krishnakumar of how much can be done in India. While Coca-Cola was in the race to acquire Kraft Heinz’s India portfolio, which would have given it Complan and later, GSK, which had Horlicks, his mind is, in fact, convinced about the organic story in India. “There is a significant growth opportunity here and each of the categories we are present in has huge headroom to do that,” he says. On the anvil is a foray into coconut water, with its Zico brand. This year, an imported version is being sold and the plan is to make it locally over the next few months. RimZim, a jeera-flavoured carbonated drink that came through the Parle acquisition, will be Coca-Cola’s entry into the ethnic beverages business — it is here where it will be in direct confrontation with the likes of Hector Beverages’ Paper Boat. For the workaholic Krishnakumar, it will mean only more time out there doing market visits. By his own admission, he says at least ten days a month are spent talking to the trade. “I will not leave a city without visiting 10-15 outlets and I prefer doing it alone. Nothing to me is more exciting than a market visit,” he says with a twinkle in his eye. Here’s your chance to read the latest issue of Outlook Business for free! Download the Outlook ​Magazines app now. Available on Play Store and App Store More from Feature

Read More…

It’s official: Bournemouth’s favourite takeaway is fish and chips

1 comment FISH and chips has been revealed as the favourite takeaway in Bournemouth.
A study of 63 towns and cities across the UK saw Chinese top the table in 59 of the locations.
But Bournemouth residents gave the traditional chippy the thumbs up and were joined only by people of Brighton and Norwich.
London was the only place to put Indian food in first place.
In Bournemouth, Chinese cuisine was the second choice with Italian food in third place.
The study was carried out by MyVoucherCodes and a spokesman said: “As a nation we love having a wide range of food and restaurants to choose from.
“When choosing what to eat, the range of takeaway meals and restaurants is almost limitless. There is a type of cuisine out there for everyone and we all have our favourites.”
The study analysed the number of people searching online for 12 different types of food .

Read More…

Persian Rice with Saffron and Asparagus

You are here: Home | Vegan Rice Recipes | Persian Rice with Saffron and Asparagus Persian Rice with Saffron and Asparagus April 3, 2019 Print Recipe
A recipe for Persian Rice that’s pure gold, with the sass of saffron, the fire of cinnamon, and the freshness of asparagus.
With rice being a whole food group rather than just a grain hereabouts, I am always looking for tasty ways to cook with it. Desi and Jay love it, and even the dogs will eat bowlfuls.
My own love for rice was a little late coming, despite the fact that it’s a rock-solid staple of Indian cuisine and I grew up eating it every day. Or perhaps it was this omnipresence that made me not love but almost hate it. When I did fall in love, eventually, the fondness stuck.
It’s hard to allay those feelings, not when there are so many delicious ways to cook rice, like this Vegetable Biryani that’s a lifesaver on hurried weekdays, or this Vegan Jambalaya with flavors that dance on your tastebuds, or this Vegan Paella that makes me want to do the flamenco.
In fact, everything I cook with rice only reinforces my enchantment with it now.
And with this Persian Rice with Saffron and Asparagus, I think I’ve pushed myself past the point of recovery.
The rice here is true gold, infused with the delicate sass of saffron fronds and the fire of cinnamon and cayenne. Onions, tomatoes and asparagus add freshness. The soft, textured bites of extrafirm tofu, standing in admirably for meat, give an untraditional yet welcome new dimension.
But it’s the tahdig, that crispy, sublimely scorched layer of rice cooked at the bottom of the pan, that bowls you over and makes you realize the miracles that rice is truly capable of.
We know that when starch hits high heat, the result is finger-licking good. Think French fries, what’s not to love? The tahdig is just that kind of magic, albeit a healthier one.
Exotic and elegant, this recipe would be great for entertaining friends, but I think you could make it for your kids too and they’d love it. Jay finds the tahdig immensely fun and delicious and the saffron intensifies that savory flavor he craves when I am not letting him have as much junk food as he really wants. 😉
A win, I think. 5 from 1 vote Persian Rice with Saffron and Asparagus A fragrant, golden dish of Persian Rice with Saffron and Asparagus. It’s savory, exotic and fresh, and perfect to eat with family or to entertain. Prep Time 20 mins Total Time 1 hr 5 mins Course: Main Course, Rice Cuisine: gluten-free, nut-free, Persian, Vegan Servings: 8 servings Ingredients 2 1/2 tbsp vegetable oil 2 medium onions (thinly sliced) 3 cloves garlic (thinly sliced) 3/4 tsp ground cinnamon 3 large tomatoes (diced, or use 3 cups canned, diced tomatoes) 1/2 tsp saffron (mixed with 1/4 cup of any non-dairy milk and set aside for a few minutes) 1 14-oz block of super firm tofu (optional. If using cut the tofu into 1/2-inch cubes) 1 pound asparagus (tough ends trimmed, and tender parts cut into 1/2 inch pieces) Juice of 1 lemon Salt and ground black pepper to taste Instructions Drain the rice and place it in a microwave-safe bowl with the bay leaves and salt to taste. Add 2 cups of water and microwave 10 minutes or until the rice is mostly but not fully cooked. You can also do this on the stovetop. Bring a large pot of water to boil, add salt and bay leaves and add the drained rice. Cook about 7-8 minutes until rice reaches the right level of doneness, then drain and set aside. Heat 1/2 tablespoon of oil in a large saucepan with a tight lid. Add the onions and garlic with a pinch of salt and ground black pepper and sauce until the onions start to brown. Add the tofu cubes, if using, and continue to cook, turning the pieces of tofu over carefully every couple of minutes so they brown slightly without breaking. Add the asparagus along with the turmeric, cayenne, ground cinnamon and more salt if needed. Continue to cook a couple of minutes, then add in the tomatoes and lemon. Cover and cook 10 minutes, then remove everything to a bowl. To the same saucepan, add half the saffron milk and the remaining 2 tbsp of oil along with 2 tbsp water and 1 cup of the cooked rice. Mix them together lightly with the spatula and spread it evenly across the bottom of the pan, Next, layer on half the remaining rice. Over that, add half the tomato-asparagus mixture. then continue to layer on the rest of the rice. Over the rice, sprinkle the remaining half of the saffron milk and then proceed to layer with the remaining tomato-asparagus mixture. Cover the saucepan with aluminum foil or parchment paper. Cover with a tight lid and place over high heat for five minutes. Turn the heat to low and continue to cook 40 minutes. Once cooking is done, let the rice stand at least 10 minutes before you open and serve. Notes I serve this with a yogurt-based dish, like cucumber raita.
Filed Under: All Recipes , Gluten Free Vegan Recipes , Healthy Vegan Recipes , Vegan Kid Friendly Recipes , Vegan Middle Eastern Recipes , Vegan Rice Recipes About Vaishali Honawar
I love food! And I think the first slice of a freshly baked sourdough bread, a steaming and fragrant bowl of vegan stew, and tearing into a flaky, hot aloo paratha are the simple little pleasures that make life even more worth living. If you enjoy fresh, original and delicious vegan food that you can sink your teeth into, stop awhile and browse — these are recipes my family and I love and enjoy, and I’m honored to share them with you.

Read More…

‘Mauritius Week’ launched in Saudi Arabia to promote tourism

Home / World Localities / ‘Mauritius Week’ launched in Saudi Arabia to promote tourism ‘Mauritius Week’ launched in Saudi Arabia to promote tourism World Localities
JEDDAH — The Mauritius Tourism Promotion Authority has recently launched a week of promotions, travel industry workshops and gala events to take place in Jeddah, Dammam and Riyadh to promote the Indian Ocean island’s breadth of attractions, and remind Saudis why it’s a great family -friendly, honeymooner and adventure-seeker destination to be visited throughout the year.
The “ Mauritius Week in Saudi Arabia” is a multi-faceted program of promotional events spearheaded by Anil Kumarsingh Gayan, Mauritius Minister of Tourism , and implemented by the Mauritius Tourism Promotion Authority that included evening events such as travel industry workshops and one-to-one meetings between 25 Mauritius travel industry companies and Saudi leading travel agencies, as well as a photography exhibition highlighting the attractions of Mauritius for tourists, cultural demonstrations, and a gala dinner showcasing the multi-cultural cuisine that Mauritius is famous for. These visits culminated with the mission delegation participating in the just Riyadh Travel Fair.
In a speech delivered on the behalf of the Mauritius Minister of Tourism , Anil Kumarsingh Gayan said: “ Mauritius is a world in miniature where different cultures, religions and ethnic groups thrice in peace and harmony. Mauritius offers not only distinctive luxurious experiences, but also eco- tourism , wellness and spa, adventure sports, conferencing and incentive programs, as well as amazing golf courses, hiking, horse riding, hunting, nature and wildlife, zip line excursions, jeep safari , walking with lions, skydiving and trekking to name just a few of the activities in addition to all the sea-based activities that can be enjoyed.”
He added: “All food served in Mauritius hotel restaurants and retail outlets are Halal certified, and Saudis can taste the local dishes at any restaurant or outlet of their choice without any apprehension.”
Arvind Bundhun, Director of the Mauritius Tourism Promotion Authority , noted: “ Mauritius was discovered by the Arabs and ever since, the cultural and historical ties between our two countries continues to grow stronger yet.” Bundhun added: “Saudia Airlines have been instrumental in their contribution towards the seamless link of passengers between our two countries. They have transported tourists from Saudi Arabia to Mauritius and also pilgrims from Mauritius to Makkah point to point.”
Tourism is the third pillar of the Mauritius economy accounting for 8.6% of the nation’s Gross National Product (GDP), 20% of the labor force and 11% of investment. Tourism earnings amounted to $1.9 billion and tourist arrivals reached 1.4 million in 2018. With the total number of hotels and resorts increased to 114 properties, representing 13,523 rooms.
In 2018 the number of visitors from Saudi Arabia to Mauritius numbered 16,507, a 221% increase compared to the number of visitors from Saudi Arabia in 2017 which numbered 5,142, ranking Saudi Arabia as the 12th most important international market for inbound travelers to Mauritius .
Saudi nationals do not require a visa to visit Mauritius .
The “ Mauritius Week in Saudi Arabia” as well as a whole slew of promotional activities planned to be held throughout the year in Saudi Arabia by the Mauritius Tourism Promotion Authority are expected to increase the number of visitors from the Kingdom even further, raising the profile, ranking and importance of Saudi Arabia as a key strategic market for the Mauritius tourism industry. Based on the latest data available, 2019 has started off well, with the number of visitors from Saudi Arabia to Mauritius in January 2019 increasing by 6.3% compared to January 2018. — SG Google News: Tourism India site-saudigazette.com.sa

Read More…