A to Z Quick 30 Minutes Meals Recap ~ Mega Marathon BM#99

A to Z Quick 30 Minutes Meals Recap ~ Mega Marathon BM#99

I have been doing April and September Mega BM on this space since the 2018 and its been hectic planning 52 dishes. However, as I always enjoy challenge, I have managed to accomplish the last four times, even it meant stretching beyond.
This April we decided to do Biryani / Pulao / Khichadi Festival in either AtoZ order or random, either from India or International.
I decided to do Indian dishes in the A to Z Quick 30 Minutes Meals. While I did AtoZ Biryani / Pulao / Khichadi on SYL
I am never prepared well ahead and I have always managed to cook over the weekend in a marathon style and cover all dishes. Since the theme was with grains, I wasn’t sure if I could manage as I had to do 51 dishes in both the blogs. I had only 1 dish ready ahead.
I realized we can do anything if we plan well and can execute it. So I had about 3 to 4 cooking marathons over the weekend and even over the weekdays, I managed to cook khichdis. We are not used to eating rice for dinner, still, all the elders were happy and gladly had it as the khichdis were really good.
Before I go into the recap of this series, let’s take a look at what we have been doing the past years.
We have been doing the Mega Blogging Marathon since April 2013, with the below themes:
April 2013 was weekly themes.
September 2013 was ABC Cooking
April 2014 was Indian Food Odyssey
September 2014 was Around the world in 30 days
April 2015 was Fire up our Ovens
September 2015 was a Buffet On Table
April 2016 was a Journey through the Cuisines
September 2016 was Cooking Carnival!
April 2017 was AtoZ Baking around the World
September 2017 was Protein Rich Dishes (My choice was AtoZ Bengali Sweets)
April 2018 was Explore the Flavours – A to Z International Streetfood on SYL
April 2018 was Explore the Flavours – A to Z International Flatbreads on C4AS
September 2018 was “A to Z Flatbreads and More” – A to Z Indian Flatbread on SYL
September 2018 was “A to Z Flatbreads and More” – A to Z Dosa Varieties on C4AS
A to Z Quick Under 30 Minutes Meals A for Achari Chana Vegetable Pulao
B for Bhuga Chawara
C for Cholia Chawal
D for Dal Khichdi
E for Ellu Sadam
F for Fodnicha Bhaat
G for Green Garlic Pulao
H for Hare Chane Ka Pulav
I for Ivygourd Masala Rice
J for Jevarisi Chitranna
K for Kadam Bhog
L for Lilva Pulao
M for Methi Matar wara Chawaran
N for Neyichor
O for Oralu Chitranna
P for Pariba Khechudi
Q for Quinoa Biryani
R for Raw Mango Rice
S for Shahzeera Pulav
T for Thinai Sambar Sadam
U for Ulundogorai
V for Vegetable Biryani
W for Watanyachi Khichadi
X for Xacuti Masala Rice
Y for Yellina Chitranna
Z for Zafrani Pulao
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The post A to Z Quick 30 Minutes Meals Recap ~ Mega Marathon BM#99 appeared first on Cooking 4 all Seasons .

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Hilde Lee: Try rosemary-rich potato pie with roasted or grilled meats

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Second of two parts.
Potatoes are very much a part of our cuisine. What would we do without potato chips or French fries? No I certainly don’t want rice or pasta as a substitute.
According to last week’s column, we all know that potatoes originated in the high Andes Mountain of Peru, and some of them eventually got to Europe with the Spanish ships and even some American explorers.
Food historians tell us that either Sir Francis Drake or Sir Walter Raleigh in 1580 or 1586 brought potatoes from the New World back to England and gave them to Queen Elizabeth I. She really was not interested in these brown looking, unappetizing tubers. However, John Gerard — a man of science, a barber, surgeon and botanist — got interested in this new plant. He published a pamphlet with a cover illustration of himself holding a bunch of potato blossoms.
Sadly, potatoes did not catch on and were sparsely cultivated in the British Isles for the next hundred years. Their pulp was used for starch to be used as hair powder instead of wheat flour, which was very scarce due to crop failures in the mid-1800s. Eventually, with potato flour saving the men’s hair fashions, the potato gained royal status, being named “the noble tuber.”
Ireland was not as slow and sophisticated in accepting the potato. After all, Ireland was only 60 miles away. It is not known if potatoes washed up on Irish shores from the wrecks of the Spanish Armada or if they were brought to Ireland by Drake or Raleigh. This new tuber was firmly established in Ireland when most food crops were destroyed in 1649. It saved the people from starving.
A century later, the Irish were consuming 8 pounds of potatoes per capita — not by the week, but by the day. That’s a lot, when you consider that a baking potato weighs about 16 ounces.
In Ireland, the farms were small, and enough potatoes could be grown on a little more than an acre to feed a family of five or six. By 1840, half of the Irish population had little else. Even the Great Potato Famine of 1846 did not discourage the Irish diners’ faith in their beloved potatoes.
Potatoes also became popular in America when they arrived, first via the West Indies in the early 1600s and then with Irish immigrants in 1719. By the mid-19th century, potatoes traveled West with new American settlers. Many took potato cuttings with them to plant on their new farms. It was not long before potatoes were not only for cooking and eating, but became the center of growing and cooking contests at state and country fairs.
Even Russian fur traders from Siberia brought potato cuttings with them from Siberia in 1783. Potatoes were grown within 70 miles of the Arctic Circle.
Ideal potato growing conditions and the building of a railroad to transport lumber in Maine helped establish that state as” potato land.” The average yield per acre planted in potatoes was 108 bushels of the tuber. Today, Maine has less land planted in potatoes than Idaho. However, California is the biggest producer.
Like other fruits and vegetables, there are varieties within each group. Idaho potatoes are drier, mealier and fluffier, which makes them good for baking and French fries. Maine potatoes have a higher water content, which are good for boiling, potato salad and mashing.
About $2 billion a year of Russet Burbanks are grown annually in Idaho. The Russet is a descendant of a potato developed by Luther Burbank in 1873. He had found a seedling of this potato in his mother’s garden in Massachusetts. One of these seedlings was later taken West by the Rev. Henry Spalding.
Today in the United States, we consume more than 5 billion pounds of commercial French fries each year. That’s in addition to freshly made fries at home and in better restaurants.
Potato chips account for another big number — more than $4 billion in annual sales. They were originally known as Saratoga Chips for the New York horse-racing village where they were born. George Crum, the chef at the Moon Lake House, a restaurant in Saratoga, learned that a patron complained that the French fries coming out of the kitchen were too thick for his liking.
Angered by this comment, Crum who was an American Indian, took a batch of fresh potatoes, sliced them very, very thin, and plunged them into a pot of boiling oil. The patron, Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt, shouted his praise of these potato chips. They were an instant success and have been ever since. Today, potato chips are available in a variety of flavors – jalapeno pepper, cheddar, onion, garlic, and barbecue.
Mashed potatoes did not come into fashion in this country until the early 18th century. They were called “Dutch potatoes” until the 1850s, because only the Pennsylvania Dutch prepared them. Other variations of potatoes in the early 1900s included French fried potatoes, whose name was shortened to “fries” around the 1920s. In the Roaring Twenties, a sexually attractive lady was called a “hot patootie.”
In the 1980s, TV watching created the name “couch potato” for an avid TV watcher. The name “Spuds,” the nickname for potatoes, comes from the narrow-bladed spade used to dig up potato roots.
There is quite a selection of potatoes available in out grocery stores. There are reds, Yukon Golds, baking potatoes (also known as Russets), long whites and even purple potatoes.
I like a potato dish with grilled or roasted meat. Try the following Potato Pie with your next grilling.

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7 MOST LUXURY TRAIN TOURS OF INDIA TO GIVE YOU THE BEST TRAVEL EXPERIENCE

7 MOST LUXURY TRAIN TOURS OF INDIA TO GIVE YOU THE BEST TRAVEL EXPERIENCE By Adam Emeka 0 Share
India is the tourist destination with the most variety. Starting from places to flavors, clothing everything is colorful and fun. To enjoy the most of it and have a luxurious and comfortable travel India has many grand luxury train services. Managed by the best Indian railway services of India i.e. Indian railways (IRCTC) there is total number of seven luxury train tours in India . They are as follows –
1) MAHARAJAS EXPRESS:- This is the best luxurious train service in India which was voted ‘world’s leading luxury train’ in the year 2012, 2013 and 2014. It has been the ‘world leading luxury train’ for six consecutive years. It gives you great tours in which you witness the grand forts, palaces, and heritage of India reflected through architectural beauty. It has great hospitality, well-stocked bars, lavish interiors, and everything to fulfill your priorities.
STARTS FROM:-Trivandrum in south and Delhi from the north.
PRICE:- 3.97 Lakhs for Indians
2) ROYAL RAJASTHAN ON WHEELS:- This is another most popular luxury train in India. The facilities offered by it is beyond anyone is capable of imagining. It has royal like décor along with multi-cuisine restaurants, bars, spa and the five class treatment.
STARTS FROM:- Delhi
PRICE:-3.78 Lakhs
3) PALACE ON WHEELS:- This is the luxurious train which was relaunched in 2009 to promote tourism. Palace on Wheels train has exquisite decors, stocked bar, gracious hospitality, and delicious food. The most interesting factor is that this train promotes and enhances the local culture of India in the form of paintings available as lavish wallpapers on the train. It is the best and suitable amalgamation of transport along with luxury.
STARTS FROM:-Jaipur
PRICE:-3.63 lakhs
4) THE DECCAN ODDESSEY:- This luxurious train was inspired from the early era and showcases the traveling style of early Indian kings and rulers. The cabins are like palaces, with multi-cuisine restaurants on board along with spa and other amenities of a 5-star hotel. Managed by the luxurious Taj hotels this train service reflects the life of maharajas in the 16 th century. It is basically a 5-star hotel on wheels which gives you tremendous comfortable feel with vibes of early periods of Indian culture.
STARTS FROM:-Mumbai or Delhi
PRICE:-4.27 LAKHS
5) GOLDEN CHARIOT:- This is the most luxurious train in South India. Most of its routes cover south India. This full AC train has impeccable hospitality along with royal interiors, bars, ayurvedic spa, mini gym, restaurants and the list of services go on. The Golden Chariot train is considered as the best luxurious train in India by tourists and was awarded ‘world’s leading luxury train’ in 2013.
STARTS FROM:-Bangalore
PRICE:-16,000 per night
6) ROYAL ORIENT TRAIN:- This train takes you to most of the popular tourist destinations in India. Starting from large area cabins with good décor, multi-cuisine restaurants, libraries, bars this place has all the amenities which comes to your mind while staying in a 5-star hotel.
STARTS FROM:-Delhi
PRICE:- 7480$
7) FAIRY QUEEN EXPRESS:- Lastly we have fairy queen express which is one of the oldest and most luxurious trains in India. Being the oldest it has a charm and feel of its own, which made it a recipient for Guinness book of world records and national tourism award.
STARTS FROM:-Delhi

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Marico extends its food portfolio with the launch of ‘Coco Soul’ range India’s finest Vegan Gourmet Products made with superfood coconut

May 1, 2019 30 Cold Pressed Virgin Coconut Oil along with three new infused variants- Cinnamon, Chilli Oregano, Curry Coriander, specially curated by Chef Kunal Kapur Coco Soul Foods to include Coconut Sugar, Coconut Spread, Peanut Coconut Butter, Almond Coconut Butter and Coconut Chips
New Delhi, May 02, 2019: Coco Soul Infused Cold Pressed Virgin Coconut Oil is expertly extracted with a ‘No-Heat Process’ or ‘Cold-pressing process’ which helps preserve vital nutrients, rich aroma and flavor of real coconuts. Being a rich source of medium chain triglycerides (MCT’s), the oils are easy to digest, thus providing an instant boost of energy, aiding digestion and helping weight management and supporting cognition.
Chef Kunal Kapur has expertly curated three infused variants that bring natural flavor and aroma to many cuisines. The Coco Soul Infused Cold Pressed Virgin Coconut Oil – Chilli Oregano is naturally infused with the extract of hot chilli and delectable oregano, which acts as a perfect partner to salads and pastas. The Cinnamon variant is similarly infused with the extract of cinnamon and can be used in baking or as a top-up on shakes and smoothies. Infused with the natural extract of curry leaves and coriander, the Curry Coriander variant is best used to cook Indian dishes for an earthy aroma and palatable taste.
Coco Soul Foods offer a range of products made with simple formulation and without any preservatives or artificial flavors. This includes 100% Organic low Glycemic Index (GI) Coconut Sugar, Coconut Spreads made of 100% natural ingredients without added sugar, high-protein Peanut Coconut Butter and Almond Coconut Butter made in an unsweetened form with 100% natural ingredients and high-fibre Coco Soul Coconut Chips made by only roasting without any frying.
The foods offer a range of flavors or variants to choose from. Coconut Spreads offer Original, Sea Salt and Cacao flavours while Peanut Coconut and Almond Coconut Butters offer crunchy and creamy variants. These can be enjoyed with breads, paranthas, crackers or smoothies.
The Coco Soul Coconut chips are made using 100% natural coconuts sourced from Thailand and are offered in four flavours- Thai Chilli Lime, Caramel, Original and Chocolate. These can be consumed directly as a snack as well as sprinkled on meals.
While the Coco Soul Food range will be gradually available in stores over the coming months, the Coco Soul Cold Pressed Virgin Coconut Oil and infused oils are available in modern trade stores such as D-Mart, Big Bazaar, Spencers, Godrej Nature’s Basket, Tesco and Foodhall across Mumbai, Pune, Delhi NCR, Bangalore, Hyderabad and Chennai and on major ecommerce platforms such as Amazon, Flipkart and Big Basket. Consumers can also purchase the product on www.cocosoul.in
Corporate Comm India(CCI Newswire)

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#AskedMen: Zorawar Kalra

We chat to the brains behind Dubai’s latest dining concept Print Nick Rego Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Whatsapp
When we meet Zorawar Kalra, it’s a few days before the opening of his newest Dubai venture – Masala Library by Jiggs Kalra .
Founder and Managing Director at Massive Restaurants Pvt. Ltd, he’s considered to be one of the youngest and most successful restaurateurs of India. His passion for good food and business acumen comes across within the first few minutes of our chat, and it’s clear that he’s out to put Indian cuisine back into the minds of Dubai diners.
We chatted about what Masala Library is set to bring to Dubai’s dining scene, as well as what food trend needs to be done away with.

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This take on Sloppy Joes embodies a new wave of modern Indian cookbooks

New cookbooks explore the modernization of Indian food, which includes the dismantling of tropes and the adaptation of dishes There’s an episode of the TV show Schitt’s Creek that includes a joke about curry and related intestinal distress. The joke stands out, not only because I, along with billions of Indians and others, eat curry without a problem, but also because it’s out of date, by decades at least. “Indian food when I was a kid was ‘diarrhea food,’ and now it’s ‘turmeric will save your life and align your chakra,’” says Priya Krishna, the Dallas-raised author of Indian-ish: Recipes and Antics from a Modern American Family .
The embrace of Ayurvedic dietary principles by the Western mainstream is well-documented, from haldi doodh (turmeric milk) rebranded as turmeric lattes to kitchari (rice and lentils stewed together) as a cure-all. Non-Indians seeking plant-based or gluten-free recipe options are finding inspiration in the centuries-old cuisine. With this resultant awareness of Indian cooking beyond the ubiquitous North Indian naan, chicken tikka and palak (sag) paneer, more and more food writers of Indian descent are focusing on the daily, regional cooking of the subcontinent and its diaspora.
Nik Sharma’s Season: Big Flavors, Beautiful Food landed with fanfare last fall, and is now up for a James Beard Award. In it Sharma, Mumbai-born and living in San Francisco, populates the American kitchen with influence of his homeland, continuing the contemporary momentum of Asha Gomez ( My Two Souths: Blending the Flavors of India into a Southern Kitchen) and Meera Sodha, among others.
London-based Mallika Basu wrote Masala: Indian Cooking for Modern Living as an integral move in the dismantling of tropes. “There is still a giant Western stereotype that hangs over Indian food and cooking, and much of it follows on from the postcolonial views of our culture,” she says via e-mail.
“We must roast and grind all spices, make rotis and papad from scratch, learn how to cook from our mom and grandmom. I wanted to write a cookbook that reflected the practical realities of cooking Indian food today.”
That reality is a creative, resourceful rendering of the cuisine adapted to the availability of ingredients and the limits of time. Krishna makes kheer (rice pudding) with quinoa, for example, while Basu uses a blender to quickly blitz the marinade for murgh hariyali (chicken in a sauce of coriander and mint).
Krishna says Indian-ish came out of a piece she wrote for the defunct Lucky Peach magazine with her mother, Ritu. “Her recipes were so well-received that the editor approached me. It tells a modern American story and normalizes the Indian-American narrative.”
At first her mother, co-author of the book, did not see the draw for readers, as it was simply her everyday cooking, as common as any other home cooking.
“She was like, ‘Why will people care?’ It was unremarkable to her.” Krishna says. “… Mom does very quotidian things like putting chaat masala on her almond toast.”
Krishna also makes her pav bhaji on potato rolls or hamburger buns, calling the potato-cauliflower stew Indian Sloppy Joes.
“The -ish [of the book’s title] speaks to my identity, the fact that we put caramelized onions on dal, listen to the Kabhi Khushi soundtrack with Top 40, wear kurtas with jeans. I see myself as American first and foremost.… I’m tired of people trivializing the experience as less American,” Krishna says. “At first I didn’t want the title Indian-ish . But the more I thought about it, the more I realized it was how my family is defined.”
Basu travelled across India for her book, with the aim of counteracting cliché. “The commodification of Indian identities is nothing new; it is a byproduct of a long love affair of a wide cross-section of people with our nation. With tourism alone, we’ve had the Golden Triangle, the Bombay Goa Irani café set and now Kerala for yoga and dosa,” she says. “In many ways, our cuisine is the biggest antidote to this commodification. I like to say there is no such thing as Indian food, it is the food of India.”
But she is aware of the work to be done: “I think the bigger opportunity is for people of colour to not be afraid to challenge those age-old stereotypes, if they are no longer relevant or accurate. I have a proudly different story to tell and my cooking and recipes reflect my past as much as my present.“
Pav Bhaji on Potato Rolls Open this photo in gallery Tara O’Brady/The Globe and Mail
Ingredients (Serves 4)
For the bhaji (vegetables) 3/4 cup frozen or fresh cauliflower florets 1/2 cup frozen peas 2 medium russet potatoes, boiled and cooled 1 tablespoon olive oil 3/4 teaspoon ground turmeric 1 tablespoon ground coriander (freshly ground is best) 1/4 teaspoon red chili powder 2 large roma tomatoes, diced into 1/2-inch pieces 1 (or 2, if you like it spicy!) small Indian green chili or serrano chili, finely chopped 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more if needed 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro (stems and leaves) For the pav 8 hamburger buns (preferably Martin’s Potato Rolls or other potato rolls) Salted butter, for bun-buttering 1/2 medium red onion, finely diced Lime juice, plus wedges for serving Make the bhaji (vegetables). In a small pot, combine the cauliflower, peas and 3 cups water and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium-high, cover and cook until the cauliflower is soft and fork-tender, 7 to 10 minutes. Thoroughly drain, then return the vegetables to the pot and use a potato masher or fork to lightly mash them (they should still be chunky, just more incorporated). Set aside.
Peel the potatoes, put them in a bowl and use the potato masher or a fork to mash them (don’t worry if there are still a few small lumps). Set aside.
In a medium pan over medium-high heat, warm the oil. Once the oil begins to shimmer, swirl in the turmeric. Add the coriander, red chili powder and tomatoes and cook until the tomatoes have started to soften, 3 to 4 minutes. Reduce the heat to low, add 2 tablespoons water and the green chili, and simmer for about 4 minutes, using a spoon or spatula to mash the tomatoes into a chunky sauce as they cook.
Add the mashed potatoes, the cauliflower-pea mixture, the salt and 1/4 cup water. Increase the heat to medium-low and cook until the mixture starts to resemble a thick stew, 5 to 7 minutes. Add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, if it’s looking too dry. Taste and adjust the salt if needed. Stir in the cilantro, turn off the heat and transfer the bhaji to a bowl. Wipe out the pan.
Make the pav. Split each bun in half and butter each side. Warm the pan you used for the bhaji over high heat and toast the buns in the pan, buttered-side down, until golden brown, about 1 minute.
Assemble the pav bhaji. Evenly portion the bhaji on each bun half (like an open-faced sandwich) and top each with a tablespoon of diced onion plus a generous squeeze of lime juice. Serve with the remaining onion and lime wedges alongside.
Recipe excerpted from Indian-ish © 2019 by Priya Krishna with Ritu Krishna. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.
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MFC Malaysian Food Culture At Berjaya Times Square Kuala Lumpur

MFC Malaysian Food Culture At Berjaya Times Square Kuala Lumpur MFC ~ MALAYSIAN FOOD CULTURE A Restaurant In Berjaya Times Square Offers Hearty, Homemade Meals By Keeping It Wholesome & Simple MFC Malaysian Food Culture At Berjaya Times Square Kuala Lumpur It was love and passion for good wholesome Malaysian cuisine that led to Deng and his wife, Mandy starting MFC – Malaysian Food Culture at Berjaya Times Square Kuala Lumpur recently. This newbie eatery is a Muslim-friendly F&B outlet that opens its doors two months ago in March 2019. Hungry shoppers in Berjaya Times Square looking for a hearty, well-prepared Malaysian meal, should stop by MFC – Malaysian Food Culture, located at level 3 of the shopping mall. This family-oriented restaurant serves up a plethora of popular Malaysian’s favourites under one roof. Read on for more … MFC Monday – Friday (8am to 10pm) Saturday & Sunday (10am to 10pm) FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/malaysianfoodculture A Quick Tour Of MFC – Malaysian Food Culture MFC – Malaysian Food Culture is the brainchild of husband & wife team who are both passionate people aims to serve wholesome and simple food with recipes shared from their families. The restaurant uses fresh ingredients and prepares everything from scratch, where all their sauces and soups are homemade with quality ingredients cooked on-the-spot. MFC – Malaysian Food Culture offers a more relaxed and spacious dining experience and an extensive menu from several varieties of nasi lemak, classic noodles to clay pot dishes, stir fry dishes and many more. Plenty Of Seatings & Spacious Settings The restaurant sports a cheery and bright decor with no-frills settings. You will notice that the owner has put up some delightful pretty and creative touch to the restaurant with colourful Oriental umbrellas for the ceiling and nice little straw hats as shades for the lightings at the bench seatings. Although MFC – Malaysian Food Culture specialises in Chinese food such as noodles and clay pot dishes, they rock in serving one of Malaysian’s most famous dish, the ultimate Nasi Lemak in a variety of menu honouring our national dish. MFC’s Hot Selling Menu MFC’s dishes to look out for is their signatures such as th eir Nasi Lemak dishes , a delightful treat for all Nasi Lemak lovers. Take your pick from the highly recommended not one but four Nasi Lemak’s selection ~ Classic Nasi Lemak, Fried Nasi Lemak, Sizzling Nasi Lemak to their hot-selling Nasi Lemak In A Parcel. NASI LEMAK IN A PARCEL With Sambal Petai & Prawn RM 17.90 You will be intrigued with the signature NASI LEMAK IN A PARCEL in a Telur Bungkus , served with sambal petai prawn and brinjal, total enjoyment for me from the fragrant coconut rice to spicy savoury sambal. Close Shot – Sambal Petai & Prawns With Brinjal Deng particularly recommends the FRIED NASI LEMAK that comes with a few selections of chicken in rendang, curry, Ayam Goreng Berempah or original version because of the chicken is always fresh and bought daily from the market, and that’s why people say it is juicer. FRIED NASI LEMAK RM 15.90 Coming Back For This Yummy Chicken Rendang! All nasi lemak dishes come with a variety of meat choices such as chicken rendang, curry, Ayam Goreng Berempah , original, seafood or sambal petai and prawns. For me, each of these nasi lemak dishes is an interesting combination and complemented the coconut rice . The rice is fragrant with creamy coconut milk and provides a great balance to the chicken and spicy sambal. SIZZLING NASI LEMAK RM 12.90 Tender & Juicy Curry Chicken I loved the fact that they are generous with their flavours and portions. setting the mood for a hearty and satisfying meal, while taking Malaysia’s national dish up a notch with the creative menu. Apart from the nasi lemak, there are more noodles dishes such as Clay Pot Pan Mee, Handmade Ramen, Duck Egg Wantan Noodles and Clay pot Lao Shu Fen to delight your senses. Clay Pot Lao Shu Fen RM 10.90 Clay Pot Pan Mee In Soup RM 10.90 Handmade Noodles 200 grams Per Serving Among these offerings on the menu that have diners coming back for more are the tasty servings of Clay Pot Lao Shu Fen and Clay Pot Pan Mee. This pork-free joint serves both noodles dishes with minced chicken, fuzhok and vegetables. All soup base is made daily fresh, prepared from long hours of boiling the stock with a combination of ikan bilis and chicken stock for a flavourful soup. Not comprising on the quality and quantity of the food served in MFC, each portion of the noodles weights at 200 grams per serving. Dry Duck Egg Noodles (Wan Tan Mee) RM 10.90 Meanwhile, the Duck Egg Noodles (Wan Tan Mee) was definitely a pleasing meal if you are into egg noodles. I was told that Deng went to great length to source a home-based noodles maker to supply MFC with this special handmade noodles just for this dish. Chicken & Prawns Wantan Soup Chicken Char Siew I happily sampled the duck egg noodles and find it pretty good in taste and texture, springy and fine with an al dente bite to it. Each serving comes with chicken Char Siew and Wanton in a soup. Spinach Ramen in Soup RM 14.90 Those who would like to have ramen can try the handmade Spinach Ramen in Soup. It comes looking very appetising with four plump and juicy chicken and prawns dumplings, fuzhok and vegetables in the flavourful soup. Handmade Spinach Ramen Plump-Looking Juicy Dumplings Fuzhok MFC’s housemade condiments of this nice-tasting crunchy and flavourful fuzhok. You’ll notice they practically topped this crispy fuzhok in their noodles dishes for the added flavour. I also found out that this is one of the food items in ‘Yong Tau Foo’ dish – the thin foo chok that was cut into strips and deep-fried to a crispy texture! Clay Pot Seafood Curry RM 16.90 Seafood lovers can opt for the Clay Pot Seafood Curry, another chef’s recommended dish to try in MFC. The curry is made from scratch with fresh herbs and spices served with mixed seafood of prawns, squid, fish, long beans, brinjal, Tau Pok (deep fried beancurd) and cabbage. This is a milder version of seafood curry – moving towards the Chinese version with less intense flavours and less spicy as compared to the Indian curries which are usually thick and very rich in its gravy. Nevertheless, this Clay Pot Seafood Curry earns top marks with its tweaked version and goes well with a warm bowl of white rice. For me, the single portion is generous – good for sharing for two small eaters. So you can order an extra bowl of rice and share it with someone else. MFC Herbal Delight RM 7.90 For desserts, I would recommend the special MFC Herbal Delight . This sweet herbal soup is special and close to Mandy’s heart. It’s her mom’s recipe and she grew up drinking this healthy concoction made by her mom when young! Made from Luo Han Guo or monk fruit, this tea recipe is consumed for its health benefits to relieve heatiness from the body. Naturally sweet, this healthy chilled dessert drink is prepared with a host of tasty ingredients such as Nata De Coco, longan, Lychee fruit, Chin Chau, cendol and even sweet potatoes.

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read online Vegan Richa s Indian Kitchen: Traditional and Creative Recipes for the Home Cook Free acces

Published on May 1, 2019 From delicious dals to rich curries, flat breads, savoury breakfasts, snacks, and much more, this book brings you Richa Hingle s collection of plant-based Indian recipes inspired by regional cuisines, Indian culture, local foods, and proven methods. Whether you want to enjoy Indian cooking, try some new spices, or add more protein to your meals using legumes and lentils, this book has got it covered. You ll explore some well-known and new Indian flavours that are easy to make in your own kitchen., Learn the secrets of eclectic Indian taste and textures, and discover meals in which pulses and vegetables are the stars of the dish. And once you taste Richa s mouth-watering desserts, they will likely become your new favourites. The recipes have been designed to simplify complex procedures, and Richa s workflow tips incorporate modern appliances and techniques from other cuisines to reduce cooking times., Replacement spices are indicated wherever possible, and Richa also provides alternatives and variations that allow people to be playful and creative with the spices called for in the recipes. The restaurant-quality recipes are ideal to make for yourself, for family, and for entertaining guests. …

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Influencer Spotlight: Exclusive Interview With Recipe Master Bee From Rasa Malaysia

Influencer Spotlight: Exclusive Interview With Recipe Master Bee From Rasa Malaysia
Subscribe for the latest news and trends on top Instagrammers, YouTubers, bloggers, & Snapchatters! How Rasa Malaysia Grew From A Modest Recipe Blog To One Of The Top Cooking Resources Online
We’ve all been there—scrolling through an endless Instagram feed of mouthwatering recipe ideas. Whether through colorful images so rich you swear you could taste it or through videos so tempting you can imagine the smell of it being prepared right before you, you’ve likely saved countless recipes to recreate the edible magic that teases us across social media and digital platforms.
The chefs behind these appetizing and flavorful foods know this about us, and A-list food bloggers like Bee Yinn Low from Rasa Malaysia know how to mix those ingredients for our own ease and delicious enjoyment. Just a glance at her Instagram account will leave you salivating like one of Pavlov’s dogs. Bee ‘s Instagram Stories content will grace the homepage of Mediakix’s new website, launching this summer.
Bee Low has been a food blogger since before blogging became a popular hobby. As a best-selling cookbook author, social media influencer, and digital brand ambassador for brands like PF Chang’s and KitchenAid , Bee playfully weaves together her Malaysian heritage with her worldly cuisine interests, producing recipes that are easy enough for beginner level cooks to emulate and tasty enough for the late Anthony Bourdain’s liking.
We caught up with Bee in an exclusive interview to learn more about the journey behind her successful Rasa Malaysia recipe blog and to see what’s in store for 2019.
Can you tell us a bit about yourself/your story, how you developed an interest in cooking, and why you decided to launch a recipe-focused blog?
I am a Malaysian but a permanent resident in the US. I came to the USA for graduate school and have never left.
Growing up in Malaysia, I was exposed to amazing Chinese, Indian, Malay, and Southeast Asian cuisines. I’ve had a very sophisticated palate since I was young, having been exposed by my family to all kinds of spices and varied spectrum of Asian flavors. Also, I grew up in a huge family with amazing home cooks where food was the biggest celebration. Watching my grandmother, mother and aunts cooking in the kitchen helped develop my keen interest in cooking.
I started a personal blog in 2006 to chronicle my business travels and my family’s (Malaysian) recipes. The personal blog eventually evolved into a recipe blog and Rasa Malaysia was born.
When did you start blogging? When did it really take off?
I started blogging when I was working at MySpace as the Director of International Development. Due to the nature of my job, I was traveling extensively in Asia Pacific and Europe.
The blog started as a personal diary of my business travels, with some Malaysian recipes. The recipes were very well received, so much so that The New York Times featured my blog and interviewed me for an article. That was the moment it really took off.
Over time, my content strategy changed—from Malaysian recipes to general Asian recipes, but now I do a little bit of everything, with weeknight dinner being my main focus now.
Your Instagram account @rasamalaysia is followed by over 100K fans, while your Facebook and Pinterest attract more than 800M and 400M respectively. How do your social media strategy and creative approach differ across these channels?
I invested a lot of time on Facebook and Pinterest for a very long time as both platforms drive massive traffic to my site. I gained a lot of followers by being very active on both platforms, sharing my recipes and photos religiously every day.
I am very late to the Instagram game even though I created the account years ago. It didn’t help that my account was hacked a few years ago and the hacker deleted all my old posts.
I had to rebuild my Instagram since then, but in all honesty, I didn’t invest much time on the platform since Instagram doesn’t drive significant traffic to my site. I have only gotten active on Instagram in the past year or so.
It’s never too late; I am embracing the potential of Instagram now.
What central message do you hope your audience will take away through following your recipe ideas and videos?
The central message of my brand is easy and delicious recipes; anyone can make a delicious meal at home by following my simple recipes.
If you look at my recipe cards, they have very few ingredients and easy instructions, while the end results are delightful. I want people to learn cooking, and I make my recipes very accessible, even for beginners.
Your blog and Instagram account occasionally feature snippets of your travel adventures, fashion, and lifestyle tips. How do these elements make you a more versatile creator?
I love traveling and I travel at least 5-6 times a year, all around the world. Food, travel, and culture are intertwined; I love taking my followers vicariously through my travels and sharing my adventures with them.
I love fashion and I have a terminal disease called vanity (lol). I secretly wish that I were a fashion and lifestyle blogger. In reality, I do get bored seeing my Instagram feed with food contents, so occasionally, I share lifestyle, travel and fashion posts to keep my Instagram fresh and interesting.
When and how did you realize you could make a living through blogging?
When the annual revenue from my blog surpassed my annual salary as a Director at MySpace. That was 2009. I left my job and have since worked on my site full time.
Are any tactics particularly effective in helping you grow your audience online?
The blogging business has changed so much since 2006 and my tactics change and evolve over time. For example, what used to work 3 years ago are obsolete now. The key is to keep learning but one thing stays constant, Google is the boss. You really have to be good in SEO and continue to evolve with Google to keep growing the audience, or at the very least, maintaining the audience. It’s very challenging, as things are changing so fast these days.
How has your blog changed since you started? Any specific turning points?
In 2008, I changed from being a Malaysian-recipes-only blog to a general Asian recipes blog. It was the year of the Beijing Olympics and there was an intense interest in Chinese cooking. I started doing a lot of Chinese recipes and from that point onwards, I expanded my content strategy to include all kinds of recipes on my site.
When choosing whether or not to work with a brand, how do you decide? How do you ensure that sponsored content fits in seamlessly with your organic content?
First and foremost, I have to believe in the brand and its product. I can’t write with an authentic voice if I don’t. Secondly, a sponsorship has to be fair: the rates, the brand’s expectations, and my deliverables, etc.
I do a maximum of two sponsored posts in any given month. Anything more than that is overkill.
What advice would you give to brands and marketers looking to work with influencers for sponsorships?
I notice that brands and marketers are drawn to “superficial” things about influencers, for examples: the number of followers, likes, comments, engagement, etc. I think brands and marketers should look beyond the obvious, ROI doesn’t happen overnight and those metrics do not necessarily translate to sales conversion. Marketers should invest in good and high-quality influencers who can grow with the brand.
About 10 years ago, I worked with a big Japanese brand for 4 consecutive years. Every year we focused on a key marketing message, and then the next marketing message the following years, etc. I still get comments about the brand and my followers are still buying their products.
In what single way has social media most changed your life?
I worked at “the” social media (MySpace) before other social media platforms even existed. I started my blog because of my job at MySpace, that was pretty much life-changing.
You had the pleasure of meeting Anthony Bourdain—are there any lessons you learned from him that you apply to your cooking craft?
I am really fortunate to have met him in person. He didn’t influence my cooking craft so much, but he had certainly influenced me on my worldview about traveling, eating, and soaking in culture (other than mine).
What two pieces of advice would you give to someone interested in starting their own cooking/recipe blog?
Content is KING. Create very good content and people will come. There is no shortcut in food blogging. I had taken way too many shortcuts before I learned my lesson. Lightning Round:
Your top two cooking tips of all time?
1) Garlic and butter. You will never go wrong with them. 2) The best recipe lies between your tongue and palate.
Worst food you’ve ever tried?
None, because all foods are edible. It’s either good or not so good.
All-time favorite food?
Seafood, all kinds of seafood, regardless of cuisines and cooking styles.
Recipe you’d most like to perfect?
Right now, it’s probably Japanese cheesecake.
Favorite city you’ve ever visited?
Penang, Malaysia, my hometown.
Place you’d most like to visit?
I want to go back to Italy, again and again, for their amazing food, coffee, desserts and the sweetest tomatoes in the whole world!
Place you’ve visited with the best food?
Malaysia. Nothing tastes like home.
Any exciting projects or plans in store for 2019 that your followers should get excited for?
I just learned from a videographer how to shoot my own cooking videos. I had always outsourced them. I am excited about producing my own cooking videos and sharing with my followers.
Anything else to add?
Remember to check out my new site at Easy Weeknight . Thanks for reading this article! April 30,

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IB Presents A Festival of Culture

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Among the 7 billion people roaming our Earth today, each individual walks with a true appreciation and affinity for his own culture, carrying a particular cuisine, artistry, and fashion alongside that enriches and diversifies the world. On Thursday, April 18, 2019, Midlo’s International Festival presented a multitude of the cultures offered by the world through traditional performances, clothing, and food, granting a cultural awakening for all who attended. Hosted by Midlo’s International Baccalaureate (IB) Program and sponsored by the Mustard Seed Foundation , the annual International Festival celebrated each of the 7 billion people by simply giving a mere taste of their culture and their global influence.
Upon entering the Closed Commons, guests encountered a selection of traditional meals from around the world. From Italian pastas to Middle Eastern baklava, every assortment allowed individuals to circumnavigate the menu of the world, providing a simple taste of each culture and its cuisine. After guests stacked their plates and devoured their mouth-watering meals, the attendees traveled to the Open Commons for a cultural showcase, hosted by Midlo organizations, including Latin Club and Spanish Club. By visiting booths throughout the area, the guests pondered how language and its background play a role in enriching the society. To complement the language galore, the IB Art students showcased their IB Art Exhibitions as an art gallery for the event.
As soon as the guests finished indulging on the offerings of the world, the performance portion of the festival commenced. Delivering the show, seniors David Maddirala and Raven Coe announced introductions for each act through witty banter and humorous puns. Launching the performances, IB coordinator Mr. Mark Spewak surprised the crowd with an impromptu guitar performance. After the strum of his last note, the classic Fashion Show hit the runway. Directed by senior Nabiha Rais , Midlo students and faculty strutted through the auditorium aisles and stage, styled in the traditional fashion trends around the world, such as Vietnam, Finland, France, Lebanon, and Ancient Rome.
Initiating the next set of performances, Midlo’s Jazz Band played a harmonious concert, which included drums and saxophone solos. As a second solo performance, American Idol star Shayy Winn entertained the audience with her smooth vocals. Continuing the acts, Alex Murias and Ashley Murias spun and grooved in a Mexican Jarabe Tapatío dance, swaying their traditional skirts as part of the movement. Kicking off the next production, Dong’s Karate Academy and itsTaekwondo students demonstrated their defense and battle strategies. To accentuate their mastery in board-breaking, the academy asked for faculty volunteers, such as Mr. Spewak , Mr. Nicholas Kirkbride , and Mr. Atticus Finn , to hold and strike boards themselves.
Adding a modern approach to the event, Midlo’s Just For Show serenaded the crown through an a cappella performance, while seniors Da-Lan Pham and Raven Coe moved across the stage to every beat of the music. Each performance was accompanied by music, but Grayden Holiday played his own music, moving his hands swiftly across piano keys and creating a melodious sound. To draw the acts to an end, a traditional Bollywood dance, choreographed by junior Avnee Raje and performed by the IB Class of 2020, graced the stage as recognition for the vibrancy of Indian culture.
The International Festival proved an event that accented appreciation and education, as it acknowledged the abundance of diversity and culture within our world. Leaving the crowd in awe, the event provided not only a cultural awakening, but an unforgettable and enjoyable evening for all who attended.

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