A Pleasurable Stay

A Pleasurable Stay

A group of four of us spent two nights, while touring Mysore, on 14th and 15th December 2018. Prior to that we had breakfast here on the 8th and lunch on the 12th December 2018 on our way to and return from Kabini. When we checked in on the 14th, we handed over the hotel voucher from the tour company to the reception. The check in at the reception was rather slow. While waiting for us to be attended to, I noticed the ‘Trip Advisor’ logo mounted near the reception. Eventually, my wife and I were allocated room 203 and were accompanied by and luggage delivered to our room by a very courteous member of the staff. The air-conditioned room was clean and comfortable and included a fridge, tv, kettle with tea/coffee, safe and a hair drier. There was ample space to keep our luggage and a cupboard for clothes. There was a writing desk, an easy chair and a small stool too within the bedroom. The washrooms too were clean and sparkling white, with freshly pressed clean towels. There was free Wi-Fi in the room. Breakfast buffet included both Indian and western dishes including fruits. Lunch and dinner buffets were mainly Indian cuisine. The food was tasty and wholesome. If you are not happy with the food provided in the buffet you are free to choose from a-la-carte options, that provide a variety of eastern and western options. The desserts were mouth-watering. There is a bar service with drinks on offer. The service was good with helpful courteous and obliging staff. It was a pleasurable stay at the hotel, with wholesome food options enjoying the tranquillity and the care provided by obliging staff.

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Taj Steps Foot In Himachal Pradesh, Opens Taj Theog Resort & Spa, Shimla

Home / Wellness / Taj Steps Foot In Himachal Pradesh, Opens Taj Theog Resort & Spa, Shimla Taj Steps Foot In Himachal Pradesh, Opens Taj Theog Resort & Spa, Shimla 19 mins ago Wellness
Taj Steps Foot In Himachal Pradesh , Opens Taj Theog Resort Spa, Shimla Now open – 99 Rooms
The Indian Hotels Company Limited (IHCL), South Asia’s largest hospitality company is introducing the iconic Taj brand in Himachal Pradesh with the opening of Taj Theog Resort Spa, Shimla. Nestled amidst thick Cedar forests and spread over five acres, every nook and corner of the hotel offers mesmerising views of the mighty Himalayas.
Taj Theog Resort Spa’s design and architecture echoes colonial charm reminiscent of hill station appeal. Surrounded by the Deodar forest, with pathways through apple orchards and terraced gardens, the resort is the quintessential luxurious home in the hills. Each of the 99 rooms, with warm wooden furniture, traditional rugs and tall French windows offer spacious balconies overlooking snow peaks and quaint villages. The hotel is conveniently located a comfortable drive from the two key cities of Shimla and Chandigarh.
Guests have a choice of distinctive culinary options which include an all-day diner – Tragopan that offers the robust Pahari cuisine along with global cuisines and comfort food; Peony, the oriental restaurant offers Sichuan and Cantonese cuisines . Theog Junction, the pub is an imaginative tribute to the classic narrow-gauge toy train that chugs from Kalka to Shimla.
The resort also houses an expansive Jiva Spa, Taj’s award winning spa brand that is deeply rooted in India’s rich heritage of wellness ; a temperature controlled pool with a sun deck and specially curated local experiences to ensure a memorable stay.
TajTheogIndia Google News: Wellness Hotels site-hospitalitynet.org Selected News

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Best Charleston Wine + Food Events For Under $100

Home › Booze › Best Charleston Wine + Food Events For Under $100 Best Charleston Wine + Food Events For Under $100 by Holy City Sinner
With the 2019 Charleston Wine + Food festival (CHSWFF) just days away, Holy City Sinner decided to share a list of the best events under $100 that still have tickets available.
Hey, we can’t all afford the big ticket events, so below are my top picks for those of us on a tight budget. All descriptions are provided by CHSWFF.
Thursday, March 7th 11 am to 12:35 pm at Graft Wine Shop $75 Award-winning sommelier Jeff Kellogg is helming this workshop where you’ll learn the ins-and-outs of the rising star of the wine world – natural wines. With the swanky Graft Wine Shop serving as homebase, guests will hear about all facets of these varietals while sipping their way through a bevy natural wines 7 pm to 10 pm at The Cedar Room $65 A line up of talented storytellers will share unique stories all centered around one word – Burned. From slam poetry to uplifting stories from speakers, including Amy Mills, Fawn Weaver and Anita Singleton-Prather, guests will immerse themselves in the worlds of the speakers for a multi-sensory experience. Bites + sips inspired by the night’s theme will be served as guests experience a truly inspiring night 8:30 pm to 11 pm at Lo-Fi Brewing $85 Inspired by new + unconventional styles, this late night party is certainly the most ironically themed of this year’s festival. Featuring artisanal cocktails, craft brews, and Instagram-worthy dishes, guests will bring out their inner hipster as the dance the night away to a DJ spinning old-school vinyl.
Friday, March 8th 10 am to 11:30 am $95 To celebrate International Women’s Day, we’re creating a tea room experience of our own and diving head first into the history of suffragists. A panel of female culinary leaders, helmed by James Beard award-winning food editor Hanna Raskin, will explore the stories of Karalee Fallert, Tina Singleton, Germaine Jenkins and Jenny Dorsey + share how they are continuing the legacy of the women who came before them. With a historic tea room serving as the backdrop, guests will enjoy a light lunch + inspired sips as we serve up a little social change with a cup of tea.
Saturday, March 9th 10 am to 1 pm at The Schoohouse $95 In this brand-new wellness experience, a talented team of wellness experts, including Kathryn Budig, Seamus Mullen, Ellie Richter, Caryn O’Hara, and Liz Moody, are tackling all facets of living a healthy + balanced life. In between each experience, guests will enjoy healthy bites + sips while strolling through a market featuring specially-curated vendors. 8 pm to 10:30 pm at the Navy Yard Power House $85 Charleston Wine + Food is paying homage to the colors + flavors of India and the Holi Festival at this late night bash. Guests will enjoy Indian-inspired cuisine, carefully crafted cocktails, and other beverage offerings as they enjoy our take on the traditional festival that brings people together. To top off the night, we’ll be hosting a color bombing experience of our own as we cap off this celebration.
Sunday, March 10th 8 am to 10 am at the Gibbes Museum of Art $65 Jennie Broe of Dance Lab is leading a hip hop workout set in one of Charleston’s most visually stunning locations – The Gibbes Museum of Art. This class is equipped with good vibes + awesome music for a heart pumping, soul satisfying great time. Following their dance session, guests will enjoy healthy bites + sips to wrap up an upbeat + energizing morning. 6 pm to 8:30 pm at The Cigar Factory $95 The South’s culinary community has seen a resurgence in recent years as a new wave of chefs introduce their takes on traditional southern cuisine. We are welcoming an all-star line up of these talented chefs, including Scott Crawford, Maneet Chauhan, Vivian Howard, Rodney Scott and more, to celebrate the finale of the 14th year of Charleston Wine + Food. Guests will also enjoy the sounds of the South from the award-winning Marshgrass Mamas and artisans + makers who are crafting bespoke items inspired by our beautiful landscape. Share this:

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Indian restaurant in downtown Stamford goes beyond the Naan

Gobi Manchurian Dry at Navaratna in Stamford.
Gobi Manchurian Dry at Navaratna in Stamford.
Photo: Ken Honore / For Hearst Connecticut Media Group Buy photo Photo: Ken Honore / For Hearst Connecticut Media Group Image 1 of / 14 14 Gobi Manchurian Dry at Navaratna in Stamford.
Gobi Manchurian Dry at Navaratna in Stamford.
Photo: Ken Honore / For Hearst Connecticut Media Group Buy photo Indian restaurant in downtown Stamford goes beyond the Naan 1 / 14 Back to Gallery When I first heard about this restaurant, I could not picture what it would be like. There are many Indian restaurants in our part of the state, but I had yet to hear of an authentic Indian restaurant that was both completely vegetarian and was certified kosher.
It wasn’t until I had lunch there a few days ago did I realize this claim was true and the key to myriad dishes I had never sampled. As far as the kosher claim, I was the only patron not wearing a yarmulke. This was the real deal.
At Navaratna, you will not find the same tired old Vindaloos and Tikki Marsalas. Instead, you can try the fabled street foods of Bombay (Mumbai) or challenge yourself with a Dosa (a yard-long paper-thin crepe filled with chick peas, potatoes and garlic). This was the first time I have seen Uttapaam listed on the menu. I had no idea what it was and could not figure out how to pronounce it. Uttapaam is a thick rice pancake with sambar and chutney, topped with chilis, onions and cheese or any other toppings you request.
This far-reaching menu is served in a small clean space in downtown Stamford. It is a modern-looking eatery with a distinct downtown feel (i.e., it is hard to park). The service is a bit cool in terms of a big gushy welcome, but otherwise very fast and very professional. When a customer orders many dishes, often the waitstaff is flummoxed and as they bring out the new foods, they leave the old dirty dishes on the table. I have a personal dislike for this shortcoming because I always feel I am sitting among the debris from previous customers.
The waiters here have figured out a way to bring us a large selection of what we ordered in stages so the new foods were hot and crisp and the old dishes were whisked away. Aesthetically, Navaratna has their act together.
I started my feast with a sweet Mango Lassi. If you never tried one, just imagine a thick fruity apricot colored milkshake with yogurt as the binder. Indian food can be very hot and something magical happens when I start a meal with a Lassi. It acts like plush stomach carpeting, so no scalding hot peppers faze me.
More from Jane Stern Enchanted Szechuan lives up to its name on Norwalk’s restaurant row Jane Stern: After Gordon Ramsay, bullied owners do their best Jane Stern: Ikea Restaurant is worth the trip Jim Barbarie’s original restaurant is nice and normal ‘Sunday Supper’ thrives at Roseland Apizza in Derby It’s OK to fill up on the bread after a trip to Wave Hill I am not a vegetarian, but the lack of meat dishes here was not in the slightest a drawback. In fact, it made me respect Indian cuisine even more. How can there be so many luscious dishes to choose from that depend solely on the chef’s imagination and his skill with stuffed breads, exotic salads, samosas and regional curries from both northern and southern India.
In addition to these showstoppers, there are eight unique dishes featuring rice. I have eaten biryanis at Indian restaurants and often thought that this yummy rice-and-vegetable hodgepodge was the scope of rice adventuring. Here I went crazy over a whole array of a platters of rice prepared as I had never seen before. I swooned at coconut-flavored rice dotted with tiny astringent mustard seeds, curry leaves, peanuts and cashews. From there I segued to tamarind rice and lemon rice, both as bright and sharp as the fruits they honored and laced with savory nuts. The lemon rice was one of the best dishes I ordered and the bright citrus tang brought back my appetite, rather than erased it.
With some difficulty, I forced myself to stop ordering side dishes and moved on to try a Mumbai street food called Baingan Chaat. This is a batter-fried tiny eggplant with a sauce of tamarind chutney. Absolutely terrific as is the South Indian curry called Enni Kathrikini a more sophisticated pairing of eggplant, tamarind, peanuts in a sesame seed gravy. I am embarrassed to say I kept eating. I felt I had already consumed enough to feed a small village in Indian, but there were now eight breads that caught my eye.
Years back when I first fell in love with Indian food I always ordered Poori bread (deep-fried whole wheat bread that looks like a balloon when it hits the table and then slowly deflates like a sigh.) Along with the Poori, one should order the yogurt-based cucumber and mint raita used to dip the warm bread into.
I have made whole meals of a Mango Lassi with Poori and Raita. There are few things I find more satisfying than this simple combination.
Photo: Connecticut Post Photo: Connecticut Post Image 1 of / 10 10 Photo: Connecticut Post Top Yelp-reviewed Indian food in southwestern Connecticut 1 / 10 Back to Gallery But let me lodge a small complaint against almost all the Indian restaurants in Connecticut that have become so lazy they only serve Naan and maybe a Paratha bread if you are lucky. In the “Bread Corner” of Navaratna’s menu there are two kinds of Poori, plain and stuffed with potato marsala, a gentle Bhatura which is a deep-fried soft bread, Chapathi (a whole wheat soft bread) and Parathas stuffed with cashews, raisins and coconut or chickpea curry.
Navaratna 133 Atlantic St., Stamford
navaratnact.com
Rice and Breads are the cornerstone of the Indian meal for good reason. I knew I had to sample the Aarambams (appetizers), again a rarely seen selection. I adored the Lentil Doughnuts with onion ginger and green chili, and the Gobi Malligai, deep fried cauliflower with mint and cilantro. Brilliant!
I lost track of my orders after a while. Stuffed as tight as a paratha bread my mind wandered to the miracle that in Fairfield County I would be sitting in a kosher vegetarian Indian restaurant. I marveled at the team of waiters who managed to understand my slaughtering of the Indian language. Somehow, they figured out my pathetic pronunciation of Vaarual, Bahara, Thayir, Aloo, Huliyana and Chettinad. I did my best trying to form the words I saw on the menu. If they had a good laugh in the kitchen at my expense they deserved it, and four stars to them for never bringing a dish I did not ask for even in my mangled version of their beautiful language.
At my first dining experience at Navaratna, I might have seemed a happy idiot, but I was the best fed happy idiot around. I am fine with that.
Jane Stern, a Ridgefield resident, co-authored the popular “Roadfood” guidebook series.

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Spicy Sichuan French Fries in Greenwich Village — and Other Cheap Eats

, with maps, walking tours, and other resources. USHA Foods Alu tikka burger, with potato chips Sweets from OSHA Foods You think Superiority Burger makes a great vegetarian burger? Well you probably haven’t tried the alu tikki burger at the strictly vegetarian USHA Foods , from Anil and Indira Mathur . A grilled potato patty stuffed with peas and other vegetables and brushed with a sweet tamarind sauce is pressed with lettuce and tomato inside a sleek wraparound bun which has a bit of a crunch. The whole thing leaves a mild chile burn, but it slides down easy, especially when dipped in the mint condiment on the side. Including potato chips, $7 is a great deal for this filling meal, and it is certainly one of the city’s greatest veggie burgers. Other savory bites at this supremely wonderful northern Indian snack shop just inside the Queens border in Floral Park run to chaats, paratha rolls, and dosas. The most remarkable dosa, and the one that caused a friend and I to stop here, is cryptically dubbed the Chinese dosa. It turns out to be stuffed with the Chinese Indian dish known as Hakka noodles. It’s damn tasty, sided with a cup of thicker than usual sambar and a fine grained coconut chutney. This is a great example of the culinary whole being much greater than the sum of its parts. There’s also a sweets counter featuring various forms of the fudge called barfi , along with all sorts of other milk-based sweets. 255-03 Hillside Ave., between 255th and 256th streets, Floral Park Peppercorn Kitchen Spam is one of you four meat choices (the others: beef, lamb, and fish) to top the mini mala hot pots that are the stock in trade of relative newcomer Peppercorn Kitchen . Opened by Kurt Liu last September, the wide and shallow space is in the midst of the New York University campus and presumably aimed at budget conscious students. It mounts a limited menu and provides mainly window counter seating — though the place is dolled up with stylish neon. The hot pots contain numerous vegetables, as well as a nest of mung bean thread, with a starting price of $9.99. A chicken broth is used, but a vegetarian option is available, making for a perfectly satisfying vegetarian dish. The slender menu also has a few other crowd pleasers, priced substantially below the bowls, the foremost of which is a carton of chile-dusted french fries. The dumplings in chile oil are similarly solid, but the actual amount of Sichuan peppercorns is on the low side, even if you order the soup extra spicy. Deploy the bottle of Sichuan peppercorn oil on the table to remedy that, if you dare. 289 Mercer St., between East 8th Street and Waverly Place, Greenwich Village Mala hot pot heavy on the spam Inside Peppercorn Kitchen The Gochujang The name of this counter in Koreatown’s wonderful Food Gallery 32 food court refers to the spicy red sauce that’s a centerpiece of the national cuisine. The counter goes on to describe itself as “Korean School Food,” a label irresistible to those who never went to school there, and also for those who did. Leading off the menu is a dish called Korean-style soft rice cake ($7.99), which consists of bouncy tubular rice cakes in a red tide of gochujang with thin floppy fish cakes that might be mistaken for spam and a boiled egg. Dig in! The menu features several other things that may or may not be school lunch standards but are certainly comfort food: a plate of steamed and sliced blood sausage, and an assortment of fried goodies that includes porky wontons, squid tentacles, battered nori rolls filled with mung bean thread, and white and orange sweet potato slices. They’re greasy and delicious. Carry your food upstairs and eat on the spacious 3rd floor. 11 West 32nd St., between Fifth Avenue and Broadway, Koreatown Order here, eat on the 3rd floor Deep fried everything at Gochujang Eater NY Sign up for our newsletter. Enter your email address Subscribe By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy and European users agree to the data transfer policy.

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Raffles Singapore Unveils New Culinary Concepts with Celebrity Chefs

February 7, 2019
Singapore (Singapore) – February 6, 2019 ( travelindex.com ) – Raffles Singapore unveiled today its new line-up of dining experiences, which combine the hotel’s much-loved culinary traditions with contemporary dining concepts by renowned celebrity chefs. Each dining concept promises to tantalise the senses and has been carefully selected to enhance the famed ‘Raffles Experience’ for the local community and the discerning travellers.
Gourmets and gourmands, discover the Best Restaurants for Fine Dining in Singapore only at Top25Restaurants.com/singapore
“For more than 100 years the dining venues at Raffles Singapore have been recognised as an integral part of the vibrant and ever changing local bar and dining scene, exciting the local community as well as city guests alike. Continuing with our tradition and commitment of the highest level of friendly, engaging and anticipatory service, we are more than excited to introduce concepts with partner chefs, who have a reputation of operating successful venues around the world, while at the same time, creating culinary experiences that are new and distinct to Singapore,” said Christian Westbeld, General Manager, Raffles Singapore.
New Celebrity Chefs Dining Concepts In 1899, Raffles Singapore was the first hotel in the city to hire a French chef, introducing travellers and Singapore to authentic French flavours. Fast-forward almost 120 years, and the Grand Dame is once again at the forefront of a culinary renaissance. The following are a series of culinary ‘firsts’ that Raffles Singapore will be introducing when the iconic hotel reopens.
BBR by Alain Ducasse Bar & Billiard Room (BBR) continues to evolve with a new chapter by acclaimed Chef Alain Ducasse, who will be presenting his first Mediterranean sharing and grill concept in the world, titled BBR by Alain Ducasse. The unique concept takes customers on a culinary journey along the Mediterranean coast, complemented by a modern and vibrant ambience. In true Bar & Billiard Room fashion, dining at the restaurant will also be accompanied by a lively bar scene that is fun, relaxed and perfect for social gatherings.
Alain Ducasse said, “I could not dream of a better location than the landmark Raffles Singapore to bring the Ducasse restaurant experience for the first time to Singapore. My team and I look forward to adding another culinary destination for Singapore’s varied international clientele.”
Seduced by the flavours of the Mediterranean at a young age, Monsieur Ducasse reveals the essence of Portugal, Spain, Italy and France in BBR by Alain Ducasse. It is a modern, energetic, vibrant and accessible gathering place to meet, exchange and discover the culinary traditions of this region.
With the new concept, the 122-year-old restaurant, which started as a club during British colonial rule, will continue to be the social gathering space of choice for travellers and the local community alike. Serving sharing plates and regular-sized dishes, this bar and restaurant is convivial and cosy – the perfect place to meet with friends. It features a high energy open kitchen with charcoal grills and wood-fired pizza ovens as well as a lively bar and lounge that will serve a selection of spirits, cocktails, beers, wines and wine cocktails. Additionally, the highly anticipated Raffles Sunday Brunch with a reputation of being one of the city’s most indulgent Sunday experiences will be returning when BBR by Alain Ducasse opens.
Gourmets and gourmands, discover the Best Restaurants for Fine Dining in Singapore only at Top25Restaurants.com/singapore
La Dame de Pic One of the world’s top female chefs with three Michelin stars, Anne-Sophie Pic, will debut her entry into Asia with a remarkable restaurant in Raffles Singapore. The restaurant, La Dame de Pic, Raffles Singapore invites guests to discover the world of Anne-Sophie’s culinary identity, which reflects her search for aromatic complexity, combinations of flavours and powerful tastes that evoke emotions. The restaurant’s drinks menu presents an elaborate and diverse collection of pairings to add both intensity and harmony in the delicate art of tasting; consisting of wines, cocktails, whisky, sake, tea, coffee, dashi, broth and consommés. The wine list in particular offers a wide international base that leans towards the French regions, with a particular focus on Anne-Sophie’s birthplace, the Rhône Valley.
Located in the hotel’s dining room at the Main Building, the contemporary chic restaurant is beautifully designed with a graceful and soft palette that is reminiscent of Anne-Sophie’s favourite colours and materials: pastel shades and natural decorative elements such as leather or wood. The renowned chef is also a third-generation Michelin starred chef, following the footsteps of her grandfather and father, perfectly reflecting Raffles Singapore’s rich heritage.
“Making our debut in Asia at Raffles Singapore is a very natural choice for me. Like Raffles, the Pic family’s culinary heritage spans more than a century. Just like this beautiful hotel that will become one of our overseas residences, we are storytellers and constant seekers of excellence. Together, we share the vision to provide distinctive experiences to our guests, delivered with innovation that combines both tradition and change,” said Anne-Sophie. “It is my personal belief that to ensure our guests are happy, it is essential to be anchored in the present while not forgetting our roots and to be creative in order to imagine.”
yì by Jereme Leung Helmed by one of the most influential chefs in the modern Chinese culinary movement, celebrity MasterChef Jereme Leung returns home to Singapore with yì by Jereme Leung. The contemporary Chinese restaurant will be located on Level 3 at the newly restored Raffles Arcade. yì, which stands for art in the Chinese language, awakens your appetite and senses. Alluding to the fine art of Chinese dining, it references centuries of culinary mastery woven into the intricacies of Chinese cuisine presented in the restaurant.Fr om Cantonese classics to adaptations of China’s ancient delicacies, Jereme will be using single sourced and seasonal ingredients with a contemporary approach to deliver refinement and sincerity.
The restaurant is designed with modern sophisticated detailing and a soft white palette amidst the colonial architecture. Guests can also explore an immersive multi-sensory dining experience in the Experience Room with poetic dishes curated to evoke all five senses. For the hosting of private affairs, intimate private dining rooms are also available.
Jereme said, “While I have lived abroad for most of my career, the formative years which I spent working in Singapore and Hong Kong were so important to defining my approach and style of cooking. Opening yì by Jereme Leung at Raffles Singapore is an honour and I am excited to be able to work with some of the best minds in the Singapore industry and present my personal take on Chinese cuisine. These dishes reflect what I believe the future of Chinese cuisine should be 20 years from today. It is not fusion, not ‘east-meets-west’; rather, it is about capturing the essence of provincial ethnic Chinese cuisines. With careful focus being placed on healthy and seasonal food produce, it will create authentic taste profiles that are enhanced by modern culinary techniques.”
Butcher’s Block The refreshed Raffles Arcade will also see an introduction of a vibrant steakhouse, Butcher’s Block. Here, the focus is on the world’s finest cuts of single sourced meats, showcased in The Vault, a glass meat cooler situated next to the Open Kitchen where the chef’s butcher block is and where meats are prepared and cooked to perfection. Guests are given personal recommendations by our resident meat specialists, based on their individual tastes. Seated amidst a lively ambience set with cobalt blue hues complemented with dark wood panelling, the restaurant features communal tables for exceptional gatherings, complete with a wine library that houses more than 100 different wine labels.
Refreshed Signature Dining Experiences Return to Delight
Signature dining experiences that over the years have come to be synonymous with the hotel make their return to delight, with many of these returning favourites incorporating subtle tributes to the hotel’s 130-year history and heritage.
Tiffin Room A part of Raffles Singapore’s history since 1892, Tiffin Room continues to celebrate the heritage and flavours of North India with our resident Indian Chef. The restaurant offers an evocative dining journey across the North Indian palate, from Rajasthan to Punjab to Lucknow through a refreshed semi-buffet lunch and ala carte dinner. Authentic specialties served in the eponymous tiffin boxes are prepared with perfectly balanced spices, paired with classic Indian brews and beverages. The restaurant will also present an interactive dining experience with tableside service by chefs, complete with freshly ground spices to elevate the experience.
The restored interior décor of the restaurant includes reinstating the wooden floorboards in Tiffin Room to bring back features from the early 1900s based on research by our heritage consultants. Intricately patterned wood and mirror wall panelling add richness and create a signature visual language while colourful displays of Tiffin boxes are imbued with historical notes but modern in feel.
Long Bar Home of the Singapore Sling for over a hundred years, the Long Bar’s plantation-inspired décor will be refreshed, and the famous Long Bar counter restored. Long Bar continues to be the heritage bar for visitors to Singapore to enjoy the most iconic cocktail of the city.
The Lobby The classic Raffles Afternoon Tea experience will be served at a new location – the iconic Grand Lobby of the Raffles Singapore. Guests can indulge in one of the hotel’s great traditions – a truly unique and refined Afternoon Tea with a distinct sense of heritage – in the newly restored lobby. The Raffles Afternoon Tea is perfect for sophisticated and elegant celebrations, serving classic sandwiches, home-baked scones and cakes as well as seasonal indulgences, complemented by a curated collection of exquisite teas and Champagnes.
Writers Bar Established as a tribute to famous writers that have come through the doors of Raffles Singapore over the years, Writers Bar will be expanded to a full bar with bespoke craft cocktails, wines and spirits. Decked in luxuriously appointed furnishings, lovingly curated mementos and books, referencing the literary legacy of Raffles, the bar will be a sophisticated and serene refuge kept exclusive to residents and restaurant patrons; keeping this a place for discreet elegance and intimate conversations.
Raffles Courtyard Exuding a garden style and welcoming vibe, Raffles Courtyard is the city’s social space in a lushly landscaped alfresco venue at the Raffles Arcade. This friendly bar and lounge is open all day, offering guests a garden respite against a colonial architectural backdrop, complete with refreshing shared summer drinks and a selection of Southeast Asian small plates, including authentic Singaporean delights.
Ah Teng’s Café Raffles’ new takeaway café is named after a famous local baker of the same name, who used to own a shop in the neighbourhood back in the 1900s. Ah Teng’s Café serves visitors, the surrounding community and travellers alike with freshly made cold beverages, a selection of premium coffee, tea and homemade bakery, pastries and artisanal ice-creams for takeaway.
Pierre Burgade, Executive Chef, Raffles Singapore, who oversees the Hotel’s culinary landscape portfolio, said, “It is an incredible privilege to be given the opportunity to update these time-honoured Raffles signatures while also curating the stellar line-up of celebrity chefs for this iconic hotel. The deliberate and careful curation of the new dining concepts aims to elevate Singapore’s culinary landscape and makes our hotel an all-in-one gastronomic journey for guests and visitors alike.”
“We are pleased to embark on the meticulous restoration of Raffles Singapore, a distinctive hotel that is emblematic of Katara Hospitality’s commitment to create extraordinary experiences on the backdrop of iconic heritage hotels and provide unsurpassed service to our esteemed guests,” said Mr. Hamad Abdulla Al-Mulla, Chief Executive Officer of Katara Hospitality, a globally recognised hospitality owner, developer and operator who is also the owner of Raffles Singapore.
“Since opening its doors in 1887, Raffles Singapore has maintained a lasting legacy as a landmark hotel, hosting some of the world’s most famous and elite personalities. As a National Monument of Singapore and one of the few remaining 19th century hotels in the world, the hotel’s restoration is a testament to our continued pursuit in preserving portraits of historic charm, while growing Katara Hospitality’s portfolio of iconic properties in key travel destinations. Raffles Singapore is no exception, with its carefully implemented restoration programme that is poised to unveil contemporary charm and elegance; reminiscent of the luxurious splendour of Katara Hospitality hotels,” added Mr. Al-Mulla.
About Raffles Singapore Opened in 1887, Raffles Singapore is one of the few remaining great 19th century hotels in the world. Till today, its architecture is perfectly preserved both inside and out, giving it an intoxicating blend of luxury, history and classic colonial design. Within its walls are more than a hundred expansive suites, framed by polished teak verandas and white marble colonnades, clustered around lush tropical gardens. Each is serviced by the legendary Raffles butlers and offers every modern convenience necessary.
Raffles Singapore is currently undergoing a careful and sensitive restoration that is being carried out in three phases. The hotel is now fully closed with a grand reopening planned in the first quarter of 2019. The Raffles Gift Shop continues to be in operation at its temporary location on 3 Seah Street, around the corner from the hotel.
The restoration of Raffles Singapore is designed to ensure that we retain what is so special about Raffles – the ambience, the service, the charm and the heritage of the hotel. It is also designed for Raffles Singapore to stay relevant and distinctive by moving with the times and with its guests and adapting to the changing needs of the well-travelled and Singapore’s community

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Raffles Singapore Unveils New Culinary Concepts with Celebrity Chefs

Raffles Singapore Unveils New Culinary Concepts with Celebrity Chefs Raffles Singapore Unveils New Culinary Concepts with Celebrity Chefs
Singapore (Singapore) – February 6, 2019 ( travelindex.com ) – Raffles Singapore unveiled today its new line-up of dining experiences, which combine the hotel’s much-loved culinary traditions with contemporary dining concepts by renowned celebrity chefs. Each dining concept promises to tantalise the senses and has been carefully selected to enhance the famed ‘Raffles Experience’ for the local community and the discerning travellers.
Gourmets and gourmands, discover the Best Restaurants for Fine Dining in Singapore only at Top25Restaurants.com/singapore
“For more than 100 years the dining venues at Raffles Singapore have been recognised as an integral part of the vibrant and ever changing local bar and dining scene, exciting the local community as well as city guests alike. Continuing with our tradition and commitment of the highest level of friendly, engaging and anticipatory service, we are more than excited to introduce concepts with partner chefs, who have a reputation of operating successful venues around the world, while at the same time, creating culinary experiences that are new and distinct to Singapore,” said Christian Westbeld, General Manager, Raffles Singapore.
New Celebrity Chefs Dining Concepts In 1899, Raffles Singapore was the first hotel in the city to hire a French chef, introducing travellers and Singapore to authentic French flavours. Fast-forward almost 120 years, and the Grand Dame is once again at the forefront of a culinary renaissance. The following are a series of culinary ‘firsts’ that Raffles Singapore will be introducing when the iconic hotel reopens.
BBR by Alain Ducasse Bar & Billiard Room (BBR) continues to evolve with a new chapter by acclaimed Chef Alain Ducasse, who will be presenting his first Mediterranean sharing and grill concept in the world, titled BBR by Alain Ducasse. The unique concept takes customers on a culinary journey along the Mediterranean coast, complemented by a modern and vibrant ambience. In true Bar & Billiard Room fashion, dining at the restaurant will also be accompanied by a lively bar scene that is fun, relaxed and perfect for social gatherings.
Alain Ducasse said, “I could not dream of a better location than the landmark Raffles Singapore to bring the Ducasse restaurant experience for the first time to Singapore. My team and I look forward to adding another culinary destination for Singapore’s varied international clientele.”
Seduced by the flavours of the Mediterranean at a young age, Monsieur Ducasse reveals the essence of Portugal, Spain, Italy and France in BBR by Alain Ducasse. It is a modern, energetic, vibrant and accessible gathering place to meet, exchange and discover the culinary traditions of this region.
With the new concept, the 122-year-old restaurant, which started as a club during British colonial rule, will continue to be the social gathering space of choice for travellers and the local community alike. Serving sharing plates and regular-sized dishes, this bar and restaurant is convivial and cosy – the perfect place to meet with friends. It features a high energy open kitchen with charcoal grills and wood-fired pizza ovens as well as a lively bar and lounge that will serve a selection of spirits, cocktails, beers, wines and wine cocktails. Additionally, the highly anticipated Raffles Sunday Brunch with a reputation of being one of the city’s most indulgent Sunday experiences will be returning when BBR by Alain Ducasse opens.
Gourmets and gourmands, discover the Best Restaurants for Fine Dining in Singapore only at Top25Restaurants.com/singapore
La Dame de Pic One of the world’s top female chefs with three Michelin stars, Anne-Sophie Pic, will debut her entry into Asia with a remarkable restaurant in Raffles Singapore. The restaurant, La Dame de Pic, Raffles Singapore invites guests to discover the world of Anne-Sophie’s culinary identity, which reflects her search for aromatic complexity, combinations of flavours and powerful tastes that evoke emotions. The restaurant’s drinks menu presents an elaborate and diverse collection of pairings to add both intensity and harmony in the delicate art of tasting; consisting of wines, cocktails, whisky, sake, tea, coffee, dashi, broth and consommés. The wine list in particular offers a wide international base that leans towards the French regions, with a particular focus on Anne-Sophie’s birthplace, the Rhône Valley.
Located in the hotel’s dining room at the Main Building, the contemporary chic restaurant is beautifully designed with a graceful and soft palette that is reminiscent of Anne-Sophie’s favourite colours and materials: pastel shades and natural decorative elements such as leather or wood. The renowned chef is also a third-generation Michelin starred chef, following the footsteps of her grandfather and father, perfectly reflecting Raffles Singapore’s rich heritage.
“Making our debut in Asia at Raffles Singapore is a very natural choice for me. Like Raffles, the Pic family’s culinary heritage spans more than a century. Just like this beautiful hotel that will become one of our overseas residences, we are storytellers and constant seekers of excellence. Together, we share the vision to provide distinctive experiences to our guests, delivered with innovation that combines both tradition and change,” said Anne-Sophie. “It is my personal belief that to ensure our guests are happy, it is essential to be anchored in the present while not forgetting our roots and to be creative in order to imagine.”
yì by Jereme Leung Helmed by one of the most influential chefs in the modern Chinese culinary movement, celebrity MasterChef Jereme Leung returns home to Singapore with yì by Jereme Leung. The contemporary Chinese restaurant will be located on Level 3 at the newly restored Raffles Arcade. yì, which stands for art in the Chinese language, awakens your appetite and senses. Alluding to the fine art of Chinese dining, it references centuries of culinary mastery woven into the intricacies of Chinese cuisine presented in the restaurant.Fr om Cantonese classics to adaptations of China’s ancient delicacies, Jereme will be using single sourced and seasonal ingredients with a contemporary approach to deliver refinement and sincerity.
The restaurant is designed with modern sophisticated detailing and a soft white palette amidst the colonial architecture. Guests can also explore an immersive multi-sensory dining experience in the Experience Room with poetic dishes curated to evoke all five senses. For the hosting of private affairs, intimate private dining rooms are also available.
Jereme said, “While I have lived abroad for most of my career, the formative years which I spent working in Singapore and Hong Kong were so important to defining my approach and style of cooking. Opening yì by Jereme Leung at Raffles Singapore is an honour and I am excited to be able to work with some of the best minds in the Singapore industry and present my personal take on Chinese cuisine. These dishes reflect what I believe the future of Chinese cuisine should be 20 years from today. It is not fusion, not ‘east-meets-west’; rather, it is about capturing the essence of provincial ethnic Chinese cuisines. With careful focus being placed on healthy and seasonal food produce, it will create authentic taste profiles that are enhanced by modern culinary techniques.”
Butcher’s Block The refreshed Raffles Arcade will also see an introduction of a vibrant steakhouse, Butcher’s Block. Here, the focus is on the world’s finest cuts of single sourced meats, showcased in The Vault, a glass meat cooler situated next to the Open Kitchen where the chef’s butcher block is and where meats are prepared and cooked to perfection. Guests are given personal recommendations by our resident meat specialists, based on their individual tastes. Seated amidst a lively ambience set with cobalt blue hues complemented with dark wood panelling, the restaurant features communal tables for exceptional gatherings, complete with a wine library that houses more than 100 different wine labels.
Refreshed Signature Dining Experiences Return to Delight
Signature dining experiences that over the years have come to be synonymous with the hotel make their return to delight, with many of these returning favourites incorporating subtle tributes to the hotel’s 130-year history and heritage.
Tiffin Room A part of Raffles Singapore’s history since 1892, Tiffin Room continues to celebrate the heritage and flavours of North India with our resident Indian Chef. The restaurant offers an evocative dining journey across the North Indian palate, from Rajasthan to Punjab to Lucknow through a refreshed semi-buffet lunch and ala carte dinner. Authentic specialties served in the eponymous tiffin boxes are prepared with perfectly balanced spices, paired with classic Indian brews and beverages. The restaurant will also present an interactive dining experience with tableside service by chefs, complete with freshly ground spices to elevate the experience.
The restored interior décor of the restaurant includes reinstating the wooden floorboards in Tiffin Room to bring back features from the early 1900s based on research by our heritage consultants. Intricately patterned wood and mirror wall panelling add richness and create a signature visual language while colourful displays of Tiffin boxes are imbued with historical notes but modern in feel.
Long Bar Home of the Singapore Sling for over a hundred years, the Long Bar’s plantation-inspired décor will be refreshed, and the famous Long Bar counter restored. Long Bar continues to be the heritage bar for visitors to Singapore to enjoy the most iconic cocktail of the city.
The Lobby The classic Raffles Afternoon Tea experience will be served at a new location – the iconic Grand Lobby of the Raffles Singapore. Guests can indulge in one of the hotel’s great traditions – a truly unique and refined Afternoon Tea with a distinct sense of heritage – in the newly restored lobby. The Raffles Afternoon Tea is perfect for sophisticated and elegant celebrations, serving classic sandwiches, home-baked scones and cakes as well as seasonal indulgences, complemented by a curated collection of exquisite teas and Champagnes.
Writers Bar Established as a tribute to famous writers that have come through the doors of Raffles Singapore over the years, Writers Bar will be expanded to a full bar with bespoke craft cocktails, wines and spirits. Decked in luxuriously appointed furnishings, lovingly curated mementos and books, referencing the literary legacy of Raffles, the bar will be a sophisticated and serene refuge kept exclusive to residents and restaurant patrons; keeping this a place for discreet elegance and intimate conversations.
Raffles Courtyard Exuding a garden style and welcoming vibe, Raffles Courtyard is the city’s social space in a lushly landscaped alfresco venue at the Raffles Arcade. This friendly bar and lounge is open all day, offering guests a garden respite against a colonial architectural backdrop, complete with refreshing shared summer drinks and a selection of Southeast Asian small plates, including authentic Singaporean delights.
Ah Teng’s Café Raffles’ new takeaway café is named after a famous local baker of the same name, who used to own a shop in the neighbourhood back in the 1900s. Ah Teng’s Café serves visitors, the surrounding community and travellers alike with freshly made cold beverages, a selection of premium coffee, tea and homemade bakery, pastries and artisanal ice-creams for takeaway.
Pierre Burgade, Executive Chef, Raffles Singapore, who oversees the Hotel’s culinary landscape portfolio, said, “It is an incredible privilege to be given the opportunity to update these time-honoured Raffles signatures while also curating the stellar line-up of celebrity chefs for this iconic hotel. The deliberate and careful curation of the new dining concepts aims to elevate Singapore’s culinary landscape and makes our hotel an all-in-one gastronomic journey for guests and visitors alike.”
“We are pleased to embark on the meticulous restoration of Raffles Singapore, a distinctive hotel that is emblematic of Katara Hospitality’s commitment to create extraordinary experiences on the backdrop of iconic heritage hotels and provide unsurpassed service to our esteemed guests,” said Mr. Hamad Abdulla Al-Mulla, Chief Executive Officer of Katara Hospitality, a globally recognised hospitality owner, developer and operator who is also the owner of Raffles Singapore.
“Since opening its doors in 1887, Raffles Singapore has maintained a lasting legacy as a landmark hotel, hosting some of the world’s most famous and elite personalities. As a National Monument of Singapore and one of the few remaining 19th century hotels in the world, the hotel’s restoration is a testament to our continued pursuit in preserving portraits of historic charm, while growing Katara Hospitality’s portfolio of iconic properties in key travel destinations. Raffles Singapore is no exception, with its carefully implemented restoration programme that is poised to unveil contemporary charm and elegance; reminiscent of the luxurious splendour of Katara Hospitality hotels,” added Mr. Al-Mulla.
About Raffles Singapore Opened in 1887, Raffles Singapore is one of the few remaining great 19th century hotels in the world. Till today, its architecture is perfectly preserved both inside and out, giving it an intoxicating blend of luxury, history and classic colonial design. Within its walls are more than a hundred expansive suites, framed by polished teak verandas and white marble colonnades, clustered around lush tropical gardens. Each is serviced by the legendary Raffles butlers and offers every modern convenience necessary.
Raffles Singapore is currently undergoing a careful and sensitive restoration that is being carried out in three phases. The hotel is now fully closed with a grand reopening planned in the first quarter of 2019. The Raffles Gift Shop continues to be in operation at its temporary location on 3 Seah Street, around the corner from the hotel.
The restoration of Raffles Singapore is designed to ensure that we retain what is so special about Raffles – the ambience, the service, the charm and the heritage of the hotel. It is also designed for Raffles Singapore to stay relevant and distinctive by moving with the times and with its guests and adapting to the changing needs of the well-travelled and Singapore’s community February 7, 2019

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Taj Steps Foot In Himachal Pradesh, Opens Taj Theog Resort & Spa, Shimla

Now Open 7 February 2019 Taj Theog Resort & Spa, Shimla Taj Steps Foot In Himachal Pradesh, Opens Taj Theog Resort & Spa, Shimla Now open – 99 Rooms Taj Theog Resort & Spa, Shimla Taj Theog Resort & Spa, Shimla Taj Theog Resort & Spa, Shimla Taj Theog Resort & Spa, Shimla
The Indian Hotels Company Limited (IHCL) , South Asia’s largest hospitality company is introducing the iconic Taj brand in Himachal Pradesh with the opening of Taj Theog Resort & Spa, Shimla . Nestled amidst thick Cedar forests and spread over five acres, every nook and corner of the hotel offers mesmerising views of the mighty Himalayas.
Taj Theog Resort & Spa’s design and architecture echoes colonial charm reminiscent of hill station appeal. Surrounded by the Deodar forest, with pathways through apple orchards and terraced gardens, the resort is the quintessential luxurious home in the hills. Each of the 99 rooms, with warm wooden furniture, traditional rugs and tall French windows offer spacious balconies overlooking snow peaks and quaint villages. The hotel is conveniently located a comfortable drive from the two key cities of Shimla and Chandigarh.
Guests have a choice of distinctive culinary options which include an all-day diner – Tragopan that offers the robust Pahari cuisine along with global cuisines and comfort food; Peony , the oriental restaurant offers Sichuan and Cantonese cuisines. Theog Junction, the pub is an imaginative tribute to the classic narrow-gauge toy train that chugs from Kalka to Shimla.
The resort also houses an expansive Jiva Spa , Taj’s award winning spa brand that is deeply rooted in India’s rich heritage of wellness; a temperature controlled pool with a sun deck and specially curated local experiences to ensure a memorable stay.

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Munch India Does Awesome Non-Naans

Munch India Does Awesome Non-Naans Munch India Does Awesome Non-Naans The popular pop-up has a brick-and-mortar outlet now that spotlights 40 regional Indian breads. By Anneli Star Josselin Rufus Published: February 07, 2019 Photo by Lance Yamamoto
If the phrase “Indian bread” makes you think instantly and only of naan, Nick Ahmed and Diana Afroza would like a word with you.
Several words, actually. For instance, rumali roti. Also luchi, puri, lachha paratha, and dozens more. But especially rumali roti, because it’s Afroza’s favorite.
Popular in the Punjab region that straddles northern India and eastern Pakistan, made from well-kneaded wheat-flour dough flattened into a 33-rpm-size circle then cooked on both sides to golden-brown, bubble-pocked perfection on the bottom of an overturned wok-like pan called a kadai, it’s a limp and almost translucently thin wheat-flour flatbread whose name, in several northern Indian languages, “means handkerchief, because you fold it like a handkerchief” before dipping it into dal or saucy dishes and eating it, said Afroza, who with her husband and fellow chef, Ahmed, helmed the popular Munch India food truck, then launched a brick-and-mortar Berkeley restaurant by the same name last fall.
“The breads that are popular in specific regions depend on the staple grains of those regions — wheat, rice, or whatever,” said Afroza, who has also authored a cookbook, Flavors of Mirch Masala.
They also depend on regional baking styles.
“Making naan requires a tandoori oven that can reach 700 degrees,” Ahmed said. Such ovens do not inhabit every corner of the Indian subcontinent.
Folded over once, then again to effect the proper handkerchief shape, “rumali roti is especially prevalent in Old Delhi, where every three blocks you’ll find someone making it — on the street and in all the very plush hotels,” Ahmed said.
It’s one of some 40 regional breads spotlighted on Munch India’s constantly rotating menu.
Another is puffy white-flour luchi. Deep-fried in ghee and traditionally eaten for breakfast with tangy-sweet spiced potatoes, “it’s very quintessentially Bengali,” Ahmed said.
Sourcing many ingredients from the Berkeley Bowl, the South Berkeley farmers market, and nearby farms, the pair — who live in Berkeley — buy herbs and spices whole, then grind them freshly to optimize each dish.
“Indian restaurants in America completely misrepresent India and have given a bad name to its food — which in reality is incredibly complex, and when prepared by authentic, true chefs is on par with French and Japanese cuisine,” Ahmed said.
“We’re trying to demonstrate that Indian food is much more than just tikka masala and naan.”
Munch India, 3105 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley, 510-847-6043, MunchIndia.com.

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Who is the Chu of ‘Chew with Chu?’

Who is the Chu of ‘Chew with Chu?’ Meet Brianna Chu. – Courtesy photo
By Brianna Chu
Before you start: I know it’s a dumb pun. I am indeed aware, as I was the idiot who came up with it.
So…hi! I’m Brianna, an early twenty-something, recent university graduate who was born and raised in Pasadena. As you might have guessed, I love food! I’ve been lucky to grow up trying and eating pretty much everything, and food is one of the things my family doesn’t skimp on! Food and family are core aspects of both Chinese and Filipino culture – my parents’ backgrounds – and meals are an integral communal activity. My mom affectionately but aggressively likes to feed anyone who comes into our house; and my fiancé has started to protest when she orders him to eat more. She’s always saying he’s skinny, but he just has a slim torso, okay? Jeez.
After growing up being able to access so many different cuisines, leaving the food haven of San Gabriel Valley was an eye-opener; I attended uni in St Andrews, Scotland, 5300 miles away from home. St Andrews, beyond being known as the home of golf and where Wills met Kate, is also well-known for being a “bubble” fairly far from any major city. St Andrews is a bonnie wee toun, and I love her dearly, but culinary diversity she has not. While my time in Britain has brought appreciation of a good fry-up (aka a “full English” – which can also be a full Scottish or a full Irish, etc….Google it! and you can thank me later for the great brunch ideas), the weirdly addictive Soreen, and the pseudo-sausage that is haggis, St Andrews in particular lacked variety of restaurants. Don’t get me started on their “Mexican food.” Britain? I love you, but please stay in your lane – you do Indian food pretty well, but please don’t touch Mexican food; you’ll only hurt yourself. You have to buy Tesco “ripe and ready” avocados a week before you use them for them to qualify as either “ripe” or “ready”…
I didn’t realize how lucky I was to be surrounded by almost every different culture of food constantly as a child; so, bereft of the food diversity I was so accustomed to, I had to learn how to make many of my favorites myself. I worked my way through some culinary staples and then eventually started moving to cooking all the foods I craved: I learned how to make congee, for instance, for when my fiancé or I was sick. I learned how to make biko, a Filipino coconut rice dessert, because there was obviously no way to access Filipino food in Scotland. As the years went by, I attempted increasingly time-consuming and complicated recipes. I started making and saying “red wine reduction,” and was way too proud of myself for that. Let’s be honest, I also got so much practice cooking because it was a great excuse to procrastinate writing my essays – a girl literally has to eat, right? In my last semester of university, I procrastinated my dissertation by learning how to make homemade carnitas and setting up a burrito buffet line in my cozy flat’s kitchen. For just two people. Don’t judge me.
I’m no professional – I’m not that technically skilled (I’m still afraid of hollandaise sauce, for instance, but I’m working up the courage to attempt it!), and while I recognize some ingredients, I don’t have a super-palate or anything like that. But that’s not what this column is for. This column is an exploration and a celebration of the amazing variety of cuisines we enjoy here in our local community! I can’t think of anything that can bring people together like food. Food is a necessity, but in every culture, the kitchen is a hub of life, love, and laughter. The multitude of different cuisines and cultures at our fingertips reflects the diversity of our community and I want to share the joys of food, culture, and community with the local restaurants that pour their hearts and souls into their businesses, as well as with you!
What’s a local treasure that you love and think I should try? Leave me a comment and share your recommendations! February 7, 2019 About Author
Brianna Chu Brianna Chu is an opinion writer for Beacon Media who was born and raised in Pasadena. She loves to cook and to eat, is a lifelong viewer of Food Network, and enthusiastically introduced the tradition of Thanksgiving dinners to her British and European friends while earning her degree at the University of St Andrews. While they absolutely hated going around the table and saying what they were grateful for every year, they also loved the excuse to get together and feast with friends enough to endure it anyway.

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