78 Popular Pakistani Foods You Must Try

78 Popular Pakistani Foods You Must Try

Meat Dishes 1. Shami Kebab
A Shami kebab is a small patty of minced beef or chicken and ground chickpeas and spices. It’s very popular during Ramadan month – which is the holy fasting month in the Islamic religion – as the patty is easy to be handled and easy to make.
The patty is made from mixing boneless meat, green chilies, fresh coriander, mint, chat masala, boiled eggs, and onions. It’s then dipped in egg and then fried. When it’s served, it usually comes with chutney to dip the Patti in for added flavor. 2. Chapli Kebab
This Kebab is a widely popular version in Pakistan. A spiced, tangy round kebab made of ground beef and cooked in animal fat. A specialty of Peshawar in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa.
The beef patty is mixed together with South Asian spices, then flattened and shallow fried. The result is a charred patty that tastes beautiful and authentic. It’s served inside a bun and pickled red onion or with a side of bread. 3. Chicken Keema Kebab
Chicken Keema is mustard hued-ground chicken with green chilies and cilantro. The locals usually prefer a much spicier variant of this grilled meat. If you prefer a milder flavor, you can ask for less spicy Chicken Keema – but we recommend you go full on and try the spicy ones! 4. Lamb Kebab
The all lamb meat kebab is usually served as cubes. The taste is hot and sour, and the addition of mustard oil gives it an interesting flavor. The lamb marinates overnight, formed into skewers and then grilled and served with chutney and Naan. 5. Bihari Kebab
Bihari Kebab, which are skewers of beef mixed with herbs and seasoning that’s marinated overnight to guarantee its tender texture and flavorful taste. It’s quite a spicy dish and is available as street food. Enjoy it with piping hot Naans, and of course some Lassi to wash down the spicy meat! 6. Bun Kebab
Bun Kebab is a sandwich that’s originated from Karachi. You can find it in food stalls and restaurants all around Pakistan. They use chicken, beef or mutton as their meat base.
It consists of a spicy patty that’s shallow fried, onion, chutney and a bun. The patty itself is mixed with ground lentils, powdered cumin and egg batter which is then fried. To kick it up a notch, you can also ask the seller to add a fried egg or omelet – People say that the beef and egg one is the most popular. 7. Seekh Kebab
Seekh Kebab is a long skewer of beef mixed with herbs and seasonings. It comes from the Indian subcontinent, made with Indian spices and cooked in a barbecue grill or tandoor oven.
The dish takes its name from the skewer (seekh). The Kebab can also be made with mutton or chicken meat. It’s slathered in spices and grilled to perfection. You can consume the meat with roti, onion, and chutney. 8. Chicken Tikka Masala
This dish originated from the Punjab region and is famous in India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan. Traditionally it is made from boneless chicken baked using skewers after being marinated in Indian spices and yogurt.
To take the dish from Chicken Tikka to Chicken Tikka Masala, the masala sauce is added which is a combination of yogurt, tomato, and spices. The result is a delicious, rich and moist chicken. The original recipe calls for a tandoor oven, which gives it the signature orange color. 9. Shashlik
Shashlik is grilled marinated baby lamb chops. It’s skewered and grilled cubes, similar to shish kebab. Modern recipes sometimes change up the lamb and use beef or pork instead – but vendors in Pakistan usually don’t use pork.
The meat is marinated overnight in a high acidity liquid and then threaded through the skewers, alternating with vegetables such as pepper, onion, mushroom or tomatoes. Then it’s grilled outside, making it the perfect dish for your summer get-together. 10. Shawarma
A dish based on doner kebab of Ottoman Turkey, Shawarma is one of the world’s most popular street foods. You can find it almost anywhere, with a wide range of variety – from turkey, chicken, beef, or veal.
The meat is is cut in thin slices and stacked into cone-like shape then shaved off as it continually cooks. It can be served on a plate, or a wrap inside a flatbread. 11. Boti Kebab
Boti Kebab is a delicious mutton kebab that’s perfect to serve during get-togethers. The dish is prepared using cubed mutton pieces, marinated with papaya paste, green chili and garlic paste. It’s then sprinkled with spices and grilled to perfection on skewers.
You can enjoy Boti Kebab with Roti or with rice, and make a substantial meal out of it. You can also serve it as starters or finger food at dinner parties. You can’s miss this dish if you’re someone who loves spicy and flavorful dish. 12. Kaleji Kebab
Kaleji Kebab is made out of the liver, particularly goat’s liver. The liver is marinated in curry spices and is then cooked in the marinate gravy. Even if you’re not fond of liver, you should give this a taste. The marinade will make the flavor more mellow, and the texture is unique. 13. Aloo Gohst
Aloo Gohst is a curry of goat meat and potatoes. This dish is a staple not just in the Indian subcontinent but also Southeast Asia and the Carribean.
Curry goat is a dish that’s made during special occasions – and it’s a popular meat choice for Hindus because they don’t eat beef and for Muslims, because they don’t eat pork – so goat is a happy medium. The meat is cooked inside the spices until tender and served with rice or Naan. 14. Haleem
This dish is a famous stew throughout India and Pakistan. Haleem consists of wheat or barley, meat, and lentils. The meat in Haleem is minced then slow cooked for seven to eight hours, resulting in a paste-like consistency – blending the flavors of spices, meat, barley, and wheat beautifully.
The first recipe of this traditional dish was said to date back to the 10th century; it’s even written inside the world’s oldest surviving Arabic cookbook – Kitab Al-Tabikh. To get a taste of the ancient world, Haleem is a compulsory dish to try when you visit Pakistan. 15. Khichra
Khichra is a variation of Haleem and is cooked all year – mainly through during the Muharram month. It’s made of goat meat, beef, lentils, and spices. The Khichra is then cooked into a very thick paste.
In Pakistan, you can buy Khichra as street food in most cities. The difference with Haleem is that Khichra’s me at is shaped into cubes – so it retains some of its original texture. 16. Nihari
Nihari is a very popular dish, and ’some say it’s the national dish of Pakistan. The dish is known for its spiciness and texture. The original recipe requires you to cook it overnight – so that the meat is tender.
Nihari is available in Pakistani restaurant everywhere in the world. The leftover of Nihari from the previous day is usually added into the next batch, and this provides it a very deep and distinct flavor. The stew consists of shank meat from beef, chicken, or lamb and mutton along with bone marrow. 17. Pasanda
Aside from Pakistan, you can also find this dish in other regions of the Indian subcontinent; notably North India and Hyderabad. The word Pasanda means favorite, which refers to the favorite or prime cut of the meat that’s used for this dish.
The original Pasanda is made from lamb or goat, marinated and fried in a dish with spices. But throughout the years, people also use chicken, beef and king prawns. ’Usually, people serve it with a side of rice. 18. Paya Curry
Paya Curry is a tasty goat or mutton’s trotter curry. This particular curry is a traditional Pakistani breakfast and one of the most finger licking and satisfying dishes there is. You can’t help but soak up the curry with Naan or Roti. 19. Sindhi Biryani
Sindhi Biryani is a popular dish in the Sindhi cuisine – which is a region in Pakistan. A celebratory meal, Sindhi Biryani is usually consumed during special occasions – weddings or religious ceremonies.
Biryanis are usually cooked in two separate pots, one for the rice and another for the meat. The dish is famously spicy, and the spiciness is countered by sour yogurt that often acts as an accompaniment to the meal. 20. Sindhi Pulao
Sindhi Pulao is another popular dish from the Sindhi cuisine. It’s a type of rice pilaf, prepared with mutton, beef or chicken. Similar to Sindhi Biryani, people consume Sindhi Pulao during special occasions such as wedding ceremonies.
The difference between Sindhi Pulao and Biryani is that Pulao is a one-pot dish, where the rice and meat are simmered together in the liquid or stock. Sindhi Pulao is more straightforward to make and allows the flavor to blend truly. 21. Mutton Taka Tak
This dish consists of stir-fried mutton, sweet bread, and kidney. It has a genuinely spicy flavor and is served with plain white rice. Although you might cringe at the ingredients, we remind you that the spices would practically make you forget that the dish has organs in it. It’s a very tasty and nutritious meal commonly enjoyed in Pakistan. 22. Chicken Jalfrezi
Chicken Jalfrezi is a delightfully flavorful curry, with juicy and tender chicken chunks in spicy tomato sauce. It’s refreshing and tasteful, and best of all – it’s straightforward to make. The stir-fry style means that it takes about 30 minutes from the pot to your plate. Find a simple recipe online, whip up some Chicken Jalfrezi and serve with rice or Naan! Dinner sorted. 23. Sajji
The origin of Sajji is the Balochistan province in Pakistan, but it’s available in all regions of Pakistan. Sajji consists of whole chicken or lamb in skewers that are marinated in salt then covered with green papaya taste, stuffed with rice and roasted over coal.
You can enjoy Sajji with roti or naan. The fresh taste of the marinade and meat makes it a delightful dish. If you ever visit Pakistan, this is one of the dishes that you must have. 24. Multani Chaamp
Multani Chaamp is the tandoori lamb chops, that’s finger licking good you won’t leave any meat behind on the bones. The lamb chops are marinated in ginger garlic paste, raw papaya paste and salt then grilled until ready. 25. Lahori Tawa Tali Machli
Pakistan is not just about red meat and chicken; this dish is made out of fish fillet dipped in a creamy mixture of rice flour, egg, cornflour, and spices. It’s shallow fried and served with chutney. So if you’re up for a lighter dish that still satisfies your stomach, this is the one for you! Vegetarian dishes 26. Aloo Bhujia
If you love potato, then Pakistani dishes are perfect for you! Aloo Bhujia is one of those recipes that use potatoes as its main ingredient. In this dish, the potatoes are boiled then fried mixed with green coriander, green chilies, and spices. This dish can be served with rice or roti; but if you’re worried you’re going to be too full from all the carbs, you can enjoy it on its own instead. 27. Aloo Gobi
Aloo Gobi is a dish made out of potato and cauliflower. The two vegetables complement each other very well, which makes this dish a favorite among locals. The vegetables are cooked in a tomato based curry and simmered until soft. Enjoy your Aloo Gobi with rice or rotis. 28. Aloo Matar
This is another popular dish, that’s easy and simple to make. Made with potatoes, peas in a curry sauce with onion-tomato based. You can enjoy your Aloo Matar with roti. 29. Arbi Masala
Arbi, also known as arvi or taro, is a root vegetable. When Arbi is cooked with masala, it makes a great spicy dish that’s enjoyable and filling. You can serve Arbi Masala with roti, puri or flatbread. The recipe is quite simple as well, just by sauteeing the taro with the spices, you’ll get to enjoy this authentic Pakistani dish. 30. Baingan ka Bharta
Baingan – or aubergine – is only available during peak summer seasons which is why this dish is commonly consumed during summer nights. This dish is smashed aubergines that are spiced and roasted.
The tomatoes, onions, chilies, fenugreek and other spices make this dish very tasty as well as healthy. You can eat Baingan ka Bharta with hot flatbread, and then finish it off with some salty Lassi, get ready to nap as you fill your belly. 31. Baghara Baingan
This is another vegetarian dish that uses aubergines as the main ingredient. The eggplants are placed into skillet then cooked inside a curry gravy until soft. Just like Baingan ka Bharta, you can enjoy this dish with flatbreads or Naan. 32. Lauki daal
Lauki is a vegetable also commonly known as bottle gourd. It’s widely available during the summer, which makes it perfect for breezy summer night meals. Lauki is widely used for dieting purposes, and many say you can lose weight by eating it.
In Pakistan, you can enjoy Lauki by making it into Lauki daal. The ingredients consist of boiled channa daal, coconut, chilis, tomatoes, and spices. Enjoy it hot, just like curry – and don’t forget to get your Naan or Roti ready for dipping. 33. Karela Masala
Karela is a bitter squash that is good for your health. It’s often consumed in Pakistan due to its health benefits. The trick to enjoying Karela is by eliminating its bitterness; one of the ways is to add tomato masala to make it more refreshing and delicious.
Karela is rich in fiber, minerals, and antioxidants. So go and have some Karela Masala with rice or Naan – and watch your health improve. 34. Bhindi
The direct translation for Bhindi is lady finger or okra – and if you haven’t tried it yet, it’s a great vegetable that you’ve been missing out on. Moreover, they are high in fiber and good for joints and knees lubrication.
In Pakistan, the okras are washed and dried then fried with a medley of spices. The dish is delicious and nutritious. Pair Bhindi with green chutney, and you’ve got yourself a full, balanced meal! 35. Saag
Saag is spiced purees of spinach and other greens; they may contain additional ingredients like potatoes, cheese, chicken, chickpeas, or even mincemeat to make it a more substantial dish.
You can eat saag along with naan and topped with ghee. This dish is healthy, warm and delicious. Perfect to eat when you’re feeling a little under the weather. 36. Chana Masala
Traditionally, Chana Masala is made from green chilis, onion, garlic, fresh cilantro, spices, chickpeas, and tomatoes. The ingredient that you can’t leave out in this dish is garam masala – which gives it that flavorful and hearty taste. You can enjoy this dish on its own, over rice, or roasted vegetables. 37. Sai Bhaji
Sai Bhaji is a dish derived from Sindhi cuisine, and the wholesome dish means Sai (green) and Bhaji (vegetables) with some Dal cooked together to make a delectable vegetarian dish. For the greens, many varieties of vegetables are used like spinach, dill, and fenugreek, and the Bhaji consists of Eggplants, Carrots, and Zucchini. Healthy and flavorful, this dish is not to be missed! 38. Moong Dal
Moong Dal is a healthy vegetarian dish comfort food made from yellow split lentil and many spices. This dish is extremely rich in protein and is a staple food throughout South Asian, and is even considered as the primary source of protein for vegetarians in the region. Serve this dish with rice and roti to get a hearty meal that’s good for you. Snacks and side dishes 39. Yogurt Raita
This yogurt-based condiment comes from India and is also hugely popular in Pakistan. It’s often served as a side dish and dip. It resembles the Greek’s Tzatziki, as it uses thick yogurt, and a variety of vegetable, fruits, and spices. The difference is it has cumin and red chili powder that give this condiment a more exotic flavor. 40. Roti/naan
This ultimate side dish is a leavened, oven-baked flatbread that can be found in many cuisines – and one of them is Pakistani. The most well-known one is, of course, the Indian variety. Typically served hot after cooked in a tandoor oven.
The difference with Pakistan’s Naan is they’re flavored with fragrant essences such as rose, khus, or with butter or ghee. You can eat Naan on its own, or as a companion to your dish. 41. Bhalla
Bhalla is sold in shops and kiosk all over the Indian subcontinent. The dish is made from green bean paste, added to spices and then deep fried to make croquet. Then the croquet is garnished with yogurt (dahi), dried ginger and tamarind sauce, and spices. Believe it or not, this deep fried dish is served cold. 42. Chaat
Chaat is a savory snack, typically served on the roadside and foods stalls in the streets of any Pakistan city. The word itself was derived from Hindi that means tasting something noisily.
The original Chaat is a mixture of potato pieces, crispy fried bread, chickpeas, and spices. Chaat is then paired with some yogurt and green coriander. There are many types of Chaat, such as Dahi puri and Panipuri which we’ll talk about later on in this article. 43. Kabab
Kabab is a staple that’s handy to have for a quick snack, or as a sandwich filling. The Kabab is made out of mincemeat combined with onions, cilantro, chilis, spices, and eggs as binding agents. Eat them with a sprinkle of lemon juice, dip in chutney, or as we already mentioned – by making a sandwich out of it. Enjoy! 44. Pakora
Pakoras are the perfect companion to the rainy season, and pairs well with a cup of Chai (which we will mention later on in drinks section). The right Pakora has a lightly puffy but crispy golden brown exterior. It has a spicy, tart flavor; thanks to the onion, potato, green chilli, and coriander.
Eat Pakoras with a simple green chutney to make it even more delicious. Thank us later! 45. Papadum
You can find Papadums in India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan. Papadums are typically served as a side dish to a meal, and in Pakistan, Papadums are made of rice. They are made very crisp and flat and is the perfect companion for chutneys or curries to dip into. 46. Samosa
Samosas are already well known as a delicacy from the Indian subcontinent, and you can find Samosas in Nepal, Burma, India, and Pakistan. But each of the countries has their take on the recipe.
The Pakistan Samosa itself has many variations, such as the spicy and vegetarian ones from southern province, or the spicy and meat-filled samosas from the west and north regions. But no worries, most restaurants offer many variations, so the choice is entirely up to you. 47. Mamtu
Mamtu comes from the region called Gilgit Baltistan in Pakistan. These are little dumplings, often used as the perfect starter for your party. They’re made out of chopped meat (lamb or beef), onion, vegetables, and spices. The mixture is wrapped inside the dough and steamed to perfection. 48. Boondi raita
This dish is made from sweetened, fried chickpea flour. It’s a very sweet dish, so a little goes a long way. Boondi raita contains curd, boondi, and seasonings. It’s a popular side dish that is eaten with seasoned rice or other meals. 49. Dahi Puri
The dish is a form of chaat (crisp fried bread with potato pieces and chickpeas) and originated from the city of Mumbai. The puri is broken on top and then filled with mashed potatoes and chickpeas. Then tamarind chutney and spicy green chutney is added to the top of the dish.
It’s also accompanied by a generous amount of yogurt and crushed serv, moong dal and pomegranate. The spectrum of flavor and texture from crunchy to soft makes for an exciting dish. 50. Lukhmi
Lukhmi is a non-vegetarian derivative of samosa but shaped into a flat square patty. It’s an everyday savory starter of Pakistani and Indian cuisines. What makes Lukhmi different from other pastry is the use of yogurt as the main ingredient of the dough, and gives it more moisture. 51. Namak Para
Namak Para is also known as Nimki or Nimkin. It’s a crunchy savory snack you can find in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. It’s a ribbon-like strip of pastry, seasoned with ajwain and cumin seeds in ghee. Namak Para is often compared to samosa. 52. Puri Bhaji
This dish is a combination of two dishes served together, as in Puri or flaky, deep-fried bread, and Bhaji, a mildly spiced potato stir fry. Although it makes for a good breakfast meal, it also can be served in a platter as a snack with pickle, green chutney, and rice.
If you ever visit Pakistan, you can look around the local restaurants, and you’ll find Puri Bhaji as a staple breakfast menu. 53. Panipuri
Panipuri consists of a round, hollow puri or bread, fried crisp and filled with flavored water, tamarind chutney, chili, chaat masala, potato, onion or chickpeas. This ubiquitous street snack can also be found in India, Bangladesh, and Nepal. 54. Paratha
Paratha is a flatbread that’s well-known throughout India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Pakistan. The bread is unleavened, which what makes it flat. It’s baked on a tava then finished off with frying.
Parathas are thicker than rotis because they are layered with ghee and has multiple folds. A paratha can be used as a side dish during breakfast or snack time. Usually, it’s eaten with curd, fried egg, omelet, or assorted spiced dish. You can also stuff Paratha with potatoes, paneer, onions or chili peppers. Desserts 55. Doodh Jalebi
Doodh Jalebi is a deep-fried batter soaked in syrup, then dunked in milk. You can eat Doodh Jalebi in both winter and summer. During winter, you can have it with warm milk; then in summer, have it in warm milk.
You can find Doodh Jalebi anywhere, in sweet shops, street vendors, and bazaars. If it’s not decadent enough for you, you can ask the vendor to top of your bowl with a dollop of fresh cream. 56. Kulfi
Kulfi is a traditional form of ice cream in Pakistan. The frozen dairy dessert is widely available in restaurants and street vendors. Kulfi is much denser and creamier compared to regular ice cream and comes in flavors like cream, rose, mango, cardamom, saffron, and pistachio. It’s the essential dessert you need to combat hot days in Pakistan. 57. Thoothi Firni
This is a milky, sweet, aromatic Pakistani pudding which served chilled during long scorching summers. There are two different pudding – one called Firni which is made from ground rice, and another called Kheer made from whole basmati rice.
Other ingredients include rose water and milk – which what gives it its vibrant, decadent and aromatic characteristics. It’s a beautiful dessert that will leave you wanting more. 58. Kulfa Falooda
Kulfa Falooda is a significant part of the Pakistani culture and especially served during Islamic holidays. It’s a cold dessert made from mixing rose syrup, vermicelli, sweet basil seeds and pieces of jelly with milk. Several are made without noodles and blended with milk. It’s a cooling dessert, due to its ingredients. 59. Rabri Kheer
Rabri Kheer is a mouth-watering Pakistani and Indian dessert. People usually consume it during the month of Ramadan. Milk, rice, sugar and rabri (sweet, condensed milk) makes up the recipe for this delicious and healthy dessert. It also has dried nut to give it a bit of crunchy texture and nutty taste. 60. Gajar ka Halwa
Gajar ka Halwa is a carrot based sweet dessert from the Indian subcontinent. It’s traditionally served during festivities. The original recipe calls for carrots, milk, and ghee. The pudding is then garnished with chopped almonds and pistachios. 61. Jalebi
Eaten warm, straight from the cauldron, Jalebi is a favorite among the Pakistani sweet treats. The flavorless batter is drenched in sugar syrup, making the thin layers crunchy and delectable. Jalebi is sometimes sprinkled with coconut or pistachios. 62. Gola Ganda
Known for its summer heat, residents in Pakistan are always eager for fresh, frosty beverages they can have. One of the most popular ones is Gola Ganda.
As you down the streets in Karachi, you can spot different carts set up. You can visit the Ghazi Salahuddin Road in Dhoraji Society to locate more than 40 carts of dessert and drinks at your disposal.
Gola Ganda, or shaved ice, is usually drenched in raspberry, rooh-afza, orange, pineapple or ice cream soda. Then topped with canned fruit, dried fruit, and condensed milk. 63. Rasmalai
Rasmalai consists of white, cream or yellow colored cheese curds soaked in sugar syrup and milk with saffron, pistachios, and kheer as stuffing. The name itself comes from the word ros (juice) and malai (cream). It’s been described as rich cheesecake without the crust. So if you ever wonder what a rich cheesecake tastes like, have a bite of this decadent dessert. Drinks 64. Lassi
You probably already know about this traditional yogurt-based drink originated in the Indian subcontinent. Lassi is a blend of yogurt, spices, and fruit. It pairs nicely with the spicy food known from the continent.
The traditional Lassi from Pakistan was made salty and is still widespread across the country. Aside from the conventional salted Lassi, you can also get modern versions of Lassi – like Mango Lassi or strawberry Lassi. But if you want the authentic Pakistani taste, we recommend you to go for the salted Lassi! 65. Sattu
Sattu is made with roasted barley and gram powder. Therefore Sattu is one healthy drink that can give you thick hair and smooth skin. Although it tastes a little powdery, the health benefits make Sattu a drink that’s frequently consumed by everyone – from the elderly to pregnant women. 66. Doodh soda
Doodh soda is well known in the Punjab region of Pakistan and northern India. This drink is often served during the holy month of Ramadan to soothe the stomach after a whole day of not eating or drinking.
The milk soda is considered to be healthier than just plain soda and can counterpoint spicy food – like a light lassi. You can buy this drink at cafes and drink stands, or even make your own. 67. Gannay ka juice
This drink is available everywhere if you’re in Karachi. Gannay ka Juice is sugarcane juice, and aside from relieving you from the heat this drink is also said to have properties that combat cancer, shrinks your belly and clear out your skin. 68. Rabri Doodh
Rabri Doodh gets the name from amazing milk dessert, Rabri. It’s a bubbly creamy drink and works best during summers to keep you cool and hydrated.
The drink itself is made from milk, khoya, falooda, almonds, and basil seeds. Aside from the original, you can also get your Rabri Doodh with chocolate topping. 69. Zeera sharbat
Zeera sharbat is an amazing Pakistani thirst quencher, but can also be found in India. All you need is Zeera (cumin), sugar, pineapple essence, and lemon juice.
You need to heat up and cook the Zeera first, then add in the other ingredients as it cools down. Zeera sharbat is also healthy, as it’s a source of iron and dietary fiber. 70. Tarbooz e Afza
Tarbooz means watermelon, but this is not just a regular old watermelon juice. Add a tablespoon of Rooh Afza (a concentrate), lemon, crushed ice and enjoy your Tarbooz e Afza! 71. Iced Chai
You might already hear about Chai, and see them in the coffee shops. But an authentic Pakistani Chai is quite different from the ones you’ve seen before. The process is simple enough.
The ingredients are water, milk, loose tea leaves, cardamom pods, and sweetener. After boiling the water, add tea leaves and cardamom. You add milk to your Chai or tea, then use a ladle to repeatedly scoop up and pour back the Chai so that it’s frothy and light. Enjoy! 72. Falsa Juice
If you’re familiar with raspberries and strawberries, it’s time you get to know Pakistan’s favorite berry – Falsa. It’s a small tangy and sweet flavored dark purple fruit that’s native to Pakistan, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Srilanka, and Thailand.
Because Falsa rots pretty quickly, people usually make juice out of the fruit, so it lasts the whole summer. What’s better is the fact that Falsa has many health benefits. According to locals, Falsa relieves digestive issues, liver, and gallbladder problems. 73. Badam ka Sharbat
Badam ka Sharbat’s ingredients are almonds, saffron, green cardamoms, sugar, and water. These ingredients magically cool you down within seconds after you drink it. Badam ka sharbat is refreshing and essential in hotter months. 74. Neembu Paani
Very easy to prepare, all you need is squeezed lemons, salt, and sugar. This is a delicious thirst quencher that’s commonly available in the streets of any town in Pakistan. The clean and refreshing flavor gives you satisfaction. Plus, it contains a lot of vitamin C. 75. Rooh Afza
Rooh Afza is said to have the ability to maintain the water balance in your body because it consists of healthy ingredients. It’s a concentrated squash comprised of fruits, herbs and vegetable extracts.
You can add Rooh Afza into almost any sweet dish, and the most common way to have it is by adding it to cold milk or cold water. Or, as we’ve mentioned earlier, you can add them into watermelon juice and make yourself some Tarbooz e Afza. 76. Shakar Kola
With a recipe so simple, it’s unbelievable how Shakar Kola is as tasty as it is. Shakar is raw cane sugar or uncrystallized brown sugar. To get the Shakar Kola, mix the raw cane sugar with water, and you get the refreshing sugar cane sherbat. 77. Sakanjbeen
Made out of lemon juice, cold water, sugar and a pinch of salt. This sweet and sour drink will boost your energy and immune system in hot weather, leaving you feeling revitalized. 78. Sardai
Sardai is a creamy drink, made out of almonds, poppy seeds, and char maghaz. Char maghaz is a mix of sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, watermelon seeds, and cantaloupe seeds.
These ingredients make a healthy, creamy smoothie that gives you enough fiber for the whole day! That was our list of 78 Pakistani dishes and drinks that you have to try! What do you think? Do you have a favorite dish that you want to share? below! Like This? Spread the love

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Top Ten Best Luxury Hotels In The Maldives – News – Luxury Travel Diary

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The Maldives are a collection of more than a thousand small coral atolls, located on the equator towards the south of India in the Indian Ocean. These beautiful islands are actually the visible coral tips of an underwater volcanic mountain range. The archipelago houses some of the world’s most spectacular beaches, crystal clear turquoise lagoons, the most colourful fish in the world (not to mention the sharks, stingrays and more!) and breathtaking luxury resorts. The Maldives offers the ultimate beachside tropical paradise getaway for honeymooners, sun worshipers, romantics, nature lovers, scuba divers and celebrities.
I have picked the top 10 best luxury resorts in the Maldives. As you can imagine, these resorts are not cheap. Some of them have the most expensive hotel rooms in the world, but if you want a room with a slide straight into the sea and a roof that opens up to the stars, you have to pay the rather expensive prices. All the resorts featured are reviewed in great detail at the bottom of this article, which should help you choose the best choice for your trip.
Everyone should visit the Maldives at least once in their lives. Their isolated nature separates you from the rest of the world and clears your mind. Feel the hot white sand slip between your toes and float your way to happiness in an azure blue sea. It seems like dream and yet it is real. Just go! I guarantee you will fall in love with these heavenly islands. Free Upgrades & Offers At The Best Hotels In The Maldives
Book any of these hotels with our Luxury Travel Concierge to get brilliant benefits at the same price as the hotel website . If you want to get the best possible rates, you should also travel out of the main season (avoid Christmas and school holidays). You can then often take advantage of discounted third or fourth night free offers, extra resort credits, complimentary breakfast and more across all these resorts. Four Seasons Private Island Maldives At Voavah
In at number one is a Four Seasons hotel. This hotel which is also available for exclusive-use, is located on a private island and is currently the only Four Seasons hotel in the Maldives. It offers all the Four Seasons luxury and guarantees of service and perfection that you would expect from this major luxury brand. the Four Seasons Private Island Maldives At Voavah , Baa Atoll.
Much like Richard Branson’s Necker Island, this Four Seasons Luxury Private Island is rented out as a whole or “entirely yours”. With seven bedrooms, a Beach House, dive school and a private spa extend the oceanic spoils of the Maldives’ only UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, you and 21 other guests can enjoy days in the double-storey Beach House and adjacent white sands. Soneva Jani
Brand new and the sister hotel to Soneva Fushi Resort, Soneva Jani is located on the island of Medhufaru in the northern Atoll of Noonu, an hour by speedboat from Soneva Fushi. It offers a huge 4 kilometers of unspoilt beach.
Each one of the 24 water villas has a private lap pool and opens to its own stretch of lagoon, with some villas featuring slides going directly from the top deck into the lagoon below. The highlight of the villas is the retractable roof in the master bedroom, which slides back at the touch of a button so that guests can lie in bed and stargaze. Soneva Fushi
In our number two spot is Soneva Fushi, sister resort to Soneva Jani (although to be honest, there is little to choose between these resorts). Soneva Fushi is located in the stunning Baa Atoll island archipelago, a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve. Eco-chic villas are hidden among dense tropical foliage and are the stuff of romantic Robinson Crusoe fantasies. In fact, many are built to resemble tree houses. All open to their own private stretch of sugar white sands and most boast their own private seawater swimming pools. Service is provided by Mr./Ms. Friday butlers who know what you want before you do! Milaidhoo Island Maldives
The Milaidhoo Island Maldives opened in November 2016 and we personally reviewed Milaidhoo Island Maldives in 2018. With 30 over-water villas and 20 additional villas that sit among the tropical greenery along the beach, this resort is idyllic. Each villa comes complete with private freshwater swimming pool and your own personal concierge.
Though the resort is a boutique hotel, its dining options are on a grand scale. Choose from 3 restaurants and 2 bars throughout your stay. A modern take on “island influenced” cuisine will be offered in the signature restaurant, and the impressive wine list will please any connoisseur.
Idyllic beaches, world famous diving and snorkelling, fishing trips and cultural excursions are just some of the memory-making activities Milaidhoo will offer. This is a place to take it easy and take a dip with your dolphin, whale shark and manta ray neighbours within this protected marine area. Pack your bags, paradise has been found. Kanuhura, Maldives
It’s not the boho-chic interior decor we’ll take away with me from this little gem of a hideaway, nice though it all is. No, it’s the warmth of the team who looked after us as during our visit in 2018. Kanuhura, Maldives, also a member of the luxury hotel brand Leading Hotels of the World, is a place to watch spinner dolphins until you lose count, it is as close to paradise as I can imagine (although is missing slides and a retractable roof!)
The beach at Kanuhura is a major feature. It is simply huge for an island of this size. Huge, white and clean. The soft coral sand just begs you to go barefoot. As if that wasn’t enough, the resort includes two further islands, one of which, Jehenuhura has another gorgeous wide beach where turtles nest and a pretty restaurant hidden under the shade of the palm trees.
At night the staff decorate your bed and bath with fresh Hibiscus blooms gathered from the meticulously kept garden, the message spelt out on the bed in carefully folded palm-fronds is “come back” and trust us, you will! The St. Regis Vommuli Resort, Maldives
Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide recently opened (Nov 16) the first St. Regis brand in the Maldives. Located on Dhaalu Atoll Vommuli, the St. Regis Vommuli Resort offers 77 private villas will include majestic manta ray shaped lagoon villas and the John Jacob Astor Estate, one of the largest villas in the Maldives, which will span 1,540 square metres and feature a 92m private pool, as well as a spa room, fitness area and mini theatre. The resort will offer six distinct dining venues, a 24-hour butler service for all guests, a nature discovery centre and a dive centre. If you collect Marriott Bonvoy reward points, this is the ultimate place to spend them! Gili Lankanfushi, Maldives
Awarded the TripAdvisor Travellers’ Choice Award of Best Hotel in the World for 2015, Gili Lankanfushi resort is just a short boat ride from Male Airport. With its philosophy of “no news, no shoes”, it’s clear that Gili Lankanfushi prides itself on being a place where you can leave all day to cares behind and relax.
Choose from luxurious water villas, spacious residences with their own mini wine cellars or impressive complexes that can house all the family or even have their own private gym. Villas on jetty 3 are generally considered to be the most peaceful and boast the best sunset views. Jetty 1 is a great choice if you like the idea of snorkelling right by your villa.
When it comes to dining, there’s a lot of choice at Gili Lankanfushi, not to mention some truly exceptional culinary experiences. Dine on the beach surrounded by lanterns or in the garden where much of the produce is grown.
The stunning pool with its luxurious loungers almost melts into the ocean, and it’s there that you’ll find a lot of the best activities. With the clear waters and abundance of coral, colourful fish, little sharks and rays, even just wading in the shallows is an adventure. For those who want to explore the sea life further, snorkelling and diving are very popular. Gili Lankanfushi is the perfect resort for anyone wanting to discover the breathtaking beauty and total relaxation of the Maldives. Loama Resort Maldives
Loama Resort Maldives at Maamigili is one of the newest resorts on these islands. Located on the beautiful Raa Atol which is just 700 meters in length, Loama Resort is easily reached by a 45-minute seaplane journey. The island boasts a long history and several artefacts from the Ching dynasty were unearthed during the construction of the hotel. You will also notice a well on the island circa 1500AD from when the island was used as a Buddhist refuge. Since completion, Loama Resort Maldives at Maamigili has been listed by Conde Nast Traveller Middle East as one of the Best New Hotels in the World and you can now book your own moment on these palm-fringed beaches. Cheval Blanc Randheli
This Louis Vuitton Moet Hennessy resort s located on Noonu Atoll its home which is made up from a number of green islands protected from the ocean by a large coral reef, home to multicolour fish, rays and sea turtles. Getting there involves a trip onboard a Twin Otter of Havilland seaplane that has been exclusively designed for the Maison.
The famous resort offers 46 island, water and garden villas that feel like elegant cathedral-style lofts, with high doors and ceilings, outdoor areas for relaxation, stunning private swimming pools and lagoon-side pontoons. Cheval Blanc Randheli was the hotel chosen by Kate and William during their Maldivian getaway a few years ago. One & Only Reethi Rah
This luxury resort is set on a partly man-made, octopus-shaped island in the North Male Atoll, the resort is blessed with an extraordinary 6 km (3,7 mi) of coastline, dotted with white sand coves and turquoise bays. All 130 spacious villas occupying their own secluded piece of sandy shore or private deck over the lagoon’s crystal clear waters. Food is innovative and of the finest ingredients. Set apart from the rest of the resort, the spa is located within tranquil gardens and manicured lawns. One&Only Reethi Rah is a favourite among royals and A-list Hollywood celebrities. Top Ten Best Luxury Hotels In The Maldives Review: Four Seasons Private Island Maldives at Voavah
In “News”
Four Seasons has just opened its first exclusive-use hideaway in the stunning Maldives, the Four Seasons Private Island Maldives at Voavah, Baa Atoll. Read More. Review: Soneva Jani – The Most Astonishing Hotel Room In The World?
In “Accommodation”
Is Soneva Jani the most astonishing luxury hotel room in the world? If your idea of heaven is to flop into crystal clear waters straight from the top floor of your villa BY SLIDE, then this is THE best hotel… Read More. Hotel Review: Soneva Fushi
In “Accommodation”
The Maldives is one of those places that is so beautiful that your accommodation needs to be something special. But must add to the experience of staying here, not detract; so, oceanfront, understated but stunningly beautiful in its own right… Read More. Milaidhoo Maldives. Our Story Of A Small Island
In “News”
We have already reviewed Milaidhoo Island in the Maldives. This is the story of our experience of this magical island and what a stay here is really like. Read More. Hotel Review: Kanuhura, Maldives
In “News”
It’s not the gypset boho-chic interior decor I’ll take away with me from this little gem of a hideaway, nice though it all is. No, it’s the warmth of the team who looked after me, made me smile over and… Read More. Review Of Gili Lankanfushi In The Maldives
In “Accommodation”
The Maldives is one of the most beautiful and peaceful travel destinations in the world. Whether you’re after a relaxing family break or a romantic getaway for two, the white sands, palm trees and endless sparkling ocean should hit the… Read More. St Regis Vommuli Resort, Maldives
In “Accommodation”
Starwood Hotels & Resorts announced the signing of an agreement with Residency Resorts Malé Private Limited, to debut their St Regis brand in the Maldives. Read More. Review Of Loama Resort Maldives At Maamigili
In “Accommodation”
The Maldives really is paradise on earth. Perfect white sand beaches. Fish and rays that swim across coral reefs just steps from the shore. The almost luminous colours on these islands will make your soul dance with happiness and when… Read More. Disclosure: Our property, service and product reviews are sponsored by the proprietor or brand being appraised. All opinions remain our own and are in no way influenced by the sponsor. Related

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Letters: Immigrants are a welcome addition to our country

I agree with Merepeka Raukawa-Tait (Opinion, January 17) that people who uproot their lives to seek a better life abroad have a special kind of bravery. That is why I go above and beyond to help them settle into our country. They are go-getters sitting back and waiting is not in their DNA, not like some. They deserve our respect – why do you think it was quoted New Zealand has a rock star economy? They brought in so much money and their work ethic is second to none. Advertisement Advertise with NZME. That is why, in my view, we didn’t feel the financial crisis nearly as bad as we could have and all they want is a fair deal, no favours. We all love the food varieties they’ve brought in – even I love Japanese, Indian and Thai cuisine and I’m an old bugger, so three cheers to them. Gavin Muir Springfield Giant Ponzi scheme The definition of speculation is to buy something in the hope that it will increase in value, without any improvements or added features. I believe the New Zealand economy is based upon an industry of speculation, namely property speculation. How the Governor of the Reserve Bank can call himself an economist while overseeing such an appalling state of fiscal affairs is a mystery to me. How NZ First MPs can look in the camera when it seems to me that they are doing nothing about this situation, where the majority of NZ’s working capital does nothing but sits tied up in property, amazes me. Related articles:

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Night Noodle Markets about to hit Christchurch

Monday, 4 February, 2019 – 10:25
Prepare your taste buds, the Night Noodle Markets is in town!
The Night Noodle Markets are taking over North Hagley Park from Waitangi Day next week, running for an extended 12 nights from 4pm to 10pm daily.
As we countdown the days before the gates open to thousands of hungry Cantabrians, here’s everything you need to know to get the most out of your Night Noodle Markets experience.
Who’s going to be there?
Melbourne-based Hoy Pinoy’s BBQ skewers have become synonymous with the Night Noodle Markets experience, but they’re bringing something new to Christchurch. Co-owner Brendan Phillis says, “We’re super excited to showcase our Hoy Pinoy Lechon (slow-roasted pork). It has been a centrepiece in Australia for a couple of years now and finally we can bring it to New Zealand for the first time!”
Local vendors – newcomers and regulars alike – are also preparing to make a mark and showcase their best Asian bites.
Owner of first-time-stallholder Mumbaiwala, Anup Nathu, says: “We’re thrilled to be part of the Night Noodle Markets for the first time and to bring the Christchurch community a taste of our Indian street food.”
Bali Thai Cuisine owner Ulfatual Rohmah says: “I’m so happy and excited to be part of the Night Noodle Markets again – it will be our fourth time serving!”
What’s on the menu?
A total of 23 food stallholders are set to satisfy all tastes and preferences, plus there are plenty of options for vegans, vegetarians, and other dietary requirements as well – check out the menu here.
Award-winning brewer Moa Beer and Crafters Union Wine have the drinks sorted, and there will be a full range of non-alcoholic beverages straight from the Coke Caravan.
What else do I need to know?
The Night Noodle Markets is free to enter and open to all ages (as well as dogs on leashes!). It’s a completely cashless events and food options range from $5 to $20. All stallholders accept major credit/debit cards (excluding AMEX), and have contactless, Apple Pay, and Google Pay facilities.
Brand-new this year is free event Wi-Fi and a mobile event guide (text “noodle” to 332 to find out more). As always there is a wealth of awesome entertainment on every night, and if you’re heading to Sparks on Saturday 16 February, make sure you drop by and grab a pre-concert feast as markets will open early at 1pm.
Take me to the food!
There are two entrances, one on Park Terrace and one on Armagh Street. When getting to and from the Night Noodle Markets, please plan ahead as public parking space will be limited.
With other events and projects going on in the city, Christchurch Transport suggests to allow extra time and plan ahead before coming into town – such as by using public transport or walking.
Visit www.nightnoodlemarkets.nz for more information and follow The Night Noodle Markets NZ on Facebook to keep up with the latest.
Event details:
When: Wednesday 6 – Sunday 17 February 2019
Where: North Hagley Park
What time: 4pm – 10pm daily (opening at 1pm on Saturday 16 February and closing at 9pm on Sunday 17 February)
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Stirring the Multicultural Pot

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Canadians have a clear appetite for podcasts, and the hunger hasn’t been dying down. According to The Canadian Podcast Listener, a study conducted by Ulster Media and Audience Insights with support from the Globe and Mail , over 10 million Canadian adults, which is 36 percent of the 18+ population, have listened to podcasts in the past year since May 2018.
In 2017, Toronto writer Lorraine Chuen looked at recipes from The New York Times cooking page and found through the database that most cultural recipes were written by white chefs or authors. For instance, 90 percent of the authors under the Chinese and Indian recipe filters were white, with African cuisine (84 percent white authors) being treated as a monolith instead of Asian cuisines, which are broken down more specifically. The data was subjective, as Chuen manually searched and entered the data on her own for the Intersectional Analyst, a data researching project she co- created. The findings are still subject to error because of this, but as Chuen said in an email, “The fact that this was one of the only options points to the lack of survey data on diversity of journalists/writers.” These are just some examples found in Chuen’s study, but data like this should get the consumers of this content wondering who is writing about food and if there should be an authority on it, especially when it comes to cultural food.
Life and social media editor at Now Toronto and former food writer at The Georgia Straight Michelle da Silva says while there are no rules to becoming a food critic or writing about food, the internet has changed the accessibility of the craft and everyone is now able have their own food blogs or Instagram accounts. Podcasts are just another facet of the shifting landscape.
“There’s been this proliferation of food blogging where a lot of people who enjoy food or want to learn about food and they enjoy going to restaurants and taking photos, they start their own food blogs and they have food Instagram pages,” she says.
The worlds of podcasting and food writing were bound to intersect— Eat North’s “More Than Maple Syrup” and Canadaland’s “Taste Buds” are just a few Canadian examples. The Huffington Post ’s podcast “Born and Raised” debuted on Nov. 18, 2018 and concluded on Dec. 9, 2018. The first season consisted of five episodes and explored Canadian second–generation immigrants and their relationship to the cultural foods that shaped their connections to their roots. The podcast shares a name with the Huffpost video and blog series and is hosted by Ryerson Journalism graduates Angelyn Francis and Al Donato. Donato is a co-producer along with Stephanie Werner, also a Ryerson Journalism grad.
“It’s really more focused on storytelling than it is on education,” says Werner. Donato and Werner reiterate that “Born and Raised” is not an authority on food, nor does it strive to review or critique it. Instead, it’s a space for second-generation immigrants—who don’t often get to hear their own stories reflected back at them—to tell the stories about their culture.
Donato, who uses they/them pronouns, adds that guests on the podcast explain the historical context around each dish mentioned. “Often times, they’d be super personal, added with the context of history or family or the background about the dish itself,” they say. “So, it ends up being sort of educational, but it’s not the main goal.” Some anecdotes involving the intersections of food and heritage include a guest whose grandmother continued to cook a Sri Lankan dish called kutta sambol even as she grew sick, and another guest who refused to eat biryani, an Indian rice dish, unless it was homemade.
Chuen’s study only looked at one publication and focused on written recipes, though there are people who are beginning to question if one or a few food critics should be responsible for bringing the news on the newest hole-in-the-wall restaurants, especially ones that serve cultural cuisine.
Da Silva says it’s still possible to write about food from a culture the writer is not a part of themselves, but it needs to be approached in a specific way. “I feel it’s unfair to say, ‘you’re not allowed to write about this’, but I think you need to check your privileges and your blind spots to go, ‘OK, what might I not know about this that I should be sensitive about?’” She also says consulting other writers from the culture being written about to read over the piece before it goes out to ensure those blind spots don’t exist.
“I think it boils down to coming from a place of good intent, and if are they also asking the right questions,” Donato says. They also add that “Born and Raised” didn’t want to “tokenize anyone and make anyone the spokesperson.”
Podcasting is often regarded as a more intimate and personal form of storytelling in journalism. The Canadian Podcast Listener study from 2017 found that the top three reasons people wanted to listen to podcasts were to be entertained, to hear interesting stories, and to learn something new. Though it may not replace traditional written reviews or pieces about food, perhaps it can offer something different: a laid-back, personal approach to food stories.
“Food is our entryway into this world, but at the end of the day our stories are really more about the people,” Werner says. Though not claiming to be any sort of authority on food, she says “Born and Raised” offers relatable, anecdotal stories about culture and food, if that’s what the listener is looking for. “If you want the end all be all, top biriyani in the world, you’re not going to find it here. But if you want one person’s story about the way their mom cooked it in a special way…that’s what we’ve got.” (Visited 6 times, 7 visits today) Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Comment

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Tomato Pie: The trouble with recipes

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I have often thought about how to teach people to cook. Not just follow the occasional recipe like a computer follows its programming but to really cook, digesting and flowing from one ingredient to another.
Celebrity Chef Francis Mallmann describes this phenomenon saying, “The most beautiful thing about cooking is the silent language. You can’t write about it. I can’t teach it.”
When someone cooks and gets really gets it, there is this wordless and unspoken interplay between the ingredients, tools of the chef and the heat of the fire.
I think Mallmann is right that no one can teach you the unspoken laws of flavor and taste, and perhaps the huge numbers of trendy cookbooks for a populace that increasingly does not cook bears that truth out. Even so, I won’t accept that creativity and skill in the kitchen is reserved only for those that can innately speak the language of the kitchen. Yet, I don’t think there is a cookbook that can teach you to have an intuitive feel for how things play together on a palate.
One must teach themselves how sweet, savory, salty and umami proportionally combine into a plate.
Even yet, I will do my best to give some guidelines to someone who really wants to learn to cook. I will start out by saying that cooking is (in my mind) the most rewarding hobby one can endeavor to join.
By cooking, you have taken in important step in being a provider for yourself and in part free yourself from a toxic system of food production so many Americans are reliant upon.
My main word of advice toward learning to cook would be to just cook. Of course, you will need to find recipes, but I would never treat a recipe as law in the early stages. If you want to learn to cook, use free recipes online and just start cooking.
At first, you will make a lot of bad food, and get discouraged; I did.
As you cook more and more your dishes will begin to get better. The flavors will get bolder and less muddy on the palate. More specifically, I recommend picking a cuisine and starting to cook from that cuisine. By cooking within one cuisine, you will gain a deeper understanding of how the different spices and herbs indigenous to that cuisine play together.
Once you have a reasonable understanding of, say, Indian cuisine, you can move on to a different world cuisine.
Now is where it gets fun and you can really improve your skills.
As you learn the new style preparing food, try to create a fusion using what are learning with the new style and your favorite elements of the old one. By blending these together, you can start to get a feel for what I believe is the most important element of preparing food at a high level: ratio.
Ratio is the fundamental separation between home cooks who follow the occasional recipe at rote, and home chefs who use creativity to create bold and inspiring gastronomic creations.
Understanding ratio means understanding the basic mathematical principles that make fine dining a heightened experience and gaining an ability to bring a creative impulse from conception to ingestion.
To rotate back to the start of the article, ratio really is the unspoken “silent language” of the kitchen. Well, ratio and a hearty dose of creativity. By working to gain a culinary understanding of how, why, and in what proportions one can start to learn to speak the secret language of the kitchen. There aren’t shortcuts and natural skill can only take you so far. If someone wants to learn to cook, stop buying cookbooks and start cooking with an analytical and observant mind for the details of gastronomy.
I leave you with this statement: Start cooking and free your mind of any conception of right and wrong in the kitchen. For us, there is no grand technique or tradition. There is only taste, sight, texture and smell.
By freeing yourself of constant worry over what is right or wrong or what other people think about your cooking, you allow yourself to just create art in your kitchen. So, go and create.
Louis Smith is a senior studying Biochemical and Molecular Biology. He can be reached at .

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The ultimate bucket list of must have Indian food in Kent!

by Vaishali S. Professional Web Designer Kent is brimming with brilliant restaurants with some amazing tasty flavorful food which will only make you ask for more! When in Kent you are sure to get those taste buds working because there’s a restaurant for each of your cravings. One of the cuisines which have really become popular is the Indian cuisine. India being a country with so much diversity in its culture, it sure translates into the food platter. When it comes to finding Indian food in Kent, with Eat2Save you can be rest assured to get the very best. There is no dearth of Indian restaurant in Kent and if you are in the mood to taste some authentic traditional Indian food get online and order your favorites from the best Indian restaurant in Kent. In the current growing market people are eating out and ordering food online now more than ever. Indian food is not hard to find anymore, you can now have all the diverse variety of Indian dishes with just a touch of a button. If you are an Indian food newbie, with Eat2Save you can check out the best Indian restaurants in Kent and order delicious and flavorful Indian food with just a few clicks. Don’t miss out on the heavenly butter chicken! When it comes to Indian food in Kent, if you have not yet tasted the famous butter chicken then you are really missing out. It is an absolute favorite and a top notch dish. The amazing mouth watering gravy will make you drool. If it’s your first time venturing into Indian cuisine’ this is the perfect start. So what are you waiting for, experience deliciousness like never before with the famous butter chicken from the best Indian restaurants in Kent. Your plate of biriyani is waiting for you, grab it now. When the bold flavors of authentic Indian spices intermingle on your plate, you cannot stop yourself from drooling. That is exactly what you experience at Radhuny Express on Pickford Lane at Kent. In Indian cuisine biriyani holds a very special place, it is loved by all. No matter where you are, a plate of biriyani can make you forget all your worries. Once you taste their Radhuny Special Biriyani, not just its taste but its aroma will not leave you forever. Order your plate of biriyani with us and get it delivered right at your door. Experience the richness of the amazing Indian dishes. Another mouth watering Indian dish that satisfies your palate unconditionally is Chicken Makhani from Zeera Spice in Kent. If you are craving wholesome exotic Indian food in Kent, with Eat2Save book a table at Zeera Spice or order online and enjoy your favorite delicacies with just a few clicks here and there. Indian cuisine has really created a niche for itself. With its authentic spices, traditional style and heavenly taste, it definitely makes for a more than satisfying feast. We are your eyes and ears and with us you can be sure to get the best of Indian food in Kent right at your fingertips. Dig into the delicious Mach Kofta with authentic Indian herbs and spices! When you think of Indian food there is no forgetting about the mind blowing and tasty dishes that can be prepared with fish. At Lal Sag in Dartford, Kent there is nothing that can be compared to their Mach Kofta. It is an extraordinary dish prepared with minced fish and traditional Indian herbs and spices. It is definitely a must have. It is healthy, delicious and a worth every penny. So what are you waiting for, hurry now and order this delight online with Eat2Save and enjoy the best Indian food in Kent within the comfort of your home. Book your table at the best Indian restaurant in Kent now! If you are looking for inspiration as to where you can go for a weekend dinner outing, we have the most amazing list of the best Indian restaurants in Kent that is perfect for a hearty meal with your loved ones. Sometimes all you want to do is go out and enjoy a wholesome comforting meal with your friends and family. With us you can book a table beforehand and not have to worry about rushing through traffic to make your reservation or wait in lines for a table. If you are looking to enjoy a relaxing evening with some amazing Indian delicacies , then Albert Spice is the place to be. So book your table with Eat2Save and enjoy amazing Indian food in the best Indian restaurant in Kent.

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Superfoods for Better Balance + an Ayurvedic Recipe

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Image via Shutterstock.
Imbalance in the body and mind can majorly affect your overall health. Keeping yourself mentally and physically balanced is a vital part of feeling your best. One way to bring more balance to your life is by including superfoods that stimulate a grounding effect on both body and mind. Though everyone has their own bio-individual needs, incorporating foods high in vitamins and minerals that promote brain function, good digestion, and metabolic health is a key aspect to achieving balance.Originated in India thousands of years ago, Ayurveda is a system of healing that encourages balance within the mind, body, and spirit. In the Ayurvedic tradition, diet and lifestyle practices are recommended based on an individual’s dosha, or type. According to Ayurveda, eating and living in harmony with your type supports balance and good health.Within the Ayurvedic diet, there are a variety of healing spices, teas, tonics, herbs, and oils intended to make your body feel balanced according to its bio-individual needs. The intention of these Ayurvedic superfoods is to reduce inflammation, stress, and adrenal dysfunction; relieve pain; and enhance digestion and gut health, all to create overall balance in the body.Here are some of our favorite balancing superfoods: Ashwagandha Ashwagandha is an adaptogen that helps the body modulate its reaction to stressful conditions. Some of its many benefits include promoting healthy cortisol levels and supporting a relaxed and stable mood, leaving you feeling more balanced. In Ayurveda, ashwagandha root is also said to encourage proper hormonal function and promote happiness. Turmeric This bright and vibrant spice often seen in Indian cuisine is more than just a powerful flavor addition! It’s also packed with curcumin, an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant-rich compound that helps detoxify the body. Turmeric is best absorbed by the body when combined with black pepper. Triphala Triphala is a staple to Ayurvedic medicine. It consists of three plants – amla, bibhitaki, and haritaki. This Ayurveda essential contains antioxidants that protect the body from causes of stress and fight chronic disease. It has also been used as a natural laxative to treat constipation. Don’t worry, though! You won’t have to travel long and far to reap the benefits of this superfood combo. Due to popularity, it’s now commonly found online and at most natural health food stores. Ginger Loved or hated, ginger is among the healthiest spices out there. It contains powerful medicinal properties that have long been used to support health. From cold control to cancer prevention , ginger has been used to heal a variety of health matters. Grass-Fed Ghee Ghee is the clarified form of butter, meaning it has been separated from the milk solids, producing a nuttier golden fat. Ghee is cooked longer than clarified butter and can cook at higher temperatures without burning. It contains fat-soluble vitamins A and E and promotes heart health. Many Indian and Ayurvedic dishes are cooked with grass-fed ghee due to its anti-inflammatory health benefits.If you’re looking for ways to incorporate these superfoods into your diet, check out the kitchari recipe below! Ayurvedic Kitchari Superfood Recipe

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Doha- the land of beautiful contrasts – Media India Group

Doha- the land of beautiful contrasts Experience two worlds in one city By , Delhi
With Qatar all set to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, here’s our list of five exciting things you can do in Doha ADVENTURE IN THE DESERT-BEACH
ADVENTURE IN THE DESERT-BEACH
Not all places give you the opportunity to experience adventurous activities in both desert and the sea. The Khor Al Adid allows you to experience both. The UNESCO-recognised natural reserve is a rare example of the sea jutting deep into the heart of the desert. For a heart-stopping roller coaster ride over the steep dunes, try a 4×4 off-road safari and, if you are feeling particularly adventurous, hire a dirt bike. Or have a go at camel, sand boarding or driving a dune buggy. Do not forget to watch camel racing- ‘the sport of the sheikhs’, where you can watch robots whipping the camels, with owners and spectators following along in their 4-wheel drives.Many safaris take in the spectacular ‘Inland Sea’ and the chance to enjoy glorious desert sunsets and moonlit barbeques. Daytime, evening and overnight camping trips; take your pick. With no sign of civilisation, it is a place of stark solitude. GO ON A SHOPPING SPREE
GO ON A SHOPPING SPREE
All the shopping stories in Doha begin at Souq Waqif that stands for ‘standing market’. A promenade in the bustling alleys of Doha’s first major market provides an authentic taste of traditional commerce, architecture and culture. The maze of small shops offer a dazzling array of Middle Eastern merchandise from spices and seasonal delicacies such as fresh dates and nuts, to perfumes, ornate jewellery, clothing, handicrafts and a treasure trove of souvenir bargains.
The city is filled with malls. They say for a population of nearly 3,00,000 there are 100 malls. Villagio Mall finds a place in Forbes magazine’s ‘best malls of the world’ list, followed by Mall of Qatar, Doha Festival City Mall and the Pearl-Qatar where you can relax and soak up the vitality and atmosphere at one of its eclectic mix of restaurants and cafes.You can even book a private one day shopping tour and be chauffeured around the city’s retail hotspots.
“A visit to the Villagio Mall is a must. It looks like Vatican City with a man-made inland lake. One might find a stark similarity to it with the Bollywood movie Saawariya,” says Lamiya Mohammed, a blogger based in Qatar, who goes by the name “thelittlehijabee”on Instagram. For a glimpse of Qatari heritage, a visit to the Falcon SouqMarket in Doha is a must. You will find customers examining the birds – most of them hooded in black leather, and perched on posts or railings – and discussing the finer points of falconry with the shopkeepers.
HAVEN FOR ART LOVERS
HAVEN FOR ART LOVERS
The city is home to numerous museums and galleries. Besides the incredible Qatar National Museum, check out the Sheikh Faisal Museum that displays the private collection of random artifacts of a Qatari billionaire.
The Museum of Islamic Art (MIA) boasts a world-class collection of art spanning 14 centuries and is one of the leading collections of Islamic art in the world. Its award winning collections include paintings, glassworks, metalwork, ceramics, textiles and manuscripts. TANTALISE YOUR TASTE BUDS
TANTALISE YOUR TASTE BUDS
To experience Qatari food and Arabic coffee, head out to either Souq Waqif or Katara Cultural Village—the sheer variety of traditional cuisine here wil surprise you. The Qatari’s favourite food is roast camel, roasted on a BBQ is the best option. Over the years, local dishes have been influenced by the cuisine of the Indian Subcontinent, Iran, the Levant and North Africa. They include-Balaleet, cooked sweet noodles with fried eggs spiced with saffron and cardamom; a traditional sweet and savoury dish that is well-known as a local breakfast meal. Lunch or dinner meals includes machboos, a stew of richly spiced rice with seafood or meat; ghuzi, a whole roast lamb on a bed of rice and nuts; and stuffed boiled sheep or goat served with seasoned rice. The region’s favourite dessert is Luqaimat, a deep fried sweet dumpling drizzled with sugar syrup. UNVEIL THE OFFBEAT TREASURES IN DOHA
UNVEIL THE OFFBEAT TREASURES IN DOHA
“Located on Qatar’s north-west coast and comprising the immaculately restored Al Zubarah Fort and surrounding 60-hectare archaeological works, this UNESCO World Heritage site is the only remaining example of a complete Arabian pearl merchant town. It is one of the most extensive and best preserved examples of an 18th–19th century settlement in the region,” says Joe Fernandes from Aviareps, the India representative of Qatar Tourism Board.
Also, a visit to Zekreet known for its beach and film city and the stunning “East-West/West-East” sculpture by Richard Serra, an American artist known for creating imposing metalwork sculptures in the desert is a must.The site has become a place of occasional pilgrimage for locals, tourists and art devotees alike.
“One of my favourite things to do in Doha is go and visit the Aspire park (Doha’s biggest park), where one can sit and relax and enjoy the view of the magical bridge and the Aspire tower especially in the evening. Also I love to sit at the corniche, late at night and enjoy the view,” adds Lamiya.
DID YOU KNOW?
• 99 pc of the country lives in the capital of Doha, since the other part of the nation is just desert.
• Doha is home to the world’s first and largest underground stadium, called the Wall Stadium.
• The Doha Festival City Mall is home to over 200 international brands, the world’s largest Monoprix Hypermarket, Middle East’s first NBA Store, and the world’s first Angry Birds World Theme Park.
• Mall of Qatar is home to the world’s first alcohol free Curio Collection by Hilton, an IMAX Laser 3D projection system, KidzMondo, the mall also includes live entertainment as part of ‘MOQ Live’, making it the world’s first mall to recruit an in-house theatre crew. The Doha Marriott has a 100-metre buffet that offers anything you can imagine.

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The Ultimate Moab Travel Guide – Outside

Search The Ultimate Moab Travel Guide This small town in southeastern Utah has come into its own as one of America’s great multisport destinations. Here’s how to make the most out of a visit, from pedaling its world-class singletrack to hiking its famed national parks to rafting the Colorado River. The definitive outside guide to everything Moab. (Daniel Holz/Tandem) Text
Moab, sandwiched between Arches and Canyonlands National Parks in Utah’s red-rock desert, is a town with two personalities. Its crimson cliffs, alpine peaks, and slickrock valleys are both a massive outdoor romper room for thrill seekers and a landscape that begs quiet contemplation and introspection. As the town’s most famous alum, Edward Abbey, put it, “Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit, and as vital to our lives as water and good bread.”
The town has grown up around this duality—using the land for mountain biking, four-wheeling, rafting, climbing, and backcountry hiking and skiing while appreciating and protecting its unique splendor. I made my first trip to the area in 2001 for an all-night party disguised as a 24-hour mountain-bike race. Those were more rustic times in the region, when accommodations typically meant sleeping in the back of a truck and the only thing haute about the cuisine was sharing a beer with friends at the top of Burro Pass . But my fondness for the desert, my appreciation for its nuance and beauty, has only grown since. That’s why I wince a little now when I hear people refer to the town as one of the country’s greatest “adventure playgrounds.” It seems a callous and disrespectful way to describe such a sacred landscape, but of course I get it. It’s true.
Today, commercial activity in town has expanded beyond bike shops and 4×4 garages. You can now sip on expertly pulled espresso while browsing the town’s bookstore and art galleries, or return from a day of play for Wagyu flank steak and a craft cocktail, a soak in a hot tub, and a stopover in a plush, luxury lodge. Still, 87 percent of the aptly named Grand County, Utah , of which Moab is the county seat, is public land, and you could spend a lifetime goofing off here and not cross your own footsteps.
The guide that follows will point you to toward the best the area has to offer. Some are classics that simply can’t be skipped. Others are new entrees soon to be staples on the region’s ever expanding adventure itinerary. Need to Know
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Moab shines in the shoulder season —that is, spring and fall, when the weather is at its best and temperatures are at their most benign—but it can be manageable in the summer and winter, too. A January trip, for example, can entail backcountry skiing in the nearby La Sal Mountains and biking sunbaked slickrock trails in the same day. Summer days are sweltering but great for stand-up paddleboarding, rafting, and swimming in the Colorado River, which skirts northwest of town. But the best month for a Moab adventure is November. The October crowds have disbanded, daytime highs are typically pinned in the high fifties and sixties, and quality campsites are easy to find, even for a spontaneous weekend trip.
There’s little mandatory prep, but some advance planning may be required. Backcounty camping in both Arches and Canyonlands National Parks is permit only, as are some activities, like Arches’ popular Fiery Furnace hike. Established park campsites can be snagged for a fee, but if you plan on visiting during peak season, they must be reserved well in advance of your trip. Ranger-led Fiery Furnace hikes happen every morning and afternoon. Morning hikes can be booked online or by phone at 877-444-6777 up to six months before your trip, but afternoon hikes can only be reserved in person up to seven days in advance. If you want to go unguided, you must obtain a $6 permit in person at the visitor center and watch an orientation video on how to best protect terrain and its flora and fauna.
During peak season, if you plan to ride the region’s most popular routes, the world-famous Whole Enchilada and Magnificent 7 trails, make a shuttle reservation as soon as you can. They sell out quickly, and I’ve been S.O.L. trying to book a seat the night before. The trips to the trailhead in the stretched VW vans of Coyote Shuttle run between $15 and $30.
Before you go, immerse yourself in a copy of Abbey’s Desert Solitaire , a memoir about the famed environmental activist and author’s life as an Arches park ranger in the 1950s. And for a little extra homework, check out In Search of the Old Ones , by longtime Outside contributor David Roberts, an engaging exploration of Anasazi ruins around southern Utah and elsewhere. Getting There
(Justin Bartels/iStock)
It’s easy to get to Moab by car. Interstate 70 is just 31 miles to the north, and Highway 191 runs right through town and passes many of the city’s best adventures. For those outside driving range, the closest major airports are Denver, a six-hour drive east, and Salt Lake City, four hours to the north. But the best option is to fly into Grand Junction, Colorado, and rent a sturdy vehicle with four-wheel drive. It’s all asphalt to Moab, but you’ll want off-road capacity to get to the best campsites, trails, and adventures. Another option is to fly directly into town. Tickets can be expensive, but as of June 2018, visitors can fly directly to Moab’s Canyonlands Field from Denver via daily commercial flights from United through its partnership with SkyWest Airlines. Base Camps
(Jake Sloop/Unsplash)
Whether you’re a vanlifer, an Airstream nomad, a teardrop traveler, or a traditional tent camper, Moab provides some of the best alfresco accommodations anywhere in the lower 48. You can’t go wrong by posting up in an Arches or Canyonlands campsite ($15–$25), but there are plenty of alternatives. Check out sites off Kane Creek Road, just west of town along the Colorado River; Highway 128, which wraps around Arches to the northeast; and the Sand Flats Recreation Area, a high plain three miles east of town, where you can park or pitch your tent beneath ancient, gnarled juniper. It should be noted that there are no facilities, and whatever waste you pack in—including human—must be packed out. But for stellar cosmic views of the night sky and easy access to the five-star Magnificent 7 trail system, head to Horsethief Campground, a first-come, first-served BLM site off Highway 313, about a 25-minute drive west of town ($20). It’s just a few miles from Dead Horse Point State Park and the best view of the Colorado River outside the Grand Canyon.
Want a roof over your head? Your best bet is Airbnb, which includes everything from deluxe desert homes to a teardrop trailer with an outdoor kitchen delivered to your campsite. I like the new Moab Cataract Condo , which sleeps eight, comes with a hot tub and storage space for your gear, and starts at just $100 a night on the weekends. A few local hotels are also recommendable, including stalwarts like the Gonzo Inn and the basic-but-budget-friendly Adventure Inn . But the best hidden gem may be 57 Robber’s Roost , a five-unit condo complex of two- and three-bedroom suites, a half-block from the center of town (from $199). There’s one potential drawback, though: no pets. Adventure
(Jeremy Pawlowski/Stocksy)
Framed by two national parks, etched with more than a thousand miles of mountain-bike trails, home to hundreds of canyons, ravines, rock walls, and a major river, recreational omnivores arriving in Moab might not even know where to begin. We’ll take it sport by sport, starting with mountain biking since the area may be the best place to ride in the country. Cycling
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First-timers should tick off Moab’s bucket-list rides: the Whole Enchilada and Slickrock trails. They get crowded, but they’re world-famous for a reason. A shuttle of the Whole Enchilada will see you descend 7,000 feet from the high-alpine forests atop La Sal Mountain to the emerald Colorado River in 27 miles. However, it’s easy to dodge the crowds without sacrificing any fun. You can’t go wrong with the Amasa Back/Captain Ahab, Sovereign, or Navajo Rocks trail systems, but to capitalize on bang for buck, link up the seven trails that make up the Magnificent 7 route. The 26-plus-mile ride showcases just about everything that makes riding in Moab so special, including ledge drops, slickrock, fast and flowing dirt, and endless scenic vistas. We recommend letting the expert guides at Western Spirit Cycling lead the way, especially during short November days. But you can easily DIY by hiring a shuttle.
For an endurance challenge, head to White Rim Trail, which circumnavigates the Island in the Sky mesa, a broad plateau above the Green and Colorado Rivers. Ride the 100-mile route, clockwise, in a day if you’re feeling tough and fit. Or break it up into a two- or three-day bikepacking adventure. Stellar views, sweet slickrock campsites, and remote backcountry await. Just be smart when planning water, food, mechanicals, and shelter. You’ll need a camping or day-use permit from Canyonlands National Park .
Road cyclists should queue up the La Sal Mountain Loop, a paved 60-plus-mile scenic spin that wraps around the nearby La Sal Range. You can tackle the ride any time, or join the party on May 4 for Gran Fondo Moab , a festive supported ride with aid stations along the route. Hiking
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Prefer adventuring on foot? By all means, go explore the two national parks. Arches’ moderate three-mile walk to Delicate Arch, and Canyonlands’ scenic Lathrop Canyon Trail, a 22-mile round-trip, are worthy classics. But the best hike in the area isn’t in a park. About 40 miles north of town you’ll find Fisher Towers. The moderate 4.4-mile round-trip provides easy access to mind-blowing views of the Colorado River and Castle Valley. It’s not overrun like much of the national parks, and, unlike the parks, it’s dog friendly, so you don’t have to leave your pup behind.
For a more sporting outing, consider booking a canyoneering trip. There are many amazing slots to explore, and while you may be able to plot one on your own, it’s highly advisable to go guided. Flooding, rockfall, and navigation are all serious issues, and experienced outfitters can advise and instruct accordingly. If you only have time to do one, ring up Windgate Adventures and have one of its guides take you to Land Before Time. The all-day, six-mile trip involves multiple long rappels, including two of more than 100 feet, knee- to neck-deep water holes, boulder hopping, and scrambling around dramatic slot canyons. Climbing
(Kaare Iverson/Tandem)
Start your Moab climbing trip at Ice Cream Parlor, a sport and trad crag along Kane Creek Road about eight miles outside town with many moderate, bolted routes, before stepping it up to one of the area’s dramatic sandstone towers or making the hour drive south to the cracks of Indian Creek. The four-pitch, Grade III Kor-Ingells route on Castle Valley’s Castleton Tower, sandbagged at 5.9+, is a right of passage for intermediate climbers who want a long, challenging route. The summit is a football-field-size aerie, and at 300 feet straight down, the rappel off the top is one of the most exhilarating you’ll encounter in the region. The American Alpine Institute has named it one of the 50 classic climbs in North America , so you’ll earn some bragging rights, too. Rafting
(Courtesy Moab Adventure Center)
While most of Moab’s adventures take place on dirt and red rock, don’t overlook the water. Some of the finest river trips in the country start in town. The reigning classic is the four-day Colorado River trip through Cataract Canyon. You’ll wind 96 miles through Canyonlands National Park, navigating Class II–IV rapids, before returning to Moab by scenic charter flight. The Moab Adventure Center runs deluxe guided trips May through August.
Short on time? MAC also offers a two-day option that utilizes sleek, speedy rafts to double your daily mileage. For a more leisurely experience, rent a stand-up paddleboard from Paddle Moab to explore on your own, or book one of its guided trips, like the Splish and Splash tour, a six-mile introduction to SUP river running through four sets of waves on the Colorado. Eat and Drink
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Complaining about the food in Moab has historically been a sport unto itself. That’s not to say there haven’t been some beloved classics. Milt’s Stop and Eat dates back to 1954 and still serves some of the best grass-fed, all-natural burgers and shakes in the region, if not the country. But the rest of the culinary scene has slowly been catching up. It’s now possible to enjoy high-quality sushi at Sabaku , banh mi and pho at 98 Center , and wood-fired pizza at Antica Forma .
The current culinary star, however, is the La Sal House , an upscale neighborhood tavern that opened in May 2018 in an adobe building on Main Street that once housed the storied Poplar Place Pub. Bourbon is the featured spirit at La Sal House, and it turns up in a number of recipes, as well as in its top-notch cocktails. Settle in early for a classic Boulevardier, with bourbon, Campari, and vermouth, or my personal favorite, the Cholla, a seasonal drink made with tequila, beet juice, lime, and house grenadine. The miso-bourbon-gravy poutine is arguably the best you’ll find this side of the Canadian border, and, for carnivores, the Wagyu flank steak is divine.
Proprietors Pennellope and Wes Shannon also run Love Muffin Café , an excellent coffee shop and breakfast café known for its espresso and breakfast paninis. On hot summer days, get your ice cream—or, rather, your cryocream—fix at Moab Garage Company , which blends its ingredients with liquid nitrogen to create custom flavors like blueberry basil without relying on preservatives. Detours
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Take a day off from bikes and hikes, and immerse yourself in the region’s natural history, starting at Moab Giants, a museum dedicated to the area’s prehistoric heritage. While it may seem like a tourist trap from the road, the attraction actually has some serious science and great displays, including life-size dinos. Then see the real thing—or at least real dinosaur footprints—for yourself at Mill Canyon Dinosaur Trails, an interpretive loop run by the Bureau of Land Management 16 miles outside town along Highway 191.
North of Moab along the Colorado River, you’ll find Red Cliffs Lodge, home to the Museum of Film and Western Heritage. The venue offers a comprehensive overview of Hollywood’s infatuation with the area and all the films that have been made there, from early westerns like Wagon Master and Rio Grande to more modern classics such as City Slickers and Thelma and Louise .
Round out your Moab education with a stop at Back of Beyond Books , one of the best bookstores in the West, and browse its extraordinary collection of natural history, environmental literature, guidebooks, current bestsellers, and rare titles. The store’s name is taken from Abbey’s classic conservation novel The Monkey Wrench Gang . There couldn’t be a better way to carry on his legacy.
Other worthy side trips include the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monuments to the southwest, the centerpieces of the most recent fight over the protection of our public lands. They are some of the country’s most dazzling and precious landscapes, and there’s no better way to appreciate what is at stake than seeing them firsthand. For a full immersion, head to Kane Gulch Trailhead at Bears Ears, and hike the 52-mile-long Grand Gulch, home to petroglyphs, pottery shards, cliff dwellings and ancient kivas.

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