6 IDEAL THINGS TO DO IN MAURITIUS

6 IDEAL THINGS TO DO IN MAURITIUS

6 IDEAL THINGS TO DO IN MAURITIUS By – May 28, 2019
In the famous words of Mark Twain “You gather the idea that Mauritius was made first and then heaven, and that heaven was copied after Mauritius.” Indeed, Mauritius is best known for its lush landscapes, turquoise waters and beautiful beaches. However, not many people know that it’s also home to one of the world’s greatest Creole cuisines. M ost Mauritians are descendants of people from Africa, Asia, Indian and Europe and as such it’s cuisine is an interesting and intoxicating mix of flavours and flair from different countries and continents.
T he capital city of the Mauritius, Port Louis, which was recently ranked as the 16th city in the world with the best street food by CNN, so if you’re visiting the island, its food and flavours should definitely be on your agenda. Even if you’re on one of those wonderfully luxurious Mauritius all inclusive holidays where all your drinks and food are included, you’d be a fool not to get out and explore more of the island’s cuisine. With that in mind, here are 6 foodie things to do in Mauritius. ENJOY FRESH FISH AND SENSATIONAL SEAFOOD
With the warm waters of the Indian Ocean surrounding the island, as you’d expect the bounty of fresh fish and seafood from its waters is something else. Exotic catches like marlin and parrot fish that roam the waters around the island are typical offerings. Fitting for an exotic holiday , a plate of smoked Blue Marlin served with palm heart salad is a typical dish you’ll find on menus across the island and shouldn’t be missed. Also look out creole specialities like Fish Vindaye. This intensely flavoured dish features fish cooked in turmeric, mustard, garlic and ginger and is not only one of the most popular dishes, but perhaps the islands defining dish.
The north has the greatest concentration and variety of beaches and it’s in the northern coastal villages you’ll find some of the best seafood restaurants. Elsewhere on the island Poste de Flacq is another place known for its seafood restaurants and is home to a sea farm rearing oysters and sea cucumbers. The fishing village of Mahébourg in the south-eastern coast is one of the best places for Lobster. Simply grilled on the barbeque is the best way to have it. Blue Marlin Kim /Flickr STOP FOR STREET FOOD IN PORT LOUIS
Everywhere you turn in Mauritius you’re guaranteed to see food stalls offering local specialities to islanders and tourists alike. As mentioned, one of the best places to get your fill of the Mauritian street food culture is in the capital city of the island. The hustle and bustle of the city’s historical market (bazaar) is well-known for serving a range of local snacks and cheap eats and there’s a small food court where you can sample most of the best known, convieniently under one roof. A must-try is Dholl puri, a kind of pancake made from ground yellow split peas and seasoned with cumin and turmeric, then stuffed with butter bean curry and r ougaille (a spicy Creole tomato sauce and the soul of nearly every Mauritian dish) and topped with chutney and pickles. Gateaux pimments which are little chilli cakes, similar to fried fritters are another street-food-snack must try as are manioc goujons; delicious deep-fried cassava chips. DON’T FORGET THE FOODIE SOUVENIRS
While your at the market, don’t forget to get your foodie souvenirs. Mazavaroo, a complex chilli paste made from chillies, garlic, ginger, preserved lemons and spices is served with just about everything and they sell it at the market by the bucketload. Get a jar and take this fiery taste of the island home with you. Vanilla, which is grown on the island, is prevalent in both savoury and sweet dishes here. However when it comes to vanilla products, Bois Chéri vanilla tea is particularly famous throughout the island, which you can also buy at the market. But be warned, if your after Vanilla itself, be mindful that much that you’ll find at the markets is from nearby Madagascar. If you want authentic Mauritian vanilla products take a trip to the Saint Aubin plantation where you can even take a vanilla tour should you so wish. CHOW DOWN IN CHINATOWN
Mauritius is home to reportedly the oldest china-town in the whole of Africa. From the 1780s a wave of Chinese immigrants came to the island bringing their food customs with them. Known as Sino – Mauritians, today they form about 3% of the local population, however while their numbers may be small their food is immensely popular and attracts visitors from all over the island and indeed, all over the world.
In Chinatown, you’ll find vendors selling wontons, spring rolls and steamed pork buns at every turn. Bol Renverse, often revered to as magic bowl or upside-down-bowl is perhaps the most famous of the Sino-Mauritian dishes. An egg, some stirfry and rice is layered into a bowl, then flipped onto a plate and the bowl is then taken off to reveal a dome shape, with the egg on top. You can find this dish at nearly every Sino-Mauritian Restaurant. However, a foodie visit to this part of town wouldn’t be complete without a bowl of boulettes soup (dumpling soup). Since Sino – Mauritians have the bounty of the sea at their finger tips, we think the best version are the dumplings made from fish, prawns and crap in a fishy broth. That said, chou chou an exotic pear-shaped vegetable which is cultivated on the island is another dim sum winner for us. Mine frit (fried noodles) is another popular snacks within the Sino – Mauritian food lexicon.
If you’re interested in touring this part of town, the best time to come is during the Chinese Spring Festival which takes place on the second full moon after the winter solstice. The festival is widely, and fervently, celebrated – in fact it’s a holiday across the whole island. ENJOY A BOTTLE OF RUM
Where there’s sugar canes, there’s rum and there’s certainly a lot of rum in Mauritius. There’s a number of distilleries across the island that offer tastings, two of the oldest and most famous are St Aubin and Chateau Labourdonnais. Other the last decade, the rum industry in Mauritius has grown exponentially . For decades, Sugar was the only commodity worthwhile, so there was a ban on using raw sugarcane to distil rum. However since the government lifted the ban, there’s been a boom in small-scale artisanal bottlers producing agricole rum which in turn, has caused bigger distilleries to diversify and experiment with their offerings. As such, now is an exciting time to learn about the Mauritius’ rum industry.
Mauritius’ rum comes in a variety of grades, from light to dark, depending on how long they’re fermented. However, look out for bottles of Rhum Arrangè where local sugar cane rum steeped in different types of fruits and flavours. The word arrangè refers to infusion, and they infuse the rum with local produce including lychee, coconut, vanilla and even chilli. Also, try a glass or two of Ti rum punch; the traditional version mixes agricole rum with sugar syrup and lime. By the end of it you’ll be a rum maestro, or at the very least know how to mix a decent rum punch. If rum isn’t your thing, try the Island’s famous Phoenix beer which has bagged several international awards since 1963. INDULGE YOUR SWEET TOOTH
Mauritius is known for its sugar-production, so make the most of it and indulge your sweet tooth. At the central market you can pick up a bag of Napolitaines which are melt-in-your-mouth buttery shortbread biscuits filled with strawberry jam and covered with a layer of sweet pink sugar icing – a little taste of paradise. Gateau Patate Douce, made with sweet potato, coconut, cardamon and lots of sugar are another local sweet treat that you can’t miss. Wash them both down with a glass of refreshing Alouda , the nation’s favourite non-alcoholic drink which contains vanilla, basil seeds, agar jelly and milk served over ice.
If you want to learn more about the sugar industry, visit L’Aventure du Sucre, this former factory is a sugar museum where you can learn everything about the industry. From the early cultivation of the canes and the role of slavery to having the opportunity to sample many different varieties of unrefined sugar, it makes for an interesting day out. There’s also an on-site restaurant serving up sugary sensations. SHARE

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Indian Cooking with a Twist

1 cup coconut milk 500 grams fish filet (I used cat fish today) Heat oil in the pan. Add in the ginger and curry leaves. Fry for a minute. Add in the finely chopped onions and fry for a couple of minutes in medium flame until the onions are soft. Add in the tomatoes, green chillies, turmeric and the salt. Green chillies is the used for spiciness and turmeric is for the color. Fry till the tomatoes are cooked and the mixture is almost dry. Add in a cup of water and a cup of coconut milk. You can use canned coconut milk too. Mix well and let it simmer to a boil. Once the mixture is coming to a boil, add in the fish. Cover the pan and cook for 10 minutes on medium flame. As you wait for the food to be ready, you can try some of these no deposit bonuses on food themed slots. Switch off the flame and serve the fish curry hot with rice, appam or idiyappam.
BAKED VANILLA YOGURT WITH ORANGE GLAZE SAUCE / 5 INGREDIENT RECIPE
Yogurt based desserts are another of India’s most famous and incredibly tasty desserts. If you would like to spoil yourself with something fun, colorful and sweet after dinner, then this is definitely your go-to recipe. INGREDIENTS ½ cup heavy whipping cream (Amul cream works fine) ½ cup condensed milk ½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract 2 tablespoon orange marmalade Take a bowl and add in half a cup each of plain yogurt, heavy cream and condensed milk. Add in the vanilla extract. Mix everything well until smooth. Pour it in ramekins and bake in a 120° celsius oven for 15-20 minutes. No need to preheat the oven for this recipe. After 15 minutes, the middle of the ramekins should be jiggly. If its still liquid, bake for a couple of minutes more. Remove from the oven and allow it to cool. Take 2 tablespoon of orange marmalade or jam of your choice and add in 2 tablespoon of water. Bring it to a simmer until the jam has melted. Allow it to cool a bit and pour a tablespoon of the melted syrup on each ramekin. Refrigerate for 6-8 hours in the fridge and serve cold. Indian snacks to impress your guests
Break from the usual, predictable collection of snacks, and awe your guests with this selection of these Indian Cuisine snacks for a refreshing change. Kebabs
Why don’t you try a Northern India Bihari kebab; where you marinate the beef with a seasoned yogurt mixture for several hours before grilling? You could also try the reshmi kebabs or paneer kebab for a vegan choice. You can make a finger-licking platter of all three, then serve it with a suitable dipping sauce. Chicken tikka
This is another highly loved modern Indian dish where the chicken is marinated in a mix of yogurt and special spices like Garam masala, ginger paste, and coriander, then grilled on skewers. Samosas
This popular Indian snack is essentially a crispy pastry filled with meat or a nice mix of vegetables. For a vegetarian recipe, you can fill the flour and ghee dough cones with potatoes then deep-fry them. Bizarre Indian dishes
If you are a foodie with a flair for the peculiar, then India is one place where you can count on for that out-of-the-ordinary culinary experience: Black rice
While most people are used to the regular, tasty white or fried brown rice, North Bengal, Manipur and Kerala have a favorite, incredibly nutritious dish of black rice. Phan Pyut
Phan pyut is essentially a collection of potatoes left to rot in the soil, then taken out, treated with a complex mix of spices, then eaten! Red ant chutney
This incredible dish of red ants is called Chaprah, and is said to be very flavorsome! Koldil Paro Manghor Jalukia
This interesting dish is made from Pigeons, and banana and potatoes. It is said to have a very exotic and delicious taste.
Healthy = Yes
Indian cuisine has thousands of both modern and unusual snacks, desserts, and main courses to treat yourself and your family to. You get to enjoy the piping hot and spicy deliciousness in just a few minutes, and not compromise on your desire to have a healthy diet. Next Post → Suguna Vinodh
I’m Suguna Vinodh aka Kannamma. I love south Indian food and I am passionate about baking. My Favorite things include my Wusthof knife, Coffee, Ilayaraja, Tamil and beaches. I love Jacques Pepin and Julia Child.
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Conflict of culture and trade in Cochin

It has been realized over years that there is a global consumer culture that is spread by companies like McDonald’s and Coca-Cola. Even Indian companies have started following their pattern to remain competitive. Ice cream and soft drink parlors, Chinese French, Spanish and Italian cuisines are among hot favorite eatables in the prominent business centers.
The ambulatory van carrying chat has disappeared since ages from all the metro cities. Florists and costly gift shops are flourishing. In certain localities, on the other hand, the classical scenario still remains and is functioning properly. The chat and chhole-bhature vending itinerant and fixed booths continue to function.
The famous lanes named after food specialties are even now hot areas because their trusted customers are still patronizing paratha and jalebi in the Cochin. Eatables like kulfi-faluda, cheese pakora, dahibara, halwa, drinks like sugar cane juice, lemon sharbat, jal jeera, lassi etc., are hot favorites among the immigrant population. These items are within the purchasing power of low income group population, though with the elites also these items now stay put. This may not be labeled as a cultural crisis.
Culture is much deep rooted. However, if one looks beneath the surface and ask the people from different states as to where their loyalties lie, how they regard their families, and how they regard authority, there will be enormous differences. The proliferation of Apartments in Cochin has lead to significant bonding between different cultures and along with it there is a craze for foreign cuisines among the local population.
When people examine a culture, they pay too much attention to aspects like the kinds of consumer goods that people buy. This is the most superficial aspect of culture. A culture really consists of deeper moral norms that affect how people link with one another. This aspect needs much deeper understanding when analyzing both culture and trade.

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Quote: : My daughter lives a couple hours away, so we meet halfway, in Cranberry, PA, for dinner every so often. She is a vegetarian, and I usually eat vegetarian when we dine together.
What cuisine do you think offers the best options for vegetarians? IME I would say Indian food fits the bill. We ate at an Indian place last night and there were at least as many vegetarian choices as meat options, and they were all delicious. Cranberry Township’s going to limit you, I think. I ended up eating at a Primanti Brothers when I was there for business a decade ago. Pittsburgh’s going to give you more options. If you can find a Buddhist chay restaurant, they’re kind of neat with the ersatz meat they can make. That said, here’s Trip Adviser’s Top 10 Vegetarian restaurants in Cranberry https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaura…nsylvania.html
Aladdin’s, with a meze platter or the like, is probably your best bet other than the Indian place you went to. 34

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This is a bit of an out-of-left-field suggestion, but if you like wine, perhaps a winery tour and lunch at Ana at District Winery ? It’s in a beautiful location in the recently-revitalized Yards Park, and while I haven’t tried Ana’s brunch menu I loved their dinner menu.
I agree with u/demeteloaf that Fiola Mare isn’t as fancy as Fiola, but it’s very good and you can look out on the wharf in Georgetown. Another Georgetown option is Chez Billy Sud for fairly traditional French food in a very cozy setting.
Not specifically an interesting experience, but Rasika West End is nearish the White House and great for fine-dining Indian food in DC.
One last idea if “hard-to-find cuisines” qualifies for “interesting experience” – Supra for Georgian food and wine. Do not miss the ajaruli khachapuri.

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The Creole cuisine, Tour Of The Gastronomic Of Mauritius

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The camera can fix color and light, but it’s hard to describe the flavors and aromas of Mauritius to those who do not yet. Upon landing, we realize that everyone knows of spices and fruit: the tropical air caresses sugar cane, grown out of sight in much of the territory, and raises the smell of the earth, flowers and magical local herbs. It is precisely the herbs, spices and fruits to give personality to the Mauritian cuisine, which is an astonishing mix of cultures and tastes decided spicy Indian cuisine and Chinese cuisine meet European sophistication, creating tasty dishes based on fish or meat.
The term “curry”, which for us corresponds to a mixture of spices yellow, actually indicates the typical dish of the island: vegetables, meat or fish served with rice and spices, accompanied by the inevitable. This is the inevitable food on the tables of Mauritius, and that is what you eat in the restaurant most striking characteristic of the island, the now famous Grandma’s Kitchen. It is located in Souillac in the south of Mauritius , and is a sort of ” detachment “from the Shanti Maurice, a luxury resort on the Riviere des Galets. The name means “grandmother’s kitchen”, because the cook is a real grandma, ready to get help from children and grandchildren to transform their home into a charming restaurant two times a week. Nothing artificial: the home of Grandma is humble but cozy, heated by the warmth of a real family busy in the most beautiful ritual of the day, dinner preparation. Tourists can get there for dinner accompanied by Arounen, who works at the Maurice and Shanti is the grandson of the chef, up to a maximum of 12 per evening, or they can spend the whole afternoon with her grandmother, helping the shopping at the market and creation of the menu, before sampling the result set. A compelling and moving result: you take a drink on the veranda beside the vegetable, and consists of a cocktail served in a fresh pineapple fruit, vegetable fritters and donuts tasty lentil and spices. Then we move inside, where the boys of the family have graced the table with flowers and fabrics. Among the chatter in various languages, depending on the origin of the diners, rice, vegetables, meat and fish disappear quickly, before concluding with ice cream and tapioca.
The idea of hosting tourists to its board has been a great success, so that the initiative has been awarded as Best in Client Experience Initiative at the World Hospitality Awards. The credit goes to the staff found the Shanti Maurice, as he intends to kitchen. Also at the resort, in fact, every meal is a ceremony of taste, from breakfast with fresh fruit and freshly baked croissants, pancakes, omelets and hearty Indian. A simple fruit juice becomes a pleasure if it is prepared with fresh pineapple and sipping along the Indian Ocean, the resort’s breezy veranda.
The two restaurants are covered, “Stars” and “Pebbles”, and all dishes are prepared with herbs and fruits grown in the large garden, which can be visited on request. Once a week guests can enjoy a special dinner on the beach in the outdoor restaurant “Fish and Rhum Shack”. The tables are arranged on the sand, and dozens of lights illuminate the night enough to choose some yummy buffet and enjoy a good wine, strictly South African. The menu features vegetarian side dishes (heart of palm salad, spicy sauce with vegetables, peppers of every color and flavor) but mainly meat, fish and shellfish delicious cooked on the grill. Even the bread is special before ending up on the fire is brushed with a mixture of oil and garlic, which makes it fragrant and crisp on the outside. Meanwhile on the beach and the ocean whispers sega dancers are circling the colorful clothes to the beat of drums. From the tables there are those who rushes to dance with them, overwhelmed by the atmosphere of exotic Mauritius.
To the north of Souillac, inland, along the Route du Tea, Bois Cheri tea factory welcomes visitors with a warm and intense fragrance. From a distance you see the plantations (250 hectares), where hundreds of patients hands gently grasp the leaves before they are processed for the preparation of the drink. Before tasting the many types of tea you can take a guided tour of the museum and factory, observing how the leaves are sorted according to size, cut, left to ferment and macerate. Then she puts in special envelopes, are manufactured and put on the market, or transferred to a nearby restaurant. Here you will taste the tea, green tea or black tea, flavored with ginger, mint, coconut and vanilla. Perfumes and not know the nature of chemicals, to be savored slowly without added sugar. After all, “Bois Cheri” means “to drink, honey,” and no name could be more appropriate.
Moving toward the west is the town of Chamarel, home to the eponymous “Rhumerie”. The rum factory is surrounded by lush vegetation: orange walls contrast with the bright green leaves of Badami (a large tree trunk gnarled and shiny leaves and large) and the bright yellow flowers dell’angsana. At Rhumerie de Chamarel sugar cane used to produce many kinds of liqueurs and rum, from the more sweet and fruity to the stronger ones, which can be tasted in the trendy lounge bar. The machinery is in full view beyond the glass, and you can see them even more closely during the guided tours. The adjoining restaurant, “The Alchimiste”, can accommodate up to 80 people and serves traditional dishes accompanied by the drink amber, while the nearby shop you can buy gadgets and gift bottle. Often, good food and beautiful scenery go hand in hand in Mauritius, as is the restaurant “Varangue sur Morne”, or “Veranda on Morne”, Mount protected ‘UNESCO-shaped cake. The ideal is to eat you for lunch, when the sun illuminates the landscape of palm trees, and flowers at the bottom, before the sea, the sandy strip of Baie du Cap.
Continuing north along the coast there finally meets the capital of Mauritius, Port Louis, which as the name suggests is a bustling port city. The catch of the day ends sull’appetitoso menus of restaurants in town, such as the lovely “The Courtyard”, which is located on the corner of Rue St. Louis and Chevreau. He looks vaguely Mexican: the dining rooms overlook a courtyard walls white, with lemon trees and a fountain. You can not leave town without diving into the local market, a maze of noisy stalls overflowing with fruit, vegetables, spices and textiles. The air smells of ginger, coriander, saffron, garlic and lemongrass, and coconut counters are split in half, purple and yellow passion fruit, papaya orange and juicy “dragon fruit” flesh pink. Colors that are found in sarongs, pashminas in straw hats and apparel industry and handicrafts.
In the north-east there is another resort that offers enchanting dinners on the beach is the ‘Angsana Balaclava, Balaclava located along the Turtle Bay. Destination Dining The culinary program offers a multitude of personalized dinners, served from 19.00 onwards, strictly by the sea. Whether you’re a couple, a family or a group of friends you can ask the board of your dreams and start eating at sunset, to conclude under the stars. A formula is particularly spectacular barbecue buffet: as lobsters, shrimp, fish and meat on the grill abbrustoliscono, you can devote to the selection of appetizers and side dishes. You will find a veritable sculpture of snacks and finger food, with the obligatory heart of palm, some shellfish and fresh caprese salad for a touch of Italian taste. The choice of desserts is even more difficult, and certainly should try everything from cheese cake with berry mousse with chocolate, from chocolate cake to crème brulée.
Continuing the ascent towards the northern end of Mauritius meets the prestigious Royal Palm Beachcomber Hotel a member of Leading Hotels of the World. The delicious food does not exhaust the attractions of the resort – which is nestled along a bay with fine sand and soft, has 84 rooms with king, a Clarins Spa and a large space devoted to sport – but it certainly is a strength. The restaurants are three: “The Goélette” combines local flavors and international recipes, “Natureaty” offers themed menu of wellness, of Asian or Mediterranean atmosphere, and “Le Bar Plage” is specialized in seafood. At the head of “The Goélette” there is the Michelin-starred chef Michel de Matteis, Lyon-born blood of Puglia, which makes every ingredient into pure poetry. Among his specialties are diced fresh tuna, breaded with spices and grains of lentils, accompanied by a biscuit dough with grilled vegetables and fruits: a sublime dish of saffron sauce to be sprayed.
Inland, in Mapou, there is the kingdom of another master Italian chef Fabio De Poli has long been established in Mauritius, and after years of work in the hotel decided to open his own restaurant, to the delight of true connoisseurs. The location was perfect the Château de Labourdonnais, a restored colonial mansion in 2006, immersed in nature: It resulted in the restaurant “La Table du Château”, capable of seating 75 people and features a creative cuisine that is inspired by the fruits and vegetables offered by the Mauritian landscape but it also some influence from Chinese, Indian and Italian. In addition to the rolls of vegetables, yogurt sauce and skewered shrimp and pineapple is worth tasting the sweet banana flambé with vanilla ice cream.
On the east coast two successive Constance Hotels, Le Prince Maurice and Belle Mare Plage, both located in Poste de Flacq. The first, the only hotel in Mauritius affiliated to Relais & Chateaux chain, boasts the only floating restaurant in the Indian Ocean: the small restaurant “Barachois”, open only at night, reached by a long wooden walkway, reaching the heart of a spectacular lagoon. The tables are arranged in five floating platforms, and the blue of the night is full of lanterns. The sister property Belle Mare Plage has the beauty of 7 restaurants from the smorgasbord of “La Citronelle” elegance of the “Blue Penny Café”, through the romance of “The Beach”, is a pleasure to seek their own favorite restaurant, with the certainty that nobody will be disappointed.
Among luxury resorts, family dinners and exotic tasting, mouth-watering in Mauritius is assured. A tasty but healthy cuisine, flavored with spices and naturally low in fat, where fish and vegetables are the protagonists. Only an inevitable gluttony opens every meal: bread, warm and fragrant, is great with butter or oil, and a bite leads to another. If eaten is substantial enough to conclude with a digestive herbal tea with ginger or lemon grass, and why not, a good coffee. 09:57.

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I’m a veg and I prefer Indian over nearly everything else nearly all of the time. Quote: : the Mercotan Why hasn’t anyone thought of Ethiopian food, with its delicious injera bread and many spices? Ethiopian is my 4th choice, behind Italian and Mexican cuisine. I love injera and shiro be kibbe; I can’t remember the other lentil dishes I’ve had but they were all unique and delicious. 38

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Spicy Seasonings Guide: Fiery Spice Blends Around The World

Spicy Seasonings Guide: Fiery Spice Blends Around The World You are here: Home / Guides / Spicy Seasonings Guide: Fiery Spice Blends Around The World
Spicy seasonings have been loved all over the world since ancient times. Nowhere is the world’s love of fiery flavors easier to see than in the almost global adoption of chili peppers after the Columbian Exchange. You can find spicy blends that feature chili peppers and other hot spices in every region. Below we break down some of the most common spicy seasonings you’ll find from around the world. Plus, discover many PepperScale recipes for these fiery blends. Africa Berbere
From Eritrea and Ethiopia comes berbere spice. It is a highly aromatic spice blend featuring fenugreek , cardamom , and hot peppers. You can find berbere as a powder and as a paste. Berbere Spice Mix Check out this recipe Ras el hanout
A North African spice blend, best known for its role in Moroccan cooking, ras el hanout can contain dozens of ingredients. The name translates to “head of the shop”. It indicates that the spices in the blend are the best a spice merchant has to offer. Ingredients include ginger , black pepper , and powdered chili peppers. Ras El Hanout Spice Mix Asia Shichimi togarashi
Often likened to Chinese five spice powder , shichimi togarashi contains seven spices. The list of shichimi togarashi spices includes chili pepper, sansho pepper , and seaweed. Shichimi togarashi’s use is usually as a table condiment rather than as a cooking ingredient. Shichimi Togarashi Seasoning Europe Curry powder
Wrongly believed to be an Indian spice blend, curry powder was invented by the British as a way to make Indian spices palatable their tastes. Curry powder does use spices that show up in Indian food like chili pepper, turmeric , and fenugreek. Spicy Curry Powder Check out this recipe Vadouvan
As curry powder’s French cousin, vandouvan offers many of the same ingredients but uses them in a more restrained manner. In addition, it has a stronger focus on onions and garlic. Vadouvan’s subtlety means that you can use it in a greater number of foods. The Subcontinent Tandoori masala
A tandoor is a clay oven, and tandoori masala is a spice blend traditionally used on Punjabi dishes like tandoori chicken. Along with chile peppers, tandoori masala spices include ginger and cinnamon. Tandoori Masala Spice Mix Check out this recipe Vindaloo masala
Vindaloo comes from the Goa region in India, one of Portugal’s former colonies. It is a pork curry and its name comes from the Portuguese dish carne de vinha d’alhos, which translates to meat marinated in wine and garlic. Vindaloo has a reputation for heat; vindaloo masala contains large amounts of chili pepper along with ginger, black peppercorns, and other spices. Vindaloo Masala Powder United States Chili Powder
While chili powder does make use of Mexican spices, but it is an American spice. It was invented to make it easier for American cooks to find and use Mexican spices. Chili powder typically includes ground chili peppers (usually ancho pepper ) along with cumin and g a rlic . While chili powder is a versatile spice blend, cooks use it most often to make chili con carne. Spicy Homemade Chili Powder Check out this recipe Old Bay
Old Bay Seasoning is as closely identified with seafood as it is with the state of Maryland. No crab or shrimp boil would be the same without it; Old Bay provides a distinctive salty and spiced warmth to shellfish. Along with paprika , Old Bay’s long list of ingredients includes mace and celery salt . Homemade Old Bay Seasoning Check out this recipe Cajun seasoning
A Louisiana staple, Cajun seasoning boils down the flavors of Cajun cuisine into a simple seasoning blend. The ingredients of the spice mix will vary from recipe to recipe. Most contain some form of chili pepper powder, from paprika (mild) to cayenne pepper (medium-hot). Cajun Seasoning Recipe The West Indies Jerk seasoning
West Indian cooks use jerk seasoning in the form of a paste or a powder. The dominant flavors are those of scotch bonnet peppers , scallions, and allspice . Adobo seasoning
Adobo is a popular Latin American spice blend that typically includes garlic and oregano among its ingredients. Its name comes from the Spanish practice of immersing food in vinegar and spices to preserve it. Homemade Adobo Seasoning

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A song of curry and rice. Sunday special mangshor jhol or Bengali mutton curry recipe and memories.

Subscribe to this blog A song of curry and rice. Sunday special mangshor jhol or Bengali mutton curry recipe and memories. on Other Apps Mangshor jhol. Bhaat makes this picture complete. Want me to translate? Well, read on then. The heading of this post is inspired by George R.R. Martin’s series of books, A Song of Fire and Ice, on which the Game of Thrones HBO series is based. I am not sure about where and when I had first heard of ‘ kosha mangsho,’ arguably the most famous Bengali mutton dish today . Was this when it was served with pulao at our Presidency College socials by Promod Da in the mid 1990s, I wonder. Or did I first see it on the menus of Calcutta’s Moghlai restaurants; or its cabin restaurants when I was in college? Or did I first come across it at wedding feasts even earlier? Or in the Bengali recipe websites emanating from the US which I would refer to, in an age before there were blogs, when I first entered our kitchen in the early 2000s? Or did I first see it on the menus of the Bengali restaurants that I would go to when I moved to Mumbai from Kolkata. Restaurants where I would go to and pay (!) to eat Bengali food, a cuisine that I had once considered rather mundane when I lived in Kolkata. Unlike the kosha mangsho however, which came into my life a bit later, mangshor jhol bhaat ( mutton curry and rice), has been a part of my life ever since my parents and I moved into Kolkata in the early 80s when I was still a kid. Mutton was considered to be expensive and usually a Sunday lunch special in most middle class Bengali households back then. Things are rather different in the post liberalisation India now, where meat is consumed more frequently, with affordability being less of an issue. Though with the broiler revolution, chicken has entered our homes too and is a lot cheaper than mutton and is consumed more frequently. In the process, making our diets less balanced than what they were at the risk of sounding like celebrity dietician and ‘back to grandma’s kitchen advocate,” Rujuta Diwekar. She never speaks of non-veg though does she? A mutton shop near Central Kolkata’s Sabir Hotel. 2018. The Muslim run shops were shut on Fridays, while the Hindu run mutton shops (which were prevalent in the part of south Calcutta where I grew up) were shut on Thursdays. Wonder if that has changed. Come Sunday in the 80s and the man of the house would step out of the house and queue up outside the local meat shop . Waiting patiently to be served, newspaper in hand, chatting with his fellow bespectacled kakus and jethus (Bengali for uncle) about the latest East Bengal Mohun Bagan Derby or about how Castro was our only hope. When his (Kaku, not Fidel’s) turn came, the meat would be cut from the goat hanging at the shop according to the specifications given, and then packed in either dried shaal paata leaves or newspaper to be taken home. There was obviously no need for a plastic ban back then. You would know that the clock had struck twelve a bit later when pressure cookers from kitchens across the paara (locality) would whistle gaily in unison. When it came to a choice between celebrating the ‘joys of slow cooking’ versus spending a bit less time in the kitchen and using a bit less gas too (getting LPG cylinders were way tougher than achieving moksha after all), the women of the 80s seemed to have made their stand clear. There is no one standard recipe for the mangshor jhol to be honest. Every kitchen has its own recipe. The colour of the curry could vary from a calm brown to a fiery red to even a chirpy yellow, depending on what your tolerance levels for chillies are. With the oil adulteration mishap that took many unfortunate lives in Behala in Kolkata in the early 80s, and the concerted effort of refined oil hawking corporates that followed, the loyalty to mustard oil became a tad shaky in some houses like ours. The thought of Bengal ever abandoning mustard oil would seem as inconceivable then though as that of the Left Front government being voted out. “Why even bother with exit polls here,” as Dr Prannoy Roy had once said with his characteristic wry smile during a post election analysis when I was in high school. The Communists of Bengal are but a memory now according the latest parliamentary polls. Refined oil is used quite a bit in Bengal today. and mustard oil is not as ubiquitous as it was. Apasanskriti as many would have said in the 80s. It is against our culture. As was consuming chicken. Interestingly, we had moved to chicken in our house by the late 80s as my mother believed that it was better for the heart than mutton. I have doctor friends today who can the argue the opposite with her today but then which Bengali son would ever argue with his mother? My mother, a working mother who raised us as a single parent after my father passed on, swore by the pressure cooker too. As does her mother, my didu. As I often say, the question of ‘authenticity’ of Indian recipes often boil down to a case of ‘my grandma is the best.’ I know that as a food writer and a Bengali too, saying that one had grown up on murgir jhol and not mangshor jhol (chicken and not mutton curry), that too made in a pressure cooker AND with sunflower oil, would set me up for derision on Twitter. Just as saying that I enjoy alu parathas with ketchup did after my previous post, but do be kind guys. I did not run our kitchen then! Homework time Here’s my recipe for the mangshor jhol that we made the other day at home in Mumbai where I live now. Is it the most ‘authentic’ recipe? I do not know. It tasted pretty good to us and that is all that matters at the end doesn’t it? My Mangshor jhol recipe Ingredients: 500 g mutton on the bone (shoulder piece is the best says the missus), 1 dry red chilli, 1 bay leaf, 1/2 a teaspoon of whole cumin, a piece each of cardamom, clove & cinnamon to the oil, 2 tablespoons of mustard oil (or vegetable oil), 1 tablespoon of ginger paste and 1/2 of garlic, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons dahi (curd), 250 ml water, spices (1 teaspoon each of cumin, coriander and turmeric powder, 1/2 teaspoon of red chilli & garam masala powder: depends on personal tastes), 2 potatoes (peeled and halved) Cooking method: Heat 2 tablespoons of mustard oil Add a dry red chilli, a bay leaf, 1/2 a teaspoon of whole cumin, a piece of cardamom, clove & cinnamon to the oil. Once they splutter, add 1 sliced/ finely chopped red onion Once the onion is translucent (in kosha mangsho you add a lot more onion and let it cook more too) add 1 tablespoon of ginger paste and 1/2 of garlic Then goes in the meat which has been marinated with two teaspoons of dahi and spices, and halved potatoes. Add salt. You could add tomatoes before this stage for some added tartness. Many Bengalis though would find this to be as heretical as saying you did not believe in the Little Red Book but hey, it is not the 80s anymore! Add water. 250 ml for half a kilo of meat and then let it cook for about 8 to 10 whistles in the pressure cooker and another 30 minutes after that at least on a low flame in a closed cooker. Or, if not using a pressure cooker, for 1.30 hrs. If you are afraid of the potatoes getting overcooked, take them out before adding the water and then add them at then end and let them cook together for 2,3 whistles in the pressure cooker or for the last 20 minutes if cooking outside a cooker When done, add some roasted garam masala at the end Have it with hot rice and follow it with a bhaat ghoom (afternoon siesta) While we do love our jukti tokko goppo (the name of the legedary film maker Ritwik Ghosal’s last film), what requires no debate among Bengalis is the fact tha t alu (potato) is a must in mangshor jhol and that bhaat (plain boiled rice) goes best with mangshor jhol (unlike paratha, luchi or pulao with kosha mangsho). And that in mangshor jhol, it is the noli (marrow) piece that is most coveted. Sucking it is what makes this Bengali Game of Bones complete! We had made the mutton curry that you saw in the header picture on Thursday and not Sunday. Used pieces of mutton that we did not finish in the curry for our lunch of Parsi masoor ma gos today (Sunday). With pav since my mother in law said that pav is a must with masoor. Food pairings are sacred after all! Appendix: Note: In India, we mean goat meat when we say ‘mutton’ Posts which could be of interest.

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Anguilla Island: The Best Little Island in the Carribean

Without exaggerating it’s tough to find a view that’s not scenic.
Best Things to Do in Anguilla
I did a lot of research about Anguilla island before arriving. To be honest this isn’t an island where there are a lot of things to see. But if you want to get off the beach you can independently tour the heritage trail .
I didn’t get to see all of these because I was on a press trip and I travel to eat!
But I wanted to share my list and I hope to return soon and will be checking these things off my list. There are plenty of water activities, although you’ll never catch me kite surfing. However, it is one of the best things to do on the island and a great place to learn. Anguilla’s Historic Catholic Church This historic church is the only Catholic church on the island. It was built with local rock and you can walk inside. It’s next to a Protestant church as well as Wallblake House. Wallblake House is on the same site as the Catholic church. Wallblake House
A former plantation, I was told that Anguilla doesn’t have the same history of slavery as other islands. Although it was initially occupied by the French and then the British, the land in Anguilla is primarily limestone – notoriously bad for farming.
Plantations didn’t perform well because the land was not suitable. Instead of the island revolting to reclaim their land similar to countries like Jamaica, European colonialists made the first move and left for other countries. Land was distributed and today most land on the island is Anguillan owned as it continues to pass from generation to generation.
The Wallblake House is owned by the neighbouring Catholic church and is used for community events. Anguilla’s Farmers Market
If you’re buying local food visit the Saturday market across from Ken’s BBQ on the strip. The building was hit during Hurricane Irma so it’s just the cement shell and not an official market.
But farmer’s kept coming so the locals did as well. Although spots haven’t been designated there’s an understanding of who is where each week.
If you’re buying at the supermarket the weekly container of imported produce apparently comes on Wednesdays so hit the stores on Thursdays.
Guided Rum Tasting
While Anguilla does not have its own rum, in some ways I think that makes a rum tasting even better as there’s no national loyalty.
I went to the beautiful Rum Room at Zemi Beach for a tasting with a group and we had a lot of fun.
But the informal rum tasting at CuisinArt Resort’s Kas Bar with Jamal Hodge blew me away. I left my bar stool with 6 pages of notes (post coming soon!) and a new appreciation of rum. It was clear he not only had a passion for rum, but the knowledge and energy to inspire anyone to become a rum connoisseur.
Even if you’re not staying at CuisinArt Resort find out how you can book a tasting with Jamal because it’s amazing. Kite Surfing and Wind Boarding
Kite surfing is huge here, the winds here are calm but strong enough to make for ideal conditions. I’ll never do this but may people list it as one of the best things to do in Anguilla. Snorkeling
Shoal Bay East is often listed as the best snorkelling in Anguilla. But it’s not the only spot.
Little Bay is more difficult to reach, easiest by boat as otherwise you’d need to find the rope that allows you to climb down a jagged cliff. It’s a marine preserve and not many people come here so you’ll have space to explore.
Sandy Island, Crocus Bay and Prickly Pear are also local favourites if you’re keen to explore the island underwater. Birdwatching
If you’re interested in bird watching head to East End Pond, this shallow 13 acre pond is the place to go. It’s a protected area that’s managed by the Anguilla National Trust. After a relaxation massage you can spend the day at Zemi Thai House Spa Spa
Anguilla is known to have fantastic spas, and both Zemi Beach and Cuisinart offer incredible services.
I really like that Zemi Beach ties in its Taino heritage. But I also loved the deep tissue massage at CuisinArt Resort. I have a lot of issues from working at a laptop while on the road and the massage was very therapeutic – I asked him to crush me and that’s exactly what he did. Scuba Diving
Not only are there are number of reefs offshore at Junks Hole there are historic shipwrecks (with cannons still in tact) at Anguilla Island and seven different marine parks.
If you don’t have your PADI certification you can take it on the island. Deep Sea Fishing
Chartering a boat for deep sea fishing is very popular. You can find marlin, swordfish, black fin tuna amongst other sporting fish around the island. World Class Golfing
Anguilla is home to an 18-hole Greg Norman Signature Course, and it’s the only golf course on the island.
Located at the CuisinArt Resort, green fees are what you would expect for a Greg Norman course so prepare to pay for the quality of a champions resort. No need to bring your own clubs, the rentals are considered to be amongst the best. Fountain Cavern National Park’s Petroglyphs
Evidence of Anguilla’s first settlers remains inside the Big Spring collapsed cave. The petroglyphs are known as Spirit Eyes, you can also see petroglyphs at Fountain Cavern National Park. Sandy Ground
A small strip of ground with a beach and string of restaurants and shops, Sandy Ground is a popular local spot despite having a lot of boat traffic. There are lots of fun beach bars and other spots where you can find local food and drink at reasonable prices. Sandy Island
A small cay off Sandy Grond Sandy Island was once one of the top things to do in Anguilla, but after Hurricane Irma and a fire in July 2018, much of it was destroyed including one of the iconic beach bars.
However, it is rebuilding and there have been lots of discussions amongst locals to support weekly theme nights. The iconic Pumphouse is gone but soca and jazz at Johnno’s is still there.
The Facebook page is still active if you want to check out weekly events. Heritage Museum Collection
If you’re looking for a bit of culture Anguilla’s Heritage Museum will surprise you. This small museum is the person collection of Colville Petty OBE, who has been collecting Anguilla island historical and cultural items. Eat at The Strip in the Valley
This was one of my FAVOURITE things to do in Anguilla. It wasn’t because it was food, but it’s because it’s where you’ll hang out with other locals.
The Strip started with iconic Ken’s barbecue, and later more food stalls joined and so you can get a number of different traditional Anguilla food for local prices. Also you can try some non-traditional food like Indian.
Some stalls are open all day so you can go to Ken’s for lunch. More is open in the evenings and Friday night is the time to go. Food stalls are open until 2am and the Latin bar is open late until 4am.
Anguilla doesn’t really have a late night food scene so this is your best bet after midnight.
The view of Rendezvous Bay from my room at CuisinArt Resort
Best Beaches in Anguilla
There are 33 beaches in Anguilla and the truth is that it’s pretty tough to find a bad beach on the island. However, not all beaches on Anguilla island are accessible by land, in some cases you’ll need to take a boat to reach them and so many tour operators will include these remote spots as part of a tour.
If you’re looking for a spot with restaurants and beach bars you’ll want to hit up Shoal Bay, Rendezvous Bay, Sandy Ground or Meads Bay.
You can also find bars on Sandy Island and Scilly Cay, but you’ll need to get a boat – don’t worry there are plenty of people who will offer to taxi you there for a small fee.
If you want to get away from everyone consider the other beaches but remember you’ll need to bring your own food and drink, and don’t forget an umbrella – the sun is HOT! Traditional Food on Anguilla Island
Anguilla island is home to some fantastic seafood, barbecue and lots of great Caribbean dishes with its own unique spin.
I wrote this post on Anguilla food if you’re interesting in eating local. It deserved it’s own post.
One of my favourite spots was JW Procter supermarket. It not only features a lot of local farmers, it also brings in food from Dominica and other areas of the Caribbean. So if you’re making a local recipe it will have all of the ingredients.
The bakery is also fascinating as local bakers bring their goods to the bakery and the supermarket sells it on their behalf. Sunshine Shack on Rendezvous Bay. Best Restaurants in Anguilla
There are over 70 restaurants for only 15,000 people. And the diversity is crazy. You can get lots of traditional Anguillan cuisine, but also have incredible French food, sushi or pizza. And unlike other Caribbean islands, the Anguillan lobster is served year round – how could you miss out.
Tipping is customarily 10-15% of the bill. Many restaurants add it automatically, but not all so make sure to check your bill. Palm Grove Barbecue Grill
Palm Grove Bar and Grill is better known as Nat’s Place. This is definitely off the beaten track. So much so that one of the locals who drove us here couldn’t find it right away.
It’s at the end of Savannah Bay which has an amazing beach, and few people are on it. I recommend placing an order and then hitting the beach.
A family owned business. Nat and his wife started it 25 years ago and the menu hasn’t changed much over the years. His son is now cooking and they serve lobster, crayfish, whole fish and shrimp. There’s also barbecue for people who are too foolish not to order seafood.
The restaurant took off in 1995 Bon Appetit wrote about it, and a year later the New York Times followed.
Today you can still find Nat making the rounds talking to people who come back year over year. Lots of people come but you need some time because everything is cooked to order so lobster takes 25 minutes and the chicken is 40 minutes. So place your order and take a walk on the beach.
The funny thing is that Nat is known for the seasoning on his shellfish and his homemade hot sauce but he can’t actually eat either.
He’s allergic to all shellfish and he finds the hot sauce too hot, yet he refuses to change it.

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