36 Hours in Ghent. Along the Leie River. Belgium

36 Hours in Ghent. Along the Leie River. Belgium

Ultimo aggiornamento il 4 Marzo 2019 12:27
Along the Leie River in Ghent’s city center. Credit Joann Pai for The New York Times Politically to the left, eco-friendly and a touch bohemian, the city has its own scenic waterways, soaring spires and a massive Gothic cathedral where you’ll find one of the most stunning paintings from the Middle Ages. There are also first-rate museums, vivid street art, some splashy new hotels in centuries-old edifices and, tucked away in the maze of cobblestone streets, some of the country’s best restaurants. Come evening, when the city center is beautifully illuminated, ambitious cocktail lounges, natural wine bars and traditional beer emporiums offer a nightcap for any thirst. Friday 1) 5 p.m. From marsh to metropolis Grain and wool were the principal commodities that elevated Ghent from a barren marshland to a wealthy trade center during the Middle Ages, and the grandiose gabled, scrolled and chiseled architectural results are still on display when you take a tour with De Bootjes Van Gent . Threading through rivers and canals in a long, slim, open-air boat, you’ll have front-row seats for a historical survey of the city, from the crenelated battlements of the medieval Gravensteen Castle to the Baroque-era fish market to 19th-century textile factories and socialist headquarters. Adults 7.50 euros, or about $8.50. ▷ LEGGI ANCHE: ✓ Lavori stagionali nel Principato di Monaco. Ottime opportunità 2) 7 p.m. Don’t Give Up! The city’s motto —“Nie Pleuje!”(translation: “Don’t give up!”) — is a useful mantra as you stagger through the late rounds of the multicourse tasting menu at Oak , a minimalist, white, villa-like restaurant with wood plank floors, autumnal tones and candlelight. A recent meal started with five amuse-bouches (including a supersoft, bite-size blood sausage taco), before moving on to tangy, marinated sea bass topped with crunchy red beetroot; a fisherman-meets-forager mix of cod chunks and mushrooms in warm dashi broth with herring eggs; a triple preparation of Iberian pork (including bacon pellets on ultrathin zucchini discs and a miniature kebab of pork belly cubes in tzatziki sauce); and numerous other finely wrought and flavorful inventions. Six courses for 80 euros. 3) 10 p.m. Belgian beverages Even if you don’t know your lagers from your lambics, you can enjoy the homey décor, riverside views and convivial tavern atmosphere at Het Waterhuis aan de Bierkant . Choose from the extensive list of Trappist-brewed ales, sour suds and other Belgian brews — around 170 in all. The vibe goes upscale at The Cobbler , the cocktail bar in the new 1898 Post hotel. The soaring ceiling, majestic fireplace, Oriental rugs and book-lined shelves evoke a nobleman’s salon, as do drinks with names like Queen Anne’s Revenge (genever, rum, vermouth, absinthe, lemon juice, cinnamon syrup; 16 euros) and Le Marquis (calvados, Talisker scotch, Oloroso sherry, grenadine, cacao; 15 euros). Smoked eel ravioli at Oak restaurant, a minimalist, white, villa-like restaurant with wood plank floors, autumnal tones and candlelight. Credit Joann Pai for The New York Times Saturday 4) 9 a.m. Expert panelists Bathed in divine light and watched over by Jesus, Mary, John the Baptist, Adam, Eve and a chorus of singing angels, a wounded lamb bleeds into a holy chalice in a radiant open field while oceans of worshipers — apostles, holy hermits, martyrs, virgins, popes, Old Testament prophets — approach from all sides and New Jerusalem rises in the background. Such is the vast, richly colorful and minutely detailed scene depicted by Hubert and Jan van Eyck in “The Adoration of the Mystic Lamb,” an assemblage of 12 wooden panels that form one of the most famous (and most often stolen) masterpieces of medieval art. (One panel is still at large.) Admission: 4 euros. The painting’s forum, the 16th-century St. Bavo’s Cathedral , is a soaring repository of paintings and sculpture that also houses “Saint Bavo Enters the Convent at Ghent,” by Rubens. 5) 11 a.m. Antique boutiques St. Jacob — isn’t he the patron saint of used trousers, silver soup tureens and gumball machines? You might think so, given the abundance of vintage and retro dealers who operate in the leafy cobbled lanes around his namesake church. In addition to a weekend flea market, the nearby streets hold Galerie St. John , a Baroque chapel-turned-antique shop that now draws worshipers of gilded clocks, Chinese screens, painted porcelain, exquisite glassware and Art Deco silver sets. Nearby, 20th-century items get second lives at Antiek-Depot , a two-level hodgepodge of toys, games, industrial lighting and midcentury furniture. Holy Food Market, in a former church, houses a bar and more than a dozen food counters. Credit Joann Pai for The New York Times 6) 1 p.m. Daily bread Holy Food Market — another deconsecrated church that now houses a bar and more than a dozen food counters — provides your daily bread, as well as your daily sushi, curry, pizza and bacalhau. Japanese, Indian, Italian, Portuguese and other cuisines provide one-stop global roaming, while French and Belgian specialties are on offer at Bubba (including crunchy croquettes of Emmental cheese and local Ganda ham; 4 euros) and Sea Me (notably, classic moules frites; 9 euros). The stylish central bar even serves (and sells) the market’s own house gin, distilled with Ghent’s famous Tierenteyn-Verlent mustard. 7) 3 p.m. Salmon and steel If you’ve ever fantasized about lounging in a bright red armchair made from corrugated cardboard while sporting a salmon-skin bikini, head to Design Museum Gent (adults, 8 euros), where those innovative objects (designed by Frank Gehry and Birgit Kraner, respectively) and hundreds of others are on view. Housed in an 18th-century townhouse, the museum uses period rooms of parquet floors, painted wallpaper and chandeliers for its temporary exhibitions, and more modern spaces for “Object Stories,” its permanent collection of (mostly) 20th-century design icons and iconoclasts. Classics like an Art Deco silver set by Philippe Woolfers, an S-shaped chair from Verner Panton, and a red plastic Olivetti typewriter by Ettore Sottsass shine alongside fabulously freaky items like Shiro Kuramata’s steel mesh love seat and Kraner’s fishy fashions. 8) 5 p.m. Creative corridors With their street murals and independent designers, the narrow lanes of the medieval Patershol neighborhood showcase Ghent’s creative side. Highlights include huge black and white rabbits by the local artist ROA (along Tempelhof), and two adjacent buildings (in Sleepstraat) sporting multistory scenes — both eerie and dreamlike — by A Squid Called Sebastian and Violant. For local goods, the street whose name shifts from Sluizeken to Oudberg to Kraanlei turns up elaborate women’s hats by Ria Dewilde ( Sjapoo ), minimalist leather handbags by Mayenne Nelen ( Mayenne. Shop ) and wild sculptural lighting made from musical instruments and cookware ( Blue Poodle Gallery ). ▷ LEGGI ANCHE: ✓ Non profit e mondo accademico. City Angels e School of Management LUM 9) 8 p.m. Eat yourself silly “Don’t play with your food!” is, of course, a parental command familiar to children. Fortunately, the chef Tom Van Lysebettens didn’t listen, and his elegant restaurant, Cochon de Luxe , is now the laboratory for his culinary cleverness. Your meal might start with a tiny golden pig’s face of lush ham mousse and end with a morsel called Russian roulette: a chocolate bullet shell that contains either more chocolate or, occasionally, hot sauce. In between, the menu might include a Dadaist dish called Chicken Curry — which contains neither chicken nor curry, but rather smoked eel and yellow beetroot purée — and Darth Tatin, black cinnamon gel molded into the head of Darth Vader alongside vanilla ice cream. Seven courses for 55 euros. 10) 10:30 p.m. Lowland libations Wine from Luxembourg? Does the tiny nation even have space for vines? Yes, indeed, and the Fossiles pinot blanc (8.50 euros) is a honey-apple white wine as rich and plump as the Duchy itself. That vintage is just one of the discoveries at Ona , a chic, candlelit bar devoted to organic and biodynamic wines from Europe. For a Benelux take on a classic Italian cocktail, slip into the dark and sultry Café Theatre and order the Negroni, (12 euros), which mixes genever infused with cuberdon (a local gumdrop-like candy), Campari and vermouth. The Design Museum Gent, housed in an 18th-century townhouse, has hundreds of innovative objects, from a steel-mesh love seat to a red plastic typewriter, on view. Credit Joann Pai for The New York Times Sunday 11) 11 a.m. A Flemish finale A trip to the Low Countries isn’t complete until you’ve encountered the Renaissance religious art of Hieronymus Bosch. To do so, head to Room 3 of the M.S.K. (Museum of Fine Arts; 8 euros). “Christ Carrying the Cross” depicts Jesus accosted by a scary mob, while in “Saint Jerome” the artist’s namesake lies prostrate in a dark, eerie landscape as an owl and lion look on. The regional survey continues in other rooms with ominous religious work by Rubens, stern portraits by Franz Hals, lively village scenes by Pieter Bruegel the Younger, wonderfully strange proto-expressionism from James Ensor, and the creepy surrealistic humor of Rene Magritte. for a taste of the 21st century, the S.M.A.K. contemporary art museum is just across the street. Lodging Opened earlier this year in a former baronial residence, the 157-room Pillows Grand Hotel Reylof Ghent (pillowshotels.com/ghent; doubles from 165 euros) is a Neoclassical mix of marble floors, Ionic columns and sweeping staircases. Locally famous for its clock tower, the late 19th-century, neo-Gothic post office building on Ghent’s main square was reborn last year as 1898 The Post (zannierhotels.com/1898thepost/en; doubles recently from 143 euros), a plush, 38-room boutique hotel with a beautiful cocktail bar and upscale shopping center in the same complex. True to its name, Furnished Apartments Gent ( furnishedapartmentsgent.be/ ) has a collection of studios, one-bedrooms and larger accommodations for rent by the week or month in various neighborhoods. Weekly rentals start around 300 to 400 euros.

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King Of Prussia Restaurant Week: What You Need To Know

0 King of Prussia’s restaurant week is coming up in March. ((Image via Shutterstock)) KING OF PRUSSIA, PA — King of Prussia’s restaurant week is just around the corner. The event bringing a wide variety of deals at local eateries will take place from March 11 to March 17.
Prix-fixe lunch and dinner menus at numerous restaurants will donate some proceeds to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.
There will also be three special events during the week.
March 13, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.: Lunch Break for CHOP at Xfinity in King of Prussia Town Center Delicious samples from numerous local restaurants at this free event, with giveaways and demos from Xfinity March 14, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.: Fashion Pop Up For CHOP at Mistral A fashion fundraiser from various local retailers, raffles, and food March 15, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.: Healthy Running Talk and Sampling at Road Runner Sports Talks on injury prevention, running technique, and more, with sample tastings from Vitality Bowls The following restaurants are participating in restaurant week, and will offer special deals thoughout the week:
MidiCi Valley Tavern Bonefish Grill Bahama Breeze Cantina Laredo City Works Eatery & Pour House Creed’s Seafood & Steaks Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse Eddie V’s Fogo de Chao Founding Farmers J. Alexander’s Legal Sea Foods Maggiano’s Little Italy Mistral Morton’s the Steakhouse North Italia Outback Steakhouse Paladar Latin Kitchen & Rum Bar Pepper’s Italian Restaurant Ralph’s of South Philly Revolution Chop House Ruth’s Chris Steak House Savona Seasons 52 Sullivan’s Steakhouse The Capital Grille The Melting Pot The Pub by Wegmans The Zodiac at Neiman Marcus Tiffin Indian Cuisine True Food Kitchen Yard House

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Superb!

Got food poisoning after eating at the Asian (Thai/Japanese/Chinese) restaurant (3rd floor)on the second time. First time the food served was very tasty and fresh and the waitress serving us was very nice and friendly. Second time around the experience was not that great as we decided to move the table due to cold wind coming through the doors to the open terrace and noticed the staff making up some faces. The foid was tasty still but did not feel so fresh (at least some of the dishes). Had caught bad food poisoning so suffered the whole night on the flight back home and still not recovered from it. I believe this is an independent restaurant that is run in the evening at the Taj as all the staff is different (but I might be wrong). Apart from this episode I’ve got nothing to fault this hotel and it’s management.
Superb 5* reputable hotel. Amazing breakfast including Indian, Asian, continental, Arabian cuisine. Staff are all very polite and helpful. It’s located just opposite the Burj Khalifa só the view from the terrace at night is spectacular where they have a Shisha bar every night. Had dinner at the Indian restaurant which was superb first class food. (4th floor)
Stayed in February 2019

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Vegetarian Paella

Vegetarian Paella Posted on the 04 March 2019 by Spk100
Paella is a traditional dish from Valencia, Spain. Being a local cuisine, it is most made with sea food that popularly includes shrimps and mussels. In our recipe, we will explore the Vegetarian Paella.
Paella, a Venecian word, is derived from paelle, an Old French word referring to pan. It is regarded as the national dish of Spain. A rice based dish, very similar to the Indian/Middle Eastern Pilaf ( Pulao ), Paellas are popularly made with meat (chicken, rabbit or sometimes duck) or seafood (mussels, shrimps). Saffron is a predominant spice used for seasoning. However, there are 2 major differences between the Paella and the Pulao/Pilaf. The rice used in Paella is usually short and round (called Bomba Rice ) and some versions include a sticker variety, unlike the Pilaf that used long grained rice versions. The other major difference is that the rice is not braised in oil.
The vegetarian paella is called paella de verduras (vegetables) in Spanish and is a hearty meal loaded with lots of vegetables. A beautiful party-worthy, one-pot dish that is gluten-free, nut-free and 100% vegan. You can use any vegetable you want in this dish. Cooking this includes a stove-top method and well as baking – both of these modern versions. The traditional ones were cooked over direct fire. When it comes to the utensils, you have two options: a Paella pan ( Paelleras ) or a vessel similar to a Dutch Oven that has a tight fitting lid and a heavy bottom.
In this Vegetarian Paella recipe, we will use the stove-top method. Vegetarian Paella
A traditional rice and vegetable dish from Valencia, Spain. Colorful and flavorful, this hearty vegetarian Valencian dish is an eye catching center piece for the table!
Cuisine: Spanish, Valencian 1 Yellow Capsicum thinly sliced 10-12 strands Saffron

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First Chefs and a Seed Cake with Jane

A temporary exhibit that really brings you a sweet taste of history!
Last post, I mentioned an exhibit at the National Archives that I had missed out on years ago. Living in DC, such worries are a thing of the past, unless of course there’s a cool exhibit going on at a non DMV area museum. Take the current exhibit at the Folger Shakespeare Library: First Chefs!
First Chefs spotlights books, documents and artifacts from the library’s collection, as well as a few other local institutions that help bring to life how and what people in Britain and North America ate in the late 1500’s through the 1700’s. The exhibit shines the spotlight on several interesting figures in culinary history, as well as showing the public that more extravagant food often meant exploiting the labor of enslaved people, women, servants, and laborers. Read on to see highlights from the exhibit and a recipe inspired by one of the personalities featured in the gallery!
The Folger Library is located a few blocks down the street from the Library of Congress. It’s an independent library that boasts the world’s largest collection of the printed works of William Shakespeare, as well as countless other priceless books and manuscripts. The Folger Theatre puts on a season of plays inspired by Shakespeare or the works of the Bard himself. I’ve walked by it many times on my way to and from the Library of Congress, but had never visited before hearing about this exhibit. Of course, being a food history person, I dragged the whole grad school gang down with me and Jane.
The library’s temporary exhibitions are free and open to the public, so it’s definitely worth coming down to see what they have out on display. This exhibit spotlighted five different personalities who represent different perspectives and aspects of culinary history from this period. They include Thomas Tusser, who wrote an agricultural book entirely in prose aimed at the common man, Hannah Woolley, the first female celebrity chef, Robert May, the first author of a cookbook aimed at professional chefs, William Hughes, a pirate obsessed with botany who helped introduce chocolate to Britain, and Hercules, the extremely talented personal chef of George Washington who stole himself to freedom.
Most of the artifacts in the exhibit are books and documents from the Library’s collections, including the only known copy of Hannah Woolley’s earliest book. Other objects featured are on loan from places like Mount Vernon and the Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation. The Library has done a really cool job of trying to find artifacts that relate to parts of the history that aren’t well preserved, like the perspective an illiterate servant or early colonist to the Americas might have had, as well as giving voices to women, African Americans and Native peoples involved in changing British cuisine.
Jane was particularly excited to see the artifacts on loan from Jamestown. I can’t believe I’ve lived down here for two years and haven’t yet found time to head down there for some photos with Jane in her hometown. Maybe later this year!
A really impressive part of the exhibition was the interactive book displays. The Library had digitized six books in their collection and had a touch screen display where you could page through literally every single page in beautiful high resolution. Most books were cookbooks, but one focused more on medicinal recipes for anything from boils to fevers. We had a lot of fun “thumbing” through these and taking a look at some of the recipes.
There were some fun interactives aimed at kids, which encouraged them to think about where they get their food from and how foodways have changed.
Which also included a wall where visitors could write about their favorite culinary memory or share a recipe, with lots of different colored pencils for illustrating their submissions. It was a lot of fun looking through what other people had written, as some of them were just genuinely very funny and others quite touching. One recipe for fruitcake sounded a lot like the one I made with Nanea for Christmas this past year!
I included Jane’s recipe for Indian pudding, which I shared on the blog a few years ago and now is a staple of my family’s Thanksgiving dessert spread!
But my favorite part of the exhibit was definitely the free recipe cards they had available for visitors to take home and bring a bit of history into their kitchens! I love when exhibits do this, and have quite a stash of recipe cards from similar displays, most of which have sadly gone untested so far. But I knew I wanted to make one from this set to share with all of you and was very eager to get started!
Again, perhaps unsurprisingly given my enthusiasm for baking and love of cake, I immediately gravitated towards the Thomas Tusser inspired seed cake. Seed cakes are a classically British baked good, which I was first introduced to when my dad read me The Hobbit as a small child. Bilbo’s enthusiasm for them intrigued me, but I’d never actually come across one to try myself before getting this recipe card in hand.
The recipe itself isn’t a historic one written by Thomas Tusser himself, but it is based on a historic recipe and adapted for a modern audience by Marissa Nicosa of Rare Cooking , a really interesting blog that focuses on updating recipes from historic cookbooks to a modern kitchen. I would definitely recommend checking out her work!
To start off, you’re to grease a spring form pan and line it with parchment paper. In a bowl, mix together 1 cup of flour, 7 teaspoons of caraway seeds, 1/2 teaspoon of salt, and 1/4 teaspoon of mace. In a separate bowl, cream together 1 stick of room temperature butter, 1 teaspoon of rosewater, and 1/2 of a cup of sugar. Add one whole egg to the wet ingredients along with one tablespoon of sherry and mix well. Finally, add in the dry ingredients and mix. You’ll end up with a really thick batter that definitely feels more like dough than cake batter.
Next, whip up two egg whites “until they hold their form”. I think I might have whipped mine a little too vigorously, as they were definitely at stiff peak stage when I stopped. The recipe instructs you to fold these into the batter very gently, “maintaining the fluffiness of the whites even if it means the batter looks clumpy.” I was really skeptical about this. I’ve made other historical cakes with no chemical leavening agents before, and one of the first ones I did I definitely didn’t fold in the egg whites well. Certain slices had weird, almost spiderweb looking clumps in them that were extremely off putting and did not taste good, so I tried to make sure I was incorporating the eggs even at the expense of fluffiness.
Once that was done, I poured it into my prepared cake pan.
The cake bakes at 350 degrees for about 40 minutes, or until the cake is golden and a cake tester inserted in the middle comes out clean. My cake was done at the 40 minute mark exactly, so I took it out of the oven and let it cool for ten minutes before trying to take out of the pan.
After impatiently waiting for the cake to cool, I eagerly cut a piece to see what it tasted like!
It’s a little hard to tell from the photos on the recipe card, but I think my cake might be a tiny bit flatter than Marissa’s. The cake was definitely fluffier in the middle than around the edges, but there were no bits of cooked egg to be seen, so I was a really happy camper.
Plus, it smelled delicious, and looked really inviting!
This seed cake was super, super tasty. Texture wise, it was a little dense, like most historic cakes are, but it wasn’t heavy . If you made a double batch of the batter, the cake would likely be fluffier as the resulting cake would be taller.
So, sonfession time: none of the grocery stores near us had rosewater, so I substituted vanilla the way I did with Felicity’s Queen Cakes . This worked out for me, because I tend not to love rosewater as a flavor, whereas vanilla is delicious, so flavor wise, I was very into this cake. I also liked the caraway seeds a lot, and Jess was surprised at how much she liked it, because she’s really not a fan of caraway seeds and this recipe does have quite a lot of them. I thought the caraway definitely had a presence in the cake, but I totally agree with her: they weren’t the stand out flavor, so if you’re not really a fan but can tolerate a subtle hint of caraway, I’d say you’d be safe giving this one a shot. The seeds did make for a nice, crunchy bite, which was a lot of fun, and it paired extremely well with tea. I have to admit, I intended on bringing it in to work to let my coworkers try some, but I liked it so much, I ended up keeping the leftovers to share with wifey instead.
This is a recipe we will definitely be making again and I would absolutely recommend trying it out yourself.
First Chefs will be at the Folger Library until March 31. If you’re local or visiting the District before the end of the month, head down there and check it out for yourself! If you can’t make it, but still want a taste of early American cuisine, the Folger Library has published the recipes online . Let us know if you try any of them out yourself!
Or if you check out the exhibit!

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Carius: The future unknown whets the appetite | Food and Cooking | pantagraph.com

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It is difficult to remember when Bloomington-Normal restaurants didn’t serve Mexican, Greek, Japanese, Korean, Indian, Turkish, Mediterranean, Filipino, Thai, Middle Eastern and other “ethnic foods,” and we had only two Chinese restaurants!
Bloomington-Normal was known as a “meat and potatoes” community and commonplace menu items today — burritos, gyros, sushi, samosas, pad thai, hummus, kimchi and many more ethnic foods — were not available in local restaurants when I started as a sanitarian with the McLean County Health Department in 1968. My primary responsibility was inspecting restaurants.
When I started, the two longtime Chinese restaurants in downtown Bloomington were thought of as the only “ethnic restaurants” in the Twin Cities.
The increasing number and diversity of ethnic restaurants after 1968 coincided with the doubling of the population from 66,000 in 1970 to the current 132,000.
The Twin Cities became more of an international city fueled by the growth of State Farm and Illinois State University, plus Mitsubishi selecting Normal for its only U.S. manufacturing plant. The growing diversity of restaurants reflected the expanding population.
I can recall restaurants owners, managers and employees from almost 40 countries who I have known in my five decades of being involved in the Bloomington-Normal restaurant industry.
The parade of diverse restaurants began soon after I was employed by the health department and the first two Mexican restaurants opened — de Taco Villa on West Market Street in Bloomington in 1969 and Taco King on Dale Street in Normal in 1970.
By my latest count, Bloomington-Normal now has 25 Mexican restaurants and two Mexican grocery stores, both with a fresh meat case. Of course, many other restaurants also serve Mexican foods.
The diversity continued when Tien Tsin Mandarin Chinese Cuisine — in my opinion the most beautiful Chinese restaurant ever in B-N — opened in 1976 on Four Seasons Road in Bloomington. The site is now a State Farm parking lot.
By my latest count, B-N has more than 15 Chinese restaurants.
Greek food came to Bloomington-Normal in the late 1970s when Greek owners opened the Fifth Wheel restaurant in what is now Garden of Paradise. Gyros and two or three Greek dishes were included on the traditional American diner menu.
Gyros came to Normal in 1983 when the family-owned (husband was Greek-Cypriot) Greek specialty restaurant Zorba’s opened on Dale Street. It was a popular restaurant until the family closed it and retired 32 years later. The building has been demolished.
Korean food came to Bloomington when Me Me opened downtown in 1984. After it closed, several restaurants offered Korean food as a small part of their menus. A second Korean restaurant, however, did not arrive until Seoul Mama opened in Parkway Plaza in January 2019.
Caribbean food showed up in 1985 when the owner, who was from the Dominican Republic, opened Chimi’s Caribbean Restaurant in what is now Mugsy’s. She introduced goat as a delicacy.
The beautiful KiKu Japanese Restaurant opened in 1987, bringing the first sushi bar and a traditional Japanese menu and dining to B-N. The location now is Mandarin Garden.
Today, several restaurants and grocery stores feature sushi and/or other Japanese foods on the menu or have it available for purchase.
The first B-N Indian restaurant — India Garden — opened in 1988 in an existing hotel restaurant on Brock Drive in Bloomington.
Bloomington-Normal now has four Indian restaurants and three Indian grocery stores. Namaste Plaza, a $3 million Indian grocery, opened in Bloomington a little over a year ago.
In 1993, Bangkok Café brought the first Thai food to Bloomington-Normal when it opened in a former Taco John’s at 612 Kingsley St., Normal. The building has been demolished. The Twin Cities has had as many as three Thai restaurants at one time; now, only the very successful Thai House remains.
Turkish food arrived when a family from Istanbul, Turkey, opened Ephesus Turkish & Mediterranean Cuisine on East Empire Street in 2012.
A small, specialty food African grocery also opened in 2012, remaining open in Normal.
Filipino food was a part of the Grand Café Express menu when it opened on East Oakland Avenue in 2017.
Over the years, these ethnic foods have become my favorites. I consider it a privilege to have known individuals from almost 40 countries in my 50 years of being involved with B-N restaurants.
Although the Twin Cities now have a wide variety and a large number of ethnic restaurants and foods available, I am still waiting and eagerly anticipating the arrival of another type of ethnic food not yet available.
Carius, of Bloomington, is a former food program and plan review supervisor for the McLean County Health Department. His Facebook blog, Bloomington-Normal Restaurant Scene, has 21,000 followers. Love

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An interview with Garima Arora, Asia’s Best Female Chef 2019

We talk Indian influences and the pressures faced by female chefs today. 4 hours ago By Megan Leon | Mar 04, 2019 We talk Indian influences and the pressures faced by female chefs today. By Megan Leon | Mar 04, 2019
Following tenures at Copenhagen’s Noma and Bangkok’s Gaggan , chef Garima Arora launched Gaa back in early 2017. By November 2018, her high-wire techniques and inventive trans-Asian flavors had gained a Michelin star . Last week, her winning streak continued as she was awarded the title of Asia’s Best Female Chef 2019 by Asia’s 50 Best. We spoke to her about her influences and the challenges of accepting an award that has long been a subject of controversy.
How does it feel to be named Asia’s best female chef, especially fresh from gaining your first Michelin star? It’s great to get recognition by my peers. We are really thrilled that 18 months into opening we have got so much love from everybody. It makes me really happy. What do you think are the biggest challenges facing female chefs today? I think the biggest challenge is the amount of pressure we face from our own choices. Take this award for example, so many people were against me accepting it, while others wanted me to take it—so whatever you choose, you do something wrong. As women, there’s pressure to show that we are progressive and support other women. The best way to look at it, I believe, is to stop apologizing for our choices. I don’t think I owe anybody an explanation as to why I accepted the award.
You’re the first Indian woman to receive a Michelin star. How do you hope it will impact other female Indian chefs? India hasn’t really been seen as a serious gastronomic destination other than just for comfort food. I hope that changes—I’m really passionate about how Indian cuisine can offer the resources to make a completely modern menu. You sit and eat at Gaa, and it’s not Indian, but I do use Indian techniques—I hope with all this success we are gaining that people will recognize that these techniques can be used to create something so relevant to today.
How important is it for you to incorporate Indian flavors and techniques in your dishes? Techniques always, I don’t go for flavors as much. The food is always technique-driven.
You studied at Le Cordon Bleu in Paris. Where else did you learn your cooking skills? My time at Noma probably changed me most, not only as a cook but as a person. I learned how to think about my job more than just do it and the whole approach to cooking that I took away still resonates at Gaa. I’m so proud of that.
How has your time at Noma influenced your dishes at Gaa? Some might think we have Noma-inspired dishes or styles. The truth is, you can’t take recipes away from a restaurant like Noma, it’s impossible. I think what a restaurant like Noma teaches you is attitude—it’s a way to be, a way to live your life and your career, so yes in that sense, you can compare us to Noma.
What is your earliest food memory? My earliest and most fond memory is of cooking with my father when I was young. I remember the first time he made risotto and I couldn’t eat it. I also remember him making a tarte tatin with bananas and I was just amazed, he would tell me it was magic. I can still remember the first time he made sweet corn soup and I was so impressed by the texture.
Who else has been influential in your journey to becoming a chef? After Rene [Redzepi], I would say it was my father. If it wasn’t for him, I would’ve never gotten into food the way I have.
Where is your favorite place to eat in Bangkok? There are so many…I love Khua Kling Pak Sod . I recently discovered Bangkok Bold and I really enjoyed it. The Broccoli Burger at Broccoli Revolution is delicious and definitely Holey Bakery for the Sunshine Sandwich.
Do you have any future plans or projects coming up? Not at the moment. My main focus is making sure everything is running smoothly at Gaa, the team is getting so much stronger. The next challenge is for them to take over when I’m not around and to give them the same experiences that I’ve had.
Visit Gaa at 68/4, 68/5 Lang Suan Rd., 091-419-2424 Latest News Head there between Mar 11-31 for two-for-one deals. 4 hours 7 min ago

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Hull’s Tiffin Box restaurant owners fined after sudden closure

Hull’s Tiffin Box restaurant owners fined after sudden closure
The owners of a Princes Avenue restaurant which suddenly closed its doors have been fined thousands of pounds for environmental health offences. The Tiffin Box took over the former Florins cocktail bar early last year, providing Indian cuisine in a unique tiffin box-style. However, the restaurant suddenly closed several months later, with the building still standing empty. Now, Hull Restaurants and Food Ltd, who traded as The Tiffin Box, has been fined £2,000 and ordered to pay £50 for three offences under the Environmental Protection Act. The offences include: Failing to prevent the escape… read more Pontefract restaurant owners ‘overwhelmed’ by public support
Restaurant owners say they have been overwhelmed by the community’s support after fearing they would be forced to shut. Jemma and David Ladwitch only took over the Pontefract Roast House on Market Place in September, but were hit by a huge £3,000… Pontefract restaurant owners ‘overwhelmed’ by public support
Restaurant owners say they have been overwhelmed by the community’s support after fearing they would be forced to shut. Jemma and David Ladwitch only took over the Pontefract Roast House on Market Place in September, but were hit by a huge £3,000… Hull Daily Mail , 14 October 2016 in Yorkshire & Humber Hull Daily Mail , 21 July 2015 in Yorkshire & Humber Lord Line owners fined £900 over state of iconic Hull building
THE owners of the derelict Lord Line trawler company offices have been fined £900 for failing to carry out essential maintenance work on the building. Six planning notices were served on Lord Line Campus Ltd in May 2014 requiring urgent safety work to… Hull Daily Mail , 16 January 2016 in Yorkshire & Humber Hull restaurant owners hurt in Manchester Arena terror attack
A Hull restaurant owner has described the moment he and his partner were thrown backwards by the suicide bomb which killed 22 people at Manchester Arena. Gianpaul Redolfi and Alex Stothard, who run Gusto’s in Newland Avenue, west Hull, were just… Hull Daily Mail , 25 May 2017 in Yorkshire & Humber

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Indian spices transforming the world

Chef Khulood Atiq Saeed attended a food festival in New Delhi, where she expressed her passion for Indian cuisine and ingredients. (Photo: Facebook/ChefKhulood.page) New Delhi: Food ingredients, mostly spices, come from India and this makes the Emirati cuisine taste almost similar to Indian cuisine, shared Khulood Atiq Saeed, the first female chef from the United Arab Emirates (UAE).
Attending an international food festival hosted by the Embassy of UAE in New Delhi in collaboration with multiple embassies of other countries, including France, Tunisia, Czech Republic and Hungary on Friday, Saeed told ANI, “We don’t grow many spices in our own country. Most of the spices come from India. Hence, Emirati food and Indian food taste a bit similar.”
“Few differences however, which you will notice in taste are that we use less chilli in our food. But today it was all about fusion and combining both cuisines. I made the Emirati stew and used the Indian ‘rumali roti’ as the bread to go with it,” Saeed added. The celebrity chef further went on to state that Indian food was one of her favourites.
“I am excited about exploring more Indian recipes and spices in the food festival. In my country, we have Indian food present to some extent as well but it is not the same as here. There are a huge number of recipes here to delve into. I have relatively more time here so, I went to the kitchen and saw the chef preparing a few Indian dishes,” Saeed said.
When asked to elaborate on her journey of becoming the first female iconic chef from the UAE, Saeed said that her career started in 2006. “Initially many people had commented that how are you going to work with your ‘abaya’ along with so many men around you. But now those people are proud of me because today I not only cook but also write Emirati cookbooks. I have also shot for lots of episodes on the local television channels and travel around the world to promote Emirati food,” Saeed stated.

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Originally Posted by NakedDesires3 [View Original Post] Hello friends,
I am an experienced monger from Kolkata.
I am looking for a very picturesque place anywhere in north-east to spend time with my girlfriend.
Anywhere in north east. Assam, arunachal pradesh, mizoram, sikkim, meghalaya. Off-beat location is fine.
The place must be amidst deep greenery and great views.
Place must be very safe, quiet and clean. Kind of honeymoon place. For 15-20 days. Suitable for couple. IDs will be provided. If multi-cuisine / north-indian / punjabi food is available that would be great. Total all inclusive budget for expenses including accommodation and food is around 3 K per day. Hotel or resort or lodge or BnB. Anything. Also ready on 1 month rent basis. But, the place should have great views amidst deep greenery.
Please help with the best choices of location and place of stay.
I will be pleased to reciprocate if you need any help in Kolkata. Hello Bro,
In my opinion, you can either opt for Pelling or Ravangla in Sikkim, or even the scenic Dzongu Valley in North Sikkim. Or you can opt for Sohra in Meghalaya, or even Tawang in Arunachal. But keep in mind that food options in all of these places can vary from being good to basic, so need to factor that.
I had the pleasure of taking my chick to Pelling, where we had stayed at a Hotel on long term basis. The place is absolutely serene, where my only focus was to eat-drink-screw-sleep & repeat LOL.
Regards,
Monk.

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