How can one pick a favorite? Indian food has wonderful legumes, Tandoori, and spices that ignite the imagination. Chinese is excellent, complex, and has been adapted to U.S. produce availability. I’ll go to either restaurant in a minute, and thoroughly enjoy myself. But I’m a nut for ethnic cuisines.

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NY Night Market – The NEW Vivocity Outlet Offers 1-For-1 Draft Beers!

Fans of NY Night Market will be stoked to know that it has recently opened a new outlet at Vivocity! Sitting on the first level of the huge mall, the restaurant is one of South Korea’s most popular chains. Their menu is inspired by cosmopolitan New York and lively night markets of Seoul.
From the ambience, to the food and beverages, everything about this space reflects the brilliant East meets West Concept. Entering the restaurant, you will be captivated by the loud and colourful setup. The menu itself is quite extensive, so remember to grab a few friends so you can try a bigger variety! Expect sandwiches, pizzas, stews, pastas, and more! There’s lots of cheese, big flavours, and surprises so come all ready for a huge feast! Psst, read till the end to find out about an on-going promotion that NY Night Market is running!
We were spoilt for choice. NY Night Market is here to seriously pamper your taste buds. We absolutely loved Cream the Curry Feat. Toppoki ($14.90) which was such a sweet surprise. To put it simply, it tasted very much like Indian curry, but sweeter. The mildly spicy pot contains beef and toppoki. The extremely light and fluffy whipped cream which dissolved really quickly into the curry gave it a lovely richness and creaminess that we just couldn’t get enough of. Who would have thought that whipped cream would go so well with curry?
Next, we had the Waterfall Cheese Shrimp ($14.90) which was a complete stunner. Sauteed succulent prawns, broccoli, king oyster mushrooms and cherry tomatoes sit on a hot plate, and is accompanied by a little pot of mozzarella and emmental cheese. Pour the warm cheese over the ingredients when you’re ready, and watch a literal waterfall of cheese flow onto the mix of ingredients! Cheese lovers will definitely love this creation!
Hawaiian Freestyle ($7.90) is inspired by a Korean street snack that has been trending in recent years. The savory sandwich sees a firm chicken patty, grilled pineapple, corn omelette, cheese slice, pickles and shredded cabbage, NY Night Market sandwich jam, BBQ sauce, and mayonnaise sandwiched between toasted brioche. You can look forward to a great mix of tantalising flavours, because this sure is a flavour bomb! Maria’s Corner – Good Ol’ Home-Style Nasi Lemak in Tanglin Halt
Almost like a classic breakfast toast from New York, You’re Bacon Me Hungry ($7.90) is crafted for those who love their eggs and bacon. The combination of fried bacon, scrambled eggs, hashbrown, cheese and shredded cabbage will never go wrong! Laced with tartar sauce and NY Night Market sandwich jam, which bring all the ingredients together harmoniously, this toast is perfect for breakfast, or even as a snack anytime of the day.
When we were first introduced to the 50cm Baguette ($14.90), we went “Hell yeah, bring it on!” Seeing the masterpiece lying across the table, we were all super excited to tuck into it! There is just something about unusually huge food creations that gets everyone pumped up. Maybe it’s how glorious the food looks, or how instagram-worthy it is, or maybe because it’s irresistibly aromatic because it’s supersized. Whatever it is, NY Night Market’s 50cm Baguette nailed them all. The combo of sliced beef, jalapenos, cherry tomatoes, mozzarella, cheddar, onion salsa, BBQ sauce and butter set off a party in my mouth. The toasted baguette had a slight crisp on its edges, and we loved how the entire setup was unpretentious and just delicious! Everyone at the table was impressed!
The moment the Little Chicken in New York ($24.90) arrived, everyone at the table stared at it longingly, all eager to dive into it. The fragrance of the Korean fried chicken was just too captivating! 4 big juicy chicken thighs are accompanied with French fries, onion rings and a citrusy mango salad. The chicken thighs were perfectly crispy even after a while. This was undeniably one of our favourite dishes of the day!
Budaejjigae is a spicy sausage stew which usually comprises kimchi, baked beans, sausages and melted cheese. But at NY Night Market, the Budaejjigae ($18.90) is made up of a jumbo pork sausage, bulgogi beef, and the usual ingredients. Served with a generous sprinkling of cheese, the stew began to bubble shortly after. We waited for the cheese to melt before giving the stew a good mix. Armed with a marvellous creaminess from the cheese, the luscious stew was appetizing and appealing. The stew is pretty filling so make sure you have your gang with you to tackle it! Masizzim – Hearty $50++ Set Meal That Will Make You Go “Daebak!”
A rather interesting combo is the Avocado Steak ($15.90) which is a solid outfit of medium-rare beef steak and fried avocado slices seasoned with cayenne pepper. The tempura-like batter holding the avocado slices was slightly crunchy. Best eaten when it is hot, the beef steak was wonderfully seasoned, and the flavour of the herbs and spices made the steak even more enticing. I was excited to see if NY Night Market will nail the doneness of the steak, and they sure didn’t disappoint.
Rosti seems to be most commonly paired with smoked salmon or sausages. NY Night Market decided to take their rosti to another level by pairing it with beef. The Rosti&Beef ($11.90) comes with house-shred Russet potatoes and sweet bulgogi beef. Topped with a dollop of sour cream, the golden crispy rosti was yummy enough on its own! NY Night Market elevated the time-tested pairing of sour cream and rosti with the sweetness and savoriness of the beef, and this combination definitely deserves lots of credit!
The Pasta de Dak-Galbi ($17.90) was spot on! NY Night Market put oodles of spaghetti, dakgalbi (stir-fried spicy marinated chicken in gochujang sauce) and assorted vegetables together, before smothering the mix with gooey melted cheese. Beware, this is one fiery plate! For spicy-food lovers (hi-five), this will be very satisfying! The first mouthful was intense and spicy enough to let me know that this dish will probably send beads of perspiration flowing down my forehead. It’s super shiok though and I loved it to bits!
NY Night Market is not just about savoury dishes and sides. Their beverages, especially the alcoholic ones, are really good as well! Blood&Seoul ($14.90), one of its signatures, was so refreshing and tasty! This giant beverage may seem intimidating at first (try carrying it and you will know what I mean), but you’ll have no trouble finishing it! Before releasing the Cass beer into the mix, you have to drink some of the cocktail which is a blend of lime Mojito, raspberry and strawberry puree, lemon juice and mint. The cocktail has a sweet and citrusy aftertaste. Beer lovers will love this more and more as the taste of the beer becomes increasingly prominent. Makko Teck Neo – Hidden Peranakan Restaurant in the Heartlands
I’ll recommend the NY Strawberry Coffee Frappe ($6.50) for those who want a non-alcoholic drink, and the Cream Beer ($12.90), which comes with whipped cream, for beer drinkers who also have a sweet tooth.
Good news for beer fanatics (hi-5 again)! Currently there is a 1-for-1 promotion for ALL draft beers . This applies to beer TOWERS (U.P. $75++ to $80++ each) too! I know, it’s SUPER WORTH IT RIGHT? Jio your drinking kakis now because no one knows when this promotion will end! Just note that this promotion is available only at NY Night Market (VivoCity and [email protected] ); the Westgate outlet offers 1-for-1 bottled beers instead.
NY Night Market is not just hip and trendy, but it also sends out amazing food at wallet-friendly prices! They have successfully brought Western cuisine and Korean flavours together seamlessly, creating an extensive menu full of instagram-worthy and great-tasting dishes. We really enjoyed the food and ambience here, and will no doubt be back for more. If you’ve been thinking of visiting, now’s the perfect time because you certainly shouldn’t miss the beer promotion! NY Night Market
Address: 1 Harbourfront Walk, Vivocity #01-116, Singapore 098585
Phone: 6974 4113

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DISH OF THE WEEK: Market Plate at TERANGA

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Every week, I document another dish that impressed and satiated me during my food adventures around New York City
Bowls are quite the rage in New York. They’re super simple and allow the ingredients to shine. Pick a base (usually salad, rice, or grain), a protein, toppings, and a sauce. I actually really like them.
And it seems it’s infiltrated every culture’s food here in the city. We have Japanese bowls, Mexican bowls, Italian bowls, Indian bowls, Australian bowls. You name it.
But until I discovered the fresh and bright café Teranga hiding on the northeastern corner of Central Park, I had yet to see African food make its way into this bowl sensation.
Teranga sits inside the Africa Center , a recently opened cultural center with African exhibits and events. The space is exciting and modern. There is a museum vibe but there is also a hipster thing going on as well.
I absolutely loved it and was only disappointed to realize how far away it is from my apartment. Because I would truly be here multiple times a week.
And I would probably always order the Market Plate.
My customized bowl ended up being very colorful as you can see in the photo below. Not sure if any combination gets you a beautiful Instagram-ready plate or I just lucked out.
I must admit I am not as well versed in African cuisine as I am in say Italian. So I was thankful for the descriptors on the menu. For my base, I chose Attieke, which is a couscous made from fermented cassava. It had a rich nutty flavor that held up to the toppings above it.
The grilled chicken was amazing – smoky, tender, and full of flavor. I topped it with a caramelized onion and lime sauce called Yassa that was perfect with the chicken.
On one side of the meat, I got a summery salad with tomatoes, watermelon, cucumber, and mango and on the other, an earthy salad made of beets and fornino (a grain similar to millet).
I wish Teranga all the luck in the world. It’s an exciting place that has the ability to introduce a new cuisine to those who may not seek it out on their own. The only thing that could make it better is if it was closer to my apartment. Price: $10-$14 TERANGA 1280 Fifth Avenue (at 109th Street), Inside Africa Center,

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Lemon Tree Takeaway

Lemon Tree Takeaway of Carshalton is located on Stanley Park in Carshalton. GOOD Indian Cuisine is brought to your door when you order online. Lemon Tree of Carshalton offers you a delicious choice of traditional Indian cuisine. Order online today to have our delicious food delivered fresh to your door. You are just one click away. Browse through order online and either order one of your favourites or go for something a little less ordinary with so many different dishes to choose from. Order a cool drink to wash it all down with too. Lemon Tree hopes you enjoy your takeaway and we are confident that you will order from us again soon. iPhone Screenshots

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Cajun Cuisine to try on your Jewish trips with Kosher River Cruise

Cajun is a form of cooking identifying the French-speaking Acadian people deported by the British from Acadia in Canada to what is now called the Acadiana region of Louisiana. Cajun cuisine is sometimes ascribed to as a ‘rustic cuisine,’ which simply means the food is sourced from locally available ingredients, and preparation is relatively simple. An authentic Cajun meal is usually a three-pot medley, with one pot dedicated solely to the main dish, one dedicated to steamed white rice, handmade sausages, or some sort of seafood dish, and the third containing whatever vegetable is plentiful or available during the season. Crawfish, shrimp, and andouille sausage are staple meats used in a variety of Cajun dishes. Which one of these dishes are you willing to try on our Jewish trips down the Mighty Mississippi ? Crawfish or Shrimp Étouffée There’s nothing better in Louisiana during crawfish season! An étouffée is a stew-like sauce served over a bed of warm rice. This is a staple dish that’s served all year round, but it’s best in the spring when fresh crawfish are available. Jambalaya Jambalaya is a favorite Louisiana-origin dish of Spanish, West African, and French influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. It uses the same techniques as Paella but uses heartier ingredients. You can walk into any restaurant in Louisiana and order a big bowl of Jambalaya to enjoy. Seafood Gumbo Hit it with a few douses of tabasco and this meal is ready to warm you up on a chilly southern night! Gumbo used to be made in cauldron sized pots for the community to share during parties and social gatherings. Maque Choux Thought to be an amalgam of Creole and American Indian cultural influence, Maque choux is arguably the most popular side dish in the whole Southern region. Be careful; you don’t want to stuff yourself with this delicious appetizer before you can get to your food. Beignets Technically, beignets don’t count as a meal, but desserts have a special place in all Southern peoples hearts. They’re the equivalent of french donuts dusted with powdered sugar. You can have them with your morning coffee or afternoon tea; they’re just that good. Excited to learn more about the culinary treasures of the Cajun region on your Jewish tours ? Book a tour now on Kosher River Cruise!

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Pullman Novotel New Delhi Aerocity Appoint the Game Changer – Biswajit Chakraborty as the New General Manager Delegate – The Week

Pullman Novotel New Delhi Aerocity Appoint the Game Changer – Biswajit Chakraborty as the New General Manager Delegate PTI July 09, 2019 12:00 IST
(Eds: Disclaimer: The following press release comes to you under an arrangement with PR Newswire. PTI takes no editorial responsibility for the same.) Accor further cements its position in the capitalNEW DELHI, July 9, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Pullman, New Delhi, the perfect blend of elegance and the vibrant, & Novotel, New Delhi, both located at the trendiest new destination in the capital Aerocity, have announced the appointment of Biswajit Chakraborty as their new General Manager Delegate (Cluster General Manager), who will spearhead the operations of the prestigious tripartite venture between Singapore GIC, InterGlobe & Accor. With an intricate understanding of the luxe segment, Biswajit considers himself a catalyst that adds impetus to his team, by further creating finer experiences for the luxury and upscale travel and business market in the country.With over 30 years of experience behind him, Biswajit has been the driving force behind some of the world’s top luxury hotels. In his last assignment, he was the man behind a successful transformation of the Sofitel Mumbai BKC, by strongly establishing the brand in the country, after its inception in 2011. The luxury hotel has now grown and has made an impact on the development of the Bandra Kurla Complex in Mumbai. While the micro-location has advanced as a business centre, over the years Sofitel Mumbai BKC has created experiences that are commensurate with luxury, style and panache for discerning guests.At a handover ceremony in the capital over the weekend, Biswajit stated, “I am grateful to be associated with the Accor group and am thankful to Shree Naman Group for the significant leadership opportunity at the Sofitel Mumbai BKC that I was given. I look forward to bringing together all the interesting elements of our key learnings and create a unique and chic hospitality experience in Delhi & Gurgaon, that not only furthers the Pullman and Novotel brands but also contributes to the growth and development of Aerocity itself.”Business development being his forte, combined with market leadership and a multi-functional approach, Mr. Chakraborty has achieved operational excellence in all his key assignments. A strategic thinker whose strengths also include execution, he is capable of blending quality operations with astute marketing in any hospitality leadership role with his humane and effective style. A complete turnaround specialist, he has transformed several properties in his past assignments.Throughout his career, Biswajit has been felicitated with numerous awards. Some of the highlights are – the first ‘General Manager of The Year’ award by the Hotelier India group in 2009. He was also awarded the prestigious ‘Game Changer GM’ award at the Food & Hospitality World (FHW) Business Excellence Honours in 2017. Further, in 2015 he received the ‘International Honorary Membership to Union Internationale des Concierges d’Hotels’ at Les Clefs d’Or, Paris.An alumnus of Bangalore and Cornell University, he was a part of the Oberoi McKinsey transformation. He began his career with the Taj Group and later moved to contribute to the growth and stature of the Yak and Yeti, the Oberoi Group, Mövenpick Hotels & Spa Bangalore and Sofitel Mumbai BKC. Further, under his leadership as the General Manager of The Leela Kempinski Mumbai and Leela Kempinski Kovalam, both hotels reached great heights and became well-known destinations in their own right. He is the only General Manager in India who has had the privilege of working with the top three Indian luxury hospitality brands including The Oberoi Group, Taj Group of Hotels and The Leela Group. He is an accomplished archer, a fond listener of Jazz & Blues and his understanding of gastronomy covers an international range. With a successful stint of 5 years at the Sofitel Mumbai BKC, he looks forward to this new era of Pullman & Novotel New Delhi Aerocity in the capital city.About Pullman New Delhi AerocityPullman New Delhi Aerocity is a perfect mix of luxury & convenience suited for the hyper-connected and seasoned traveller. Styled with contemporary taste, the hotel has 270 chic rooms, offering seamless connectivity and an exclusive bedding concept.Located in the trendiest location of New Delhi – Aerocity, the hotel offers unparalleled accessibility to the business hubs of Gurgaon and New Delhi. The hotel is well positioned to attain a large segment of the increasingly important Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions (MICE) market as it is home to Delhi NCR’s largest convention space spread over a vast expanse of more than 40, 000 sqft.Pullman New Delhi Aerocity offers an assortment of dining options including Pluck, a modern-day eatery on the lobby level serving modern European & contemporary Indian cuisine with freshly picked ingredients from the in-house farm. Café Pluck, a stylish go-grab delicatessen, it offers a widespread range of tea, coffee and other beverages along with freshly baked delicacies. The hotel’s signature Asian bistro, Honk is a melting pot of flavours with an indoor and alfresco seating offering Asian inspired street food cuisine. Pling, a vibrant lux-lounge that showcases a fine selection of wines with the signature ‘Vinoteca by Pullman’ concept.The hotel also features Woo Wellness Spa & Salon, Fit Lounge, and an outdoor pool. For reservations, kindly visit https://group.accor.com/en About PullmanPullman Hotels & Resorts delivers an experience that is upscale, upbeat and perfectly in tempo with the global zeitgeist. Against the backdrop of today’s fast paced life, Pullman helps guests be at their best, in business and at leisure, enabling them to seamlessly conduct business, explore the locale, workout and make connections – to the neighbourhood and people around them. Retaining the values of exploration, comfort and dependability that drove it to become a pioneering travel brand over 150 years ago, Pullman today features 130 worldwide properties including Pullman Paris Tour Eiffel, Pullman Park Lane Hong Kong, Pullman Shanghai South, Pullman London St Pancras and Pullman Sao Paulo Vila Olimpia. Pullman is part of Accor, a world-leading travel and lifestyle group which invites travellers to feel welcome in 4,800 hotels, resorts and residences, along with some 10,000 of the finest private homes around the globe. pullmanhotels.comAbout Novotel New Delhi AerocityNovotel New Delhi Aerocity is the first Novotel in New Delhi’s new trendiest location, Aerocity and features 400 rooms and suites. The hotel is in close proximity to the Indira Gandhi International Airport and the prominent business hubs of Gurgaon and New Delhi. The hotel is a classic blend of modernity, design, simplicity & efficiency and promises an experience tailor-made to suit the convenience of its guests.With a healthy and diverse approach to cuisine, Food Exchange at Novotel offers an exceptional culinary experience comprising of world cuisine, home style desserts and an excellent beverage program. For those looking to unwind, Novotel’s chic and modern sports bar, Quoin has an extensive and exciting selection of beverages served in a soothing and friendly ambience.For conferences and meetings, the hotel offers 1181-sqm pillar-less ballroom, thirteen additional co-meeting rooms suitable, three boardrooms and a business centre to suit all formats of conferencing requirements. The hotel also features the noteworthy spa – Woo, In Balance fitness gym, and an outdoor, heated swimming pool. The hotel breaks down the walls that separate business and leisure travel so that guests can find the right balance between work and play.For reservations, kindly visit group.accor.comWith Novotel, Accor offers every guest the freedom to fully enjoy their stay.Novotel Hotels, Suites & Resorts provide a multi-service offer for both business and leisure guests, with spacious, modular rooms, 24/7 catering offers with balanced meals, meeting rooms, attentive and proactive staff, kid areas, a multi-purpose lobby and fitness centers. Through PLANET 21, Accor’s sustainable development program, Novotel commits to Man and the Planet. Novotel has over 520 hotels and resorts in 60 countries, ideally located in the heart of major international cities, business districts and tourist destinations.Accor is a world-leading travel & lifestyle group and digital innovator offering unique experiences in almost 4,800 hotels, resorts and residences, as well as in over 10,000 of the finest private homes around the globe.novotel.com| group.accor.comPhoto: https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/943815/Pullman Novotel Biswajit_Chakraborty.jpg PWRPWR
(This story has not been edited by THE WEEK and is auto-generated from a PTI feed.) Also read

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Where to eat in Bir

Where to eat in Bir by Pallavi Pasricha (Lonely Planet Author) Jul 2019 Many cafes in Bir offer delicious pancakes for breakfast Image courtesy: ©GooDween123/Shutterstock
Paragliding is the soul of the Himachali town of Bir, the world’s second highest spot for this adventure sport. Over the years a number of cafes and restaurants have opened doors offering not just lip-smacking food but also gorgeous views. When hunger pangs strike, take your pick from these.
Paloma Café and Bistro
Their breakfast options are quite massive. Take your pick from avocado toast, chickpea and onion omelette, eggs benny to Italian, French and Viennese options. This is also one of the few cafes to have a variety of vegan items on the menu including pizza, burgers and more. Even the desserts, except for cheesecake and croissants, are eggless. The view from the rooftop terrace is quite amazing with paragliders going above you.
Image courtesy: ©Pallavi Pasricha
This cosy eco-friendly cafe is one of the best places for breakfast. It has a limited menu but whatever you order will be fresh and tasty. The pancakes, French toast and waffles are ideal breakfast staples. You can take a cup of coffee and sip it while reading a book. If you forgot to bring yours, pick one from a shelf here.
Avva’s Cafe Image courtesy: ©Pallavi Pasricha
If you are craving for South Indian food, the only place to head to is Avva’s Cafe. With a gorgeous view of the Dhauladhar Range and terrace farms, this is the only one in Bir that offers everything from crisp dosas, piping hot vada to idli and uttapam. Munch on channa and sip hot rasam as you wait for your order. On a rainy day nothing can beat sipping filter coffee as you gaze at the mountains.
Gliders Pizzeria Image courtesy: ©Pallavi Pasricha
This is the best place for those delicious wood-fired oven pizzas. With just six pizzas on the menu, two pasta bakes and waffles, you can be assured that whatever you bite into will taste really fantastic. The cabanas in the garden are inviting as you can watch gliders fly over you and come down from the take off point. The ice tea is not heavy on sugar, and while you wait for the order try your hand at a few games kept here.
June 16 Café Image courtesy: ©Pallavi Pasricha
This charming café with colourful interiors offers some of the best desserts in Bir. If you are wondering about the name – it’s the date when the owner Sumit confessed his love to Ritu. The happy couple serves good food and chats with the customers. Desserts like carrot and lemon cake can’t be skipped. They even have a few vegan dishes on the menu – omelette, pancakes – but if you love eggs then go for shakshuka, rosti with fried eggs and eggs Kejriwal. The pancakes and waffles are also worth a try.
Ara Cafe, Parvatah Image courtesy: ©Pallavi Pasricha
If you like sampling local fare, then go for the Himachali thali at this charming rooftop cafe. This is one of the few places that offer this delicious thali consisting of the local dishes. But, if you would rather stick to tried and tested ones, then opt for pakodas, pizza, biryani and devil momos (they are dunked in Schezwan sauce). Everything is presented well and the view from here, especially at sunset, is to die for.
Sasta Cafe Image courtesy: ©Pallavi Pasricha
True to its name, this place follows the concept of pay what you want to. With three wooden tables, it is not very big, and has just four items on the menu (wraps and sandwich) and a few shakes, fresh juice, coffee and tea. Vikrum, the owner has placed a small bowl and you can put in whatever you feel like. You pay for the experience and not the food – that is his philosophy.
Musafir Traveller Cafe Image courtesy: ©Pallavi Pasricha
What attracts people here is the freshly plucked home grown mint that makes its way to your glass when you order Lemon Mint Ice Tea. It’s a tall glass of something so refreshing that you will surely come back for it. Their menu is huge – it includes 10 types of pancakes, Maggi and special sandwiches.
Nyingma Kitchen Image courtesy: ©Pallavi Pasricha
No matter how many cafes come up, nothing can beat digging into a meal of Tibetan and Chinese food. This happens to be one of the best eateries for this cuisine. The momos, thukpa, fried rice and chowmein are delicious. But be careful, if you order something spicy like chilli chicken, it is going to be extra hot.

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July 4th 2019: How a tax on playing cards and a thwarted tea shipment led to American Independence Day

Ticker Tape by TradingView July 4th 2019: How a tax on playing cards and a thwarted tea shipment led to American Independence Day Posted on Read MORE
July 4 1776 was a prominent day in American history, as the 13 colonies successfully claimed their independence from the British Empire. In what is now known as Independence Day, the US’ most beloved national holiday is celebrated annually on the Fourth of July, with millions of Americans coming together to celebrate the anniversary of the birth of their nation. From the history behind America’s independence to the modern celebrations, here is everything you need to know. What is Independence Day? Independence Day commemorates the day the Declaration of Independence was adopted in 1776. Introduced by the Second Continental Congress, the statement outlined that the 13 American colonies were united, independent states, who were no longer subject to British monarch. Recognised annually by Americans, fireworks, parades and other patriotic celebrations are held every year on the Fourth of July to celebrate the colonies breaking free from British control. Why did the Americans want independence? The relationship between the settlers and British had been amicable, however tensions started to escalate over the imposition of British laws and taxes. To help control settlements in the western territories, King George III introduced the Royal Proclamation of 1763, preventing the colonists settling along the Appalachian Mountains. After the French and Indian War came to a close, the Quartering Act was passed in 1765, ordering the American colonies to help house the British soldiers. Also in 1765, Britain then introduced the Stamp Act to help handle war debts; this required colonists to pay a tax on printed paper including newspapers, licenses and playing cards. Colonial governor Thomas Hutchinson (1711 – 1780) escaping from local rioters after demanding Stamp Tax from them Credit: Getty Images/Hulton Archive Unsurprisingly, the colonists were not pleased. ‘No taxation without representation’ became the cry around 1765 after a rise in Britain’s national debt forced the colonists to raise import tariffs and crack down on smuggling to raise funds. There was also a growing sense of nationalism in these largely agricultural colonies and acts of American colonial defiance began in the form of rebellions, fighting and protests. Social unrest escalated further in 1773, when patriots in Boston famously destroyed a shipment of tea by boarding three ships in Boston harbour and throwing 342 chests overboard in protest over the Tea Act. This became known as the ‘Boston Tea Party’. These rebellions over taxes led to full-scale revolutionary war. What happened in the Revolutionary War? Determined to fight for their independence, Great Britain’s 13 North American Colonies fought for control over colonial affairs. They included: New Hampshire Massachusetts Connecticut Rhode Island New York New Jersey Pennsylvania Delaware Maryland Virginia North Carolina South Carolina Georgia George Washington led the American forces to victory and, thanks to the diplomatic efforts of Thomas Jefferson, France and Spain acted as allies, providing arms for the war. Independence was formally declared on July 2 1776; on July 4 1776, the final version of the Declaration was approved by Congress, announcing that the 13 colonies were free from British rule. While the Fourth of July marks the adoption of the Declaration of the Independence, most of the Congress members actually signed the document on August 2, 1776. Following the Declaration of Independence, they went on to become the United States of America – however conflict continued up until 1783. How is the day celebrated in the US? In what was a simple but powerful mark of respect to each of the colonies, 13 gunshots were fired as part of the first celebration of independence on July 4 1777, a year after the Declaration of Independence was approved. George Washington commemorated the Fourth of July the following year in 1778 by ordering a double ration of rum for his soldiers at Ross Hall, near New Jersey. Meanwhile outside the US, Benjamin Franklin and John Adams organised a celebratory dinner for Americans in Paris. The Fourth of July was officially acknowledged as a state celebration by the Massachusetts General Court in 1781, and Moravians in North Carolina, observed the day with The Psalm of Joy music programme in 1783. Nearly 100 years on from the Declaration’s approval, Independence Day was made an unpaid holiday for federal employees in 1870, and it was later established as a paid holiday by US Congress in 1938. Nowadays it’s typically marked by patriotic activities – usually outside. Think parades, camping, barbecues, beers and fireworks, with as much red, white and blue as possible – all punctuated with a backing track of “Star spangled banner”, “Yankee Doodle” and “God Bless America”. Politicians also like to make a point of appearing at Independence Day celebrations and praising the nation’s heritage, history and people. Who celebrates it apart from Americans? The Philippines and Rwanda also observe Fourth of July anniversaries for their own reasons. The US gave the Philippines independence on that day in 1946 and the Rwandan genocide ended with US help on July 4 1994. Rather more bizarrely, Denmark also celebrates the US version – it started with European expats in 1911, but now is just an “excuse for a nice day out”. When is Britain’s Independence Day? Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage made a case for the 23rd June to be Britain’s Independence Day in 2016, because that was the date of the 2016 Brexit vote in which he said the nation “took back control” from the European Union. However, he was criticised by some who pointed out that liberation from colonial ownership was not really equivalent to Brexit. And the point that most independence anniversaries around the world celebrate breaking from the British Empire has also been well made. Best American recipes for Independence Day From sweet treats to traditional dishes, the US is famous for its cuisine, with Americans tucking into an array of classic foods every year on Independence Day. If you’re celebrating the Fourth of July in the UK, here are some of our favourite American recipes to try and taste with your family and friends. Perfect homemade beef burgers Juicy beefburgers, served with roughly torn lettuce, ripe tomatoes and thinly sliced mile cheese in a bun of your choice, are perfect for any Independence Day barbecue. Mississippi mud pie Mouth-melting dark chocolate combined with delicious praline, biscuits and cream. This Mississippi mud pie makes a great, indulgent Independence Day treat. Credit: Andrew Crowley Cheat’s mac and cheese Diana Henry’s simple recipe for mac and cheese requires no sauce-cooking or pasta-boiling, helping you to serve the American favourite in minimal time. The best cornbread This tasty cornbread, coated in melted butter and honey, is another perfect dish for your Independence Day feast. Classic shrimp and grits Get a real taste of American cuisine with this classic Shrimp and grits recipe. This traditional Southern dish is creamy, versatile and packed with coastal flavour. The best American pancakes with banana, blueberries and maple syrup Credit: Barry Taylor Whip up a stack of these banana and blueberry pancakes, best served with a drizzle of maple syrup, to satisfy your sweet-tooth craving. Salt beef New York-style salt beef is delicious with pickles, horseradish, English mustard or piccalilli and can be enjoyed both hot and cold. Prepare it yourself in the comfort of your own kitchen, following this simple and affordable recipe. Related Posts

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On the Culturally Appropriate Game

The MeFi community could benefit from hearing from members of color about your experiences on the site. On the Culturally Appropriate Game July 5, 2019 11:57 AM Subscribe posted by Caduceus (15 comments total) 20 users marked this as a favorite Hey, I saw that video. When your half-hour discussion of the nuances of cultural appropriation in film not only doesn’t mention any distinction between *adopting* things from other cultures and *depicting* things from other cultures, but blithely goes ahead and assumes there is no such distinction to be made, I think you’re doing it wrong. A movie being set in New York, even if it’s 100% made by people not from New York, does not in itself make it an example of cultural appropriation, unless you define the term so broadly that you end up a very small step away from simply claiming that all culture is appropriated, as some people do. It did make me wish I could go back in time and see Pocahontas instead of The Lion King . posted by sfenders at 1:07 PM on July 5 There is no meaningful distinction, at least from an art criticism standpoint, since art itself necessarily involves “depiction”. Your distinction would go all the way in the other direction in claiming that nothing is appropriation, since it’s all merely “depiction”. posted by tobascodagama at 1:33 PM on July 5 [ 1 favorite ] After the Problematic Fave Orc FPP earlier this week, I was expecting a furthering of that conversation and analysis. But this article is barely there, and its advice is terrible. While its points (cultural borrowing isn’t necessarily offensive, depending on who’s doing it; you’re allowed to use details from other cultures if you do it with care; know your audience) aren’t exactly wrong , the article is really brief and lacks nuance. It brings nothing to the table that the previous FPP did not, and that one had some great and concrete guidelines for how to better depict cultural analogues with care: provide diversity within any given culture, include a variety of human cultures and skin tones, tie culture to history and environment, decolonize violence. I feel like the advice here boils down to “don’t worry about it as long as you don’t offend anyone at the table.” And I think that’s terrible advice. DMs and GMs need to set a good example, because if we’re doing a good job our stories will reach beyond the table and into people’s lives. And I hope to god we’re past the point where it’s okay to tell an offensive joke just because it won’t personally offend any of the people listening to it. posted by rikschell at 2:08 PM on July 5 [ 4 favorites ] When your half-hour discussion of the nuances of cultural appropriation in film not only doesn’t mention any distinction between *adopting* things from other cultures and *depicting* things from other cultures, but blithely goes ahead and assumes there is no such distinction to be made, I think you’re doing it wrong. What an odd distinction. Could you please help me understand — what’s an example of a film that *adopts* things from other cultures, rather than depicting things? I’ve never seen a film that did anything other than depict stuff. posted by Homeboy Trouble at 2:24 PM on July 5 [ 1 favorite ] what’s an example of a film that *adopts* things from other cultures, rather than depicting things? A clear-cut example would be some hypothetical film in which they take culturally meaningful symbols from somewhere or other and use them wholly out of context as part of the design aesthetic for unrelated world-building. I dunno, there have to be a million examples but I’m not good at thinking of any. Some versions of The Mikado? It’s complicated, but a case could be made. How about Leprechaun (1993)? posted by sfenders at 2:38 PM on July 5 Never seen it, but from what I hear, Avatar adopted a lot of Native American cultural references for its blue aliens. The other Avatar (The Last Airbender) also made up a whole world with multiple cultures that were based on Asian themes. In both these cases, the creators were white dudes. posted by rikschell at 3:04 PM on July 5 [ 1 favorite ] Another type of example would be lifting a whole story from another culture. If your movie tells the story of Romulus and Remus, odds are you’ve culturally appropriated it from ancient Rome. That it depicts another culture isn’t what makes it a (different) type of appropriation, it’s that you’re performing their cultural thing of telling their story. At no point did I intend to suggest that depicting another culture prevents something from being called cultural appropriation, only that it isn’t sufficient to make it so. A majority of the pitfalls of depicting other cultures that Disney movies typically get flack for are just ordinary pitfalls of depicting other cultures, rather than appropriating things from those cultures, not that they don’t sometimes do that too. posted by sfenders at 3:05 PM on July 5 Merit in the argument. For example, no fish and chips in the Village of Hommlet but 2 evil temples mere leagues away.. posted by clavdivs at 4:02 PM on July 5 By depicting a culture, you’re using that culture as raw material for your creation. In copyright terms, if the culture was a form of intellectual property, then your creation depicting it would be a derivative work. Conveniently for the purposes of creators from dominant cultures like Disney, cultures are free for the taking, whereas it’s their corporate creative works which are actually protected in the intellectual property regime. (“Conveniently” with the most vigorous of air-quotes in the case of Disney, since when it comes to copyright and other IP they’re kind of like a fairy-tale supernatural evil that corrupted the mortal world in a previous age.) So yeah, the state of affairs is “a very small step away from […] all culture is appropriated.” You couldn’t permeate your own work with another piece of intellectual property and say you were “just depicting it”: under the rules our society abides by for IP, you’d be garnering benefit from the original. And even even below the level of a derivative work our conception of intellectual property can construe illegitimate ways of garnering benefit… such as trademarked Disney characters, which you’re not supposed to use even to tell original stories. Sure, you can conceptually distinguish cultural appropriation from depiction of a culture, and as the OP embedded video points out all instances of cultural appropriation aren’t equally objectionable, it’s just that by making such a distinction you don’t really create much daylight between the concepts for purposes of discussing cultural appropriation, not without getting pretty hypocritical about how our society evaluates garnering benefit in creative domains. posted by XMLicious at 4:28 PM on July 5 [ 4 favorites ] Copyright is another whole thing of its own that isn’t cultural appropriation. If beauty itself was something you could copyright, then I suppose any depiction of it might be counted as a derivative work, under whatever convoluted intellectual property regime might apply. But it isn’t like that. Not much in the “real” non-legal world is like copyright law, that stuff is weird. If depiction of any culture other than one’s own is all it takes for the label of cultural appropriation to apply, I’d be engaging in it by writing my novel to include a character who’s Italian. Is it cultural appropriation just to make reference to Italy, or do I have to give my Italian character a name for this comment to qualify? Let’s call her Donna, just to be sure. I don’t see how it’s possible to think sensibly about this stuff if you *don’t* distinguish between [what I think people would more usually refer to as] cultural appropriation and the depiction of [some part of] a culture. posted by sfenders at 5:05 PM on July 5 It’s not because intellectual property is “real” that its rules and their application serve to demonstrate the exploitation which is possible through cultural appropriation. Think about it through the lens of plagiarism instead, if you want. However if you can handwave away all of copyright law, (or all of law, is it?) I think you’re going to be able to absolve yourself of any sort of exploitation along these lines by also declaring it to not be real. posted by XMLicious at 8:48 PM on July 5 [ 2 favorites ] A clear-cut example would be some hypothetical film in which they take culturally meaningful symbols from somewhere or other and use them wholly out of context as part of the design aesthetic for unrelated world-building. Admittedly, I am not 100% sure I follow or agree with your definition here, but it seems to me a clearcut example of this would be the Vulcan salute 🖖, which Leonard Nimoy lifted from the shin gesture he had seen kohanim doing in synagogue when he was a child. posted by ricochet biscuit at 9:47 PM on July 5 Trope Talk: Planet of Hats , or why having a world where each race is just a cultural shorthand is boring at best. I really don’t think white people should be the arbitrators of what is and isn’t cultural appropriation. I do have my qualms with a lot of cultural appropriation discourse ( people are SERIOUSLY REDUCTIVE about Asia’s takes on it, for example ) but the reason I specifically say white people probably shouldn’t talk is because they keep missing the most important elements that set appropriation apart from borrowing or exchange: power dynamics and context . Power dynamics got alluded to in Lindsay’s video, but not further. Who stands to gain from the exchange of culture, and who stands to lose? Who is able to explore other cultures freely and who isn’t even allowed to explore their own culture? Black people get suspended from school or lose jobs due to having dreadlocks, but the worst thing a White person with dreadlocks might face would likely be grumpy responses. If this was more of a cultural exchange, Black people wouldn’t face nearly as much backlash just wearing their own hair: the hairstyle itself becomes value-neutral. Similarly, T-shirts and jeans are pretty normalised now (for the most part), but clothing that codes more “ethnic” can still carry a lot of baggage. Bollywood is kind of an interesting choice because financially it is a much more powerful entertainment industry than Hollywood, and in some ways more culturally influential, but also Bollywood’s portrayal of White Western culture isn’t likely to have as much effect on how South Asians interact with White Westerners compared to the reverse as a result of Hollywood portrayals of South Asian cultures. (That being said, this is not without problems. The common depiction of Western culture as “bad” and “corrupt” has been used against certain marginalised groups in Asia, notably LGBTQ people and activists, as we’re seen as being “part of the colonizing infiltrating foreign culture”, to the point of conspiracy theories of being paid off by Foreign Zionist Agents to disrupt local harmony. Such portrayals may have some effect on how White people in Asian countries are treated, but most of the negative fallout ends up on local marginalised folk who “don’t conform”.) Context also makes a difference. Lindsay Ellis talks about the Claddagh ring and how her wearing it is appropriation. Would it? Is there a particular context that the Claddagh ring is meant for, like a particular sacred cultural ceremony, or is it a design that originates from a specific culture but has a more general purpose? One of my biggest bugbears with the CA Discourse is that people tend to put too much context on certain cultural artefacts and forget that other contexts are possible or that other cultures do genuinely have something similar – it’s like everything is sacred and there’s no possibility that Global South cultures have any kind of profane pop culture. As an example, some people seem to want mendhi/henna to be a purely Hindu Indian Wedding thing and decry every other wearing of it as appropriation, but a lot of other South Asians who aren’t Hindu Indians wear it for all sorts of reasons, including Just Because (I just got some done this morning for a personal photoshoot!) and a lot of other cultures have henna too and consent to it being shared. Some things that are Ethnic are also Open Access, it’s not limited to one situation or another. HOWEVER, the caveat to the above is that sometimes people take the Open Access stuff and use it to turn into a stereotype. For instance, henna – there’s a difference between a White person getting decorative henna done at a stall by a South Asian but just staying normal/regular with the rest of their look, and a White person getting henna so that they can turn into some kind of Indian stereotype caricature. And it’s especially worse when these people demean and disrespect the very same folk whose cultures they’ve borrowed – which leads to the first issue of power dynamics. A D&D GM going “imagine XYZ culture is like This Other Culture” is daft, and yes racist, because what exactly do they mean by “like this other culture”? What kind of cultural stereotypes are they assuming and how much of it is true? How much are they homogenizing in the process? Does everyone even have a shared understanding of the culture they’re meant to be alluding to? Be specific. What exactly is going on in your world’s culture? Why is it like that? (The Trope Talk video above has some great worldbuilding questions.) These traits don’t exist as a vacuum – if you’re going to borrow them, at least know what you’re borrowing. posted by divabat at 12:51 AM on July 6 [ 11 favorites ] Yay, so many quality comments! IME, FRPGs (narrative-only, table-top, boardgame, and/or videogame) almost all of them, have this issue and tendency. In the 1980s when I was playing a lot of D&D, and the 1990s when I was playing other games by other publishers, there were innumerable appropriative examples. Mostly gamers at that time went for the Asian countries for the most exotic (and ignorant and casual) appropriations. But sometimes the Middle East (of course) and really any other “exotic” culture. I remember having to try to reorient so many GMs. Commonly I’d start with, “Hey, did you know that in (appropriate country), (appropriate cuisine name in the US) food is actually just ‘food’ there?” But it’s so tiresome. One does not always need to go to preexisting foreign lands to cultivate the exotic. Often, being specific like divabat talks about is all that’s needed. And take a few fictive steps and find exoticism in an alternate universe where only the barest few things have changed from the trappings of whatever’s considered “normal” in one’s own fictive universe. The first white author I saw get that firmly was Neal Stephenson in one of his giant novels, Anathem. But others are getting it too. posted by kalessin at 4:04 AM on July 6 Also, I myself was not immune to it. But at least I stuck to my own ancestral cultures, innately feeling like borrowing from other cultures was a bit awkward. But I still feel icky about it now, because I super-disneyfied and packaged the exoticism up for white players’ amusement and fascination. Part of what you can do is follow the power dynamics of whatever appropriation you’re doing, divining how transactional it is, versus how personal and meaningful it truly is, to see how inappropriate your appropriation is. If it’s all about building social (or real financial) capital, then maybe your use of X isn’t as fair, respectful, or equitable as you’d like it to be. posted by kalessin at 4:07 AM on July 6 « Older “His family often had to choose between food and… | 4.669201609… Newer » You are not currently logged in. Log in or create a new account to post comments. Related Posts

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Spices Not Only Add Taste to Food But Offer Health Benefits

Spices Not Only Add Taste to Food But Offer Health Benefits Spices Not Only Add Taste to Food But Offer Health Benefits 0
The spices of India are of diverse types and are mostly grown in the Western Ghats and North Eastern states, and some other parts of the country. Although, the spice varieties are known for adding taste and flavour to the dishes, yet, they serve several health benefits. Having so many health benefits of using spices, there is a large demand for the same throughout the world. India being one of the largest producers of spices, the Spices wholesale exporters in India earns a good amount of profit.
What health benefits, the spices offer to mankind?
Each spice has its own essence and flavour as well as specific medicinal benefits. Some of the commonly used spices in the kitchen like cumin, carom seeds, black pepper, coriander, cardamom, bay leaf, clove, fennel, fenugreek, etc. play a significant role in the medicinal uses.
A large number of Indian bulk masala exporters are present. They took the chance of the growing demand of the spices for their medicinal benefits. A brief about the medicinal usage:
Black pepper: Black pepper is one of the most commonly used spices used for multiple cuisines throughout the world. However, the product has benefits like promoting weight loss, relief from cold & cough, improving digestion, enhancing metabolism and treating several skin problems.
Black Cardamom: Black cardamom helps in maintaining respiratory health, cardiovascular health, oral health, urinary health, skin health and so on.
Green Cardamom: Green Cardamom is used mostly for adding flavour to cuisines. But, it has several health benefits like keeping heart health good, in treating asthma, respiratory issues, and skin care.
Bay Leaf: Bay leaves are found in several dishes, yet it has a lot of medical benefits also. The benefits include detoxification of the body, anti-cancerous properties, slowing natural aging, improvement in heart health, etc. This is also used in managing diabetes, speeding up the healing of wounds, alleviating respiratory issues, etc.
Sesame Seeds: These seeds are mainly used in making sweets and also as a spice mixture in different cuisines due to its nutty taste. However, the seeds possess cholesterol-lowering compounds and help in balancing hormones as well as boosting nutrition. The black sesame seeds, according to study are affluent in vitamin B and iron.
Coriander Seeds: The coriander seeds also known in name of cilantro. Adding the seeds in daily food is very healthy. This spice has anti-oxidant properties that are quite beneficial for everyone to be healthy. It also has dietary fibre that eases bowel movements. It also helps in the digestive system by generating digestive juices and compounds.
Nutmeg & mace: The very popular spice around the world has the medicinal properties that improve bad breath, detoxify livers, improves skin texture and helps in sound sleeping. The outer coating of nutmeg is used in managing stress, enhancing blood circulation, improving appetite and protecting kidneys.
Black Cumin Seeds: Black cumin seed is used in balancing immunity system, preventing asthma, respiratory issues, allergies. It is a natural antioxidant and comprises of vitamin B.
Turmeric: This spice is known to add yellow colour in curries, vegetarian and non-vegetarian dishes. Along with that, it has benefits like anti-oxidant properties, anti-bacterial, anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory properties. PR Exports is a renowned writer and he has written several write-ups on Indian spices that include Bulk masala Exporters and Spices Wholesale Exporters . Rate this Article

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