24-Hour Restaurants For Midnight Pregnancy Cravings

24-Hour Restaurants For Midnight Pregnancy Cravings

24-Hour Restaurants For Midnight Pregnancy Cravings 22 March 2019, 02:02PM shares   
You can’t help cravings particularly when you’re pregnant. More often than not, they strike at the wee hours of the night and really put a damper on your—and perhaps your husband’s—sleeping schedule. Not sure where to grab your grub besides the usual fast food joints?
Worry no more, we’ve got your back—and your baby bump! Here’s a list of restaurants open day and night for you to try: Al-Ahzar Restaurant
Indian, Malay, Thai, and Western dishes at pocket-friendly prices? Sign us up! Al-Azhar Restaurant along Cheong Chin Nam Road is a staple of many late-night dinners and suppers, which makes it no surprise that it lands at the top of the list. Favourites include mee goreng, butter chicken masala, and chicken biryani.
Where: 11/11A Cheong Chin Nam Road, Singapore 599736 Contact: 6466 5052 126 Dim Sum Wen Photo credit: 126 Dim Sum Wen
Dim sum is a fantastic cuisine to have at any time of the day—and 126 Dim Sum Wen makes it accessible for all 24 hours. Go for the fried treats such as dumplings, prawn rolls, and carrot cakes, or indulge in steamed delicacies like siew mai and buns. Great for family feasts, too!
Where: 126 Sims Avenue, Singapore 387449 Contact: 6746 4757 Al-Jasra Photo credit: Al-Jasra
Is your stomach a bottomless pit that can keep going for a while? A roti prata buffet at Al-Jasra may be just the thing for you. At only S$7.90 per person with unlimited servings of our favourite Indian flatbread, you’ll have over 15 kinds of prata to choose from, with fillings such as egg, mushroom, and cheese.
Where: 459 Changi Road, Singapore 419882 Contact: 6742 5786 EAT (selected outlets) Photo credit: EAT
If you love local noodles—think lor mee, minced meat noodles, and satay beehoon—try out EAT. Not all outlets are open 24 hours, but those living in the West and North can have their midnight suppers at EAT Jurong Point, Woodlands, and Rail Mail. At affordable prices (say, S$5 or so for a dish and a drink), you’ll be sure to satisfy your local taste buds.
Where: 1 Jurong West Central 2, Jurong Point #01-76/77/78, Singapore 648886 | 380 Upper Bukit Timah Rd 436, Rail Mail, Singapore 678040 | 30 Woodlands Avenue 2 #01-09/14, Singapore 738343 Contact: 6370 1155 Brinda’s Photo credit: Brinda’s
Sometimes, you crave but don’t want to step out of the house. Cue Brinda’s, a 24-hour online delivery service serving up wholesome Indian cuisine island-wide. Featuring dishes from both the North and the South, they have a variety of tandoori, biryani, naan, and gravies delivered straight to your doorstep. They also offer bento boxes for convenient meals and those living around Bukit Merah Central can pop by their 24-hour restaurant!
Where: Block 162 Bukit Merah Central #01-3533, Singapore 150162 Contact: 6274 6327

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Pizza – It Needs No Introduction!

We all know Pizza very well when we talk about food generally we always need introduction when we talk about some new Dish because everybody is not aware about every delicacy that is there in every cuisine but there is one thing that everybody loves to eat and everybody is aware of and that is pizza and it needs no introduction whatsoever and that is why pizza in Fremont is so famous and there are many Italian restaurants in Fremont where you can indulge in some really delicious tasting Pizza made just right way for you to dig into.
While everybody is aware about what pizza is there are many different types of Pizza that are available around the world and there are many Pizzas that you get your inner neighbourhood itself that you can taste and savor to your heart’s content and you can get the pizza delivered to your door steps also so next time just order food online in Fremont and get your fees Pizza delivered at your doorstep if you are not in a mood to step out to eat your dinners and just want to chill out at home.
Now a days you can also try out some really good and interesting variants of pizza like a Desi Pizza which has got Indian Curry used over the Italian crust as a topping for the pizza base and trust me this recipes are really are delicious you can find these kind of pizza at Bombay Pizza House in Fremont and there’s a range of amazingly tasty and delicious pizza that you will love to indulge in and relish to your heart’s content. After you have eaten your amazing pizza you can listen to some really good Indian desserts which are really amazing in taste like the Indian kulfi or the gulab jamun which is just simply delicious.

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Great places to eat out in Lymington and the New Forest

Share – Great places for lunch or dinner in the New Forest We bring you the best in fine dining, cosy pubs, oriental delights, family friendly lunches and restaurants where your dog is welcome too!
Looking for an excellent restaurant, cosy bistro, foodie pub or café where you can have a great meal out? We really are spoilt for choice in the New Forest, with a huge number of fantastic eateries offering a broad variety of gastronomic delights, with prices to suit all budgets. So, whether you are looking for fine dining for a special occasion, a family friendly treat, a good lunch after a dog walk or the perfect venue for a working lunch, you’ll find the perfect answer in our recommendations below! Fine Dining The Terrace – Montagu Arms Hotel – Beaulieu The restaurant at The Montagu Arms Hotel in Beaulieu is a hidden gem. Set overlooking a stunning garden at the rear of the hotel, you’ll find a warm welcome, exceptional service and superb cusine. The winner of a number of awards, including 3AA Rosettes, a member of the TripAdvisor Hall of Fame 2018, Hampshire Life Restaurant of the Year 2018 and Gold for ‘Best Bistro and Restaurant’ at the Beautiful South Awards 2018 to name just a few. Undoubtedly the focus of every guest’s visit is enticing modern menu designed by innovative Head Chef Matthew Whitfield, who returned to the Montagu Arms in January from the three-Michelin-Star Eleven Madison Park in New York. Read our review . Find contact details for The Terrace . Cambium – Careys Manor – Brockenhurst The restaurant at Carey’s Manor Hotel in Brockenhurst has 3AA Rosettes and an AA Notable Wine List, with one of the biggest collections of English wines in the country. Relaxed refinement is the name of the game at Cambium. Unwind in chic yet comfy surroundings and experience delicious cuisine inspired by the enchanted New Forest. The food, service and sommelier are all exceptional – as are the finishing touches. Read our review . Find contact details for Cambium . The Dining Room – Chewton Glen – New Milton
The Dining Room at Chewton Glen has 2AA Rosettes and an AA Notable Wine List, awarded ‘Most Innovative Wine List’ by Condé Nast Johansens in 2018, alongside many other distinguished awards. The menu combines classic British and European with global flavours and excellent variety across a broad menu. Many of the ingredients used by Head Chef Simon Addison, Executive Head Chef Luke Matthews and their talented team have travelled less than 100 yards from the Chewton Glen’s own kitchen garden. Impressively elegant, any visit to The Dining Room is a real treat! Find contact details for Chewton Glen . Stag Restaurant – New Park Manor – Brockenhurst
The Stag Restaurant at New Park Manor offers elegant fine dining in the evenings, with friendly service and sophisticated menus using fresh, local ingredients. Feast on venison from the New Forest or wild mushrooms from local woods. Savour fish freshly caught from the nearby coast and dishes flavoured with locally grown vegetables and herbs from New Park Manor’s own gardens. By day things are more relaxed and informal with an emphasis on family time – definitely one of the most family-friendly places to eat in the New Forest! Find contact details for the Stag Restaurant . Beresfords – Balmer Lawn – Brockenhurst
The elegant yet relaxed Beresfords restaurant within the Balmer Lawn Hotel serves a fabulous blend of the finest seasonal dishes selected by the Chef from the finest of local produce. This award winning 2AA rosette restaurant is open every day for lunch and dinner with a choice of starters, main courses including 2 chargrilled steaks, desserts and a cheese board that has to be seen to be believed. Any dietary requirements can be catered for provided notice is given, and there is an excellent children’s menu. Al fresco dining too, when the weather permits. Find contact details for Beresfords . Armada Restaurant – Rhinefield House Hotel – Brockenhurst
The 2AA Rosette Armada restaurant at Rhinefield House combines a historic setting with an unfussy menu of classic British dishes that have been enhanced with a contemporary twist by Head Chef James Verity. A focus on provenance ensures much of the menu is sourced from trusted suppliers based in and around the New Forest. Find contact details for the Armada . La Perle – Milford-on-Sea La Perle is a small family-run restaurant, where the menu is completely governed by the British seasons and what can be sourced locally. The Good Food Guide has highly commended La Perle, praising Chef Sam Hughes for the fact that he deals with small producers in Hampshire and Dorset and readers praised the generosity of the food, as well as its pretty plating and big flavours. Sam represented Milford-on-Sea in the TV series Professional Master Chef a few years ago and as a young chef trained under Raymond Blanc. Find contact details for La Perle . Read our review of Lunch at La Perle . Etain – Stanwell House Hotel – Lymington
Recently refurbished, Stanwell House Hotel’s 2AA Rosette restaurant Etain overlooks the hotel garden. New Head Chef Robert Key creates menus full of vibrant colour and excellent flavour – British á la carte dining at its best with the majority of produce sourced locally. Find contact details for Etain . Relaxed Refinement Hartnett Holder & Co – Lime Wood – Lyndhurst
Chef Angela Hartnett and Lime Wood’s Luke Holder do the cooking, pulling together both of their much admired signature styles, to create Hartnett Holder & Co, the hotel’s relaxed and stylish Italian restaurant. Hartnett and Holder’s food comes with the much loved Italian approach to eating – where sharing and provenance is everything. The style is chefs’ home-cooked food not chefs’ food cooked for restaurants. Both Angela and Luke are famed for their informal, grounded style of cooking and their respect for local produce. For an extra special experience book the kitchen table for 10 and dine amongst the atmosphere of the HH&Co kitchen. Find contact details for Lime Wood . Burcher & Co – Stanwell House Hotel – Lymington
Overlooking the hustle and bustle of Lymington’s high street you will find the informal dining space that is Burcher & Co at Stanwell House Hotel. Menus incorporate the freshest and best seasonal produce championed from local suppliers who work closely with Head Chef Robert Key, showcasing the very best of the New Forest. Locally caught game, fresh fish from the Solent and seasonal vegetables form the foundation of Burcher’s extensive menus. Find contact details for Burcher & Co . The Haven Bar and Restaurant – Lymington
With glorious views straight down Lymington River and across the Solent to the Isle of Wight this has to be the prime spot in Lymington for coffee, lunch, tea or dinner! Now under close management by the award winning Lymington Yacht Haven, its superb location between great family and dog walks along the sea wall in either direction with its relaxed, comfortable ambience, excellent food and great service, the Haven offers a winning formula and a whole experience hard to beat any time of the year! Read our lunch review . Find contact details of The Haven Bar & Restaurant . The Bell Inn – Bramshaw
The Bell Inn is an 18th century coaching inn in Bramshaw to the north of the New Forest, proud of its four-star AA Inn and 1AA rosette recognition. Sourcing produce locally, their pub menu and dining experience showcases natures larder which is on their doorstep with an impressive selection of tempting seasonal dishes as well as daily specials. With an informal feeling throughout and dogs more than welcome in this New Forest pub, guests can choose to eat wherever they want in up to four areas including the light and airy Garden Room or the warm and intimate Oak Room. Winner of the 2018 New Forest Dog Friendly Award in the Restaurant category! Find contact details for the Bell Inn . The Kitchen at Chewton Glen – New Milton
The perfect location for foodies, The Kitchen is a relaxed restaurant with a fantastic cookery school supported by celebrity Chef James Martin. The diary is filled with classes to suit all abilities – the perfect place to eat, meet, create and cook. The Kitchen delivers stylish, informal, family-friendly dining in a beautiful purpose-designed space (plus al fresco when weather permits), with views over the Chewton Glen estate. The seasonal menu has been created to showcase local suppliers and produce grown in Chewton Glen’s kitchen garden. Choose from casual classics with a luxurious twist, including wood-fired pizzas, chargrills, gourmet burgers, superfood salads and deliciously indulgent desserts. International wines, craft beers, local spirits and an extensive cocktail list. Find contact details for The Kitchen . Cedar Tree Restaurant – South Lawn Hotel – Milford on Sea
The newly renovated and modernised Cedar Tree Restaurant (named because of the enormous cedar tree in the grounds of the South Lawn) offers a very pleasant dining environment in which thanks to generous soft furnishings it’s easy to have a conversation – a rarity these days! With views over the gardens, the Cedar Tree offers traditional and international cuisine with a wide range of fine wines to complement your meal. Find contact details for the Cedar Tree Restaurant . Cosy Pubs The Bosun’s Chair – Lymington
Originally a coaching inn, the Bosun’s Chair is conveniently located very near to Lymington Town train station, Lymington High Street, the quay and marinas. It is also very close to the Isle of Wight ferry. The kitchens serve good home cooked traditional pub food, with a good roast on Sundays during the winter months. The pub boasts a large, secluded garden – a wonderfully peaceful oasis in the summer months, with real charcoal barbecues at weekends. Child and dog friendly! Read our lunch review . Find contact details for the Bosun’s Chair . The Turfcutters Arms – East Boldre
The focus of the menu at this traditional New Forest pub is real ales and home cooked food. The menu is varied and exciting, using the freshest, seasonal and local produce that can be found from producers here in Hampshire. Some of our favourite menu items include; home made pie of the day, veggie quiche of the day, home cooked chilli and lasagne, and home cooked Hampshire ham with free range eggs and chips. Well behaved dogs and children are welcome! Child sized portions are offered on a selection of meals from the menu, bring your dog to the bar where they’ll get a tasty treat! Winner of the 2018 New Forest Dog Friendly Award in the pub category. Find contact details for The Turfcutters Arms . The Monkey House – Lymington The Monkey House is one of the last standing free houses in Lymington. Family run, the restaurant brings all the elements of the classic British pub which everyone can enjoy; combining home cooked food with cosy log fires, great pub garden and excellent service. The extremely talented head chef and his team prepare daily specials that will definitely tickle your taste buds, including the famous Sunday Roast. Find contact details for the Monkey House… Monty’s Inn – Beaulieu The Montagu Arms Hotel’s charming Inn offers a rustic country fare of traditional English favourites, a wide range of beverages including the award winning hand-pulled Ringwood ales and a warm, relaxed atmosphere. Delicious home-cooked dishes from fresh, organic, local produce, enjoyed in a relaxed, comfortable setting – including roaring fire when appropriate! Find contact details for Monty’s Inn . A taste of the Orient Koh Thai Tapas – Lymington
Now well established on Lymington High Street, Koh Thai Tapas is an award winning beautiful low-lit restaurant. A place where the incredible holy flavours of Thai cuisine can be shared and sampled tapas-style with fiery cocktails, far-flung beers and world-class music. The irresistible cocktail menu features expertly designed cocktails all created and honed by bar tenders from Koh. Find out more about Koh Thai Tapas . Zen Garden – Brockenhurst
This unique restaurant, located at the SenSpa, offers an authentically Thai dining experience. The Thai chefs serve freshly prepared Thai dishes using organic and locally sourced products where possible. Whether you visit the Zen Garden Restaurant for a 3 course dinner or just a freshly made smoothie, you will find the atmosphere relaxing and friendly. The restaurant offers a range of dishes catering for all tastes. Read our review . Find contact details for Zen Garden . Rivaaz – Lymington
Multi award-winning Rivaaz offers fine Indian cusine in contemporary surroundings in the centre of Lymington. The dishes are prepared using the freshest and best ingredients. Consistent winners of the Trip Advisor Certificate of Excellence. Booking in advance is recommended – or opt for a takeaway and enjoy at home. Great buffet on Sundays, which is very family friendly! Read our review . Find contact details for Rivaaz . Have you discovered…? Le Blaireau – Brockenhurst
Set in the grounds of Careys Manor Hotel, Le Blaireau offers authentic French cuisine inspired by traditional regional cooking, with a selection of fine wines to choose from and a vibrant informal atmosphere. There is a very welcoming and relaxed feel to the restaurant where you will enjoy the simple delight of delicious and flavoursome food and excellent service. Celebrate here Beaujolais Nouveau and Bastille Day without having to cross the channel! Find contact details for Le Blaireau . Lanes of Lymington
Formerly a church and school, Lanes Restaurant is tucked away down a quiet cul de sac, just off Lymington High Street in the centre of the town, near Elliotts. The split levels, small intimate alcoves, balconies and an open plan ground floor are stylish and what you’d expect from a fashionable top London eatery. The excellent food is prepared daily by owner and chef Peter Leyland Jones, using plenty of fresh seasonal ingredients and offering an exciting and varied menu. Find contact details for Lanes. Steff’s Kitchen – Beaulieu One of the most popular places to eat in the New Forest, with its warm and friendly welcome and home cooked food. From warm scones straight out of the oven to hearty soups, everything is freshly prepared. Local ingredients are used wherever possible, including local free range eggs, sausages and ham. Vegetables are largely sourced from within the New Forest area and often taken direct from Patrick’s Patch over the road. Described as one of the New Forest’s hidden gems, it is an ideal spot to start (or conclude) a wander along Beaulieu’s quaint High Street – and perfect for a relaxed family lunch. Find contact details for Steff’s Kitchen at Fairweathers.
See our Directory for a full list of places to eat out in the New Forest, or click on the buttons below…

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CBD saffy said: ↑ I’ll only eat meat if I see it die naturally in front of me, or it gets killed accidentally in a road accident or something Click to expand… I can’t imagine hedgehog tastes very good. I’ve never wanted pricks in my mouth either.
I eat meat, but I’ve cut back dramatically over the last year or so. Cholesterol a little high and I have high uric acid… Both genetic , but trying to budge both numbers down through diet. (A futile attempt unfortunately)
I would absolutely prefer to eat lab grown meat to meat from slaughtered animals as long as the price difference wasn’t too steep.
I could probably be vegetarian if Indian food was more common here. Indian cuisine has a lot of really delicious vegetarian dishes.

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Indian Food Tours in New Delhi https://ift.tt/2HSfVOF A food tour is one of best ways to explore cuisine, sights and culture. It is a city tour, food walk, sightseeing, urban exploration and culinary tour of Delhi city in one package .The eating part of the food tour include sampling different varieties of street food from various places in the itinerary. Food is all that you can eat, but we insist you to have a little of everything and enjoy the variety.

via Rajasthan Food Tour https://ift.tt/2OjFBEQ

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A Comforting One-Pot Chicken Pasta, by Way of Peru

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You may notice that two elements in this dish are common in Italian cuisine: spaghetti and basil. This isn’t mere coincidence. In the 1800s, Italian immigrants settled in the areas around Chincha to work in agriculture or guano harvesting. These Italian immigrants, who mainly hailed from Liguria (the birthplace of pesto), brought their food customs with them.
The legend holds that local Afro-Peruvian chinchanos saw their new neighbors consuming pasta with pesto and tried to recreate it themselves. However, they were a little perplexed as to how to actually cook the noodles, so they decided to cook it like rice—everything together in the same pot. Little by little, the dish evolved into its present incarnation.
While researching sopa seca, I discovered something important about carapulcra as well. In Chincha, it is always made with fresh potatoes. While it also features ground peanuts, it doesn’t have all of the fancy extras like Port, wine, and chocolate. The type of carapulcra I made and ate was the limeño variety.
Besides discovering that not all Peruvians ate the same kind of carapulcra, I also learned that in Chincha there is no such thing as carapulcra without sopa seca. They are as inseparable as a pizza to its crust. The combination is such an iconic part of the local cuisine that it even has its own name: mancha pechos , or “chest stainer.” You can probably guess why.
This combination of dishes is particularly popular at important gatherings like baptisms, birthdays, and weddings. In fact, it’s the last of these types of events that is said to have been the birthplace of this dish. According to local lore, when a couple got married, each side of the family brought its own signature dish. One side brought carapulcra, the other brought sopa seca, and just as the young couple exchanged vows, both of these dishes became perpetually bound in culinary matrimony. The Vast, Incredible World of Peruvian Sandwiches
While most Peruvians from the Sur Chico region, which includes Chincha, agree that carapulcra is made with fresh potatoes and that it is never complete without a side of sopa seca, there is some controversy as to the precise preparation of the noodles. As I was comparing recipes online, I encountered the same types of arguments that surrounded the proper presentation of carapulcra. There were those who insisted that sopa seca had no ají (Peruvian chiles) and needed to be mild because the carapulcra was already spicy. There were those who proclaimed that sopa seca included carrots and those who thought such an inclusion to be blasphemous. There were even arguments as to what to do with the chicken, with some advocating for shredded poached chicken while others claimed that this dish required bone-in chicken quarters.
The more I researched, the more confusing things became. Apparently, there are different micro-regional versions of sopa seca that can include such things as dry botija olives, raisins, hard-boiled eggs, and wine. I read comment threads where individuals from the town of Cañete would battle those from Lunahuaná on how to authentically prepare this “dry soup,” which also goes by the names of sopa bruta (“stupid soup”) and sopa chola (“Indian soup”).
I decided to develop a recipe that reflects the version of this dish you’d find in Chincha. I call for bite-size pieces of chicken, eliminating the extra step of poached chicken while also making it easier to serve and eat. I like carrots in many Peruvian stews and think it adds a sprinkle of color against the green background of these noodles. I include ají panca in the recipe, which adds a smoldering heat. However, feel free to omit it, especially if you want to eat this the way chinchanos do (with a side of carapulcra).
Just be sure to wear a bib so that this “chest stainer” doesn’t end up on your shirt.

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Review: I learnt to cook like a pro at Zouk’s Cookery School

Review: I learnt to cook like a pro at Zouk’s Cookery School March 22, 2019 By Ben Brown Zouk offer a range of extensive cookery classes that explore traditional Indian cuisine and techniques.
As a man who considers himself one of the greatest cooks in the world, surely there’s no way that I’d ever need (or want) to go to a cookery class?
Not only am I skilled with many types of blade in a combat situation but I can also speed chop an onion in 1.3 seconds while poaching an egg in a kettle.
All these skills have contributed heavily to my ability to keep friends and girlfriends happy for a long period of time, bashing out an award-winning pie when things are tough or creating the perfect lasagne when someone is feeling down.
So surely there’s nothing else I can learn further? Well, not exactly.
The one area in my cooking arsenal that has always needed a bit of assistance is curries. Indian food is something that yes, I know how to do most things, but it never, ever tastes as good as what you can get in a proper Indian restaurant.
I find my favourite curry of all time –the Lamb Nihari – to be nigh on impossible to make at home, I don’t know when to put the lamb in to ensure that it melts in the mouth, I always make it a little too spicy and it’s just always fails to impress.
Similarly, a Tarka Daal can be particularly difficult, insofar that it usually ends up as a sloppy mess stuck to the bottom of my pan.
I think it’s safe to say that I could probably do with improving my Indian cooking skills, and so a couple of weeks ago I went on down to one of the brilliant Cookery School sessions down at Zouk.
For half a day I joined a group of like-minded people to learn all that there is to know about how to make tasty traditional Indian dishes and most importantly – learn all about the best ingredients and the most effective way to cook them.
Each Cookery Class comes with a theme, which may revolve around a particular ingredient, region of India or in our case – vegetarian dishes. We were tasked with preparing 2 starters and 2 mains which we would then all sit down and eat at the end of it all.
Taking control of the class was Ali Malik, who is also one of the owners of Zouk. He managed to create a fantastic atmosphere almost immediately and he was full of so much food knowledge that I reckon he would smash Mastermind if he had it as his specialist subject.
The class was very hands on – we all mucked in both behind the kitchen and in the restaurant. There was also a massive level of satisfaction with making something in a proper restaurant kitchen, something I’ve never done before (you can’t really describe a kebab shop back office as a kitchen).
The classes run every month – see what they’ve got coming up; SEAFOOD MASTERCLASS Tandoori Haddock, King Prawn Pakoras Goan Fish Curry, King Prawn Karahi —

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LF launches new lifestyle show ‘Dakshin Diaries’ ,,

Advertisement LF launches new lifestyle show ‘Dakshin Diaries’ with Chef Rakhesh Raghunathan as host MUMBAI: Lifestyle channel LF has launched a new lifestyle show ‘Dakshin Diaries’, hosted by Chef Rakhesh Raghunathan. The tagline of the show follows ‘Dakshin Dekho, Desh Samjho’, where it focuses on ‘Unstereotyping the South of India’. The show launched on 21st March. It airs every Thursday, Friday at 8:30 pm. ‘Dakshin Diaries’ is being positioned as being an experience whose essence breaks the stereotype with which an entire nation views the Southern region of the same country. The show includes avenues that are familiar but when explored reveals a beautifully curated mix of culture, cuisine, travel, music and faith. Each episode of the part special gives fresh insight into the lives of the locals in the different cities of South India and the ancient traditions being passed down for thousands of years that have till now gone undocumented but need a mention in history of our country. The channel added that the beauty of the show lies within the host and presenter or as it likes to call him the ‘Singing Chef’. Chef Rakesh Raghunathan brings to Dakshin Diaries what tamarind brings to Puliyogare (tamarind rice) by virtue of just being himself. What make something great are the minds behind it and in this case Chef Rakesh, who was perhaps born with a passion to retain all things South, takes viewers through a journey so rich that it is difficult to envisage it without him. The series explores everything that has as yet rarely been spoken about. It revolves around the one thing that makes it relevant – the people. Be it the people making the temple ‘prasadam’ and adding their extra faith to it, the people rapping about current issues and trying to make a difference or even the housewives and grandmothers who, for centuries, have cooked with their own recipes with just a pinch of salt or just a hint of turmeric while making the best cooked dishes in the world. Dakshin Diaries, as the name suggests, is a record of experiences that revolve around garnering a sense of familiarity to the unknown. Each episode starts with a spiritual passage in a new city, a new temple and a new ‘Madapally’ (royal temple kitchen). Here the heritage of the city is explored whilst speaking about traditions that uphold the beliefs with which the locals live together. Each episode then transitions into speaking about musicians, art, culture and more. Chef Rakesh meets people from various walks of life each offering something exceptional. An auto-driver who has given a talk at TEDx and provides free Wi-Fi to all his customers since he realizes the importance it may have especially for his expat riders. A Mylapore Mystical Magical Food Walk with the budding generation to break certain stereotypes. Meeting Dabba Chetty the owner of a traditional medicinal store over a century old selling various herbs, ingredients and medicines some of which one may have never heard of. A visit to ‘SoFar’ which is an underground music concert community that welcomes music collaborations between the locals and expats and also where Chef Rakesh joins in for a session. Dakshin Diaries’ tagline says ‘Dakshin dekho desh samjho!’ A conversation on the sports culture of Chennai at the Madras Cricket club – Chepauk with a senior journalist and active member of the club Mr. R Mohan reveals a time when India lost a match but the entire stadium did a standing ovation for the Pakistan team’s victory lap. From touching the ‘Golden Lizard’, searching for Saurashtrian weavers in Kanchipuram, trying to get tickets for a Rajnikanth movie, learning the recipe for the bestselling halwa by a North Indian in Kumbakonam, cooking from recipe books left by Serfoji the Maratha ruler, Dakshin Diaries has it all, and more. Chef Rakesh Raghunathan said, “As someone who has looked at food culturally, historically and enjoyed the journey where I have travelled the length and breadth of the South of India, I have been able to meet interesting people, document recipes, culinary practices, cooking techniques and local legends. I am thrilled about the association with the LF channel, for they continue to set new standards in showcasing food the way it must be shown. I strongly believe that this show will give viewers a nuanced understanding of South India culturally, historically and gastronomically. I am already looking forward to Season 2 of Dakshin Diaries.” LF business head Amit Nair says, “South has been a relatively less explored place for the rest of India. On films and TV and whenever it finds a mention its mostly in cliches. What we have therefore tried to do thru this show is to Un-Streotype the south which also is our key communication peg. The people, culture and tastes combined with distinct traditions make it a unique part of the country and the show manages to capture south in all its glory. I’m very confident that combining great quality of human stories and the unique milieu, the show will be a success and will look forward to more seasons.”

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10 Best Places to Travel in June

Photo by Olga Khoroshunova /Shutterstock Visit Bali in early June for shoulder season prices and good weather. Dreaming of a beach vacation? Seeking an adventurous experience? On the hunt for the perfect plate? June has plenty in store for you.
F or the Northern Hemisphere, June marks the official start to summer (with the summer solstice kicking things off on June 21, 2019, but unofficial summer starting at the beginning of the month in many places). It’s the perfect time of year to enjoy sunny days lounging on a beach, picnicking at a park, or perusing an arts district on foot. Here are 10 places to jump-start your travel plans for June. Photo by GuoZhongHua/Shutterstock Shanghai has a number of museums, luxury boutiques, and other attractions. Shanghai
June is good for: history hunters, art lovers
Shanghai —China’s original capital of cool—is packed with museums, luxury boutiques, restaurants for every budget, hidden cocktail bars, and a rich history visible in its varied architecture. Go early in June, when the weather is hot, but not as sweltering as July and August. Plus, on June 7, 2019, head to Suzhou Creek where you’ll get to witness festivities for the annual Dragon Boat Festival, which was inscribed in UNESCO’s list of intangible heritage 10 years ago ; it f eatures dragon boat racing and a lot of zongzi ( sticky rice dumplings).
Apart from the festival, check out Shanghai’s varied art scene, which has museums and galleries spread across the city. If you like antiquities, start at the Shanghai Museum in People’s Square. Although it might seem a bit dated and dusty , admission is free and it’s worth a stop for anyone keen on porcelain, jade, and bronze pieces, traditional landscape paintings, and calligraphy.
Also in People’s Square is the Shanghai History Museum, its 1,100 artifacts about the city displayed throughout a handsome neoclassical building . Nearby is the Museum of Contemporary Art (MoCA) , featuring art by mostly Chinese artists, plus temporary shows by star-power artists like Yayoi Kusama. Photo by Alexander Sviridov/Shutterstock Bermuda boasts ideal beach weather in June. Bermuda
June is good for: beach bums, anyone who wants a second shot at Carnival
Just over two hours by air from New York, Bermuda is conveniently close, but a world apart from the United States in terms of culture (decidedly British) and attitude (island friendly). Yes, technically June is the start of hurricane (and tourist) season in Bermuda. But hear us out. In June, it’s ultimate beach town weather, the island’s location means hurricane risk is minimal compared to other island destinations in the region, and on the third weekend of the month, you can experience National Heroes weekend.
The holiday honors Bermudians who have made positive contributions to the country. Celebrating its fifth anniversary this year, it’s a fast-growing summer party. Think Carnival, but in Bermuda: You can dance to soca music until dawn, watch some of the best steel pan musicians play, and nosh on local fare.
If you’re tuckered out from the fete (or missed that weekend altogether), head to the beach for relaxation. Clear seas and healthy coral reefs make Bermuda a great diving destination, and numerous dive sites right off the island’ s signature pink-sand beaches mean you don’t need to charter a boat. Church Bay and Tobacco Bay are two of the best areas to spot fish. At Church Bay, you’ll discover a reef close to shore with plenty of colorful parrotfish to keep you company. Tobacco Bay’s shallow and calm w aters make it especially appealing for families with kids—plus, there are lots of angelfish, blue tangs, and spiny lobsters. Photo by Tupungato/Shutterstock Art is everywhere in Berlin, including on the building walls at Hackesche Höfe, a courtyard complex in the city center. Berlin
June is good for: street fair fans, art scenesters
If you weren’t already pla nning travel to Germany in 2019 because of the exciting Bauhaus centenary, here are a few more reasons to visit its capital. June brings idyllic summer weather (highs in the 60s and 70s), perfect for enjoying the ma ny parks and outdoor festivals. Catch the Carnival of Cultures , a giant street party highlighting art, music, and food from around the globe from June 7–10, 2019; the Staatsoper für alle (“State Opera for All”), a free open-air classical music concert held at the Bebelplatz on June 16, 2019; or the Berliner Volksfestsommer , a folk festival (also free) featuring rides, performances, and fireworks, starting on June 21, 2019, the first day of summer, and running until July 14. Where to Celebrate 100 Years of Bauhaus in Germany This Year
If all that culture isn’t enough for you, you could spend more time marveling at the city’s expansive art scene. The pinnacle of exhibition spa ces is Museum Island , an ensemble of five galleries recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage site. The palatial Bode Museum lures with medieval sculpture, while 19th-century European romantic paintings take center stage at Alte Nationalgalerie (Old National Gallery), and ancient Roman and Greek art rules the Altes Museum (Old Museum).
At the Neues Museum (New Museum), the undisputed showstopper is the 3,500-year-old (yet eternally gorgeous) bust of Egyptian queen Nefertiti, although the monumental Babylonian Ishtar Gate at the adjacent Pergamon Museum also elicits “oohs” and “aahs.” For something more contemporary, swing by Urban Nation , dedicated to street art, which has partnered with artists like Christian Böhmer. For the most cutting-edge works, though, book months ahead for a tour of the Sammlung Boros , a private collection moodily ensconced in an upcycled WWII bunker. Photo by Flashon Studio/Shutterstock Bozeman is popular with hikers, rafters, and kayakers. Bozeman, Montana
June is good for: outdoor adventurers
Bozema n, Montana , is one of the fastest growing communities in the United States. Set in a grassland valley between three mountain ranges, the “Boz one” makes an awesome base camp for outdoor adventuring and exploration in the northern Rocky Mountains. Weather in June is warm—prime time for hiking and kayaking.
Rafting trips travel down three main waterways near Bozeman: the Yellowstone, Gallatin, and Madison rivers. The longest undammed river in the lower 48, the Yellowstone River east of Bozeman is a great choice for family travelers or first-time rafters who want a manageable half- or full-da y outing. For more action-packed rapids, bound down the Gallatin River through the rock-walled Gallatin Canyon, the uber-scenic southern passage from Bozeman to Yellowstone National Park .
Prefer to stay dry? Take a hike. With its picture-perfect setting surrounded by craggy mountains and its proximity to Yellowstone (a 90-minute drive) and even Glacier National Park (a five-hour drive), Bozeman delivers a full range of trail experiences.
But if you’re looking for local favorites, hit the Drinking Horse Mountain Trail, a two-mile figure-eight loop with minimal elevation gain that moseys past willows and rocky outcroppings, a short drive north of town. Sweet views of the Absaroka and Gallatin ranges await atop the 5,550-foot peak. Shorter but steeper, the Sypes Canyon Trail is a bit more challenging and feeds into longer through-hiking trails. Or, south of town, photographers will want to follow the paved path to Palisade Falls where an 80-foot waterfall cascades down amid basalt columns. Photo by Eric L Tollstam/Shutterstock French-speaking Montreal is home to clubs, vintage boutiques, and striking architecture. Montreal, Quebec
June is good for: Shakespeare fans, jazzophiles
Montreal is the free-spirited, cosmopolitan heart of French-speaking Canada, a sprawlin g metropolis with a vibrant arts and cultural scene, a distinctive mix of historic architecture, late-night clubbing, and great vintage shopping. The city has truly perfected its joie de vivre, especially during the summer when there’s a different open-air festival rocking out the streets every week.
Discover French Canadian culture on Quebec’s official holiday, La Fête Nationale , with a huge show, parades, and more, from June 23–24, 2019. Another favorite is the Festival International de Jazz de Montreal. It’s gigantic (the Guinness Book of World Records cited it as the world’s largest jazz festival) and hosts around 500 concerts, with thousands of musicians from dozens of countries. The 40th iteration in 2019 strikes its first chord starting June 27 and runs for 10 days.
And don’t forget a quintessential summer night activity: Shakespeare in the Park . The Repercussion Theatre Company puts on free summer pl ays at venues across the city, all written by the Bard, except with eclectic and modern production twists (imagine Julius Caesar , but with live drumming and an all-female cast). Photo by Sean Pavone/Shutterstock Summer in Portugal’s capital city of Lisbon is ideal for wine-tasting and strolling the sun-drenched streets. Lisbon
June is good for: oenophiles
Lisbon is coming to terms with its newfound christening as the continent’s current capital of cool by tastemakers and hipsters the world over. In June, sunshine and warm days abound, ideal for strolling the cobblestoned streets or taking a day trip to Alentejo or Porto to experience the country’s vinho ( Douro Valley has the world’s oldest demarcated wine region).
Portugal’s wine scene is inexpensive and phenomenally good, and in Lisbon, it seems like there’s a wine bar on every corner. Top spots include Wine Bar do Castelo , where over 150 Portuguese wines by the glass are served in the shadow of Lisbon’s iconic São Jorge Castle . Or reserve well in advance for BA Wine Bar do Bairro Alto , where owner Rui Rossa peddles exquisite boutique wines from lesser-known producers, all paired with artisanal cheese and charcuterie plates. A Literary Trip to Lisbon Is the Best Way to Uncover Portugal’s Hidden Beauty
Fans of porto (the fortified wine, not the city or the football team) will definitely want to check out Solar do Vinho do Porto , which makes up for its stodgy ambience inside an 18th-century mansion with an epic inventory of port—it stocks over 180 labels. Elsewhere, imbibe within the centuries-old vaults of Lisbon’s famed aqueduct at Chafariz do Vinho or in an atmospheric pharmacy at the aptly named Old Pharmacy —either way , the popping of corks is a Lisbon soundtrack second only to fado . Photo by bogdanhoda/Shutterstock Bali is home to world-class spas and retreats, ranging in price and treatments. Bali
June is good for: wellness seekers
The Indonesian island of Bali incites wanderlust. While tourist crowds have increased exponentially to this land of beautiful beaches, emerald rice paddies, and volcanoes, it still is one that truly lives up to the hype. Visit in June: If you go early in the month, you can enjoy some remaining shoulder season prices, and the weather is good all month.
No matter what time of the year you go, you can experience the holistic approach to wellness that is ingrained in Balinese life. The island is a major destination for visitors in search of world-class spas and retreats, ranging from all-women yoga and meditation getaways to spas devoted to ancient Balinese healing traditions. The one island treatment not to miss is a classic Balinese massage, a deep tissue affair that incorporates stretching, reflexology, and acupressure.
Most of the island’s luxury hotels have on-site spas, but some of the best places to get a treatment are stand-alone spas dedicated to a few treatments. About 20 minutes southwest in Semin yak, Jari Menari (the name means “dancing fingers”) is a long-standing favorite spa devoted to Balinese massage with open-air treatment rooms. Also in Seminyak, Prana Spa offers one of the large st spa spaces on the island, incorporating Middle Eastern and Indian influences into its design and treatments. Microbreweries and pubs are ripe for the picking in Manchester, in northwestern England. Manchester
June is good for: beer drinkers
Manchester is England’s capital of the north and has been gaining ground as one of the country’s most dynamic cities for years. It’s shaking off its industrial roots to yield an exciting and sophisticated arts scene while still staying true to its heritage with down-to-earth, no-fuss culture. Weather is good in June (think highs in the 60s), and on the 23rd, you can attend the parade and other performances on Manchester Day with locals and visitors alike. (Alternately, make it earlier in the month to see the Spice Girls perform at Manchester Arena on June 1.)
Although Manchester is changing, one thing that has stayed the same is how much locals enjoy a night out on the town, and June is an ideal time to check out the exploding microbrewery scene. Keep your eyes peeled for June dates of the Summer Beer Thing , a three-day beer festival that launched in summer 2018; it’s hosted by local microbrewery favorites Cloudwater , Port Street , and The Pilcrow .
And don’t miss Cloudwater Barrel Store Tap Room, one of England’s most revered microbreweries (and voted the world’s second-best brewery by the popular beer site RateBeer ). Established in 2014, the warehouse space, set under vast arches, is an atmospheric spot to throw back a few, with its Double IPAs leading the accolades. Or head for a traditional pub exper ience at Lass O’Gowrie , a Victorian classic that brews its own beer in the basement. It’s a favorite with everyone, from students to office workers to pensioners. Photo by manjagui/Shutterstock For music fans, there are numerous museums, clubs, and other local stops to enjoy in Detroit. Detroit
June is good for: architecture aficionados, music maniacs
The largest city in Michigan is welcoming loads of creative and entrepreneurial types who have moved in, attracted to its can-do spirit (and inexpensive real estate). Detroit is now hopping with cafés and galleries and offers a sweet bike share program. June is one of the city’s loveliest months for weather (sunny, with highs in the 70s), perfect for gaping at the incredible collection of art deco buildings and enjoying outdoor concerts and festivals. The River Days festival with music, games, and other events that supports the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy will tentatively take place the fourth weekend in June, and the annual Motor City Pride festival will feature multiple stages of entertainment on June 9–10, 2019 (admission is $5 for people over 12 years old). Is Detroit the Next Big Boutique Hotel Destination?
The music legacy in Detroit is a s inesc apable as the towering skyscrapers. Motown’s soul sound, the Stooges’s punk rock, Eminem’s rap, the White Stripes’s garage rock—all of it has come out of Detroit’s fertile music scene. The Motown Museum occupies the house where Berry Gordy began Motown Records and whe re the careers of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, and many other big names started. Walk the halls where Diana Ross sashayed and see Studio A, where Motown’s most famous names recorded their first hits.
For live music fans, there are plenty of local clubs. The candlelit, art deco ambie nce at Cliff Bell’s (open since 1935) attracts a diverse young crowd for jazz. And at Baker’s Keyboard Lounge , everyone from Miles Davis to Thelonious Monk to Nina Simone has let loose on the small stage. Photo by Baturina Yuliya/Shutterstock In June, Moscow experiences warmer temperatures and many hours of daylight. Moscow
June is great for: foodies
Visitors to Moscow are often pleasantly surprised by its trendy shopping, world-class art institutions, and excellent fine dining. In June, the city’s usually chilly temperatures rise to the pleasant 60s and low 70s, with the sun setting around 9 p.m. From June 27–30 in 2019, check out the Taste of Moscow , a three-day festival that brings together chefs and foodies to celebrate cuisine from Russia and beyond. Participants can sample signature dishes, watch cooking demonstrations and mas ter classes, and eat to their hearts’ content. The Surprising Story of Moscow’s Food Revolution
Otherwise, get to know the Russian capital through its evolving food scen e. Café Pushkin is the top choice for the Russian elite, known for its pre-Revolutionary decor, long vodka list, and views over leafy Tverskoy Boulevard. The superb menu focuses on classic Russian and French dishes, and the restaurant is housed in a former nobleman’s home. For five-star dining in an early 20th-century atmosphere, head to Savva in the Metropol Hotel , where the excellent fish-focused menu (with many Russian and Scandinavian influences) is served alongside views of the Kremlin and the famous Bolshoi Theatre .
Sophistication rules at CDL , set in an elegant 19th-century mansion where heads of state and celebrities often dine on classic Russian cuisine. And this being Russia, you have to try caviar, which you can do at elegant rest aurant Beluga . It offers caviar tastings and has an awesome view of Red Square , too.

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Moroccan Food Festival gets underway in Delhi; Know more

Latest Delhi Events: India’s love affair with Morocco is nearly 700 years old, from much before the country’s cuisine gained international repute. New Delhi Mar 23: India’s love affair with Morocco is nearly 700 years old, from much before the country’s cuisine gained international repute, if one considers that a North African nobleman named Ibn Batuta’s account of life in the Delhi Sultanate is a primary source of information for studying the culture and customs of that period. This Moroccan scholar and judge came to Delhi to join the Sultan’s service and lived in India from 1334 to 1341.
Located on the southern rim of the Mediterranean, Morocco was on the Spice Route from Kerala to the Middle East and Europe and, therefore, acquired a number of spices, while there is a lot of Indian influence in Moroccan food, Ambassador to India Mohammed Maliki said at a preview lunch for the Moroccan Food Festival that got underway here on Friday.
The Mediterranean diet is considered among the healthiest in the world and Moroccan cuisine has a “wide variety of food for every kind of palette”, the Ambassador said, unveiling choice dishes in the ambience of Ottimo at West View, the Western restaurant at the ITC Maurya.
Spices, therefore, are used extensively in Moroccan cooking and there is a centuries-old art to their careful mixing. Common spices include saffron, mint, olives oranges, lemons, cinnamon, ginger, paprika and coriander. Ras el hanout is a commonly used dried spice mix that can combine anywhere from a dozen to 100 spices.
The buffet consisted of traditional Moroccan salads and of spiced meat and vegetable dishes slow cooked in a distinctive earthenware dish with a tall, conical lid called a tajine.
The chicken tajine is a classic Moroccan recipe using preserved lemons, olives and onions. It can be cooked in an authentic tajine or roasted in the oven. The secret of its exquisite taste lies in marinating the chicken for five-six hours with lemon, onion, garlic, cilantro, parsley, ginger, pepper, turmeric, salt and the Ras el Hanout spice mix. Moroccan food has become globally famous for its use of spices.
Among the various salads on offer was the Zaalouk made of cooked tomatoes, aubergine and eggplant, which is a popular vegetable used in Middle Eastern cooking. The salad is enhanced with garlic, olive oil and spices and is a common side dish to Middle Eastern meals.
The assortment of salads included the Taktouka, made of green bell-peppers, tomatoes, garlic and olive oil, which is another dip commonly used for eating with various types of Moroccan bread.
The lamb dish on offer was the classic sweet and sour tajine with prunes that combined dried prunes and lamb meat with the ginger, saffron, cinnamon, and pepper. It’s popular as a traditional offering at holiday gatherings, weddings, and other special occasions.
Another very tasty main dish laid was the nutrient-rich Rfissa made of chicken and lentils – again slow cooked with spices.
The unique Moroccan flaky bread called Msemmen forms the base for the dish with the lentil stew acting as a sauce for the pancakes.
There followed a range of Morroccan desserts like the Briouat pastries filled with fresh almond paste flavored with orange flower water and cinnamon. Once fried, the pastries are then given a short soaking in hot honey for flavor and sweetness.
The Chebakia is a sesame cookie made by folding dough into a flower shape, frying it and then dipping it in hot honey flavoured with orange flower water.
Sellouf is an unbaked sweet also served at special occasions like Eid and weddings and is made from toasted unhulled sesame seeds, fried almonds and flour that has been browned in the oven.
Hospitality is a very important part of Moroccan culture, the Ambassador explained. On entering a Moroccan home, guests are typically offered food and tea within seconds, and the meal here ended with the refreshing green tea with mint. The Moroccan tea ceremony is sacred and pouring of the tea is considered something of an art form.
The food festival is on till March 30

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