If there is a strike there will be no ferry’s from either Piraeus or Rafina. Your only option will be to fly if you want to get to Mykonos on 3 July.
For flights check https://www.olympicair.com/en and or https://www.skyexpress.gr/en/
>>Being Indian and Pure vegetarian I am carrying my food along with me <<
Are you aware that 50% (or even more) of Greek cuisine are vegetarian dishes? So why should you take a whole lot of food all the way with you?

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World Cuisine: Indian Food – Myth or Fact

EES Presents Food Ways “Food ways” is an expression that dates back to 1946. It refers to the eating habits and culinary practices of a people, region, or historical period. Food Ways Presented by Everyday Exotic Spices : Foodie finds for food lovers – curated content from around the web, presented by Everyday Exotic Spices, sharing the ways we all like to enjoy our food! Pages BLOG SPONSORS Have Fun Exploring This Blog and the Related Links We Share! Thank you for visiting. NOTE: You may need to pause AdBlock in your browser to fully enjoy this site.
Tumblr for Foodies ♦ Shop and Earn! ♦ My Shopping Channel ♦ Rx4Wellness Health Tips ♦ My Fox Nooze ♦ The Health Food Store ~ your one stop shop for healthy, gluten free, innovative products.♦ Salsa Express ~ The original and largest source for gourmet fiery foods since 1991. Gift packs, popular salsas, hot sauces, dip mixes, and fiery snacks delivered quickly for your next celebration!♦ Personal Chef To Go ~ Say goodbye to dieting and say hello to delicious, everyday gourmet meals for today’s health conscious consumer. Enjoy fine dining restaurant quality meals at half the cost! * Thursday, June 27, 2019 World Cuisine: Indian Food – Myth or Fact Do you like Indian food? I do! Although must admit, had to acquire a taste for it. My first time trying a so-called authentic Indian dish was at one of those American mall-type food courts, where there are all kinds of restaurants for you to choose from. That probably wasn’t the best place for me to get my first taste. Was taken aback by some sort of flavor or spice that my palette was clearly not expecting. It threw me off! Later on, when cooking channels became so popular on television, started learning how to prepare Indian dishes. There was the one lady who referred to herself as a “ spice goddess ”. Because really it comes to cooking, Indians do know their spices. No argument. Her recipes always seemed so simple, easy to prepare, and she explained the herbs and spices she used for flavoring and showed you how to incorporate them into the recipes. Crush these seeds. Warm this spice in the pan. Sprinkle these herbs. Decided to try Indian food again and was very pleased with the tasting tests. Below is a link to a blog post that eliminates common myths about Indian food. Didn’t know there were myths but good to know they can be ignored. What were some of the myths? All Indian food is spicy. All Indian food is vegetarian. All Indian food is overloaded with curry.

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All-Purpose Indian Seasonings – The All-Purpose Indian Fusion Spice Blend Features 16 Spices (TrendHunter.com)

References: momsmagicmasala & specialtyfood At the annual Summer Fancy Food Show from the Specialty Food Association, Mom’s Magic Masala’s innovative Indian seasoning was recognized in the 2019 sofi Awards as the Product of the Year. The Indian cuisine-inspired seasoning blend was created based on a family recipe and features 16 different spices, including paprika, cumin, cinnamon, as well as unique additions like pomegranate powder and dried mango. According to founder Sumeet Jhamb, the product is “derived from Indian cuisine, so it borrows heavily from the wider palate of flavor, without being overly spicy.” The All-Purpose Indian Fusion Spice Blend is said to have a unique and savory taste that lends itself well to being paired with everything from meat and vegetables. Some of the recipes that Mom’s Magic Masala shares include kabobs, lamb chops and fried potatoes.

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Mauritius: The ultimate wellness and culinary travel guide

Home / Wellness / Mauritius: The ultimate wellness and culinary travel guide Mauritius: The ultimate wellness and culinary travel guide 1 hour ago Wellness
Submerged in the azure Indian Ocean , an atmospheric melody I’m imagining was orchestrated by mermaids fills my ears as we slowly glide through the water approaching the site of the Star Hope shipwreck. It’s one of dozens of ships scuttled off the coast of Mauritius to create “five- star fish hotels” says our submarine captain, Samuel.
It’s not every day you find yourself at 35 metres below sea level, exploring the depths of the ocean in a submarine. In fact, it really is a rarity, with just 12 tourist subs in the world and the Blue Safari Submarine tour I’m on being the only one in the Indian Ocean .
It’s a calm and dreamy feeling to be in the small 10-seater vessel, where everything is cast in a strange blue light as the colour absorption changes the deeper we go.
I spend most of the 45-minute trip with my eyes glued to the porthole, taking in the real-life tropical aquarium as patterned fish dart in and out of softly waving coral, incredible schools of shiny silver trevally flash by and graceful sea turtles gently float past.
Back on the surface, the reality of my surroundings is no less beautiful as we swap submarine for speedboat and glide back to the postcard-perfect white sandy shore, sandwiched between turquoise water and jungle-covered volcanic mountains.
Our morning under the sea is just one of many experiences that make a trip to Mauritius unforgettable. Located off the coast of Africa, this tiny island nation is famous for its 330 kilometres of coastline broken up by beaches , lagoons and reef, and deservedly referred to as the Pearl of the Indian Ocean .
It’s fascinating, 400- year -old human history has created a cultural melting pot where Creole, Indian, French, British and Asian influences permeate everything from the cuisine to the architecture, to create a tantalising place all its own.
“ Mauritius was made first , and then heaven; and … heaven was copied after Mauritius ,” – Mark Twain
To get a sense of Mauritius away from the pristine beaches , we venture to the capital, Port Louis. We wander past 18th-century French colonial buildings in the old town and see the stately white Government House , before ducking into the bustling central market, jammed with stalls and people.
Pyramids of pineapples, mounds of chilies and bundles of bananas are sold alongside everything from dried vanilla beans to clothing to homewares.
Skipping the tempting street food– think Creole curries, sugarcane juice, preserved pineapples, and samosas – we drive back down the island’s west coast for half an hour to our luxurious digs, Maradiva Villas Resort and Spa.
Located near Flic-en-Flac on a secluded beachfront in the Black River area of the island’s south-west, Maradiva is another slice of paradise. The five- star , villa-only resort is owned by a Mauritian family and is the only one of its kind on the island.
Dotted among 10 hectares of lush gardens, each of the 65 decadent villas has a private plunge pool and daybed, outdoor lounge area, and an enormous bathroom the size of a small apartment.
The bathroom comes complete with walk-in robe, huge bathtub and two showers – one glass-walled so you feel as though you’re showering in the private tropical garden, and one in the tropical garden for those who like to shower underneath the sun or moon.
It’s fascinating, 400- year -old human history has created a cultural melting pot where Creole, Indian, French, British and Asian influences permeate everything .
The villas are spacious but the opulence is understated; the focus is on discreet luxury and impeccable service. Fresh fruit and other tasty titbits, a newspaper, and Dalai Lama quotes left by your bide are the kind of thoughtful daily flourishes one could get used to.
Having touched down in Mauritius the previous day, our group was swiftly transferred to the hotel in a Rolls-Royce Ghost and Phantom. Once in the private oasis of Maradiva , after being welcomed with smiles, fresh ginger-and-lemon drinks, and enveloped by the relaxed yet luxurious ambience, it’s certainly hard to leave.
I can’t deny the seduction of the place, which is unsurprisingly popular with couples and honeymooners as well as celebrities, who are drawn to the privacy and service of the villas as much as their stunning location, and wellness and culinary attractions.
As well as in-villa dining and a beachside picnic option, there are three restaurants to choose from at the resort. Part of the appeal of staying somewhere like this, we realise, is that we get the choice and service of a resort, with the space and luxury of a private villa.
Keen to experience the spices and flavours of India that has so influenced Mauritius , we opt for dinner at Cilantro on our first night.
While golf carts are available to guests to get around the grounds, it’s a warm evening and I choose to wander the romantically lit garden paths by foot.
The aromas lure me in and our group is not disappointed by the authentic, rich flavours of the Indian cuisine and Cilantro’s romantic setting. A ginger crème brûlée and after-dinner cocktail in the lounge make for the perfect finale.
Daily buffet breakfast is offered in the open Coast2Coast restaurant, surrounded by gardens and a lawn that stretches all the way down to the sandy beach .
Under a high-ceilinged pavilion, seated on dark timber rattan chairs, we feast each morning on fare that features everything from fresh fruit and pain au chocolat, to local dishes including rice, chutneys and curries. Fruit juices of your choosing, eggs and delicious hot crepes can all be whipped up when and how you like them.
The third option is the Japanese Teppan which, as the name suggests, is a teppanyaki restaurant. Seated in an octagon around the chef and his hot plates, we are treated to a degustation.
A vegetable soup appetiser is followed by melt-in-the-mouth fresh sashimi and a lime sorbet palate cleanser before the theatrical teppan display begins. With lightning-fast swishes of knives and bursts of flames our food is expertly tossed from hotplate to dinner plate. Matching wines and a trio of desserts add to the memorable evening.
The next day, I visit the spa for an Ayurvedic consultation with Dr Praveen before a traditional oil massage . An ancient medical practice, Ayurveda is deeply rooted in Indian culture and is therefore part of the Mauritian heritage too, and the health and wellness focus of Maradiva .
The level of wellness focus is up to the guests and free yoga is also offered once a week. As someone new to Ayurveda, I find the consultation fascinating and leave with new knowledge of Ayurvedic body types and wellness habits to consider as I make my way to one of the tranquil treatment rooms for my massage .
With a series of pagoda-like structures, cascading pools and treatment rooms that open onto private garden courtyards, the spa is a soothing place. Instructed to let the oils sink in for a couple of hours, I bliss out on a sun lounger under a frangipani tree by the pool before meeting up with our group for our next activity.
Still rather oily, I meet chef Rakesh at Karo du Chef, Maradiva ’s impressive organic kitchen garden where the delicious fresh produce for our meals is lovingly grown and harvested.
We’re here for a Mauritian cooking class and, after a tour of the grounds, put on aprons and get started. We learn more about the traditional spices and ingredients of the local cuisine and, under Rakesh’s guidance, cook a classic chicken curry, a palm heart salad and fruit skewers in syrup for dessert.
After an indulgent afternoon spent sampling cocktails from the poolside bar and lolling by the edge of the infinity pool admiring the sunset, I recall how a local had described this experience: “West is best over here.” With sunsets like this, I see what was meant.
Our days here have been as adventurous or as lazy as we wished. You could whip across Tamarin Bay on a James Bond-esque speedboat and hike past waterfalls up a jungle-clad mountain, or simply enjoy private service on a sun lounger by the sea.
Mark Twain made famous the local sentiment: “ Mauritius was made first , and then heaven; and … heaven was copied after Mauritius .” Twain added, after his visit in 1896: “This is the only country in the world where the stranger is not asked ‘How do you like this place?” And as I stand under the outdoor shower in my private courtyard, surrounded by lush tropical foliage, washing the sand and salt from my hair with the Hermes toiletries provided, I consider the past few incredible days spent in the pearl of the Indian Ocean and decide that, yes, perhaps this is heaven after all.
# Mauritius #Coast2Coast #MaradivaVillas Google News: Wellness Hotels site-theceomagazine.com

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Bliss Hotel: A Paradisiac Hideaway

Travel Bliss Hotel: A Paradisiac Hideaway
Hidden within a lush cove on the northern side of Mahe, Bliss Hotel overlooks a stunning beach caressed by cascading boulders and cuddled within a lush backdrop of green forest. One of the oldest hotels in Seychelles that was once called Vista Do Mar and was abandoned for some time, the owner Mr Alain Hazan renovated it and transformed it into the beautiful gem that it is today.
The Suites are decorated with only natural materials found in Seychelles and as well as combining creole architecture with contemporary interior design, Bliss Hotel evokes an exotic, friendly and romantic space with 24 Suites, each with its own charm.
Bliss Hotel believes in ‘real relaxing’ where the sounds and beauty of nature inspire the guest and provide them with a total escape. There are no paintings on the wall in this hotel, to promote tranquility and keep the focused attention on mother nature. Situated within the same building guests can also enjoy soothing natural massages and treatments at the Pure-Bliss Spa with Coconut Scrubs, Patchouli Sugar Scrubs and other delightful treatments on offer.
The hotel is situated in the quiet area of Glacis that’s only 10 minutes’ drive away from the famous Beau Vallon Beach, home to the Bazaar Labrin Street Market, the Baobab Pizzeria, Boat House Restaurant and water sports activities.
Travelers can enjoy varying ambience at Bliss, the Seaside and the Hillside. Both with its own unique features.
Seaside Let the lapping of the waves on the shores delight you! The Suites overlook a stunning white sandy beach and the world’s most breath taking deep orange sunsets. The private beach is nestled within the cove and features a natural swimming pool, made from the cascading boulders surrounding the shoreline.
One of the pearls of the Seaside is the Junior Opuni Suite with its rustic furniture and a panoramic view of the Indian Ocean that can also be enjoyed in the outdoor bathroom. The Oceanfront Wave Suite offers a stunning view of the beach with a private terrace, and a personal sitting area ideal for socializing and relaxing. For a more inspiring blend of contemporary and creole architecture, the Suite Birgo would be the luxury escape. The white cement and polished granite plays beautifully with the setting sun creating deep shades of relaxing earthy colours. The Family Apartment, named The Shadow, provides enough space and is ideal to accommodate up to 6 adults and somehow in the various spaces, the sails and the sun are having fun; the shadows and reflections somehow merge. The natural wood used to decorate the rooms give off a natural and organic feel, providing the perfect space for a relaxing and re-energizing holiday at one with nature. The hotel also offers Zumba and Yoga classes for the active clients!
Hillside Nestled up in the Secret Garden, the Suites offer beautiful views of the Indian ocean and the relaxing sounds of nature.
The Suites are surrounded by green vegetation, tropical flowers and the sounds of birds singing. Perched on the hillside, the rooms are spacious and plush with wooden furniture and white walls, some with beautiful shell curtains. The Charme Superior Room is spacious with a double view of the garden and the ocean with a private terrace/garden which melts in luxuriant tropical vegetation. Set amidst the vegetation, guests can enjoy the private pool or the choice of walking down just a stone throw away to the secluded beach.
Dining at the Bliss Hotel is an unforgettable authentic experience of traditional creole cuisine using fresh ingredients from the island!
Barefoot Terrace Restaurant
Bliss Hotel offer their clients homemade Breakfast and Afternoon Tea, found only on the islands in the stunning Barefoot Terrace Restaurant that boasts amazing sunset views, sandy floors and wood beamed ceiling covering the comfortable sofas. Once the sun has set behind the horizon and the sky is adorned by a tapestry of exotic colours, guests can enjoy happy hour sipping a tropical cocktail in tranquility. For Dinner guests can taste the exquisite authentic creole cuisine Buffet. The restaurant also offers an a la carte lunch menu that offers a variety of local dishes as well as snacks and coffee. Whatever time of day that you are enjoying a meal, you can do it soothing your toes in the sand, sitting back and relaxing with the amazing view and sounds of the waves.
Rockpool Seafood Grill & Bar
Another must try is the Rockpool Restaurant that is shaded just below the terrace offering a cozy and elegant atmosphere. The friendly team offer wonderful cocktails and some of the best Italian food on the island. Rockpool is the ideal venue to experience the perfect fusion of local and Mediterranean culinary delights with a hint of creole touch, whilst enjoying a stunning panoramic view of the Indian ocean. Be sure not to miss the majestic Silhouette Island in the far distance.
The hotel offers a few attractive packages such as the Honeymoon Package, Wedding Package and Long Stay Package. To make your holiday to Seychelles exciting, snorkeling trips to beautiful secluded beaches can be organized on their very own boat. An opportunity not to miss to see colourful fish and corals in the alluring clear turquoise waters.
As well as snorkeling, the team at Bliss Hotel can arrange for Hiking, Fishing, Island Tours, Diving and other activities to make your holiday moments memorable.
At Bliss Hotel guests can experience mother nature in her truest form and marvel at the world’s most beautiful sunsets, all the while enjoying traditional creole cuisine and appreciating the rustic and creole inspired architecture.
Got more information or to make a reservation, visit www.bliss-hotel.net

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Nestlé India Introduces MAGGI Fusian Noodles range

MUMBAI: In line with its vision to introduce products that cater to evolving consumer preferences, Nestlé India will be launching MAGGI Fusian – a range of Asian flavor inspired noodles. This range reflects MAGGI’s strong food and cuisine expertise and our deep understanding of Indian consumer preferences. Crafted using signature herbs and spices predominantly used in pan-Asian cuisines, MAGGI Fusian will be launched in a range of three unique flavors- Bangkok Sweet Chili, Hong Kong Spicy Garlic and Singaporean Tangy Pepper.
Announcing the new range, Mr. Nikhil Chand, Director, Foods & Confectionary, Nestlé India, said, “MAGGI brings to India, for the first time ever, an innovative range that will delight food lovers who love to explore new taste and flavours. This unique range has been specially crafted for our loving consumers. With this range consumers will be able to experience, the thrill of tasting flavours from all over Asia with the simplicity, trust and convenience that MAGGI brings in our lives.”
The new range will be available as part of Amazon Prime Day and a limited edition assortment box has been designed for consumers ( https://amzn.to/2LfLgwm ). The new range will be rolling out in select cities in a phased manner. tags Nestle MAGGI Fusian Noodles Trending

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Fifty shades of grey

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June 1 Having arrived at Heathrow at 8.30pm the previous night, and having stayed up past 2am writing in my London hotel, I was hoping I could catch a couple of hours’ sleep on the early-morning train to Cardiff for the Sri Lanka v New Zealand game. Unfortunately, the train is full of travelling match-goers and, as there are no seats available, I have to stand. Among the passengers I hover over is a fan wearing a Sri Lanka jersey, reading the article I stayed up late writing. He shares it with friends on WhatsApp, which is nice. Could have given me his seat instead, though.
June 2 Another day, another train. This time a much more pleasant ride through the south-east, glades gliding by, rivers glimpsed through the gaps in roadside copses. There are few cricket nations in which inter-venue travel is as pleasant as in the UK. Instead of airports, check-ins, baggage belts and cramped seats, you can just rock up to the station five minutes before the train is due to leave, hop aboard and find a comfortable little corner. Some people chat. Others read or watch videos. Yet more fall asleep, wake up suddenly at their destination, and have to rush off before they can adequately wipe up the puddle of drool they bequeathed upon the table in front of them. And nobody can prove that last one was me.
June 5 The Hampshire Bowl is a nice enough ground, but there is only one tiny road in, and on the morning of India v south Africa , this is so abominably packed that the taxi I am in finds itself lodged in an unmoving clot, stationary vehicles as far as the eye can see. It takes me 80 minutes to travel the roughly four kilometres to the ground. It would have been faster to walk it. Or to do the worm all the way from my hotel room to the press box.
June 6 I check into my room in Taunton, which smells of paint, because the hotel is renovating. I can’t open a window to let the fumes out, because apparently it is painted shut until it gets a second coat. The hotel does, however, gives me a flask filled with 1.5 litres of fresh milk. What is it for? To bathe in? Sri Lankan food in Bristol: it’s not all that Andrew Fidel Fernando / © ESPNcricinfo Ltd
June 7 My editors and colleagues want me to send them stories and videos that bring to life the “colour” from the towns hosting the World Cup. I haven’t the heart to tell them that the only colour I’ve really got to know so far is grey. It was overcast when I arrived in Cardiff. Raining when I left. Raining when I arrived in Southampton. Raining when I left. Taunton has been in non-stop drizzle mode in the first 24 hours.
This might be just as well, though, because my hotel doesn’t offer a laundry service, and the nearest laundromats are busy for the next few days, so at least I have the option of taking the clothes on my back for a spin on walks around town. If I was really keen on the washing-machine experience, I could even have sprinkled a few granules of laundry powder on myself and performed a few cartwheels to and from the ground.
June 9 Despite the many wonderful things about the UK – the gentle pastoral landscapes, the friendly locals, and best of all, its great writers , there is one failing for the traveller. Many colonial offensives have been waged on nations with vibrant cuisines, and yet, somehow, with all that food to draw from, the UK is where flavour comes to die. I don’t mean there are no good meals to be had – only that the baseline is low. A Thai restaurant in Bristol, for example, is reliably worse than a Thai joint in, say, Hamilton. Without solid recommendations, you’re flying blind.
Having had awful culinary luck over the past week, my Uber Eats orders began to grow increasingly desperate. Seeing as how more depth of flavour seemed like an unreasonable thing to ask for over an app, I began to make escalating requests regarding heat. Starting off with “Very spicy” in the “Notes” section of the order, I moved to, “Please make it extremely hot – I’m Sri Lankan” before pleading, “Use all the chilli you have.” I even tried a Sri Lankan restaurant after getting to Bristol. I regret to say nothing quite hit the spot.
June 10 Traipsing around Bristol in the morning, and oh, what unspeakable joy, I stumble across one of modern cricket’s most hallowed sites – the mBargo nightclub, out of which Ben Stokes stumbled on that storied September night and properly decked that one guy. Just walking down the street you can feel that it is a special place. You feel it in the pit of your gut, almost as if it is receiving repeated kicks. There are rumours that if you speak a word against any historically disenfranchised group of people in this neighbourhood, the ghost of Stokes – even though he is still alive – will jump out at you and pop you right in the mouth. I observe a minute’s silence, and lay a bouquet of flowers on the roadside. I don’t know who for, but it seems like the right thing to do. A crawlspace for a bedroom, fruit crates for a headboard – cricket writers travel in luxury Andrew Fidel Fernando / © ESPNcricinfo Ltd
June 11 Not for the first time in the UK, I’ve been duped. In 2013, I had a mobile phone stolen out of my hand in London. (Yes, I know I’m a moron for letting this happen.) In 2016, a vending machine that was supposed to spit out a sim card did not deliver its payload until it ate up a second £20 note. This time, I was sure my telecom issues were under control, because I had bought my local sim from a store inside Heathrow airport, and paid £30 for 20GB of data. Yet, weirdly, the night before the Bangladesh v Sri Lanka game, my data runs out, and when I look into my account, it suggests that my sim had only been loaded up with 3GB.
I attempt to rectify this injustice at a store belonging to the offending multinational telecom company in Bristol the next morning. They tell me that as I bought the sim and plan from “a kiosk” and not one of their trademark stores, they could not help me. They give me a number, through which I can “escalate the issue”, but this turns out to be manned by a glorified answering machine.
Everybody knows that the most productive way to deal with this kind of thing is to lose your cool and yell at the staff, so this is exactly what I do, and the moment my swear words impress upon them exactly how annoyed I am, they smilingly acquiesce to 100% of my demands, no questions asked.
June 12 Clearly, by this stage, and having seen what seems like a trillion hours of drizzle since I’ve arrived in the UK, I need something to improve my mood. Instead of heading straight to Cardiff, which hosts the next match I’m due to cover, I take a train to London instead, to crash with friends for a couple of nights. They know exactly what I need.
That evening we go to an unassuming joint that serves outstanding northern Sri Lankan cuisine. The mutton stir fry is glorious. The fish-and-egg rolls taste just like they do in the Colombo suburb down the road from home. The idiyappam (string hoppers) soaking up the kiri hodi (coconut curry) are warm and fluffy. I’m internally weeping tears of joy as we exit the restaurant. Birmingham’s 35 miles of canals are set against lowering skies and industrial car parks – and you thought Venice was romantic Andrew Fidel Fernando / © ESPNcricinfo Ltd
June 14 I do eventually have to rejoin the cricket tour, so I make my way to Cardiff, where the apartment I have hastily booked is unlike any place I have ever stayed in. An Elton John concert in town has ramped prices up, so my “loft apartment” has a glorified ladder leading up to a “bedroom”, which is essentially a crawlspace with a mattress, with some pretty lights attached.
June 15 Some people don’t believe me when I tell them that on my first night ever in Cardiff – a Friday in 2013 – I came out of a bar with a bunch of journalists and saw a post-fight brawler being attended to by paramedics, three revellers synchronised-vomiting, and a couple unsubtly going to second base in an alley, all within two or three minutes of each other. After our work at the Afghanistan v South Africa match wraps up, colleague Alan Gardner and I head into town with a bunch of South African journalists for a couple of post-match drinks. En route to the bar, in a stretch of about 100 metres, we spot a guy throwing up at a bus stop, another being pinned to the pavement by five bouncers, and a couple engaged in public heavy petting. Not quite the bingo card of that first Cardiff night, but a decent approximation.
June 17 I’ve arrived in Birmingham, where locals like to brag that the city has more canals than Venice.
It’s also way more beautiful.
June 18 Cricket South Africa have very graciously adopted myself and colleague Sidharth Monga as honorary South Africans and take the whole travelling South African media pack to dinner at an Indian joint. The evening ends at another of cricket’s most revered sites – the Walkabout bar, where David Warner took a swing at Joe Root and missed, in 2013.
Cards are written. Hymns are sung. This is the kind of history every cricket tour to England should be about.
June 20 I’m traveling south again following the exciting conclusion to the New Zealand v South Africa game the previous night. It’s raining in Birmingham as I leave, but when I arrive in Southampton, there is birdsong in the air, the smell of flowers on the soft breeze, and the city is bathed in glorious sunshine.
Haha. Just kidding. It’s raining, windy and cold in Southampton as well.

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What’s the FUSS about a Michelin star?

Crystal Orderson grew up on the Cape Flats. As a lover of breyani and various other curries, she explores the big fuss surrounding the Michelin star. Crystal Orderson pictured with head chef Cedric Bourassin. Picture: Supplied. Crystal Orderson | 5 hours ago
JOHANNESBURG – My food palate has been shaped by growing up on the Cape Flats on the outskirts of Cape Town. Here a meal would consist of various curries, breyani, be it fish, chicken or meat, samp and mielies; fish and chips and as dessert warm bollas and koesisters. Food influenced by migration, a movement of people, buying your vegetables on the street and what is on offer locally and the sea.
I have also been fortunate that from my roots on the Cape Flats, I have travelled across the length and breadth of Africa, tasting the infamous pepper soup in Nigeria, eating red-red – a popular bean dish in Ghana, Djebo-Djen – the famous fish dish in Senegal and an array of local foods from East to Central to West Africa.
But one thing I know, is that I am not is a foodie, I eat because I have to; I like my mother’s food and will not book a restaurant months in advance because of some famous chef or that it has some rave reviews.
So when I was invited by the number one hospitality school in the World, Ecole hôtelière de Lausanne, EHL Lausanne in Switzerland where the world’s only Michelin star restaurant is located at a hotel school I thought let me give me taste buds a taste of something new. Be open, see for yourself what the fuss is about and ask the chefs what the fuss is all about.
Michelin star restaurants are scattered all over Europe, Japan and the US and Hong Kong, parts of Brazil and Singapore. It does not operate globally and does not cover Africa yet.
Student chefs hard at work at EHL.
WHAT’S IN A STAR?
Now Michelin Star was started by the world famous Michelin tyre company and word in Europe is that they started it in France because they wanted the French to explore the countryside and buy new tyres. According to the history books, Michelin Stars were a feature of the oldest guide in Europe Michelin guide books published in 1900 by Andre and Edourd.
They award up to three Michelin stars for excellence to a select few establishments and the acquisition or loss of a star can have a major effect on the success of a restaurant.
LE BERCEAU DES SENS: A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE
In February, the Le Berceau des Sens become the first educational restaurant in Switzerland to receive a Michelin star. The school already also holds the highest Gault & Millau rating for an educational restaurant.
“It is a little pressure, guests look at everything,” says the world renowned chef Patrick Oghead. He says a few days after receiving the star, they had testers coming to the restaurant to see if they were, in fact, deserving of the star.
Michelin reviewers also referred to as “inspectors “ are anonymous; they can come with a family of noisy children or sit alone, they do not identify themselves, and their meals and expenses are paid for by Michelin, never by a restaurant being reviewed.
They can come at any time and it means you have to be your best all the time adds Oghead.
With a waiting list of up to five weeks and diners travelling across Europe to eat at the restaurant, which makes the restaurant unique is that the high-quality and exceptional service that is offered by the students from serving the wine, to bread to making the food of course under the watchful eye of instructors and top chefs. The attention to the detail on the plate and the different taste is certainly something I will always remember.
A bread roll.
Chef Cédric Bourassin says: “The star was not a goal we were trying to achieve, because the primary goal is to train our students, but it is a wonderful recognition of the product that we strive to offer our customers.” The Berceau des Sens offers a menu inspired by French cuisine and Oghead. Tells me that the menu is also in pursuit of umami, the fifth flavor that one of the chefs was able to explore during his stay in Japan.
SO WHAT WAS ON MY PLATE?
My fellow journalists who was part of the media trip, hailed from India, Brazil, Mexico,China, Russia an Singapore were as excited as I was to see and taste what all the fuss was about a Michelin star restaurant.
Crispy red mullet fillet, with southern vegetables pesto.
Our the three-course meal included seared duck, rhubarb-ginger chutney as a starter; main meal was red mullet fillet stuffed with southern vegetables and vegetables with pesto scented courgette with fennel. Out dessert was strawberries with matcha green tea and green cardamon. Did I ever imagined I would have cardamon dessert apart from usually biting on it when I eat my local breyani? Hmm, no.
The chef says the secret with Michelin star food is that its inspired by local produce and sourcing only local ingredients that is grown in a sustainable manner. The menu also changes every two week and the chefs working here are a mix of students and top chefs from across Europe.
My palette was certainly taken on a journey of different ingredients and the presentation of the food was beautiful with the different colors and textures on offer.
Did I enjoy the food? It was certainly different, I am open to tasting different food. My Russian and Indian colleagues were less impressed and said they could not understand the fuss about the star.
I guess for non-foodies, myself included, we might never understand what it means to be awarded the famous star, how people who loved food travel the globe to taste the food and what chefs can do.
So, I might insult some foodies when I say, yes, it was great to see it all, watch the chefs in the kitchen stirring up their magic and presenting the meal to their guests. I know foodies and lovers of good food will be disappointed; but for a girl from the Cape Flats – breyani still stirs up so much love.
All pictures by Crystal Orderson. Timeline

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Kunal Kapur explores the authentic Sheherwali cuisine of West Bengal in the final episode of The Royal Palate

MEME SEARCH Kunal Kapur explores the authentic Sheherwali cuisine of West Bengal in the final episode of The Royal Palate 26 2 minutes One of the most influential merchant groups from the British era is most definitely the Sheherwali community. Embracing the local ways of life, this community is extensively known for its unique blend of food. A combination of Mughlai, Bengali and Rajasthani influence, their eccentric cuisine can only be dignified as royal. In the final episode of ‘ The Royal Palate ’, celebrity chef Kunal Kapur traverses through Kolkata and Murshidabad to unravel the mysteries of this food. Giving an insight into the journey of mangoes, the Dukkar family in Kolkata presented Kunal with an exceptional thaali, including sweets to sour, whose core ingredient is mango. Proud to have provided the Queen of England for her special meals, they also showcased some of the original scriptures exchanged between the royals and them. Another local from Bengal, Neeta Ji makes us realize how this community’s food was not just for the mere survival of the traders but is royal on its own and is constantly evolving. Most Sheherwali Jains settling in Murshidabad, Kunal’s excursion to Azimganj transports the viewers into the post-colonial era. Darshan Dudhoria, member of the Sheherwali Family of Murshidabad said, “ West Bengal is extremely popular for its mustard and seafood preparations. However, hardly do people know about the Sheherwalis (Jain traders who settled ages ago in Bengal), who popularized this tempting strictly vegetarian Jain cuisine served as the ‘Sheherwali Thali’. I feel privileged to be able to bring out these rich flavours, making the food luscious without onion and garlic and present it in all its glory to the world through TVF’s The Royal Palate .”
Also Read : Neeti Palta joins star-studded mentor panel in the new season of Amazon Original Series, Comicstaan Speaking about the richness of the culinary, Chef Kunal Kapur said, “ Speaking about the richness of the cuisine, chef Kunal Kapur said, “Sheherwali’s had very close ties with the royals. Sheherwalis were not born in Royalty but their detailing in food was nothing less than “fit for royals”. It’s the finesse, opulence of Sheherwali food that gives us the understanding of what it is to live life king size! ” Concluding with our favourite Indian YouTuber duo – Jordindian, the episode ends with an authentic meal in the true Sheherwali attire donned by Kunal and the guests Naser Al Azzeh and Vineeth Kumar, embracing the fraternity.

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The Best Things to do in Dubrovnik: 30 Amazing Places to See in the Pearl of the Adriatic

Views from the City Walls
Wondering what to do in Dubrovnik? Three words – the city walls.
Have you even been to Dubrovnik, Croatia if you haven’t made your way around the city’s spectacular walls ?
Now, we’ve all visited “must dos” that turned out to be kind of overrated. Trust me when I say that Dubrovnik’s city walls are not one of those attractions.
They’re an amazing way to take in the fascinating history of Dubrovnik as well as soak in its beauty. The walls were first constructed way back in the 13th century, although they have been added to over the years. Sunset from the City Walls
As you complete the two kilometre-long loop around the city, you’ll pass numerous guard towers, bastions and even the famous St John Fortress.
You definitely start to feel a little like you’ve stepped back into Medieval times – until you whip out your phone to post it up on the ‘gram, of course.
Word of warning: if you are the kind of person who gets annoyed shuffling behind a very lo-o-o-ng line of people, you’ll want to get to the walls super early to beat the crowds. Or you can face the face the fact that it’s going to be busy and go up there just before sunset when the golden hour makes the city gleam. Wander Around the Old Town Dubrovnik’s Old Town
So what was so amazing that it had to be protected by sky-high walls and soldiers who were pretty handy with a bow and arrow?
The Old Town, of course.
One look at this amazing place and it will be very clear why so much effort was put into protecting it. It is absolutely, dazzlingly beautiful.
Once you’ve got over the shock of how pretty it is, it’s time to take a deeper dive and explore.
You’ll find many different types of architecture represented throughout the Old Town. Try to spy the different Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque buildings – not only are they beautiful, but you’re sure to impress with your fancy new knowledge.
Placa (Stradun) is the main street and a good starting off point, although I highly recommend wandering further afar down the backstreets.
You can also stop by the Old Port and watch everyday life go by in one of the most beautiful cities on earth. Sunset from Mount Srd
So in case Dubrovnik wasn’t so-pretty-you-could-cry already, it really turns things up a notch at sunset.
The best way to take it all in is from above, and Mount Srd is pretty perfectly located to take in some awe-inspiring views. There is a cable car, but it’s shut at the moment – you can always hike up though.
From the top, not only will you have a gorgeous view of the ochre roofs of Dubrovnik, but also the surrounding sea.
Then there’s the bistro/cafe where you can grab a snack and/or a glass of vino. Wine in hand, watching the sunset over glorious Dubrovnik? Yeah, I’m pretty sure heaven looks something like this.
Don’t miss it – it’s definitely one of the coolest to do in Dubrovnik. PS: Park Orsula is a much quieter spot also with great views of the city – I’ve featured it in my guide to Dubrovnik’s Hidden Gems . Visit Lokrum Island Views from the Highest Point on Lokrum
I know, it’s hard to pull yourself away from Dubrovnik – but trust me, there’s more good stuff not too far away.
I’m talking about Lokrum Island, a charming island that’s just as popular with locals as it is with tourists (always a good sign.)
Lokrum Island is located just 600 metres off the coast of Dubrovnik, so it’s easy to reach as a daytrip. That’s lucky, because it’s actually prohibited to stay overnight on the island.
As a result, it’s been well looked after and is a large nature reserve. While just enjoying the fresh air is a great way to spend a day, there are a few other unmissable spots.
The climb to the highest point on the island is totally worth it to check out the beautiful Old Fortress overlooking the island and back towards Dubrovnik. Hiking on Lokrum
Then there’s the beautiful Monastery, complete with a 12th century basilica. You can’t miss it if you’re looking for amazing things to do in Dubrovnik.
Do keep in mind that Lokrum Island is only open to the public between April and October. Also, check the boat timetables ahead of time – you don’t want to end up stranded on the island! Things to do in Dubrovnik in the Day Walk Down Stradun
While you’re in Dubrovnik, I can almost guarantee you’ll end up Stradun. It’s the main street of the city, and all roads lead towards it.
Honestly, it can get crowded and toasty warm when the sun bears down on the cobblestones and visitors. Nonetheless, it’s a must do Dubrovnik attraction.
It’s the heart of Old Town and lined with shops, cafes and restaurants all beckoning you in. Personally, if you’re hungry, I recommend heading a few streets back – but you could totally indulge in an icecream from one of the vendors.
It’s certainly incredibly beautiful (where in Dubrovnik isn’t?) and there can be some great people watching to boot. Make sure you schedule in at least one stroll during your stay in the city. Visit Dubrovnik Cathedral
Visiting Dubrovnik’s gorgeous 17th century cathedral is easy on the budget and the eye.
Entry to the grand old building is free, and it is generally open from dawn to dusk except when mass is underway.
Entry into the cathedral’s treasury will only set you back 15 Kuna, and you’re likely to be dazzled by all the treasures that have been amassed during its lifetime.
In particular, the cathedral guards some pretty incredible historic antiquities, including relics from the 11th century. Not bad for the equivalent of 2 euros. Buy Fresh Fruit at the Old Town Market Old Town Market Dubrovnik
Tucked away behind the Church of St Blaise you’ll find a sprawling food market covering pretty much the entire square of Gundulićeva poljana.
Here you’ll find more than enough to tempt your tastebuds, but I couldn’t go past the delicious fresh fruit.
It’s the perfect accompaniment to a warm day in Croatia and it gives you an excuse (if you need one) to do the rounds checking out all of the stalls.
The market is on six days a week, and as well as scrummy fruit you’ll also find produce like honeys, jams, peppers and spices, if that’s more your thing. Take a Peek at the Church of St Blaise
The market’s location means it’s super easy to combine with a visit to the Church of St Blaise, another of the top things to see in Dubrovnik.
The Church’s beauty is one reason it’s such a drawcard of the city – then there’s that it’s namesake, St Blaise, is the patron saint of Dubrovnik.
It’s a beautiful Baroque-style church, that was built back when Dubrovnik was actually a separate republic.
That was in the 17th century, and it was built atop the ruins of an older church that was destroyed by an earthquake. A fire followed not long after, but miraculously a beautiful sculpture of St Blaise survived both.
It’s still on display in the church, and perhaps a good place to direct your wishes to one day return to Dubrovnik! Chill out at Fort Bokar
The phrase “it blends beautifully with its natural surroundings” is one often overused in real estate ads, but it’s totally fitting for Fort Bakar.
This defensive castle and wall around Dubrovnik blends so well with the cliffs on the coast that it’s hard to tell where one starts and the other begins.
As well as observing from afar, it’s well worth paying a closer visit and soaking up some of the good vibes.
It’s particularly popular in summer, and it plays host to the Dubrovnik Music Festival in mid-July. Head to the Beach
Croatia’s beaches have reached near mythical status worldwide, and it’s well deserved. No matter how long your visit to Dubrovnik is, you’ve got make time to hit up the beach.
While a lot of the attention is focused on the (jaw-droppingly awesome) islands, Dubrovnik also offers some pretty great beaches.
There sea, sand and surf, of course, but the best ones also offer up brilliant and kind of mesmerising views of Dubrovnik.
The most popular is Banje, owing to its beauty and central location, while Buža and Danče are also good options. Soak Up the History at Sponza Palace Sponza Palace
If you want to get a feel for what it would have been like to be aristocracy back in the 16th century Dalmatia (spoiler: pretty awesome), then head for Sponza Palace.
The character of this palace is a bit different than the norm in Dubrovnik. This is due to the fact that it was one of the few buildings to survive the massive earthquake of 1667.
Since its construction, it’s had a varied career serving as a mint, treasury, armoury and bank.
Today, it famously holds some pretty incredible books, including a manuscript from way back in 1022. A little disappointingly, but not surprisingly, it’s not on public display – but the building itself is a gorgeous sight. People Watch at the Onofrio Fountain
One Dubrovnik attraction that’s seen its fair share of history is the Onofrio Fountain.
Built in 1483, it was a huge feat of engineering back in the day, bringing water into the heart of the city (pretty important, I’d say.)
It was built so well that it managed to mostly survive the earthquake of 1667, although a few carved characters got knocked off their perches.
It remains one of the cities most iconic sights, and attracts large hordes of tourists.
Once you’ve paid a glance at the fountain, it’s time to settle in for a spot of people watching. You never know what you might see. Learn About the Region’s History in Dubrovnik During the Homeland War
Looking at the beauty of Dubrovnik today, it’s hard to forget that it wasn’t that long ago that it was caught in the grips of a country-wide conflict.
During the early 1990s, Croatia battled for independence from Yugoslavia. Dubrovnik didn’t escape the brunt of the conflict, and it was bombed extensively in late 1991.
Croatia eventually won its independence, and Dubrovnik’s wounds were largely healed. There are still, however, both physical and emotional scars of this difficult time.
Visit the Homeland War Museum to learn more about this turbulent period in Croatia – a moving experience. Climb Up to Fort Lovrijenac
Yet another Dubrovnik point of interest that may be familiar to GOT fans is Fort Lovrijenac. Not only is it one of the most picturesque sights in the city, but it’s also one of the oldest.
In fact, the base of the fort dates way back to somewhere between 1018 and 1038. Given how old it is, you’ve got to forgive the historians for being a tad fuzzy on the dates.
Throughout history there have been numerous additions and re-fortifications. My favourite is the installation of the very dramatic slogan NON BENE PRO TOTO LIBERTAS VENDITUR AURO – freedom is not sold for all the gold in the world.
George R. R. Martin couldn’t have written it better himself. Read More: The Game of Thrones Guide to Dubrovnik Pop Into the Ethnographic Museum
Once you’ve wandered around the city and been dazzled by the ancient beauty, you might find yourself wondering what life was actually like in Dubrovnik back in the day.
Luckily, you can easily find out by paying a visit to the Ethnographic Museum , one of the more unusual Dubrovnik activities.
Located in a 16th century building, this museum opened up way back in the 1950s. In this time, it’s intrigued many with its eclectic collection of exhibits.
Unlike many museums that focus on famous and notable people, I love that the Ethnographic Museum focuses mainly on everyday people.
Through the many different objects such as clothes and homewares, you can learn a lot about life in Dubrovnik in centuries past. Be Wowed by the Rector’s Palace Rector’s Palace
European history sure isn’t easy to wrap your head around with the way it’s totally changed throughout the last millennia.
Take Dubrovnik for example – did you know that 200 years ago it was the capital of its own republic known as the Republic of Ragusa?
Not just for a hot minute, either – the republic (which at its height was around 30,000 strong) lasted from 1358 until 1808. Pretty amazing.
During this time, the Rector’s Palace was the epicentre of political and social affairs in Ragusa. It functioned as a parliament, prison and armoury – talk about multitasking.
Today, it’s one of the top things to do in Dubrovnik and a great place to learn about the history of southern Croatia. Enter the Old Town at the Pile Gate
As with pretty much all walled cities the number of entrances to the Old Town of Dubrovnik is limited (that was kind of the point).
That means you’ll need to head through one of the entry points to reach the Old Town itself – my favourite is the utterly stunning Pile Gate.
While I’m kind of devastated they did away with the drawbridge, there’s still plenty of old charm at this 15th century gate. Go Kayaking in the Bay Kayak around Dubrovnik
In case I haven’t made it obvious by talking about it ad nauseum, Dubrovnik is really, really pretty. Really pretty.
Things are pretty amazing from inside the Old Town, but they’re arguably even better from the sea – and you get a workout too. What could be better?
Don’t worry if you’re not a strong kayaker, the section of the Adriatic outside Dubrovnik tends to be calm – nice and easy for your trip.
It’s a super relaxing way to spend a few hours to a day. You might even get to paddle out to the beautiful island of Lokrum. Visit War Photo Limited War Photo Limited
No matter how beautiful Dubrovnik is, it’s hard to forget that it is a city that has witnessed many conflicts, most recently in the 90s.
It’s a fitting setting for the moving War Photo Limited exhibition.
This exhibit gives an unflinching and sometimes confronting look at conflicts around the world, from a camera lens.
Each photo freezes in time a dramatic moment, and it’s impossible not to feel moved by this place. Whether covering local conflicts or those afar in places like Iraq, it’s an unapologetic and authentic look at war around the world. Lunch at Taj Mahal – a Cute Bosnian Restaurant in the Old Town Taj Mahal Dubrovnik
Once you’ve had plenty of Croatian skewers, it’s time to fill up on delicious Bosnian cuisine. For this, you can’t miss the Taj Mahal .
Yes, it’s a Bosnian restaurant, in Croatia, named after an Indian icon. Why not?
The food here is totally delicious – my mouth is watering just thinking back to that amazing Klepe (homemade egg pasta) and the delicious Bosnian charcuterie and wines.
They have a particularly good vegetarian selection, with a vegetarian platter that’s to die for. Trsteno Arboretum
Old is kind of Dubrovnik’s thing, so it may come as no surprise to know that the city is home to one of the oldest arboretums in Eastern Europe.
It may well be the oldest, but it’s hard to know – there is no record of when exactly it started. We do know, however, that it was in existence by at least 1492.
While the Arboretum sustained some damage during the Croatian War of Independence in the early 90s, it’s been restored. Today, it’s a gorgeous spot filled with lush plants and lots of flowers.
Keen eyed GOT fans might even recognise it from the third and fourth seasons. All in all, it’s one of my favourite places to visit in Dubrovnik. Day Trip to Mostar
Mostar might lay across the border in Bosnia and Herzegovina, but it’s an accessible day trip from Dubrovnik.
This city is a magical place to visit – and also possibly a hair-raising one, depending on your choice of activities.
Every year, many young men jump of the famous Stari Most bridge and into the water below to show their bravery to eligible young ladies. Well, that’s one way to do it.
I had no intention of jumping off it, but I did spent plenty of time admiring the beauty of the Stari Most bridge as well as Mostar’s other attractions like the Neretva river.
It’s easiest to do the day trip on a guided tour – I’d recommend this one, which also stops at the beautiful Kravice Falls. Day Trip to Kotor
Also just across the border is Kotor, a beautiful coastal town in Montenegro.
A stunning and historic city lying between dramatic mountains and the sea, it’s kind of astonishing (but welcome) that it avoids the crowds of Dubrovnik. (I guess Game of Thrones wasn’t filmed there, so there’s that.)
While I’m sure the secret will be out soon and you’re unlikely to be lonely in Kotor – I say visit before everyone else finds out just how spectacular this city is. Things to do in Dubrovnik at Night Buza Bar Sunset at Buza Bar Dubrovnik
As far as settings for a tipple go, it doesn’t get much better than the Buza Bar.
Apparently in the old Dubrovnik dialect, Buza means hole. It’s a fitting description since you have to literally climb through one to get to the bar.
It’s totally worth it because the view here is drop dead gorgeous. It overlooks the harbour, and you feel like you are floating over the sea as you sip your drink of choice.
Don’t miss this place – it’s one of the best things to do in Dubrovnik once the sun goes down. Read More: Visiting Buza Bar, Dubrovnik’s Stunning Cliff Bar Wine Tasting at D’Vino
Technically D’Vino offers up their drops all day and night, but there’s a certain romance to sipping wine once the sun has set.
Nestled in the heart of Old Town, D’Vino is a totally charming wine bar with an amazing selection of wine. Most of it is local from Croatia and the neighbouring countries, although you’ll find a few drops imported from further afar.
As well as doing a tasting of the wine on offer, I’m also slightly obsessed with their divine platters. Definitely the perfect accompaniment for the vino. Dinner at Restaurant Orsan Marina Views at Restaurant Orsan
While the crowds might flock to the restaurants on Stradun, I personally know the gems are usually found a few streets away.
That’s certainly the case with Restaurant Orsan – my pick of the best things to do in Dubrovnik at night. While it’s easy to get to from the centre of Dubrovnik, it’s not quite as frenetic as the places downtown.
This is the kind of place where you can stop and have a long, lazy dinner, feasting on amazingly fresh seafood. A glass of white wine and a pretty sumptuous view of the marina are the final ingredients for a fabulous evening. Stroll the City Streets (When it’s Much Quieter!) Dubrovnik at Night
It’s hard to complain about tourists when you are, in fact, a tourist, but I’ve got to admit the crowds can be a little overwhelming in Dubrovnik by day.
That’s why I fell madly in love with the city by night – once most of the tourists are safely tucked up in bed, have hopped back onto their cruise ship or revelling in bars and clubs, the streets are nearly deserted.
As a result, you can wander through at your own pace, stopping to imagine what it must have been like through the centuries.
No matter how much your feet hurt from exploring the city by day, if you’re looking for cool things to do in Dubrovnik then be sure to set aside plenty of time to explore at night. The atmosphere is totally different and totally amazing. Cave Bar
While the name might conjure up ideas of a dark and gloomy hole-in-the-wall, Cave Bar is a totally different kind of cave. My kind of cave, in fact.
A natural cave that clings to the coast in Dubrovnik, this gorgeous bar is an amazing spot any time of day. I’m particularly partial to it at night, however, when it’s a great spot for a relaxed drink – or many.
Nothing says “I’m on holiday!” like sipping your favourite beverage while hearing the sea lap at the coast and the breeze in your hair. Troubadour Jazz Cafe
What is the perfect musical accompaniment to a stupidly beautiful city with a lively and dynamic atmosphere?
Jazz, of course. And if you’re looking for jazz – you’ve got to check out the Troubadour Jazz Cafe.
There’s outdoor and indoor seating, and in either case you’ll be able to enjoy the music.
While the food is a little hit and miss, the drinks are exceptional with a great wine list and plenty of cocktails as well. It’s the ideal setting just to soak in everything that makes Dubrovnik so amazing. Places to Visit in Dubrovnik, Croatia – Practical Tips for Your Trip I’m normally a big advocate of exploring places alone, but Dubrovnik has so much history that I would recommend booking a guided tour. Dubrovnik does get really busy, not helped by the fact that it’s a popular cruise ship destination. Try and time your visit for days when the cruise ships aren’t in port. You can check the schedule here . Staying in the centre of Dubrovnik can be expensive, particularly during peak season. Neighbouring Cavtat is often better value and is well connected to Dubrovnik itself. If you really want to explore the city when it’s at its quietest, get up early – you’ll pretty much have it all to yourself. Views from Dubrovnik How Long to Visit Dubrovnik?
I’d recommend three days to visit Dubrovnik, four if you really want to take things slow. Three days is enough to see the biggest highlights without having to run around at a breakneck pace. Where to Stay The Old Town
Hotel Stari Grad is one of the best hotels in Dubrovnik’s Old Town, a historical hotel with plenty of contemporary charm. Check Rates and availability. Ploce
Villa Orsula has just 13 (very in-demand) rooms and boasts spectacular views of the Old Town. Check rates and availability. Cavtat
Hotel Croatia’s unmistakable modernist building is a peaceful haven in Cavtat and offers brilliant value compared to rooms in Dubrovnik itself. Check rates and availability. Dubrovnik Attractions Map Love this? Save and Share on Pinterest Looking for More Croatia Tips and Guides? Check these out…

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