22 Best Spring Break Destinations In The United States

22 Best Spring Break Destinations In The United States

View Larger Image 22 Best Spring Break Destinations In The United States
Spring break is here, and you will have your choice of many exciting destinations. Picking a spring break destination has a lot to do with the company you are with. If you are part of a young crowd wanting to meet up somewhere for nonstop partying, then you’ll pick one place and stay there. But if it’s just you or two of you or a family, itís great to take a road trip and visit several scenic sites. Best Spring Break Destinations In The Northeast
There are many spring break places from which to choose, especially if you live in or want to visit the northeast. The following are some of the best spring break destinations in the northeast. New York City
New York City is an amazing place to visit. There is something for almost everyone in this beautiful city that never sleeps. If you like the theater, then you can visit the world-famous Broadway or Radio City Music Hall. If you like to shop as many young college students do, then you can visit world-class stores. There are many historic attractions to visit such as the Statue of Liberty and the Empire State Building. You can enjoy a nice day in Central Park.
If you like to learn, then you will find much to do in the fabulous Museum of Natural History and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Just strolling down the street in New York City can be an adventure in itself. There are constantly different things happening. Of course, New York City can be expensive, but there are deals to be had if you do your research. You will also be able to save money if you split the cost of different items such as the hotels. Make sure that you also consider the logistics such as driving in the city, public transportation and so forth.
Also, use our NYC Travel Guide to help you plan your trip and our tips for ways to save money on a NYC trip ! Niagara Falls
Niagara Falls is a beautiful place to visit. The water falls are truly breathtaking. The area around it has turned into quite a tourist area and there is much to see and do for students on their spring breaks. It is a very pleasant area to visit and you will find many hotel choices.
Be sure to check out our top 10 things to do in Niagara Falls. Vermont
If you like nature, then you might want to consider a trip to Vermont for your spring break. There are many things to do in this lovely area including nature sightseeing and different museums, festivals and other attractions. Of course, the spring in Vermont can still be quite cold, so you should take that into consideration. How cold it is will depend on when your spring break actually is.
There are many wonderful places to visit for spring break. In addition to the ones listed above, you might want to consider the historic city of Philadelphia. There are many smaller destinations, as well, and you can go on a road trip and visit several. Be sure to be meticulous in your planning, and you will increase your chances of having a fabulous spring break. Best Spring Break Destinations In The Northwest
The beautiful Northwest has lots to offer in the spring and really any time of year. You will find many great places to spend a week away throughout this entire region. Even though Oregon, Washington, and Idaho are known for wet weather in the spring months, you are just as likely to find some sunny days. And the great news is that if there has been a good snowfall, excellent skiing should continue on into April. Here are a few places to consider. Seaside, Oregon
This quaint little town literally becomes a hub of activity during spring break. It’s a good vacation spot for families with its miles of smooth beaches, boardwalk, and interesting shops and restaurants. For a smaller crowd, consider a day trip to nearby Astoria a lovely seaport town with an excellent marine museum and the famous Astor Column that commemorates Lewis and Clark. Also, just north of Seaside Beach is Gearhart beach. This beach allows you to drive directly out onto the beach. Ashland
Shakespeare anyone? Plays run year round and Ashland is fun to visit any time of year. Nestled at the base of the Siskiyous, Ashland has quaint hotels, abundant RV parking, and fun restaurants and shops. Sunriver Kayaking in Sunriver, Oregon near Bend, Oregon
Just east of the Cascades, Sunriver is convenient to one of Oregon’s major ski slopes, Mt. Bachelor. There are loads of houses , cabins, and condos along the river to rent, because it’s a vacation town that is popular in all seasons.
See our Sunriver Travel Guide to help you plan your trip. San Juan Islands
A short ferry boat away from Seattle, you can find the San Juans. They offer excellent camping, lodging, fishing, and general relaxation. Watch for killer whales, ride bikes along nature trails, dig for clams, or just kick back and read a good book in a cozy cabin. Seattle The Space Needle in Seattle
There’s enough to do in Seattle to keep you busy for a dozen spring breaks. Ride the monorail, go to the top of the Space Needle, shop for fresh fish, produce, and flowers in Pike’s Market , take a ferry to Victoria, and enjoy some of the best coffee in the Northwest at the original Starbucks. The city abounds with great restaurants, nightspots, and fun shopping.
See our Seattle Travel Guide to help you plan your trip! Southern Oregon Coast
The banana belt of Oregon often has sunny, warm weather in the spring. Buy everything cranberry in Bandon, take a ride on the Rogue River, and go fishing and clamming on Gold Beach. Silvies Valley Ranch in Eastern Oregon
Visiting a working ranch is a unique educational experience and visiting a luxury working ranch is even better. Here you can shoot guns, interact with baby goats, hit the spa, experience gourmet dining, participate in a cattle round up and much more. Sun Valley, Idaho
Home to alpine-like skiing, Sun Valley is one of the most dramatic ski locations in the U.S. Although the area attracts the rich and famous from all over the world, there are some lodging possibilities for those just wanting simple pleasures. Coeur-D-Alene
30 miles east of Spokane, this fun town was once called “a little slice of heaven” by Barbara Walters. While a lot of recreation is centered around the summer months, the town itself is filled with quaint shops and good nightlife entertainment. If you like gambling, then you will be happy to learn there’s also an Indian casino 30 miles south. They even have a theme park. Best Spring Break Destinations In The Southeast
The southeast has many wonderful travel destinations for spring break. The following are some great destinations you might want to consider when making your travel plans. Miami/Ft. Lauderdale
You might want to consider the Miami/Ft. Lauderdale area. There are many wonderful things in this area that make it fantastic for spring break vacationers. The first hotspot for many spring breakers is the beach. You will find many beautiful beaches in this area, including South Beach, Hollywood Beach, Miami Beach and more. Many of these beaches offer low cost parking. There are many hotels on or near the beach for those who are looking for that experience. You can just go and enjoy the sun, water and sand for your spring break.
In addition to the beach, there are many fun attractions in this area. There is a zoo, a science museum in both Miami and Ft. Lauderdale, and many different other attractions that someone on spring break might enjoy. For those that want to party there are many nightclubs and nightspots where you can dance the night away. There are many fun restaurants of all different types to pleasure the palate. You will also find many performances of the arts in the form of plays and concerts. The weather during spring break is usually beautiful and warmer than much of the country. Orlando
Many spring break students would have a lot of fun spending the week in Orlando , Florida. There are many benefits to such a destination. First, there are a lot of hotels from which to choose, and many of them are very reasonable. You will usually have your choice of many hotel rooms, even for under $40. Also, there are many inexpensive places to eat, so if you are on a budget, you can still eat great.
Obviously, the big draw of Orlando is the many theme parks such as Walt Disney World , Volcano Bay, Discovery Cove , Universal Orlando, and all of the other parks. These can be pricey, but you can get deals on multi-day tickets to the parks. Sometimes they offer deals specifically for Florida residents or military members. These can be a lot of fun and provide a once in a lifetime experience. In addition to the large theme parks you will find many smaller attractions such as dinner theaters, museums, and more.
6 Day Orlando Itinerary Panama City Beach
We spent last year’s spring break in Panama City Beach and had a marvelous time. This outlawed drinking on the public beaches and reclaimed the city for families. Families can enjoy beach time, seafood and southern food , little amusement parks and more.
Check out our Panama City Beach Travel Guide to help you plan your trip! Best Spring Break Destinations In The Southwest Las Vegas
Las Vegas is great for anyone, because there is so much to do. If you are a young adult looking to party you will never run out of options. If you are a family there are multiple children’s museums, aquariums, water parks, and basically any family activity you can think of available. With so much to do, you can’t go wrong with a visit to Las Vegas.
Read our extensive Las Vegas Travel Guide to help you plan your entire trip! We also have guide for doing Vegas on a budget . Albuquerque
A New Mexico experience is one of a kind, just like New Mexican cuisine! Enjoy boutique shopping in old town, go for a beer crawl to over 15 breweries, hike up in the mountains, visit a lavender farm, and much more. From here you can take a day trip up to Santa Fe.
For a more ideas, check out our Albuquerque Travel Guide . Los Angeles Santa Monica Beach
Los Angeles is another spot in the United States that has so much to do that, they can cater to any type of traveler. Within the area there are multiple theme parks like Disneyland, Universal Hollywood, and Knotts Berry Farm. If you want to shop, you will literally never run out of places to go! And let’s not forget the beach! There’s one beach after another, including the famous Venice Beach and Santa Monica beach home to Santa Monica Pier.
Check out our list of free things to do in LA! Palm Springs
Head to Palm Springs for a spring break in the desert. If you’ve had a harsh winter, you will welcome the higher temps! Squeeze in some education and adventure on Jeep tour of the San Andreas fault . Catch relaxation at one of the many spas or head out for incredible hiking out in Coachella Valley Preserve or take the Palm Springs Aerial Tram up to Mt. San Jacinto State Park to hike in cooler temperatures.
I recommend staying at Omni Rancho Las Palmas near Palm Springs. They have several swimming pools and a lazy river.
For more tips, read our Palm Springs Travel Guide . Best Spring Break Destinations In Texas
Texas is so fabulous it has to have its own category! Fort Worth
Fort Worth may surprise you, but they’ve got a lot going on! Every meal will be delicious considering it’s mostly Tex-Mex and BBQ. They’ve got the historic Stockyards where you can catch a rodeo, watch a cattle drive, or go dancing at Billy Bob’s. The zoo is excellent and the downtown is cool. Nearby is Dallas and Six Flags.
For more info, check out our 5 day Fort Worth itinerary ! San Antonio
San Antonio, Texas is packed with activities. They have Six Flags and Sea World, not to mention one of the largest water parks in the world, Schlitterbahn (however, this water park will probably not be open during spring break). Shop and eat along the River Walk.
See our San Antonio travel guide for panning tips. Best Spring Break Destinations in the Midwest Cincinnati
Cincinnati, Ohio is a fantastic city with a little bit of everything. They have the Cincinnati Zoo and two theme parks, Kind’s Island and Cooney Island. Their playgrounds and green spaces tend to be quite nice. Highfield Discovery Center inside Glenwood Gardens is incredible. It’s a fantasy playground filled with fairy gardens, trains, a butterfly garden and more. There’s an endless supply of wonderful places to eat and lots of cool bars.

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Is it really authentic Indian? Just relax, enjoy the meal

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I recently heard a couple of food fanatic friends arguing about the relative authenticity of two Indian restaurants. Neither of the two was from India nor had any Indian family, but both were fairly well-acquainted with the cuisines of that part of the world and even some of the regional variations.
Still, I wondered who made them arbiters of authenticity.
This same story plays out with Thai, Vietnamese, Japanese, Chinese, Mexican, Salvadoran, Italian and Ethiopian cuisines, as well, thanks in large part to a plethora of food media, the ability to Google recipes and order ingredients online that once were hard to find, and a generation of serious diners who have grown up with all this access and now wear a coddled sense of culinary entitlement like a bib.
Authenticity, though, is a matter of perspective wrapped in a rose-colored blanket of opinion. Just ask anyone who has the best and most proper pizza or burger. Heck, take a local poll on what constitutes “real” Nashville hot chicken and you’ll find little consensus (except for Prince’s).
This reminded me of an interview I had years ago with Anthony Bourdain. While he decried faux Italian places like the Olive Garden as inauthentic, and spoke to his perceived validity of the new rustic Italian movement by chefs like Mario Batali, Bourdain also admitted he was wrong to denigrate the East Coast food of his youth.
Bourdain said the Italian-Americanized versions of sugo, Sunday gravy and other New Jersey takes on foods of the old country were just as valid as the authentic versions he had long promoted. Immigrant cooking in foreign lands is a take-what-you-can-get proposition as you struggle to create comfort in facsimiles. It also evolves over time.
It’s also a financial proposition when it comes to restaurants. Global cuisines have long watered down their flavors and whittled their ingredient lists for fear that American palates won’t like true, authentic cuisines.
Make it safe and make some money. Exhibit A: the standard Chinese buffet.
Mexican food in Nashville used to be the domain of large plates smothered in melted cheese and insulated with shredded lettuce. Then came the slow migration of Mexican immigrants, followed by tortilla makers and restaurants like La Hacienda on Nolensville Road where menudo (tripe soup) and pozole popped up as weekend specials.
Then came the taco trucks and markets manned by Mexican butchers who cut meats in shapes that looked like home. You could buy fresh nopal cactus paddles and whole bags of dried hibiscus flowers, and the food in restaurants got a lot more like the food from south of the grand border.
Thai food appeared in the 1970s, thanks to pioneers like Patty Myint and her International Market, complemented by the Global Market on Charlotte. Soon, Siam Cafe and others captured our imaginations with a host of curries thickened with coconut milk and unheard-of spices including galangal and kaffir lime leaves.
A funny thing then happened. More Thai restaurants popped up, and many of the dishes started tasting like they were made with the same canned curry pastes. Over time, Thai food seemed to be going the way of Chinese food in terms of homogeneity for the American palate.
Meanwhile, food television began to flourish and bring us a world of flavor. We educated ourselves and sought the best of category whenever we traveled. We wanted to know what “real” foods tasted like in their native lands and whether it could be replicated in cities like Nashville, Murfreesboro or Memphis.
Then came Smiling Elephant, and we hit another gear.
Opened by Patty Myint’s brother, Sam Kopsombut, we tasted a fresher, brighter Thai cuisine than we had known. It was hailed as, you guessed it, the most authentic.
Next came whispered reports of a cafe in Antioch called King Market that cooked the regional dishes of the Thai-Lao cultural borderlands. They even made their own sausage!
This arc plays out among many of the city’s immigrant communities, where there’s a balancing act of having the critical mass of people to support markets and restaurants that serve familiarity while also catering to neophyte taste buds.
For adventurous food lovers, it’s a welcome dance.
Which brings me back to that pesky authenticity argument.
The concern of one friend is that Chaatable, Maneet Chauhan’s new homage to Indian street food, is more authentic than her first outpost, Chauhan Ale and Masala House.
This also takes us back to Bourdain’s argument.
Like lemurs, cuisines evolve and adapt to their local environments. But there’s also a next, new wave of creative chefs mixing their old and new homes on the plate.
Chauhan is a master of this. Sure, she’s talented enough to cook any dish from any region of her native India, but chooses to look at her new local bounty, local culture and miscegenate the two into hybridized deliciousness.
Is it authentic? Who cares. It’s interesting and good.
I’m not kaiboshing the whole notion of authenticity. It’s a good baseline by which we measure future dishes.
If dumbing down a dish becomes a gateway, then so be it. If combining the Colombian dishes of his mother with the down South foods of his father, as Kahlil Arnold is doing at the eponymous meat-and-three, then let’s see how a carne-y-tres tastes.
Let’s revel in the international boom times of Nashville and quit squabbling over the relative merits of authenticity of places few of us are even beginning to understand, let alone locate on a map.
Jim Myers is a former restaurant critic, features columnist, hog wrangler, abattoir manager, Tennessee Squire and Kentucky Colonel. Reach him at Follow us on Facebook, Twitter & RSS: Sign-Up For Our FREE email edition Get the news first with our free weekly email Name

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Fun Friday Food Facts 2019 Vol. 11

Fun Friday Food Facts 2019 Vol. 11 Fun Friday Food Facts 2019 Vol. 11 15/03/2019 – 09:38 What a random bunch of Fun Friday Food Facts we have for you today! Let us know you’re favourite/ least favourite on Twitter @CSCMag. Ancient Egyptians used to cover the tombs of their rulers with pictures of onions, and onions played a vital role in burial rituals. This is because onions were believed to help the dead succeed in afterlife Arachibutyrophobia is the fear of peanut butter sticking to the roof of the mouth Blowing out birthday candles increases bacteria on the cake by 1,400% We’re an inventive lot in Britain when it comes to food, we have added Chicken Tikka Massala to the world of Indian cuisine and Spaghetti Bolognese to Italian dishes. You’ll find neither on the menus of their ‘home’ countries unless it’s in a restaurant for tourists Did you know that a shrimp’s heart is actually located in its head!

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Food

Signature French creations
Chef Ricardo Chaneton from Restaurant Petrus at Island Shangri-La, Hong Kong, will be showcasing his signature French creations at Lafite, Shangri-La Hotel, Kuala Lumpur. Through the guidance of reputed mentors, Chaneton developed his own style in classic French fare with a modern twist, a treat for those who appreciate the finer things in life. He will be presenting two lunch menus, priced at RM195 nett per person (for two courses) and RM245 nett per person (for three courses), as well as two dinner menus, priced at RM450 nett per person (for four courses) and RM685 nett per person (for six courses). The menu includes a choice of Crispy Amadai with Mini Zucchini and Lemon Thyme Sauce or Beef Tenderloin with Monalisa Potato Textures and Chimichurri Sauce for main course. It is available from March 19 until 23. For reservations, call 03-2074 3900.
Indulgent Sunday brunch
Flock at W Kuala Lumpur is presenting the Retox Sunday Brunch tomorrow, available from noon to 3pm. Dubbed the ultimate Sunday brunch, the menu includes Smoked Salmon Eggs Benedict, Foie Gras Chawan Mushi, live cooking stations, fresh smoothie bar, as well as a cold seafood spread with Alaskan crab legs and freshly shucked oysters. Diners can also indulge in some bubbles and cocktails. Flock champions a sustainable food movement, using products that are ethically and locally sourced, fresh and organically grown. The brunch is priced at RM98+ per child, RM188+ per adult (for endless mocktails and juices), and RM288+ per adult (for endless crafted cocktails, house wine and beer). For reservations, call 03-2786 8888.
SONGKET RESTAURANT, No 29, Jalan Yap Kwan Seng, KL. (Tel: 03-2161 3331). Business hours: Noon-3pm, 6pm-11pm (Mon-Fri), 5pm-11pm (Sat, Sun & public holidays). This restaurant brings Malay fine dining to a different level. Come and savour true Malay flavours with sumptuous servings of traditional dishes such as rusuk panggang, sup ekor, pucuk paku goreng and durian tiramisu, among others. As you dine, be entertained by their cultural dance performance on weeknights from 8.30pm to 9.15pm.
FORTUNA PALACE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT, 17-20, Jalan KP 1/2, Taman Kajang Prima, Kajang. (Tel: 03-8739 3388). Business hours: 11am-2.30pm, 6pm-10.30pm, daily. Non-halal. This Chinese restaurant features monthly special menus, modern food presentation and a cellar filled with hand-picked New World wines. Executive chef Oh Ah Poh is respected for his culinary mastery gained through 40 years of experience. Among his dishes are Farm Duck Salad, Padi Field Crab, Mirror Pairing Scallop Plate and Australian Wild Abalone and Fish Maw.
HEUN KEE CLAYPOT CHICKEN RICE, No 59, Ground Floor, Jalan Yew, Pudu, KL. (Tel: 03-9200 1603, 012-208 9123). Business hours: 11am-9pm (Fri-Wed). Closed on the first and third Thursday of the month. Non-halal. Near the Pudu Wet Market lies this eatery that has made a name for itself over the past 25 years. The owner uses a two-way heating system by cooking the rice in a claypot and placing more hot coals on the lid to help lock in moisture and the chicken’s flavours. A secret marinade sauce is also used for the chicken pieces
.AROMA RESTAURANT, 204, Jalan Tun Sambanthan, Brickfields, KL. (Tel: 03-2276 0032). Business hours: 11am-10.30pm, daily. Pork-free. Offers both north and south Indian food. Signature dishes are its Maharajah Sheek Kebabs, Fish Briyani, Goa Fish and Mango Curry, Black Pepper Crab, Lamb Patiala, Palak Paneer and Tandoori Prawns.
MALGUDI CLASSIC INDIAN CUISINE. 17, Lorong Universiti C, Section 16, Petaling Jaya. (Tel: 03-7931 2556). Business hours: Noon-3.30pm, 6pm-10.30pm, daily. Pork-free. Dedicated to the imaginative and creative cuisine of southern and northern Indian, with vegetarian and non-vegetarian options available. Touted to serve one of the best briyanis in the Klang Valley.
SURISIT THAI KOPITIAM, 17, Ground Floor, Lorong Rahim Kajai 13, Taman Tun Dr Ismail, KL. (Tel: 03-7731 2029). Business hours: 10.30am-3pm, 6pm-10pm, daily. Non-halal. The restaurant serves up home-style cooking from its kitchen. During lunch and dinner, staff are kept on their toes attending to a steady flow of hungry diners who seek affordably priced Thai food. Among the dishes served here are Tom Yam Ka Moo, Pucuk Paku Yam Pla, Tauhoo Yat Sai and Stir-Fried Glass Noodles with Chicken, among others
.BANGKOK HOUSE, 6-3A-O, Sinaran TTDI, Jalan Mohd Fuad 3, Taman Tun Dr Ismail, Kuala Lumpur. (Tel: 012-206 9872). Business hours: 11am-11pm, daily. Halal. The family-run restaurant has managed to capture the essence of Thai cuisine, which is known for its extreme flavours – from tongue-scorching spiciness to simple yet decadently sweet desserts. Menu highlights include Miengkham, Seafood Tom Yam Soup, Panaeng Kung, Pla Neng Manao with either garoupa or siakap and Thab Thim Krob.
U RESTAURANT, 69, Jalan Bangkung, off Jalan Maarof, Bukit Bandaraya, Bangsar, KL. (Tel: 03-2093 1268). Business hours: Noon-2.30pm, 6pm-11pm (Mon-Sat). Closed on Sundays. Pork-free. The restaurant uses the ‘omakase kaiseki’ concept where chefs decide how to cook and present the ingredients.
TAPAS CLUB, Lot.7.01.01, Level 7, Dining Loft, Pavilion Kuala Lumpur, 168, Jalan Bukit Bintang, Kuala Lumpur. (Tel: 03-2110 2718). Business hours: 10am to 9.30pm (Sunday to Thursday), 10am to 10pm (Friday and Saturday). Non-halal. The food is designed for sharing. Signature dishes include Gambas Al Ajillo (Prawns Sauteed with Garlic), Croquetas De Setas (mushroom croquettes), Calamares Con Chorizo (squid stuffed with chorizo), Tortilla De Patatas (Spanish omelette) and Huevo, Patata Y Jamon (egg, potatoes and ham).
DA ON FINE KOREAN CUISINE, Lot 6.40.00, Level 6, Pavilion Kuala Lumpur, KL (Tel: 03-2141 2100). Business hours: 11am-10pm, daily. Pork-free. The restaurant serves up authentic Korean favourites with emphasis on air-flown specialities. Its menu offers a bit of everything – barbecued items, comfort food like soups and rice, a la carte items like pancakes, rice cakes, tempura and beancurd, as well as desserts.
SKILLET AT 163, Lot 163, Fraser Place, No 10, Jalan Perak, Kuala Lumpur, (Tel: 03-2181 2426). Business hours: Noon-3pm, 6pm-11pm, daily. Pork-free. The chefs combines artistry and experience to create the restaurant’s unique contemporary cuisine, showcasing European dishes with an Asian flavour. The lunch and dinner menus are regularly tweaked based on the best seasonal produce. Highlights include the restaurant’s Texture of Chocolate and Lemongrass, Cempedak and Coconut desserts.
TANZINI, Level 28, GTower, 199, Jalan Tun Razak, KL. (Tel: 03-2168 1899). Business hours: 5pm-10pm (Mon-Sat). Closed on Sundays. Pork-free. This restaurant is known for its fine food, featuring fresh ingredients, creatively presented with a touch of flair. For a more private setting, head to Tanzini Upper Deck for a unique fine dining experience right ‘under-the-stars’ with distinctive star-lights fixtures and a spectacular view of the city.
PLOY, G-2, Work@Clearwater, Changkat Semantan, Damansara Heights, KL. (Tel: 03-2095 0999). Business hours: Noon-3pm, 6pm-10.30pm (Mon-Sat). Closed on Sundays. Pork-free. The restaurant breaks away from the conventional norm of dishing out Japanese and Thai cuisine to present contemporary and elegant ideas on a plate. Some of the dishes to look out for include Spicy Miso Soup, Crispy Fish Basket, Emperor Burger and Spaghetti Spicy Corned Beef.
SHOOK!, Feast Floor, Starhill Gallery, 181, Jalan Bukit Bintang, KL. (Tel: 03-2782 3875, 019-600 0495). Business hours: 6am-11pm (Sun-Fri), 6am-midnight (Sat). Offers an assortment of innovative as well as traditional favourites, including fresh sushi and sashimi, Chinese Wok-Fried Jumbo Fresh Water Prawns with Crispy Noodles, Wagyu Beef with Mash and Sauteed Mushroom and Snow White Dancing Prawns. It also has one of the best wine selections in the country with over eight hundred labels, from vintage Mouton Rothschild to sought-after New World Sauvignon Blancs.
HORNBILL RESTAURANT & CAFE, KL Bird Park, 920, Jalan Cenderawasih, Taman Tasik Perdana, KL. (Tel: 03-2693 8086). Business hours: 9am-8pm, daily. Halal. Dine amid hornbills at this unique restaurant offering the Hornbill Restaurant Special Nasi Lemak, Madras-Style Fish Curry, Chicken Varuval, Vegetable Curry, Penang Char Kuey Teow, Spaghetti Napolitaine and Tenderloin Steak.
SOUTH SEA SEAFOOD RESTAURANT, 229, Jalan Dua A, Kampung Baru Subang, Shah Alam. (Tel: 03-7846 1401/ 03-7846 5813). Business hours: 11.30am-10.30pm, daily. Pork-free. The restaurant has been serving quality seafood since the 1980s, with exotic items such as geoduck, Australian lobster, Estuary tiger garoupa, Sri Lankan crab, Japanese escargot, fresh abalone, mantis prawn and Empurau fish. To submit food listings and food-related queries, please email metrocfood@gmail.com or call 03-7967 1388 ext 1322.

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New gem brings remarkable flavors to Bellmore! | Herald Community Newspapers | www.liherald.com

New gem brings remarkable flavors to Bellmore! Posted Friday, March 15, 2019 1:09 pm By Terry Biener
2920-2922 Merrick Road, Bellmore
(516) 809-9927
While Mango Indian Cuisine only opened several weeks ago, management behind it is quite well seasoned. Sewa Singh, who also owns House of India in Huntington Village, boasts 20 years in the restaurant industry. Joining him at Mango are his son, Virpartap Singh, and his daughter, Simran Kaur. Still a work in progress — as they await table candles and embellishments for the walls — the intimate space is sleek yet cozy, offering rave-worthy Northern Indian food and top-notch service.
Their expansive menu had options for everyone, from meat aficionados and seafood lovers to vegetarians. Lunch Special — soup, Nan, chutney, rice and a main dish — is $11. From the dinner menu, soups, chutneys, salads, breads, and hot appetizers range from $3 to 13. Entrees (chicken, lamb, seafood, vegetable, Tandoori, and Biryani rice specialties), are $15 to $27. Desserts are $6 and $7. Children can be accommodated.
How mild or spicy your food will be is your choice … just ask. If there is something you’d like that’s not on the menu, if they have the ingredients, they are happy to prepare it. Management is friendly and very accommodating. Portions are quite generous.
We started with Mango Lassi, a refreshing, creamy yogurt beverage. Mango Special Variety Tray wowed us with a sampling of hot appetizers — crisp vegetable and meat Samosa, Bhujia (vegetable fritters), potato, cheese and chicken Pakora (batter fried), and a basket of Papadam (spicy Indian crackers) with three chutneys on the side.
Entrees include Basmati rice. Chicken Tikka Masala, boneless white meat, arrived in delicious sauce made with cream, tomato, green pepper, onion and spices. Lamb Mango, so tender, no knife needed, was dressed in a sweet brown mango/saffron sauce. Saag Paneer, a hearty blend of spinach, homemade cheese and curry, was amazing on nan bread or mixed with rice. Garlic Nan, one of 15 freshly baked breads, was served straight from the oven.
All Tandoori items (chicken, fish, lamb, cheese) are cooked on skewers in a charcoal clay oven, served with rice and curry sauce on the side. Mixed Tandoori platter offered a variety — several types of chicken, lamb Boti, and Seikh kebab — minced lamb blended with Indian spices.
Desserts are all made on premises. We shared and enjoyed Rasmalai, a traditional favorite – soft, sweet Indian cheese in cream sauce, served chilled. Gulab Jamun, Kulfi, and homemade ice cream are also on the menu.
Hours are 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday. 11:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, noon to 10 p.m. on Sunday. They are closed on Monday. Reservations are suggested. Delivery, catering and take-out are available.
Recommendations:

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Cook South Indian food and make more $$$ from home kitchen | Chef & Cook Melbourne City – Melbourne CBD | 1210318640

Work from Home and make more $$$ by cooking South Indian Cuisine food …
Join our vibrant team of Home based chefs to
·Earn extra $$$ to increase your income
·Flexi work hours and be available on Wednesdays& Sundays
·Be your own Boss and cook from home
Now Hiring People with
·Passion for cooking South Indian cuisine food
·Home kitchen license issued by local council or willing to apply for it
·High attention to hygiene & quality
About the company
Tasty Wheels is a fast growing popular South Indian food business in the South eastern Melbourne suburbs, that makes and delivers Indian cuisine food to its loyal customer base.

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Enjoying The Best Asian Food Denver CO

By Susan Anderson
Life is too short not to enjoy Asian food. Enjoying this delicacy should be in the bucket list of every American in Denver, Colorado. Asian culture is just as diverse as the continent of Asia. This is the continent of many variables. Asia has the most amazing sights and sounds in the world. A lot has been written and said concerning the beautiful continent of Asia. Words are not enough to express the beauty and glamour of Asia. There is a high demand for the best Asian food Denver CO . This is simply the best food that money can buy.
Every year, millions of people usually visit Asia. Some of the people usually do that for the food. Of course, the best way to have firsthand experience of Oriental cuisine is by visiting Far East countries such as Japan, South Korea, China, and North Korea. By visiting India, one will not only enjoy the cuisine. He will also enjoy amazing sights.
If there is one reason to visit Asia then it is the culinary reason. Asia is a culinary wonderland. It has a lot to offer to the seasoned food fanatic. The good news is that the Asian food experience can be enjoyed right in the heart of Denver, Colorado. That is because there are a number of Oriental and Indian restaurants.
To enjoy an oriental food, one needs to visit the right restaurant. Not every restaurant is created the same. There are the best restaurants in Denver. On other hand, there are mediocre restaurants. A mediocre restaurant will be of little or no use. That is due to the fact that it will not deliver much to a patron.
A top oriental restaurant in Denver, Colorado, has a number of characteristics. If a restaurant claims to serve Chinese dishes, some of the chefs should be Chinese. The location of a restaurant is another important matter. A strategic location in an up market area of the city is the best location. The restaurant should also have state of the art interior design.
When talking of the various Oriental foods that can be enjoyed in the United States of America, the first delicacy that will come to mind is rice. As a matter of fact, rice is Asian in every sense and respect. That is due to the fact that rice was first grown in Asia. Countries in Asia are some of the biggest exporters of rice.
Asian rice has adventure in its soul. This is the finest rice that can be enjoyed in the city of Denver. Rice is a meal like no other. It is known for its rich taste. Rice is the most versatile dish in the world. It can be mixed with different kinds of foods including beef, fish, pork, and chicken.
The biggest continent in the world by landmass is Asia. The population of Asia is also the largest in the world. According to the leading historians on earth, Asia is the cradle of mankind. The first humans resided in Asia. The Asians have not only contributed in the fields of engineering, medicine, and technology. They have also contributed many amazing foods to humanity.
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Exclusive: Indian antitrust watchdog raids Glencore business, others over pulse prices – sources | News | 1330 & 101.5 WHBL

Exclusive: Indian antitrust watchdog raids Glencore business, others over pulse prices – sources Saturday, March 16, 2019 11:28 a.m. CDT FILE PHOTO: The logo of commodities trader Glencore is pictured in front of the company’s headquarters in Baar, Switzerland, July 18, 2017.
By Aditya Kalra and Mayank Bhardwaj
NEW DELHI (Reuters) – India’s antitrust watchdog raided units of global commodities trader Glencore and two other firms in Mumbai on Saturday in an inquiry into alleged collusion on the price of pulses, four sources with knowledge of the raids told Reuters.
More than 25 antitrust officials carried out the raids at the offices of local units of Glencore and Africa’s Export Trading Group, and India’s Edelweiss group which previously had a commodities business, two government sources told Reuters.
The Competition Commission of India (CCI) has been investigating allegations that the companies formed a cartel to discuss the pricing of pulses while importing and selling them in the Indian market at higher prices in 2015 and 2016, when India faced an acute shortage, the sources said.
A spokesman for Switzerland-based Glencore, Charles Watenphul, declined to comment, while India’s Edelweiss, which sold its commodities trading business in November 2016, and the Export Trading Group did not respond to requests for comment.
Two years of drought pushed up prices of pulses such as chickpeas and black grams, which are a staple of Indian cuisine, in 2015 and forced New Delhi to offer duty-free imports, encouraging foreign and Indian traders who imported pulses to sell locally.
“The collusion by these companies led to higher prices of pulses,” one of the government sources said, adding that the CCI’s inquiry started three months ago.
The investigation will also assess whether the companies have continued their alleged collusion even after the prices of pulses stabilized in recent years, the source said.
IMPORT PRICES
The raids on five company offices in India’s financial capital began on Friday and were concluded on Saturday.
Antitrust officials collected evidence, including documents and e-mails, and questioned company officials during the raids, a second government source said.
Another source, an industry executive, told Reuters that CCI’s search involved going through company records at Glencore’s office in Mumbai, confirming it was part of the watchdog’s probe into accusations of fixing import prices.
The drought during 2015 wilted crops and exacerbated shortages of food such as protein-rich pulses and India, which consumes about 22 million tonnes of pulses annually, faced a shortfall of 7-8 million tonnes in 2015-16.
The CCI’s raids on commodities traders mark only its fourth such search operation in its near 10-year history. They can only be conducted with approval from a judge.
In October, the CCI raided the offices of global brewers such as Carlsberg and Anheuser Busch InBev and found e-mails which allegedly showed violations of Indian anti-trust laws. ( https://reut.rs/2JeQKEs )
The brewing companies have pleaded leniency under a CCI program, Reuters has reported.
(Reporting by Aditya Kalra and Mayank Bhardwaj; Additional reporting by Rajendra Jadhav and Aditi Shah; Editing by Alexander Smith) More From World

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Bahrain beckons

Bahrain beckons Bahrain beckons Bahrain’s charm lies as much in its winding alleys and busy souqs as in its modern skyscrapers and malls. Prachi Joshi gives you the lowdown on how to make the most of your stay here Share via Mar 16 2019, 01:00am ist updated: Mar 16 2019, 01:00am ist
The archipelago of Bahrain sits pretty in the Arabian Gulf. Its history dates back 5,000 years to the ancient Dilmun era. But the Kingdom of Bahrain also has its feet firmly in the future — with a booming economy and a more liberal culture than its Middle Eastern neighbours, the country is fast becoming an attractive destination. Add to this a burgeoning art and food scene and the annual Formula 1 Grand Prix, it is Bahrain’s time to shine like the pearl it’s best known for. Bab Al Bahrain Culture trail
Bahrain has a rich cultural history, which is wonderfully showcased in the Bahrain National Museum. The building itself is a sprawling post-modern complex surrounded by contemporary art sculptures and installations. Inside, you’re transported straight into the Dilmun era, circa 3000 BC, where you can see the ancient artefacts, coins, jewellery, and seals, stone burial mounds, grave goods etc. The exhibition also takes you through the short-lived Greek influence on Bahrain, and eventually to the Islamic period that prevails till today. The museum also houses a reproduction souq and depictions of Bahraini life in the years gone by. To get some glimpses of old Bahrain, head to Muharraq, the erstwhile capital of the kingdom. Here, many houses still stand in the traditional style of architecture with a large central courtyard surrounded by living quarters, guest rooms, and servants’ quarters; the Shaikh Isa Bin Ali House is particularly well restored. Other houses worth exploring are along the so-called ‘pearl trail’ – houses of former pearl merchants that have been restored into design and exhibition spaces; the House of Art, part of the Shaikh Ebrahim bin Mohammed Al Khalifa Centre is quite interesting, especially the photography exhibit that presents striking black-and-white photos of old houses in various stages of disrepair.
Another major attraction that you shouldn’t miss is Qal’at al-Bahrain or Bahrain Fort, the fortified Portuguese fort that stands over layers of Bahrain’s history. Archaeological excavations have revealed a Dilmun-era city, parts of which are visible on the periphery of the fort. The current fort dates to the 16th century and was built by the Portuguese who controlled the islands for trade purposes. The entire complex is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Finally, don’t miss the Al Fateh Grand Mosque, the largest place of worship in Bahrain and one of the largest mosques in the world with a capacity of more than 7,000 worshippers at a time. Especially noteworthy is the grand, Austrian-made chandelier in the main hall, the Italian marble floors, and the carved doors made of Indian teakwood. A pottery shop. Art & craft
Bahrain has a long legacy of arts and crafts ranging from ceramics and basket weaving to dhow making and metalwork. Visit the Al Jasra Handicrafts Centre to watch artisans at work and even buy handcrafted items. The centre was established in 1990 to preserve and promote traditional arts and crafts. Another place worth visiting is A’ali village, which has been known for its pottery since Dilmun times when pots were routinely buried along with the dead. From a thriving craft, pottery has dwindled down to just 4-5 workshops in the village now. Drop in at Alshugel Pottery to watch the potters in action creating pots of various sizes and shapes, lamps, decorative seals, and even some Halloween pumpkins. Buy your souvenirs next door at Delmon Pottery where you can get your hands dirty by learning how to work the wheel and create your own clay masterpiece.
For contemporary art, take a walk around Block 338 in the Adliya neighbourhood, where you can spot colourful street art. This bohemian quarter is also home to a few private art galleries like Ella Art Gallery and Albareh Art Gallery. Another place to soak in the art is La Fontaine Centre of Contemporary Art in Manama. This sprawling private-house-turned-art-gallery showcases several international artists in a rotating calendar of events. It also houses a spa and a chic café-restaurant that is quite the place to be seen in Bahrain. Bahrain Fort. Adventure calling
The Bahrain International Circuit is amongst the newest Formula 1 racetracks in the world and a popular Grand Prix event. The high-adrenaline race is accompanied by lots of peripheral events like concerts, parties, and fireworks. The 2019 race will be held from March 28-31. If your visit doesn’t coincide with the race, you can still be part of the adventure by signing up for the Land Rover Experience (bahraingp.com/-landroverexperience-.html). This 3.5 km off-road track is packed with twists and turns, obstacles, and watercourses – you can either drive yourself or strap in as a passenger as you negotiate 32 obstacles on a track next to the Grand Prix circuit. Other adventure activities include Gravity Indoor Skydiving (gravitybah.com), scuba, snorkelling, and diving tours, and horseback riding tours. Another water sport is pearl diving in the warm waters of the Arabian Gulf where you can collect up to 60 oysters and try your luck at finding a pearl (pearldiving.bh). Food fiesta
Bahrain has a range of international cuisines and restaurant chains to feast at. But it’s the local Bahraini food that really shines. Immigrant influences from Persia to India have shaped the food here, so you will find dishes that remind you of home. Like the samboosa , a cousin of our samosa but with fillings that range from vegetables to meat to plain cheese (Bahrainis love their cheese). Then there’s machboos, fish or chicken served over fragrant rice cooked in meat broth. The pièce de resistance is qouzi, slow-cooked lamb served over saffron-flecked rice, a celebratory dish that’s common during weddings and other feasts. Try these at local specialty restaurants like Naseef at Bab Al Bahrain or Seef Mall or at Hala Café at Amwaj Islands.
Breakfast is also an elaborate affair. Tucked away in an alley at Manama Souq is Haji’s Café that has been around since 1950. Servers scurry around with huge trays laden with all kinds of delicacies — balaleet (mildly sweetened vermicelli with a fried egg on top, strange but it works somehow), hamsat nikhi (fried chickpeas), foule (mashed beans), luba (a kidney bean preparation reminiscent of rajma ), kebab roll (similar to our dabeli ), zinjibari (fried pastry pockets stuffed with cheese), and more. To accompany, there’s khubz , an unleavened flatbread that the café churns out by the hundreds from its tandoor. And of course, no meal is complete without the qahwa, saffron and cardamom flavoured Arabic coffee that is served from a copper dalla (a delicate, elaborately decorated coffeepot) into small cups barely larger than a thimble. Apart from Haji’s, Saffron by Jena in Muharraq is also a great place for breakfast; the café is set inside a 200-year-old restored traditional Bahraini house. Market watch
Like all the Emirates, Bahrain has some great shopping options whether you’re looking for luxury brands or high street. These include Seef Mall, City Centre, Moda Mall, and the recently opened Dragon City Mall (a sprawling complex choc-a-bloc with Chinese-made goods). For a more local shopping experience, head to Bab Al Bahrain, a historical building in Manama where you can buy local products like carpets, lamps, perfumes, incense, handicrafts, and souvenirs. Through Bab Al Bahrain, you can make your way into the busy alleys of Manama Souq where you will find all manners of knickknacks, spices, and sweets — try the halwa (a sticky dessert made with corn-starch, sugar, and nuts) and rangeena (date and nuts dessert).

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Roses Smell Sweet, So Do They

Also Read Video Analysts Give You An Idea, Battles Are Fought Onfield: Rashid Khan Afghanistan’s Rashid Khan, the world’s No. 1 bowler in ICC’s One-day International and T20 rankings, is stuffing himself with murgh-malai tikka. His captain, Asghar Afghan, has long adjusted to ‘spicy’ Indian food. While nothing comes close to Afghanistan’s dry fruits, Asghar, at times, still carries high-quality Indian cashew nuts home. Collectively, team-members have fallen for another Indian product—Oud attar, one with a fragrance that permeates the very soul. Afghan cricketers, then, are comfortably at ‘home’ in India, thanks to the support and love showered on them by local followers of the game—among them, thousands of Afghan students who regularly throng stadiums to watch their national team play.
Yet, the cricketers aren’t on a long tour away from the scenic, craggy terrain of their beloved homeland. Quite uniquely, the national team is locked in a series with Ireland in Dehradun, capital of Uttarakhand. Our ‘mehmaans’ confess that in the hill city they are—much like they had been in Greater Noida earlier—snugly settled in a “home away from home”. India has been the Afghan cricket team’s other ‘home’ since 2015, when the Afghanistan Cricket Board (ACB) signed an MoU with the BCCI and the Greater Noida Industrial Development Authority to use Shahid Vijay Singh Pathik Sports Complex.
Dehradun’s temperate climate, good food and the unstinting support from local Afghans make this a great base for the team.
Afghanistan’s ongoing 27-day-long Ireland ser­ies, comprising ODIs, T20s and a Test, at Dehradun’s picturesque Rajiv Gandhi Inter­national Cricket Stadium, is crucial to honing their skills before they finalise the line-up for the World Cup in England in May-July. Going by the results, the WC preparations are on track: Afghanistan thrashed Ireland 3-0 in the T20 series, while the ODI series was drawn 2-2. They wrap up this Indian stint with a Test against Ireland, starting March 15. They will play two ODIs, each against Ireland and Scotland in May, before the World Cup starts. Before reaching Dehradun for the third phase of its World Cup camp, the team trained in Chennai and Bangalore.
Asghar informs that Dehradun’s climate is, significantly, the same as Kabul’s; only the Afghan capital is a bit colder right now. “Staying in Dehradun is tremendous. People here love cricket a lot. Importantly, they support both teams [opponents]. Actually, they support cricket—and Afghanistan. So, we can’t make out if we are playing in Afghanistan or in Dehradun. We enjoy playing here a lot,” a relaxed Asghar tells Outlook, sitting in Zaffran, a restaurant at Regenta LP Vilas hotel.
Team Spirit From left, Zurmati, Hashmatullah Shahidi, Rashid and Asghar find time for some post-prandial jollity
Photograph by Jitender Gupta The praise showered on Rashid, who represents SunRisers Hyderabad in IPL, but doesn’t eat its famed biriyani due to fitness reasons, exe­mplifies close India-Afghanistan ties and the immense goodwill Afghans enjoy here. “It’s definitely a ‘home’ for us, considering the crowd support and the love people shower upon us. Along with the kind of facilities that we got here in Dehradun, the heart says we are playing in our own country. This is a reason why we are performing well,” says the leg-spinner.
Unlike other cricketers, the Afghans are so frie­n­dly that staff of the Dehradun hotel they are staying at don’t treat them with the polite formality res­erved for outsiders. “They are staying for the second time with us [last year they stayed here for the Bangladesh series]. All the players are down to earth. They have no egos. We don’t treat them as guests,” says Sanjeev Sharma, food and beverages manager at Regenta LP Vilas. Listening in, executive chef Ash­ish Srivastava nods in agreement.
Asghar recalls their pleasant stay in Greater Noida. “Both hotels, Crowne Plaza in Greater Noida and Regenta LP Vilas here, take good care of us and respect us. We’re also very happy with them; it seems like we’re living with our family members,” he says. Again, because they understand Hindi and speak it fluently, the cricketers meld effortlessly with the Indian backdrop.
Their Boys Supporters of the Afghan team at the Rajiv Gandhi Stadium in Dehradun
Photograph by Jitender Gupta “Amongst other things, what the Afghans liked in Greater Noida was its greenery, particularly the roses. They would say they don’t have that rose variety in their country. They also liked our roads,” said a Greater Noida stadium official who followed the team closely. Last year, some Afghan players went river rafting in Manali and visited Mussoorie.
New Delhi, with its authentic Afghani cuisine restaurants in Lajpat Nagar, is another favourite. When Rashid visited Lajpat Nagar for the first time, he felt he was in his own country. “When I visit Delhi, I shop a lot. At times, my family joins me,” discloses Asghar. He and his teammates often visit malls for shopping in Dehradun, New Delhi and Greater Noida.
Afghan cricketers dig good, sumptuous food. Sharma reveals that since they are very particular about non-vegetarian dishes, he asked a hotel’s vendor to get a ‘halal’ certificate for the meat so that the visitors could enjoy local non-vegetarian cuisine. Afghans prefer low-calorie food, with less spice and oil. Also, they don’t eat that many sweets. “A dietician has given us a menu and we are cooking as per their requirement. They are quite happy with us,” chef Srivastava tells Outlook. For breakfast, they mostly have omelettes with Italian concasse sauce—a delicious concoction.
Srivastava informs that players often opt for the special mutton, chicken korma, grilled ‘Sole’ fish, pasta with chicken, sweet corn soup, and boiled vegetables at dinner. “Rashid also likes dal makhani and steamed rice, besides spinach with mushroom and poached eggs. And the entire team likes moong-dal halwa and carrot halwa.” During Ramzan last year, the cricketers would break fast with Rooh Afza, a popular Indian sherbet. The other drink they like is green tea with honey.
And on match days, a table laden with food is laid in the dressing room through the day. The menu includes counter sandwiches, dry fruits/nuts, juices, muffins, fruits, tea and coffee, amongst other victuals. And when Afghan players return after a sojourn back home, they bring high quality dry fruits from their country. “You know why they prefer flying Emirates? The airline all­ows more baggage, and half of the players’ luggage contains dry fruits,” says an official. “Afghanistan’s dry fruits are the best, so I carry them here while I carry Indian cashew nuts home. I also buy shirts, shoes and perfumes. The quality of the Indian Oud attar is the best; most of my teammates use it as well,” reveals Asghar. The fragrance of an enduring friendship continues to spread through cricket, lovely cricket.

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