The hotels on the main strip in Rodney bay as mentioned by the previous comentors would be ideal, if you want to be a short walk from restaurants and shops! This is basically what sets Rodney bay apart from the other areas on island. If you decide to stay at one of the hotels on the Strip then you can walk to an array of different restaurants. From delicious Indian cuisine at restaurants like Spices of India, Chinese restaurants, other pub like/ sports bar restaurants and more. You will also be like a 6 minute ride away from the Rodney bay Marina which has a great Thai place, and restaurants on the water’s edge. You will also find 2 major supermarkets on the Rodney bay strip with one of the widest range of items on the island. There are many small local bars with nice Caribbean and international music in the night time. There is also a relatively big shopping center with duty free shopping, liquor stores, footwear stores, clothing stores, souvenir shops and more. There are quite a few local restaurants there as well , such as Coconutz, or Triangle that makes delicious local food. Hope you figure out the best place for you. keiwa xx

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Rosewood Hong Kong design

by Elizabeth Kerr on May 6 , 2019 in Architecture , Interiors , Top Story The Hong Kong-based hotel brand, Rosewood , finally opens a home-market property, aiming to set a new standard in luxury hospitality “P eople today believe in visual clutter. When we were designing Rosewood Hong Kong, I spent a lot of time explaining where I thought the [Cheng] family’s art could go and where it shouldn’t. You can’t put it just anywhere. Because this is [the Cheng] legacy, I did everything I could to represent all the generations and create a harmonious single.” This is how interior designer Tony Chi of New York-based tonychi studio describes the guiding principle behind the new hotel, owned by New World Development (NWD) and helmed by Adrian Cheng. Described as a vertical estate, the 65-storey tower designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF) is the brand’s flagship home-market property, its 26th, which rolls Hong Kong history and the Cheng family legacy into the city’s newest luxury hotel. Seven years in the making, Rosewood opened its doors in March. Located at the new Victoria Dockside, an art-forward mixed-use project overlooking NWD’s revitalised Avenue of Stars, the Rosewood Hong Kong has an enviable harbourside location at the tip of Tsim Sha Tsui, of which both KPF and Chi took advantage. Situated on the site of the former New World Centre (and before that Holt’s Wharf), the hotel’s overall design ethic marries the heritage of the location with its future. Its 413 rooms and suites, quartet of food and beverage outlets and nearly 3,200sqm (34,400sqf) of event space (an Asaya spa is forthcoming) all reflect the property’s history as well as the Hong Kong clan that owns it.”We crafted it as an estate,” Chi says. “The driveway is important, the gardens are important, the family-curated [art] collection is important. Buildings often have no chance to sustain themselves through a new era. We built this with one purpose: it’s an estate. It was never meant to be a hotel. So, what would the estate become if it were to become public? And how do I make a big hotel feel small.” Despite its size, the Rosewood does feel intimate. It exudes an understated tone that favours old-world elegance combined with Asian cultural accents and undertones, which also support Rosewood’s signature ‘sense of place’ philosophy. As with the Rosewood’s London location, Chi exploited the details – though new this time – that would identify the property. In the repurposed insurance building in London, Chi opened up the main courtyard by eliminating a glass canopy that was “ugly as you can imagine. It looked like something from Flash Gordon.” It made room for the classical door service that now gives the hotel a personality at first glance. “Can you imagine the British doorman leaning over with an umbrella for a car that just pulled up?” Chi asks. “Just the gesture? It’s very elegant. But there are certain things I did there that I didn’t do here. This building was ground up.”As an estate, Chi had to incorporate three generations’ tastes and attitudes into a coherent scheme, one that paid homage to NWD and Cheng patriarch, Cheng Yu-tung, and also recognised Henry Cheng and Rosewood Hotel Group chief executive Sonia Cheng’s brand vision. “How do I reflect that her father bought the land 40 years ago? He was a jeweller, so I incorporated a lot of patterns and small-scale intricacies, the jewel-like chandeliers. The clean wrought iron represents Sonia’s more contemporary taste,” explains Chi. Rosewood Hong Kong’s personality also begins outside, with its circular driveway and limestone facade and bronze door fixtures, continuing an estate-home atmosphere after stepping through the main doors. Art deco-patterned marble floors, detailed tiling, coconut wood, the recurring octagonal ba gua and eternal knot motifs on walls and ceilings blend East and West, and carefully placed art by British sculptor Henry Moore, painter Damien Hirst, modern American artist Joe Bradley, Indian artist Bharti Kerr, China’s Wang Keping and Hongkonger Wilson Shieh enhance the old family home aesthetic. Gardens and terraces on multiple levels give off the feeling of hidden corners that only long-term residents would know about.The Rosewood event spaces are designed to function and respond in the same familiar, intimate way. The library-like gallery meeting spaces can be accessed through a hallway curated with artefacts from the other hotels, or by the grand corridor that recalls the 1920s (when Holt’s Wharf would have been in full swing). The open kitchen within the meeting room recalls the kitchen of any home – usually its hub of activity and an intentional connection, according to Chi. Each event space is designed for its location: inside rooms are richly appointed with eye-catching light fixtures and textured wall coverings. Outside rooms are toned down so as not to fight the views of Victoria Harbour and Hong Kong Island. “Interior design doesn’t stop at the glass. It goes as far as the eye can see,” Chi points out. The Grand Ballroom also boasts its own entrance, directly from the main driveway, and via a curvilinear staircase in gleaming white stone, custom-designed for statement moments. “I don’t care about Instagram. How people live in the space and how they build memories in that space is up to them,” Chi says. Secondary private bars, lawns and meeting rooms outfitted with plush furnishings rather than standard conference interiors crown the homely tone. I don’t care about Instagram. How people live in the space and how they build memories in that space is up to them Scaling down, Holt’s Café, The Butterfly Room and DarkSide each reflect the tapestry of Hong Kong just outside in its unique way. Holt’s, named for the wharf, spins traditional cha chaan teng dishes into fine dining in a turn-of-the-century international environment paying tribute to its past, stylistically bouncing off the brighter, modern all-day dining at The Butterfly Room. As the Rosewood’s in-house lounge, DarkSide specialises in rare dark liquors from within its deep blue and woodaccented space, also recalling old-world colonial whisky bars. The hotel’s fine-dining restaurant, The Legacy House, was designed separately by Melbourne-based BAR Studio. Its seven private dining rooms are each designed to mark a landmark in the Cheng patriarch’s life, from the year of his first development to a long connection to equestrian sport (also reflected in the executive lounge’s wood and saddle-leather style). As the element most closely connected to the Cheng family, BAR was required to balance its history in Hong Kong, the brand’s Sense of Place and its own design aesthetic. Director Stewart Robertson notes family lore and local heritage were integral for BAR as well. “There’s inspiration drawn from the idea of shophouses and the old family homes of Hong Kong — or of Dr Cheng’s hometown of Shunde — where hospitality and family gatherings are the soul of the space,” he says. The Legacy House is rooted in layering that re-engages diners with every visit, juxtaposing rustic and refined materials such as fine glass sculptural details with natural stone. Welcoming warm timber is used throughout, accented by custom glass fittings that reflect and refract light bouncing off the harbour depending on the time of day.”The seven private dining rooms are accessed via a ‘streetscape’-like corridor, and while the sunlit restaurant is generally relaxed and modern, the private dining areas feel more formal, classic and richly toned, ideal for a smart business lunch or spirited family gathering while soaking up the exceptional views,” Robertson says. “The Legacy House [is] a contemplative study of place and history. The design resonates with a sense of nostalgia, but it is also strongly contemporary, it speaks to generations of the past and the future.” Scaling down further still, it is on the guest-room floors where Rosewood’s estate vibe shines brightest. Flattened elevator bays create wide guest-floor lobbies, or salons, where old-world living comes into play in spaces designed for use as semi-private salons. The design resonates with a sense of nostalgia, but it is also strongly contemporary, it speaks to generations of the past and the future “Function is important in design. The way people use the word is wrong,” argues Chi, defending what many would call a waste of floor space: the guest floor elevator lobbies are enormous. Dark wood, low-focused lighting and tempting armchairs surrounded by cases containing more museum artefacts, essentially in the middle of the hallway, do indeed have a function. The salons provide a sophisticated respite from guestrooms, defined by contrasting textures (marble, hammered-copper basins, chequered wool) and individualised art, all in careful balance to the harbour views, available from most rooms. “Rosewood Hong Kong sets bold new benchmarks for design, guest experience, cuisine and culture,” Sonia Cheng remarked on the hotel’s opening day. “Our ambition is to create a new world standard for ultra-luxury hospitality.” THIS ARTICLE FIRST APPEARED AS “ROSEWOOD COMES HOME”, A FEATURE ARTICLE FROM THE MAY ISSUE OF PERSPECTIVE MAGAZINE.

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Election Tourism Offers Travelers A Chance To See Indian Democracy In Action

Election Tourism Offers Travelers A Chance To See Indian Democracy In Action Election Tourism Offers Travelers A Chance To See Indian Democracy In Action (CNN) — For most travelers, a trip to India might center around temples, forts, festivals and food. But for one niche set of visitors, it’s all about “election tourism” right now. Home to the world’s largest democracy — with up to 900 million votes being cast in the current parliamentary election — India is an ideal place to immerse yourself in politics, history and culture. Throughout the elections, on till May 23, local villages, towns and cities are buzzing with energy and events. And that’s exactly what Akshar Travels hopes to highlight with its collection of political tours and experiences.“When elections are happening, it’s like a festival over here. The people and all the political parties are holding events, rallies, parties and parades to promote their visions,” Manish Sharma, founder of Akshar Travels, tells CNN Travel.“You can see that the energy and the participation is tremendous. It is in our blood, it’s our passion.” Introducing ‘election tourism’ Established 22 years ago, Akshar Travels originally focused on general services such as visas, tickets and tours. But Sharma says he’s always on the lookout for ways to innovate and expand. That’s how he came to introduce what he calls “election tourism” to India back in 2012. Inspired by a “poll tourism” concept that he experienced in Mexico in 2005, Sharma conducted a trial during the Gujarat State Assembly Election to test the waters.“We saw some success, so we initiated another project on a more global scale during the 2014 parliamentary elections,” says Sharma, who estimates about 5,200 tourists booked tours that year.“We found that there’s a lot of people who are interested in learning about India’s democratic process — not just the criteria and system, but the various experiences. It’s an opportunity to take part in India in a different way.” This year, the company expects to welcome about 10,000 travelers on its six- to eight-day election tours. Each group is accompanied by a dedicated guide, which Akshar Travels has hand-picked and trained. So far, Sharma says the majority of guests tend to be researchers, university students, special interest groups, history lovers, culture enthusiasts and journalists from all over the world — in particular, the United States, the United Kingdom and Japan.“The elections are a large, complicated process — every state has different languages, cultures, traditions, rules and knowledge,” says Sharma.“There is huge diversity in the system here in India. It really shows the dynamic culture of India and the power of the people.” On the campaign trail Covering major historic and political destinations across India, Akshar Travels offers more than a dozen different itineraries.“We take our guests to visit local villages, meet with local people, and have dinner with political leaders so they have a chance to really understand how India’s democracy works,” says Sharma. On the eight-day “Election Moves in Uttaranchal” trip in northern India, for instance, travelers can attend a political rally in Haridwar, visit the thunderous Kempty Falls, enjoy a jeep safari through Corbett National Park, as well as attend meetings and “luscious meals” with party officials in the picturesque Himalayan resort town of Nainital. Meanwhile, the “Domestic Affairs of Uttar Pradesh” itinerary takes travelers through eastern India with stops in the city of Lucknow, known for its Mughal architecture and captivating culture; Ayodhya, famed for its caves and temples; and Varanasi, where political junkies can immerse themselves in the constituency of current Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Sharma says another popular tour is “Gandhi’s Gujarat,” where guests have a chance to trace the spiritual leader’s footsteps from his hometown of Porbandar to the state capital of Ahmedabad.“We like to include a lot of cultural experiences and landmarks. This mixture helps travelers to understand the values, traditions and culture of India,” says Sharma. “In this way, even a small village can be connected to the world.” When travelers have dinner with political leaders, for instance, Sharma says that it’s an opportunity to not only learn more about the group’s vision and mission, but also to sample signature local cuisines.“Food is something that people often want to experience, so it goes hand in hand,” he adds. With the 2019 elections winding down, Sharma has his eyes set on the 2024 parliamentary elections when he hopes to expand to an even larger pool of politically savvy travelers.“The election can really show the power of the people,” says Sharma. “I love my country and I want to show travelers a different aspect of our unique heritage and culture.” Artikel ini hanyalah simpanan cache dari url asal penulis yang berkebarangkalian sudah terlalu lama atau sudah dibuang : https://www.malaysia-today.net/2019/05/06/election-tourism-offers-travelers-a-chance-to-see-indian-democracy-in-action/ Kempen Promosi dan Iklan Kami memerlukan jasa baik anda untuk menyokong kempen pengiklanan dalam website kami. Serba sedikit anda telah membantu kami untuk mengekalkan servis percuma aggregating ini kepada semua. Anda juga boleh memberikan sumbangan anda kepada kami dengan menghubungi kami di sini papar berkaitan – pada 30/4/2019 – jumlah : 41 hits Pakatan Harapan came into power promising reforms Less than a year after taking power they have said that they need more time to deliver their promises The excuse was that they need to undo what BN had done for the last 60 years or so Then … papar berkaitan – pada 4/5/2019 – jumlah : 73 hits After almost nine months of uncertainty Ipohites can now rest easy A new mayor has been identified though nothing is final as yet The honour as at the time of reporting falls on Dr Ahmad Fadzil Tajuddin acting President and Chief Executive …

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Japan resident Sanjeev Sinha helps in global awareness of Japanese culture

Home / FOOD / Japan resident Sanjeev Sinha helps in global awareness of Japanese culture Japan resident Sanjeev Sinha helps in global awareness of Japanese culture 1 hour ago FOOD
For the first time in modern history the Japanese empower has decided to resign leading to a change from Heisei Period to Reiwa period from May 1st 2019. The Heiwa period has led Japan through a new paradigm of balance between modern and tradition and placing Japan into a post-industrial society 5.0
Among many of Japan’s traditions, lacquerware making, known as Urushi in Japanese, goes back to 5000 BCE in Japan during Jomon Period. Japanese lacquerware, paintings, ancient pottery, sculpture, ink painting and calligraphy, woodblock prints, ceramics and origami are known and collected across the world. Famous Ukiyo-e paintings are also popular collector’s items. More recently manga which is modern Japanese cartoons and comics along with a myriad of other types are being known as Japanese soft power.
With a history of Japanese capital and arts and culture hubs moving to different locations across Japan, the tradition is also dispersed across different parts of Japan including small towns and villages.
Japan is also well known for bullet trains, which is demonstrably world’s best as a combination of length, speed, frequency, service and most of all safety: not a single accident fatality despite many severe earthquakes in the total history of more than 50 years. The remote rural part of Japan is also well covered by the public transport despite a very mountainous terrain of the country through breath-taking bridges and tunnels.
Japan’s urban transport systems are also a wonder, with greater Tokyo having world’s most extensive and smooth urban rail network of 158 lines with 2,200 stations serving 40 million passenger rides daily, a little more than the total population of the region, which is also world’s largest urban conglomerate, at about 35 million.
This is further connected with a dense and frequent bus operation as well as increasingly pedestrian and bicycle friendly urban planning. This is topped with a long-time impeccable record for safety and on-going regular improvements on all aspects. This leads to a very comfortable urban life style in Tokyo with almost zero crime, practically zero unemployment, negligible traffic jams, great healthcare and increasing convenience with omnipresent network of 24 hours convenience stores.
Similar is the case for other major cities of Japan like Osaka, Fukuoka, Sapporo, Sendai, Mito etc.
This poses a dilemma for Japan as the youth of Japan especially gets pulled into a handful of bigger cities not just for economic attraction but also for the active and playful lifestyle leaving the smaller cities and towns of Japan with dwindling ageing population.
A modern dilemma for traditions
While Tokyo is upcoming as a major international arts and culture hub the traditional culture, arts and craftsmanship of Japan widespread into its diverse landscape of smaller towns are facing a threat.
Sanjeev Sinha, President of India Japan Partnership Group specializing in promotion of collaboration including technology, finance, arts and culture between India and Japan, was invited by a joint initiative of TV Osaka and TV Tokyo for an experience and global awareness building of Japan’s traditional culture, arts and craftsmanship in smaller towns.
In the context, Sanjeev Sinha is also an advisor at the committee on Promotion of AI and Inclusion at Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communication of Japan, been an Advisor to the Nagareyama City and for Japanese collaboration of new capital city of Indian state of Andhra Pradesh, President of India Japan Partnership Fund, India Japan Institute of Technology and a guest lecturer of Urban Development at University of Tokyo.
The place chosen for the theme Daigo Town is a little-known place in Ibaraki Prefecture, on the border of two other prefectures of Fukushima and Tochigi for the period of April 19th to 21st 2019.
The town at 160 km north of Tokyo is a host to a small community for plantation and collection of lacquer and more recently for making of inkstones and is the original investor of a popular health food of Japan Konyak.
The town also has many traditional inns called Ryokan and hot springs called Onsen, as is common in many places in Japan making it a wholesome trip to experience the local culture, hospitality and economy.
The Daigo Town has records of lacquer plantation and harvesting, known as Urushi Kaki in Japanese, for more than half a millennium. Sanjeev and visitors were greeted by Tobita, 84 year old on the slopes of the hills in the town where a new plantation for lacquer is being carried out. It takes 8 to 10 years for a tree to be harvested which takes specialized traditional tools. As the visitors were taken around different plantation sites, they were treated to a wide variety of fresh local food highlighting the hospitality of country side of Japan called Omotenashi.
Return of the youth to the tradition
In the team of 5 people most people were in their 70s and 80s except one Watanabe, affectionately called Watanabe Kun, who was only 26 years old.
Watanabe Kun was born and brought up in a large and world famous city of Kawasaki which is a part of greater Tokyo described above. His presence in the small and remote Daigo Town for Lacquer plantation was a very interesting phenomenon which deserves some deeper analysis. The generation of millennial across the world are known for their special and independent nature. The accelerated changes in the global economy which are now so fast that a single generation can face 3 or 4 different economic paradigms. At the same time the great access of latest and world wide access of information makes it a very different world where the younger generations have a huge reasons to think very independently of their earlier generations.
While the economic efficiency of the new world makes their lives very comfortable in the moment the serious concerns of the climate change makes the younger generation question the very values systems of the older system.
Watanabe Kun chose to leave the comforts and economic benefits of the bigger city and live in Daigo Town just with an impulse as he liked the idea. He is not worried about his economic future because the modern economy of Japan offers him enough opportunities for a good life style anytime he wishes to choose and change.
This brings the core intellectual and aesthetic luxury of arts, culture and nature to the forefront as a major driving force. Watanabe Kun, not worried about his own economic wellbeing, just chose to live in nature and tradition in defiance to the economic common sense of the earlier generations.
Vertical integration of arts and culture
While Daigo Town has had the tradition of Lacquer plantation for hundreds of years, the town has not been known much because of the background nature of the work. In the foreground is the lacquerware itself which is well appreciated as an art work across the world.
Hence not surprisingly, the town has attracted an art expert Tsuji from the top Arts University of Japan, Tokyo University of Arts, to make it a base for his lacquerware studio.
Tsuji is producing world class lacquer art in Daigo Town and gave a demonstration and educational session to Sanjeev and visitors group. He also uses latest technology for temperature and humidity control in his process creating a fine balance and coexistence between tradition and technology.
The arts and culture survive on a sense of pride by the community, hence the lacquerware artwork in the town also enhances the sense of pride of the lacquer plantation community and the whole town can expect a boost. This was seen in move of youth moving to Daigo to work with Tsuji, and this time it was two young ladies in their 20s from central Tokyo.
Lacquerware also has symbolism in India Japan relations as many of the Buddhist artwork exchanged between the two countries historically and contemporarily. Both countries and rest of Asia also place a huge symbolism on Lacquerware, brining Asia together in one of the ways of culture.
Hardship of tradition and need for society
Symbolically so too, hard stone of Daigo has led to a new artwork in the town with Sato, in his 70s, to chose the town for his hard work of inkstones making.
Inkstone making goes back hand in hand to the early history of calligraphy to thousands of years back. It requires special types of stones which lend themselves for the delicate shapes and finish required for Inkstones called Suzuri in Japanese. Sato found a river basis in Daigo which has the right kind of stone for the purpose. As a one-man project to begin with Sato started digging these stone, acquiring the tools for the Suzuri making and created his workshop on the way to a shrine in the mountains.
Sato, having lost his first wife and now battling with the illness of his second partner in the hospital, is spending a rather solitary life in the mountains and couldn’t stop his tears when spoken on the matter.
Over the time Sato, has attracted a group of younger professionals, still in their 50s, to support him in his efforts and now is a proud owner of a Suzuri gallery hosting Suzuri work ranging from few hundred grams to 10s of kilograms and from 20,000 yen to few million Yens in valuation.
Omotenashi: the mantra of Prime Minister Abe to secure 2020 Olympics and Paralympics
Japan is known for Ometanashi, which is a level of hospitality and service from heart and culture going beyond any economic reasons. And it goes beyond age too as was proven by the four sisters all around 80 years old running a 108 years old inn called Tamaya Ryokan.
The four sisters symbolizing the longer lifespan of women than men have all lost their husbands to natural reasons. They decided to come together to renew their 80 years old bonding from childhood to live together and run the 2 storied inn inherited by them in this small town of Daigo.
Running the Ryokan requires taking care of all the errands from procurement, cooking, cleaning and bed making and they do it all with their heart into it. Their deep knowledge of the society, human relations and culture makes any conversation with them very lively and enlightening.
Even in the age of 80s the third eldest sister makes an annual trip of couple of weeks with around 40 other friends from the Daigo town to different parts of Japan. Showing how the passion for life, community bonding and active lifestyle can help one live longer naturally and happily.
The reason for their good health also lies in the healthy traditional food of the town as the town takes the credit for invention of famous health food of Japan called Konjak (pronounced in Japanese as Konnyaku) made from the Asian plant Amorphophallus konjac and has great health benefits with negligible calories in the various forms of processed Konjac.
As Japanese tea has become very popular in India in recent years for its health benefits, Sanjeev is also exploring promoting Konjac in India for its dieting benefits. Japan with its excellence in food processing has a wide range of Konjac based health supplements which can be preserved, transported and consumed under various conditions.
Daigo town hosts a historical factory of Konjac and offers a wide variety of Konjac cuisines. Daigo also has a beautiful municipality run hot water spring, known as Onsen in Japanese, in the mountains with open air baths called Rotenburo. It’s a delight to soak in the natural hot water in a very comfortable and clean environment surrounded by hills and trees.
The town is also attracting modern style guest houses like Lahar run by a young couple. Coming from the bigger capital city of Ibaraki Prefecture called Mito, the couple is providing the much-needed outbound marketing insights to the town that Sanjeev and other foreigners as long-time resident of Japan in the visiting group could closely associate with.
Japan having been a very homogenous country lacks the global marketing acumen which is much needed to promote the awareness of Japanese virtues to the rest of the world and India is widely recognized as a trusted potential partner for the same.
Smaller towns as a guidelight for modern solitude
The modern world especially in big well managed cities like Tokyo have gone beyond their economic necessities. With good lifestyle infrastructure of restaurants, 24 hour convenience stores and trustworthy health care with ambulances reaching within few minutes of calling, every individual is extremely self-sufficient. The self-sufficiency has led to people living alone and has taken its toll on human and family bonding leading to serious issues of loneliness.
The lifestyle of the four sisters in the small town of Daigo comes as a great inspiration and a living example to solve that problem of solitude as the people in Japan can afford to focus more on culture and lifestyle than economy. Smaller towns can serve as the hubs for community rebuilding and in parts the big cities can also emulate to implement similar lifestyle models in the big cities.
With modern economic and urban development advantages, Tokyo is already seeing new development of smaller self-sustainable residential hubs in the so-called Society 5.0 or Post Industrial Society model which will underline the new Reiwa period.
Japan with its long term and well-balanced socio-economic planning leads the world in post-industrial society issues and solutions and can offer a significant amount of experience and know how in the domain, including the example of Daigo.
This story is provided by NewsVoir. ANI will not be responsible in any way for the content of this article. (This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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My Simple Amchi Thali~122.

“My Simple Amchi Thali 122. ~ Rajavale Nonche (Indian Star Fruit Pickle), Nachani Fryums (Store Bought), Cabbage-Piyava Bhutti (Cabbage-Onion Dry Masala), Taushe (Cucumber)-Tomato Raita, Dalitoy (Spiced Tuvar Dal), SheetHa (Rice)” … preparing bhutti after a long time, so had a tummy full lunch and an hour or good …. Ahhha Good food and friends are always a joy … God Bless ….
** Once again a simple thali with delicious Amchi / Konkani Saraswat Cuisine dishes. Today’s lunch is once again a really delightful thali that I am sure can be relished well even though it is with simple one masala dish along with a raita/salad as an accompaniment and the most desired dal of all times for amchies ie Dalitoy. About Bhutti, I have written a lot before and posted a few with different combos. I have already made a individual post of this one that is posted in the thali to which I will share the link below, also I am posting the links to other dishes too in the Thali as is my usual pattern. Do go through the links of the individual dishes for the recipe and if you find any difficulty or are not able to follow something you can always leave a comment or mail me, I will be glad to help. Do try out the dishes and enjoy with your family and friends. If you want any other particular Amchi Konkani Saraswat Recipe, that I may not have yet included in the Blog, you can always write to me and I will do the needful as soon as possible. For now try out these and yes have loads of fun as the holidays for children have begun, Stay Blessed.
** Given below are the links to the recipes of individual dishes in the thali above, please go through the link for that particular dish …..
1.. For “Rajavale Nonche (Indian Star Fruit Pickle)” Recipe, Please follow the link given below …. https://gayathrifoodbytes.blogspot.com/2019/05/spicy-rajavale-nonche-indian-star.html#more
2. Nachani Fryums are store bought . These are sun dried items that have to be deep fried … I fried them at home.
3. For “Cabbage-Piyava Bhutti (Cabbage-Onion Dry Masala)” Recipe, Please follow the link given below .. https://gayathrifoodbytes.blogspot.com/2019/05/cabbage-piyava-bhutti-cabbage-onion-dry.html#more
4. For “Taushe (Cucumber)-Tomato Raita” Recipe, Please follow the link given below, the recipe is the same, except here I have left out addition of cabbage. I am also sharing a common link for “Salads/Raitas” below, you can check out and prepare that which appeals you the most. https://gayathrifoodbytes.blogspot.com/2019/04/tomato-cucumber-cabbage-salad.html#more https://gayathrifoodbytes.blogspot.com/search/label/%23Salad
5. For the “Dalitoy (Spiced Tuvar Dal” Recipe, Please follow the link given below …. http://gayathrifoodbytes.blogspot.in/2017/07/dalitoy-spiced-tuvar-dal-2.html#more
6. For the Recipe of “Cooking Rice Starch Free / Vanu ghalnu SheetHa” , where the Rice is cooked and the water is drained off to remove excess starch, Please follow the link given below …. http://gayathrifoodbytes.blogspot.in/2015/06/vanu-galnu-sheetha-cooking-of-starch.html#more
** You can use the search option for “Thali” where you will get many more combination of thali’s. Do try out various types of mix and match dishes to relish with your family and friends. Also remember to me a feedback if possible.
** You can also click on the link below for checking the same. http://gayathrifoodbytes.blogspot.in/search?q=thali
** An Earnest Request : There are many more recipes of different types in the blog. For all my Recipes, use the search option or the label section in the Blog. If you are still not able to find it or have a query, please leave a message in comment section or mail me the same. I will try my best to get back to you as soon as possible. Do try out various types of dishes included in the Blog and Enjoy them with your family and friends and do give me a feedback if possible.
** I am happy to inform you that I have also started a food group for by the name “KONKANI DELICACIES” which is over and year old, with about 19K strong members. It is a pleasure to inform that you will find in the group many more recipes posted by our expert members and you too can share some of your own. The link to the group is posted on the left side of the blog page. Do join us in our culinary journey. I strongly believe in Sharing and always endorse that “Sharing Is Caring” … Thank You ….

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How to have black pepper (kali mirch) for weight loss – Times of India

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Now Reading: Share fbshare twshare pinshare Comments ( 0 ) How to have black pepper (kali mirch) for weight loss TNN | Last updated on – May 6, 2019, 07:00 IST Share fbshare twshare pinshare Comments ( 0 ) close 01 /11 Try black pepper for weight loss
Spices are the essence of India cuisine. They add a distinct flavor to the dishes for which Indian foods are famous across the world. One such spice that is used in almost all types of curries and vegetables is black pepper or kali mirch. The aroma and the strong taste of this spice can make any dull food tasty. This low-calorie seasoning is packed with Vitamin A, K, C, and minerals like calcium, potassium, and sodium. But do you know that apart from making your food delicious, this spice found in every household is an excellent fat burner? Don’t be surprised, we are not kidding: readmore 02 /11 How black pepper helps in weight loss
Black pepper contains piperine, a compound which helps to enhance metabolic performance and prevents fat accumulation in the body. The spice also increases the concentration of good cholesterol.
This round spice is a thermogenic food, which helps to speed up the metabolic process and burn calories more quickly.
Moreover, we know that eating spicy food can increase satiety and make you feel fuller, even after eating less. readmore 03 /11 How to use black pepper for weight loss
A lot of studies prove that including this spice in your diet can accelerate the weight loss process. There is no harm including it in your diet, but make sure to consume it in moderation. Do not have more than 1-2 teaspoon of black pepper every day. Having it in excess can have multiple side effects. readmore 04 /11 Black pepper tea
Tea is the favourite beverage of most of the people and by making a few modifications, you can make it healthy. Black tea is easy to prepare and is good for health.
How to have it: Put a cup of water in a pan and add 1 inch of crushed ginger in it. Boil it for 5 minutes, then strain it into a cup. Soak a green tea bag in it for a few minutes and then add 1/2 teaspoon of black pepper in it. Stir well and drink it. readmore 05 /11 Chew directly
If you do not have any problem with the strong taste of the spice then you can also chew 2-3 black peppers directly. Do this on an empty stomach every morning. 06 /11 Black pepper and honey
Black pepper and honey drink act as a detox when consumed in the morning.
How to have it: Boil a cup of water in a pan. Now add 1 teaspoon of honey and 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper in it. Stir well and let it cool down to room temperature. readmore 07 /11 Black pepper oil
Black pepper oil can also be used when trying to shed some kilos. Buy 100 percent pure black pepper oil from a pharmacy and add 1 drop of this oil in a glass of water. Mix it well and drink it before having breakfast. readmore 08 /11 Black pepper in vegetable and fruit juices
You also can add black pepper in your vegetable and fruit juices. Add half teaspoon of black pepper in your juice, stir well and then have it. readmore 09 /11 When to consume black pepper
It is good to consume black pepper every day before breakfast on an empty stomach. Even if you are planning to chew it then do it in the morning.

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27. Magyar Majális és Tavaszi Fesztival

Home » food » 27. Magyar Majális és Tavaszi Fesztival 27. Magyar Majális és Tavaszi Fesztival Posted on by Tarnmoor Don’t Worry If You Can’t Read This
Every year on the first Sunday in May, the Grace Hungarian Reformed Church in Reseda has a festival with authentic Magyar cuisine and Mothers’ Day entertainment. Unlike previous years, I couldn’t find any mention of the festival on the Church’s website. Martine made the perfectly logical suggestion for me to call the Church, except she made it to the wrong person. I have something of a telephone phobia, especially when I’m calling people I do not personally know. So Martine went and made the phone call herself. And yes, the festival was taking place at the usual time and place.
My rudimentary knowledge of my native language prevents me from being able to translate the above information sheet in its entirety, but I got the gist of it. The festival is a combination Spring, May Day, and Mothers’ Day event. For an admission fee of five dollars, one could have some of the best homemade Hungarian food in Southern California. For lunch, I went for the Gulyás Leves, usually referred to in English as Hungarian Goulash. What most Americans don’t know is that it is a hearty beef and vegetable soup served with chile peppers. After the kiddie Mothers’ Day entertainment, which was exceedingly cute, we ordered two stuffed cabbage dinners to go, which furnished our supper once we got home.
The highlight of Hungarian cuisine for Martine—and, in fact, for most Hungarians—is the pastry, particularly a kind of cheesecake referred to as crémes , pronounced KRAY-mesh. I get the impression that Hungarians in a pastry shop are even more dangerous than bulls in a china shop, and that they are not above packing away 25,000 calories or more.
This is aided and abetted by the Hungarian love of a fried dough concoction called lángos (pronounced LAHN-goash), richly slathered with sour cream, cheese, or garlic. It’s very like Indian fry bread, except with a different selection of toppings.

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Jai Fai Bangkok

One for the bucket list…
Jay Fai is a place that both taxi drivers and foodies wax lyrical about and it’s easy to see why. Wearing her signature goggles, the local legend that is Jay Fai continues what her father started 70 years ago and makes crab omelettes, crab curries and dry congee.
Jay Fai ( Thai : เจ๊ไฝ, also known as Raan Jay Fai, “Jay Fai’s shop”) is a street-side restaurant in Bangkok and a nickname of its eponymous owner, whose real name is Supinya Junsuta (สุภิญญา จันสุตะ). [a] The restaurant mainly serves wok -cooked seafood dishes, and is highly popular among food enthusiasts despite its high prices. It received one star in the inaugural Bangkok 2018
Jay Fai was born c. 1945 to Chinese immigrant parents, who sold kuaitiao khua kai (chicken noodles) for a living. However, she was not good at cooking, and had to learn from her younger sister, who originally doubted her abilities. Jay Fai did not initially join the family business; instead, she worked as a seamstress for several years, until a fire prompted her to turn to cooking when she was in her thirties. [b] She opened her restaurant in the 1980s and originally served congee and noodle dishes such as kuaitiao khua kai and rat na , building on her mother’s recipes. She then gradually expanded her repertoire, experimenting and developing her own recipes and techniques. She also began using seafood, travelling extensively to procure better ingredients and charging accordingly. The restaurant gained a steady stream of followers, and has since become one of the most famous street-side restaurants in the city.
Jay Fai’s restaurant occupies a shophouse on Maha Chai Road, in the neighbourhood known as Samran Rat or Pratu Phi in Bangkok’s Phra Nakhon District . It is open-air and barely decorated, with green tiled walls and simple tables and stools for seating. Cooking takes place at the side of the shop, where the walls open onto a small alley, using two charcoal braziers . Jay Fai herself works six days a week as the restaurant’s sole chef, wearing ski goggles while she cooks (the shop is closed on Sundays).
Jay Fai procures ingredients, especially seafood, directly from several sources, placing an emphasis on quality. This is reflected in her prices, which are much higher than regular street affair. One of her more famous dishes, for example, is a crab-meat omelette which costs upwards of 1,000 baht (over US$30). Other popular dishes include rat na and phat khi mao with seafood.
A serving of phat khi mao at Jay Fai’s, showing a large prawn typical at the restaurant
The restaurant has been famous among food enthusiasts for decades. In a 1999 review, Bangkok Post food critic Ung-aang Talay (Bob Halliday) described her as “one of those increasingly rare Mozarts of the noodle pan who can transform very ordinary, lunchtime-at-the-market dishes into masterpieces of local cuisine”. [7] Famous customers include Martha Stewart , who called Jay Fai “the best cook in Thailand”.
In December 2017, the Michelin Guide released its inaugural 2018 edition for Bangkok, in which the restaurant was awarded one star. It was the only street restaurant to be awarded a star, and joins a handful of others in Hong Kong and Singapore as a result of Michelin’s efforts to diversify its coverage, previously limited to fine dining establishments. The award resulted in a surge of customers for Jay Fai, who had never heard of the guide before and had to be persuaded to attend the ceremony.Following the announcement, the restaurant became so busy that it had to implement a reservations system (something she previously refused to do), and one of Jay Fai’s daughters had to leave her job in order to help full-time (in addition to another, who already worked at the
restaurant).
Jay Fai, who has never written down a recipe, has said that she does not intend to pass on the business, as she does not wish her children to pick up the hard work since it has earned enough
Attached Images raanjayfai3.jpg (121.2 KB, 139 views) maxresdefault.jpg (75.4 KB, 136 Yesterday, 07:51 AM #2 Bogon Can I still change this?
Join Date Mar 2010 Last Online Yesterday @ 11:23 PM Posts 4,485 ^ She’s heavily featured in episode 1 of the new Netflix show ‘Street Food’ if anyone’s interested. Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 07:53 AM #3 Chittychangchang Utopian Expat Join Date Nov 2013 Last Online @ Posts 12,842 Originally Posted by Bogon ^ She’s heavily featured in episode 1 of the new Netflix show ‘Street Food’ if anyone’s interested. Watched it tonight, that inspired this thread. Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 08:02 AM #4 Bogon Can I still change this?
Join Date Mar 2010 Last Online Yesterday @ 11:23 PM Posts 4,485 Did you enjoy it?
I found it a bit repetitive, and the Thai bird with the American accent nearly made me put a rope around my neck.
Apart from that, it was OK. Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 08:22 AM #5 Chittychangchang Utopian Expat Join Date Nov 2013 Last Online @ Posts 12,842 You’ve got to admire the old girl, conjuring up new recipes at 74 years of age. Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 11:08 AM #6 baldrick disturbance in the Turnip Join Date Apr 2006 Last Online Today @ 01:07 AM Location Heidleberg Posts 20,926 crustaceans from the gulf of thailand – you may be safer guzzling ladyboy sperm from butterfluffers arse Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 11:46 AM #7 Chittychangchang Jay Fai is a place that both taxi drivers and foodies wax lyrical about Taxi drivers?
Bollocks Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 11:51 AM #8 aging one Nov 2005 Last Online Today @ 06:16 AM Posts 16,616 The only bummer is Jai Fai herself is not a happy chef.
https://www.news.com.au/travel/world…0bfdffd910b402
The Bangkok chef who hates her Michelin star
IT IS the food industry’s top honour. But the head chef at this much-talked about restaurant says winning a coveted Michelin star has been a curse.
Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 07:21 PM #9 armstrong 2011 Last Online Today @ 06:23 AM Location Bangkok Posts 1,953 It’s a hipster joint. Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 07:32 PM #10 aging one the head chef at this much-talked about restaurant says winning a coveted Michelin star has been a curse. They know how to milk the publicity Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 07:54 PM #11 cyrille hangin’ around Join Date Oct 2006 Last Online @ Posts 15,230 Originally Posted by armstrong It’s a hipster joint. Punter on the right obviously feels it has to be chopsticks, not the spoon and fork he was insultingly offered. Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 08:36 PM #12 Dillinger Jul 2012 Last Online @ Posts 25,482
The two Thais behind look like they’ve been waiting an age.
Four Indians on the left sharing a dish
There’s a t budding young Tomcat top left too Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 08:47 PM #13 cyrille hangin’ around Join Date Oct 2006 Last Online @ Posts 15,230 Originally Posted by Dillinger Four Indians on the left sharing a dish They look more like they’re working out how she can take the piss with the prices. Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 08:53 PM #14 Dillinger Jul 2012 Last Online @ Posts 25,482 3 drinks between the 4 of them too
Theres some Thai guy on the Bangkok News section of the other channel who has just been arrested for doing runners from a few posh reataurants up there. I checked Not Teakdoor and DJ Pat is in town saying the weather’s a bit muggy Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 09:19 PM #15 knowsitlike Member
Join Date Oct 2018 Last Online Yesterday @ 11:35 PM Location Bangkok Posts 292 Has anyone actually tried Jai Fai? I’ve been past may times and the queue is crazy, like RotiBoy on their first day! Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 10:10 PM #16 knowsitlike Has anyone actually tried Jai Fai? I’ve tried the family’s Hi Fai and Wi Fai, never heard of Jai Fai Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 10:17 PM #17 Jack meoff Semi member
Join Date May momo’s Y-fronts Posts 4,891 I wonder if Chitty wears goggles in the kitchen? Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 10:48 PM #18 Dillinger Jul 2012 Last Online @ Posts 25,482 Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 10:52 PM #19 Jack meoff Semi member
Join Date May momo’s Y-fronts Posts 4,891 ^ Reply With Quote: Today, 12:12 AM #20 Chittychangchang Utopian Expat Join Date Nov 2013 Last Online @ Posts 12,842 That’s actually pretty funny you pair of cvnts Reply With Quote: Today, 12:52 AM #21 taxexile Nov 2006 Last Online @ Posts 14,937 Mozarts of the noodle pan bangkok, and indeed thailand is blessed with thousands of these very capable street cooks.
the trouble with this jai fai gaff is that the press, and in particular those jumped up twats who run the michelin star organisation have discovered and publicised this place which has now become just another box to tick on the bucket lists of all those camera wielding face book addicted food bores that seem to have taken over the world.
one doesnt need to spend thousands of baht on a good meal in thailand, great food can be had for 100 baht if one knows where to go, thats why i find tomboys (tomcat??) food threads on here such a giggle. all those drinks served out of jam jars, all those funny shaped plates, all those trendy new ingredients and deconstructed traditional recipes, all those up their own arsehole bestubbled and tattooed cooks who call themselves chefs and all those sucker punters with more money than sense. its all bullshit.
peasant food is where its at, and you can find it on many of the streets in bangkok. just look for the big fat sweaty mae khaas working the woks and the queues of people waiting for a rickety table and plastic stool. Reply With Quote: Today, 03:20 AM #22 hallelujah Nov 2006 Last Online Today @ 06:35 AM Posts 2,551 Originally Posted by taxexile bangkok, and indeed thailand is blessed with thousands of these very capable street cooks.
the trouble with this jai fai gaff is that the press, and in particular those jumped up twats who run the michelin star organisation have discovered and publicised this place which has now become just another box to tick on the bucket lists of all those camera wielding face book addicted food bores that seem to have taken over the world.
one doesnt need to spend thousands of baht on a good meal in thailand, great food can be had for 100 baht if one knows where to go, thats why i find tomboys (tomcat??) food threads on here such a giggle. all those drinks served out of jam jars, all those funny shaped plates, all those trendy new ingredients and deconstructed traditional recipes, all those up their own arsehole bestubbled and tattooed cooks who call themselves chefs and all those sucker punters with more money than sense. its all bullshit.
peasant food is where its at, and you can find it on many of the streets in bangkok. just look for the big fat sweaty mae khaas working the woks and the queues of people waiting for a rickety table and plastic stool. Indeed. The best country in the world for good food at excellent prices, and it’s rarely ever much more than a 5-10 minute walk away. Reply With Quote: Today, 03:44 AM #23 hallelujah The best country in the world for good food at excellent prices, and it’s rarely ever much more than a 5-10 minute walk away. Have you never been to Isaan? Reply With Quote: Today, 03:51 AM #24 hallelujah Nov 2006 Last Online Today @ 06:35 AM Posts 2,551 Originally Posted by Dillinger Have you never been to Isaan? Even better up there! The smell of pu pla ra knocking you for 6 as you move from one gaff next to the next… Reply With Quote: Today, 04:01 AM #25 Dillinger Thailand Expat

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Flavors from a world away, around the corner at Almandi

Call me shallow, but I travel to eat.
Taking a car or plane to eyeball majestic vistas, historic buildings and art museums is nice, but my favorite vehicle for broadening my horizons is a table.
So when given the chance to try an ancient and vibrant cuisine, no passport required, I jumped.
Despite our area’s sizeable Yemeni population, there haven’t been many successful Yemeni restaurants. So when an adventurous Polish-American eater and folks with roots in the Lackawanna soccer community praised the same place, six blocks from the Broadway Market, I showed up.
Almandi Restaurant’s beef gallaba with hummus. (Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News)
Almandi Restaurant: Restaurant review Almandi Restaurant is a scrappy little place with room for about a dozen diners to sit and eat. The restaurant is named after mandi, a roasted-meat-and-rice dish, but there’s plenty of other things on offer, including vegetable dishes, fish and freshly baked flatbread. With words of guidance from a Yemeni-American interpreter, we dug in.
Yemen is on the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, its port Aden part of a historic trade route between India and Africa. Spices better known in Indian cuisine – turmeric, cardamom, fenugreek – play important roles in Yemeni cooking. Cardamom flavors the tea offered free with purchase from an urn near the cash register. It is sweet, aromatic and powerfully caffeinated.
Almandi Restaurant’s fassolia with eggs, made with kidney beans and vegetables. (Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News)
After ordering in consultation with owner Mohamed Abdullah at the counter, I sat down to chat with guests.
A cook brought us a tray of soup, a traditional, free beginning. The golden chicken broth was earthy with turmeric and cumin, full-bodied and soothing. Alongside it, to be applied by choice, was a Yemenite condiment called sahawik, a fresh-ground tomato salsa punchy with garlic, jalapeno and cilantro.
Salads followed, American style: iceberg lettuce and red cabbage with red onion, red bell pepper, shredded carrot, parsley and squiggles of ranch-like dressing. We pecked at them while waiting for the main event, and after about 30 minutes platters started arriving.
Almandi Restaurant’s baked pompano fish. (Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News)
Fassolia with eggs ($7.99) was firm white beans scrambled with eggs, turmeric-scented and mild, dressed with nutty tahini sauce. Dollops of freshly ground garlic paste and a spicy green chile-cilantro version of sahawik offered ways to jack up the flavor.
Kibda ($9.99) is a liver dish traditionally offered for breakfast, but available all day. Bites of meat are simmered in warming spices, including cardamom, black pepper and clove, with red bell pepper and onions. The result was tender and almost devoid of the metallic overtones that can be disagreeable.
Almandi owner Mohammed Abdullah, right and his cousin Anees Saleh present a few dishes. (Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News)
We picked up bites of it with handfuls of supple flatbread called malooga, freshly fired in a tandoor-like oven. Record-album-sized sheets are $1.50.
Gallaba with hummus ($9.99) was a stew atop the usual tahini-enriched chickpea puree. On this night it was veal, but it can also be lamb or chicken. Nickel-sized chunks of meat simmered with fresh tomato in a light curry-scented sauce made this plate of hummus into a meal.
Besides the fassolia bean dishes, vegetarians might go for dabeekh ($9.99), traditional vegetable stew. Potatoes, tomatoes, zucchini, carrots and peas cooked in a savory gravy, toothsome but not falling-apart soft, were comforting spooned out onto rice ($3). That rice was indistinguishable from most Indian offerings, spice-scented basmati flecked with the golden-orange grains meant to mimic saffron.
Almandi Restaurant’s kibda, a lamb liver dish with onions, tomatoes and bell peppers. (Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News)
The menu’s baked fish ($15) is a whole pompano that’s butterflied open before getting a spice paste rubdown and a ride on the grill. It arrived piled with chopped onion, fresh tomato, chopped cilantro and lime wedges. After a fresh citrus spritz, I found the crispy-edged fish moist down to the bone, good to eat skin and all.
Haneeth roasted lamb ($11.99) was pieces of bone-in lamb simply seasoned and roasted, served plain on a plate. It was certainly tender enough, but its simplicity made it seem unseasoned beside its racier tablemates.
Grilled lamb chops ($15) won me over. Sprinkled with a mixture of spices – clove, black pepper, cardamom and more – they were charred quickly, keeping the inside juicy and faintly pink, served with chopped onion, tomato, and lime wedges. At two chops to a plate with rice, this was a reasonably priced lamb excursion.
Almandi Restaurant’s hummus and fresh-baked bread. (Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News)
Fahsah ($9.99), lamb stew with fenugreek sauce, is the national dish of Yemen. It’s deeply flavored with more of those Indian warming spices, and topped with an ivory cap of whipped fenugreek sauce, light but creamy, with fenugreek’s maple inflection.
Chicken on coal ($20) was a whole chicken butterflied open and grilled before being cut up with shears for serving. Some of the thinner parts were dried out, but the thicker parts and skin rewarded chewing.
Almandi Restaurant’s seltah, a steaming hot stew topped with fenugreek sauce, eaten with pita bread. (Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News)
The Yemeni dessert masoob ($10) is a mixture of bread chopped with dates and honey, aromatic with sesame oil. It’s covered in cream, drizzled with more honey, and sprinkled with black cumin seed for an exotic rice pudding effect.
After years of looking for a place to share a meal with my Yemeni neighbors, the food and surroundings at Almandi were a welcome introduction. There’s nothing fancy here, just home cooking from people who have come a long way to be here. Flavors a world away, just down the street.
(Note: During Ramadan, the Muslim month of fasting, May 6 to June 5, the restaurant’s hours will be noon to midnight.)
RESTAURANT REVIEW
Almandi Restaurant – 7 plates (out of 10)
Location: 797 Broadway, 853-1090
Hours: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily (noon-midnight May 6 to June 5).
Prices: breakfast $6.99-$9.99, sandwiches $5.99-$7.99, entrees $7.49-$19.99
Atmosphere: scruffy to-go restaurant with seating
Parking: lot
Wheelchair accessible: yes
Gluten-free: none offered
Almandi Restaurant serves halal food at 797 Broadway. (Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News)
Story topics: Almandi Restaurant / Lackawanna / restaurant reviews / yemen

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Festivals to attend in May

Festivals to attend in May Apr 24, 2019 View more festivals in Perth
Author: Alexandra Murfett
There are a huge range of festivals set to occur in and around Perth this May. Showcasing everything from Indian cuisine and Chinese dragon boats to Spanish films and laneway artwork, here are our top 5 festival picks for May. Curry Up Now
For those craving comfort food, feast your eyes on Curry Up Now at Curtin University on May 3rd. Travel via your taste buds across the full-bodied flavours of India, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Jamaica, the Philippines, Africa, Malaysia and many more curry-inspired morsels. Don’t let this festival simmer!
Fremantle Dragon Boat Festival
For an impressive cultural experience, visit the iconic Fremantle Fishing Boat Harbour on May 5th for the Fremantle Dragon Boat Festival. The air will be thick with the clash of gongs and beating of boat drums, and guests will behold the traditional Chinese eye dotting ceremony in which Taoist monks bless the waters and “awaken” the dragon figures on the boats.
Mount Hawthorn Streets and Lanes Festival
The Mount Hawthorn Streets and Lanes Festival will take place on May 5th along Scarborough Beach Road, from Oxford Street to Coogee Street. With petting zoos, a sideshow alley, free activities for kids and a range of bands, DJs, food, pop-up street bars and an indigenous art exhibition, this is one street party you won’t want to miss in 2019.
Vancouver Street Festival
Albany’s Vancouver Street Festival is set to deliver high-quality local arts, crafts, musicians and gourmet food on May 11th. Highlights include the Noongar Song Project, a new original Noongar song created and performed by Noongar musicians, and the Vancouver Project, a pop-up space for local retailers and handmade producers to showcase and sell a variety of crafty products.
Spanish Film Festival
Join in the fiesta with the Spanish Film Festival before it wraps up May 15th. The festival promises a diverse and compelling celebration of Spanish and Latino language, culture and film. 32 brand new films will be screened alongside captivating presentations and events with a focus on female directors. Hasta pronto!
Check out more festivals coming up in May below.
Image Credit: Feature Image – Ryan McLoughlin, Mount Hawthorn Streets and Laneways Festival – Ryan Ammon.

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