Rehnay dy bhai i m from Karachi(and migrant as some one still called it but PAKISTANI ONLY) yah Nihari is from Dehli,Biryani from central and northern INDian(luckhnow or hyderabad ) but Chappli is from MY PESHAWAR (wah wah ) and namkeen ghosht (that i most like from Quetta side ) lucky for us if we bring some taste rest come from all part of Pakistan here u can even find Bengali’s,Afghanis and others too really an melting pot of culture which is also evident in KHI cuisine
Dewaneh said: ↑ Be careful with your wording.
Fascists will start to say “Karachi only has delicious food because a lot of Indians immigrated there.” Click to expand… Lots of trees too compare to other cities of Pakistan KHI is less green
Secret Service said: ↑ Karachi needs lots of cleaning. Click to expand…

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Weekly Post, FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977 by Robert Glenn Ketchum
In 1977, I was commissioned by Elisabeth Mann Borgese to help do research, interviews, and take photographs for a book she was writing about worldwide aquaculture. It would be published by Harry N. Abrams, one of the world’s premier publishing houses, famous for their beautiful books. It would also involve around-the-world travel to 8 countries, and some of the most remarkable places I would ever visit. SEAFARM: The Story of Aquaculture was a very successful publication featuring over 100 of my images, and an exhibit I assembled with support from Nikon, became a Smithsonian traveling exhibition for 6-yrs., viewed by over 6-million people. ~Robert Glenn Ketchum
Friday, April 5, 2019
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #50:
Fish Farms #50: As our walk along this huge beach near the southern tip of India continues, Elisabeth and I encounter A LOT of different activities in the surrounding densely populated fishing villages. In the last post, I offer an excellent example of the many use of palm thatch A-frames in this beach culture, in that instance, as a roof above a sleeping area. Here are some other applications. As the day wears on, it has grown hotter, and even though most in the village wear little clothing, it is still too hot to spend time in the midday sun. We are walking with open umbrellas to protect us. Here use see local fisherman have set up their thatch as a sun-shields while they eat and work on their nets. This is an ingenious use of a common material that can be found everywhere here.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, March 29, 2019
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #49:
Fish Farms #49: The aquaculture research trip that Elisabeth and I are on, has now carried us by car around “the horn” of India, departing the Arabian Sea shoreline, and arriving at a very different coast facing the Laccadive Sea and the Bay of Bengal . We are as close to the equator as this part of our trip will get, and it is stunningly hot and humid. We have come to a huge bay SURROUNDED by fishing villages, and although this is not aquaculture in the sense of raising fish from eggs, these villages use of sophisticated form of sustainable harvesting that promotes healthy fish populations and still keeps the villages fed. Our hosts want us to see all of the activity. We leave the car at one end of the broad arching beach, and begin to walk to the other end, where the car will meet us once again. There are people and boats everywhere, and the entire beach is swarming with activity. A large catch has just been hauled in, so there is a wild market going in the distance that we slowly walk toward. It would seem that everyone we pass is attending to their gear. Nets are being mended. Ropes are drying in the sun. People are making adjustments to their boat, or their personal shelter (sometimes that is one and the same). This is one of the most interesting things we have yet done.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, March 22, 2019
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #48:
Fish Farms #48: Elisabeth, our Indian colleagues/guides, and I have driven around the southern tip of the Indian continent, and are now encountering numerous rural fishing villages on the shore of the Laccadive Sea . It is a long day ahead, so we stop regularly to walk through these communities and witness the buzz of daily activities. A few thatched roof huts and small shops are on the sand, at the edge of the palms, but many people live on their boats as well, using panels of thatch to cover themselves in bad weather. We are close to the equator and it is VERY hot and humid, even at night, so, as you can see, the majority of the people in these villages wear very few clothes, We (our group) on the other hand, look QUITE different, so everyone takes notice of our presence. Those that approach us are friendly and engaging, and most want to talk with us to learn why we are here. Above, is a father and his three sons, currently working industriously on repairing some of their fishing net. Their mother has gone to the spontaneous market that is occurring because a boat has just come in, bearing a large catch. What she can acquire will be their main meal of the day. All of them live in/on their boat – the one you see in this image!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, March 15, 2019
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #47:
Fish Farms #47: Our drive for the day has brought us around the southern tip of the Indian continent, and out onto the coast of the Laccadive Sea . Offshore is Sri Lanka . Onshore, the palm jungle inland is dense, and the beaches are highly populated with villages that are established in the sand. These are communities based around a daily fishing culture to survive, and there are hundreds of large, wooden fishing boats everywhere. The day is abuzz with activity, so we stop at regular intervals on our drive, and walk through the maze, to see what their life is like. Many people are either working on their boats, or mending their nets. In the distance here (above) you can also see a crowd of people gathered at the waterline (upper, right). This is a “pop-up” market, to use today’s terminology. A fishing boat has dropped a net, many people ashore then helped pull the net in, and now they are all standing around making offers to purchase various fish that have been caught. There is A LOT of yelling, and wild gestures, as buyers argue/bid for what will be their main meal of the day.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, March 8, 2019
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #46:
Fish Farms #46: In planning our trip, Elisabeth put more time into India, than any other country we would visit. She did so, because there are so many varieties of aquaculture for us to see. During most of the last 10 days, we have visited research stations and communities working with pond cultures that produce shrimp, tilapia, and six different species of carp. Our travel has presently brought us to India’s southern tip, and we have indulged ourselves momentarily in the beach resort city of Trivandrum. It is now the morning of our departure, as we are heading farther south, around the horn of the continent, and up the coast of the Laccadive Sea toward the Bay of Bengal. Elisabeth is visibly excited, because she says that we are now going into completely different, more rural communities, and we are going to see new forms of farming. The morning is staggeringly hot and humid, and the palm jungle encroaches evermore on the highway we follow. As we round the tip of the continent, and have our first view of the shoreline of the Laccadive Sea, I understand what Elisabeth has been describing. Where we are now, whole communities live, quite literally, right on the beach in thatch huts, or in their huge fishing canoes, covered by thatch roofs.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, March 1, 2019
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #45:
Fish Farms #45: Also, as promised, the beach at Kovalam is beautiful, and to me, VERY exotic. After a stifling day of heat and humidity, Elisabeth and I have tea on my balcony, in what seems to be a slight breeze. As the sun sets, that breeze picks up, and many people begin to fill the various pathways down to the beach. We join them, and by the time we arrive at the edge of the sandy crescent, it is teeming with people. At the edge of the dense, palm-lined shore, there are many thatch-roofed huts among the trees. Some are public bathhouses, others serve food. People are playing, and swimming, and most importantly, a magnificent breeze coming off the water, makes it VERY pleasant. Elisabeth and I sit for some time just to watch all of the activity. Men without women tend to hang in groups. Families also hang in groups, especially around older (eligible) daughters, assuring none of them are inappropriately approached. It is an interesting tension, but clearly, “seeing each other” is intended. I also note that the children swim in shorts, but the adults that enter the ocean, do so dressed as you see here. Women go in wearing their complete saris .
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, February 22, 2019
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #44:
Fish Farms #44: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #44: As promised, the relatively small beach community of Kovalam is VERY beautiful, and extravagantly tropical. The streets, paths, and shoreline are dense with palms, but there are flowering, and fruit-baring trees everywhere as well. I am taken aback by our hotel. Since the luxurious Ashoka in Mumbai, we have been in nice, local hotels, wherever we have stopped. This is MUCH more. It reminds me of a Hawaiian “destination” resort. The hotel sprawls with gardens and pathways. Most rooms have sizable patios, or balconies. There is no pool, because the ocean is a short walk away, and the water there can be quite warm, as are our daytime temperatures. Elisabeth has a lower room with a patio, but has come to my room before we walk to the beach. We are sitting on my balcony having tea, and watching this woman rake up fruit fallen from a tree, when Elisabeth points out that she does this, to prevent attracting scavenging monkeys that might annoy the guests.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, February 15, 2019
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #43:
Fish Farms #43: I found the villages, canals, and fish ponds of rural Cochin (posts #36-41) tropically beautiful, but as Elisabeth and I continue our journey further south along the coast of the Arabian Sea , she promises there is MUCH more about to unfold, and she is clearly excited by the plans for our coming days. We are headed toward the large, urban city of Trivandrum, that is famous for its beautiful resort beaches, especially Kovalam , the location of our hotel. The road is inconsistently paved, and the day is long and hot. She and I often take naps in a heat delirium on these long drives, and do so on this one. As we approach to Trivandrum, however, the traffic grows worse, so the incessant horn honking does as well, which brings me out of my coma, to find our car following this truck . Inspirational words out of nowhere on a stifling day, and then Kovalam.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, February 8, 2019
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #42:
Fish Farms #42: Back in our car, Elisabeth and I are now going further south to a new location, Trivandrum . Interestingly, this city, which is still surrounded by aquaculture, is the capital of the state of Kerala , and considered a resort destination. Perhaps that is so, but en route, the world seems evermore rural. Much of the road is gravel-bed, with only occasional paving, and at one point we are stopped briefly by a pipeline construction project, that I find remarkable. By any standard, this is a heavy industrial project. LOTS of digging, and many large, sections of pipe to be moved into place. However, there is not one piece of industrial machinery in sight, it is all being done by hand, and with elephants. Look carefully at the image above. It is midday, well into the 90’s, temperature-wise, and the humidity is stifling. ALL of these workers are barefoot, and barely clothed. They are moving a gargantuan section of pipe into place by hand, using boards to leverage and roll it. An elephant is then harnessed at the far end, and is used to drag the pipe into the ditch. They work ALL day like this. It is amazing to see. Elisabeth tells me they earn less than one American dollar for their time. Even more amazing..,or shocking as the case may be.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, February 1, 2019
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #41:
Fish Farms #41: Shrimp are one of the most prominent forms of aquaculture in this community, but the endless maze of ponds supports other species as well. There is also some rice grown. As our group begins the return to our car, we encounter another interesting aspect of this system. Ponds are rotated through a series of uses, which “renews” them. After the fish crop is harvested, a pond is drained, then duck farmers arrive, herding large flocks of birds that eagerly descend into the debris on the muddy pond floor to gorge on whatever they can find. While doing this, they poop, in effect, fertilizing the pond floor. When they leave and the pond is refilled, either the new species of fish introduced, or a rice crop, will benefit from this process, without using any chemical fertilizers. I did not know this at the time, but some years later when I entered China in the early 80’s, I encountered goose farmers using the same practice. Very organic – no chemistry or hormones involved.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, January 25, 2019
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #40:
Fish Farms #40: This area surrounding Cochin is a world of canals and ponds through which we have been walking to reach a small research station. The station, like many of the homes in the community, is a very open structure. Constructed mostly of concrete blocks, there is a doorway, but no door; there are windows frames, but no windows, and the roof is palm thatch. The interior consists of numerous water-filled tanks with aerators, that in this case are dedicated to shrimp research, the most prominent form of aquaculture in this area. The station is also located on the banks of one of the larger commercial canals, which is quite active as you can see. Numerous boats carrying goods are tied to the opposite shore. Another craft laden with cut wood has just gone past, and two villagers are actively fishing from their small canoe. The research station is similar to others we have previously visited, but this surrounding is unlike any place I have ever been.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, January 18, 2019
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #39:
Fish Farms #39: Wandering along a maze of dike pathways that traverse between fish ponds and canals, Elisabeth , me, and our Indian colleagues pass through various activities in the surrounding communities. As we draw nearer to the field research station, however, there are increasingly fewer people and structures. The clamor of the celebrating (last post) has been lost, and the jungle closes in around our dwindling trail. Whether related specifically to fish-farming or not, I know this is one of the most amazing mornings of my life, so I keep taking “unrelated” images, like this one – a women quietly doing laundry beside a canal, while a crow offers advice. When we arrive at the field station, it is a work-shed, similar to many others that we have seen. Clearly our walk is the most important part of our experience this day.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, January 11, 2019
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #38:
Fish Farms #38: Part of the reason I am seeing so many women and so few men on our walk through the dike paths of a Cochin aquaculture community, is that the men are still partying over the Janata party election victory of the previous week, and this particular morning, they have gathered in one of the large main canals for wild paddle races. They use canoes made from tall, straight palm trees, that seat 25-30 men. Women and children line the banks to watch in amusement, as boats that can barely stay above water, are furiously paddled down the canal with lots of yelling and wild shouts. The guy standing with his arm raised is supposedly leading the paddlers by shouting out the stroke, but the guy in front of him, I think, is just praying. It is all very funny, and for the community, the presence of Elisabeth and I, is pretty funny as well.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, January 4, 2019
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #37:
Fish Farms #37: Elisabeth and I are on our morning visit to a research station, this one in Cochin . We are in southern, equatorial India and it is a VERY hot, tropical environment. We finally find ourselves in a landscape literally defined by the presence of aquaculture. Fishing and fish farming surround us as we drive, but eventually we reach a point so rural, the road ends and we disembark to walk through the community. It is a nice day that is not too hot as yet, and our path moves along wide dikes between a myriad of ponds and canals. If you do not know where you are or where you are going, you could easily get lost in this maze. That might not be a bad thing, however. The community is vibrant, friendly,..and VERY curious to see an older white woman and a young white man draped with cameras wandering through. I note also that there are large numbers a VERY attractive women, dressed beautifully, everywhere, and no men can be seen. Clearly this is paradise.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, December 28, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #36:
Fish Farms #36: Our first morning in Cochin , Elisabeth and I wake to a hot, and VERY humid day, have a spicy breakfast at our hotel, and then we are joined by her close friends, now our hosts and guides for this region. Within minutes of our first drive beginning, the landscape is COMPLETELY transformed. We enter a world of water, and water culture. The road we follow bridges large canals, with views like the one above. This is not aquaculture, it is dip-net fishing for shrimp and small fish, and each of these nets is connected to a home. These communities of houses line the shores of large canals. In the background, however, you may begin to get a sense of this new environment that surrounds us. It is very tropical. There are palms of every description. The entire landscape is one of ponds, dikes, jungle paths, and a few roads, one of which we are now navigating toward a field research station.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, December 21, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #35:
Fish Farms #35: The next day we travel, and as we progress, the tropical jungle asserts itself evermore and rivers, canals, ponds, and the amazing coastline just keep getting better. The day keeps getting hotter, as well. We plan to be in Cochin by the afternoon, and to dine with those who will be our hosts in the area. Aside from the heat and humidity, the car ride is pleasant and we do make Cochin by early afternoon. I thought this might give you a flavor of the camera needs I manage. This is my Cochin hotel room. The two beds have a frame above them that supports mosquito netting, to be installed later. My pants are hanging there because they are soaking wet from my sweating into them throughout the long drive. Someone will soon come to claim them, clean them, press them, and return them to me for use tomorrow. On the bed is my camera and film field system. The brown shoulder bag has foam lining and cold packs into which the several hundred rolls of film I am working with, are placed to keep them from the heat. The cold packs are re-frozen at each stop. Next to the shoulder bag is a plastic bag lined with an aluminized mylar shirt. The shirt insulates the rolls of film I work with on any given day and the plastic bag limits exposure to humidity. Next is a small tripod, then a compact Knirps umbrella (which gets used a lot, for sun as much as rain), and then my aluminum Pelican case that holds many lenses and other camera bodies. Lastly, my Nikon F2 , sits on the small table. The best part of this room, however, is the all-tile bathroom (through door on right) with 4 different directional shower heads and a drain in the floor. With it this hot and sweaty everyday, these people know how to bath!!!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, December 14, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #34:
Fish Farms #34: Our dinner boat ride reveals what Elisabeth has been promising, a literal “landscape of aquaculture.” As I will learn, this is just a beginning. The restaurant in which we dine is located adjacent a multi-pond “farm” that is raising several species of fish and shrimp. Talk about “farm-to-table!” We order by selecting our primary fish, and various fruit and spice ingredients. That fish is then captured from a pond, cooked immediately, and served to us with our preferred additional choices, in a “house-style” combination that changes every night. The meal is zesty, but delicious, and I sense a new spice creeping into our palate as we move south. It is making me sweat more. When I ask why we eat such hot food, in a place that is so hot, our host asks me if I am sweating, and then assures me, I will be greatly cooled off by the boat ride home. And so I am. It is a BEAUTIFUL tropical night, and tomorrow Elisabeth says we will enter the landscape that is the heart of India’s aquaculture, southern Kerala and the city of Cochin .
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, December 7, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #33:
Fish Farms #33: Farther down the coast of Kerala , Elisabeth and I begin to come into “aquaculture country.” She has been telling my about whole communities built around various aquaculture activities, but so far we have only seen some relatively small, random sites. Then, arriving at a lovely village by a bay, we check into a pleasant hotel, and connect with her next group of friends with whom we will have dinner. Of course we go by boat, and as we leave the bay for one of the fingers that extend from it, things change substantially. The jungle asserts itself and becomes very tropical. Thousands of palms grow everywhere, AND as you can begin to see in this image, the landscape of water is changing also. The canal we are in remains unobstructed, but ALL of the side bays have been divided up with low dike walls separating fish ponds. Three large ones are visible in the background here. Note also the thatch-roofed huts at various locations on the dikes. These are huts of “watchers,” who feed and care for the fish, but also keep the catch from being poached.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, November 30, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #32:
Fish Farms #32: As Elisabeth and I travel south along the coast of India and into the state of Kerala , we stop to visit numerous friends of hers, who host us and show us about their cities. All are connected to her aquaculture research in some way, and many take us to small substations where lab and tank research is being done. Elisabeth prefers I not make too many pictures of these places because Abrams already has been sent many similar subjects by the scientists working at those numerous locations. My mission is the landscape of aquaculture,..the setting in which it evolves and flourishes. I do not see that in any significant way as yet, although there is a fishpond here or there, but I do see fishing everywhere, and am dining in a society that eats a lot of spicy seafood. The shot above is not aquaculture, these are traditional net fishermen, working very early in the morning to provide food for their village. This is a large industrial harbor, and what struck me here was the juxtaposition of the new technology and the ancient ways, one co-existing in the shadow of the other, seemingly successfully.
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Friday, November 23, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #31:
Fish Farms #31: As we travel south along the Goa Coast and into the state of Kerala , we are approaching the equator in pre-monsoon season , and things are HOT, and getting hotter. Elisabeth knows many colleagues along the way who host us, and the pattern seems to be early morning trips to some research stations, usually by water, then long lunches and an afternoon nap to pass the peak heat of the day. As the evening cool down begins, we reassemble for a little discussing, and a lot of socializing. Some of those we visit are in large commercial port cities, built around substantial bays into which feed numerous canals and rivers. Out on the water is always interesting because we see everything from supertankers, to people on sailing rafts. It is a waterworld. However, Elisabeth has described entire communities built around aquaculture, and we have yet to see that.
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Friday, November 16, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #30:
Fish Farms #30: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #30: Because we are still not photographing aquaculture, the point of my trip, I am trying to conserve film to assure I will have enough for my assignment, but at the same time, I realize I am in an amazing place at an amazing time. In the company of Elisabeth’s friends, we ride a water taxi to lovely open-air restaurant located in a discreet corner of a large bay, that is also a very busy port. There is a striking contrast of old world-new world here because in the flow of traffic there are modern industrial cargo ships, a wide variety of unusual sailing craft, and many people fishing from dugout canoes. The breeze from the motion of the water taxi is refreshing, and the evening light is radiant, so once again I am seduced, I feel I should at least take a few pictures.
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Friday, November 9, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #29:
Fish Farms #29: We are met at the airport in southern Goa , by several friends of Elisabeth’s , and they will drive us further south, into the state of Kerala. The drive follows a beautiful tropical coast whose vast beaches are punctuated by cities concentrated around bays and river estuaries, supporting a lot of boat traffic. At the end of our first day of driving, we arrive at one such city, where there are more friends, to whom we are being handed off. We are close to the equator, and just before monsoon season is to begin, so it is VERY hot and humid. Our new hosts arrange a nice hotel on the water, and then make plans to take us to dinner. Dinner is a long process that involves cooling down at the end of the day. It starts with a lengthy water taxi ride, out into a vast bay, then eventually up one of the the less traveled “fingers” of water that stretches back into a jungle-like environment, where there is a lovely, open-air restaurant at the water’s edge. It is a beautiful evening, a lovely boat ride, a GREAT dinner,..and I do finally cool down,..a bit.
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Friday, November 2, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #28:
Fish Farms #28: The drive back to Mumbai from Agra passes more quickly without the chaos of the election excitement filling the streets. Elisabeth and I spend one final day sorting our travel plans with our hosts, and packing to travel, then we are off. It turns out, Elisabeth has many friends along our route that she intends to visit. We will first fly to the southern Goa coast, then from there, journey south by car, into the state of Kerala . Traveling along the coast reveals a tropical paradise. For me, it has the feel of Hawaii, only it is hotter and more humid. There are expansive beaches lined by palm trees, things are flowering everywhere, and the principle cities are built around big bays and river estuaries, so water, and water travel abound. Fish are a big part of the regional diet. I am told aquaculture is everywhere.
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Friday, October 26, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #27:
Fish Farms #27: Elisabeth and I are wowed by the Taj Mahal . Not only is it beautiful and monumental architecture, it is intricately detailed on virtually every surface. The stone carving and inlay designs are mind-boggling. As beautiful as it is to look at, inside there is also acoustical perfection. It is also MUCH cooler, as the marble walls fend off the sweltering day, and there are rooms in which one can stand in a corner, face to the wall, and say something in a whisper to a person in an opposite corner, which they will hear perfectly. We spend a good bit of our morning at the Taj, but I am now confronted with the reality of my assignment, and I fear I am taking too many pictures and using too much film on subjects not related to aquaculture. As it is still the weekend, there is no need to be back in Mumbai , so it is determined we will stay another night in Agra , and spend the rest of this day visiting some other significant monuments in the city. I decide it best not to shoot more film unless something really amazing occurs, so there are no pictures from the rest of the day, or the drive back to Mumbai. We do return to the Taj for a beautiful sunset, however, and we have a really great dinner with live music.
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Friday, October 19, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #26:
Fish Farms #26: Given the bedlam in the streets because of the Janata Party election victory, our drive to Agra to see the Taj Mahal has taken most all of a VERY hot day. We are now exhausted, sweaty, and would like a shower and some food. It is early evening when we finally arrive at the edge of the river (last post), and although we can see the Taj Mahal at a distance, our first intent is to find a suitable hotel and freshen up, which we do, AND it is within walking distance of the Taj. We have a pleasant meal with our driver, retire early, and awake the next day to breakfast and sightseeing. It is another clear, and very hot day, so we start early. From a distance, the Taj Mahal is impressive because of architectural design, scale, and setting, but as you walk closer, the astounding details begin to emerge. The radiant white marble, reflecting sunlight, obscures much of the intricate, inlaid designs, but as our eyes adjust upon our approach, the scrolls and floral flourishes become VERY apparent. Once on the grounds, every step we take is more breathtaking. While the scale of the building continues to grow, the extravagance of the details seems evermore impossible. Every surface is decorated or carved, and there are A LOT of surfaces. Elisabeth has traveled all over the world and has seen many things, but I realize that she is truly blown away by this visit, AND, historically speaking, we are fortunate to see it when we did (1977), as air pollution is now threatening to discolor the marble and dull the brilliant white radiance.
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Friday, October 12, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #25:
Fish Farms #25: It is a VERY long, hot day on our drive to Agra . The fact there is also a national election and the streets along the way are crowded with celebrations, makes our progress that much slower. Towards the end of the day, when it becomes clear the Janata party has won a major victory, the streets turn into bedlam. We have been in the car for hours, and I am beginning to wonder if we will ever get there, and then this appears. It is the Yamuna River , which runs through a portion of Agra. We are finally close. Elisabeth agrees that we will all stay overnight (our cab driver, as well), because driving back in the dark with all the election celebrating would be insane. Making a joke, the cab driver points to the activity on the river shore, and he says he knows the hotel is preparing for us, because they are washing our sheets. The fact is, because of the numerous tourism visits to the Taj Mahal , there are many hotels in Agra, and these workers ARE washing the hotel linen in the river. This gives Elisabeth and I some pause for thought, as most rivers in India are quite polluted with human waste, and if you look carefully upriver in this shot, you will see 8 head of cattle “bathing” just beyond where the sheets are being washed. Oh well! On to our hotel.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, October 5, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #24:
Fish Farms #24: Caught up in the organizing and research around our aquaculture project, Elisabeth and I have paid little attention to current Indian news. If we had, we would know that India is in a HUGE electoral moment when the established political party, is being challenged by the JANATA – the people’s party , and a new Prime Minister is going to be elected. Because we are not paying attention, it turns out the day we choose to drive from Mumbai to Agra to see the Taj Mahal , is the SAME day as this highly anticipated election. As we drive on, and the day wears on, the public frenzy of this election begins to assert itself on our trip. Outside of Mumbai, the rural villages we pass through are increasingly crowded, and EVERYONE seems to be in the streets. You can see here, these villages are also very pro the Janata party, and the streets and buildings everywhere are decorated with the orange and green flags of the party colors. Talk about strangers in a strange land, Elisabeth and I are slowly realizing that something is up, and when we ask, our cabbie explains the circumstances, to which Elisabeth exclaims, “Oh, my god!”, realizing that out here in the villages and country roads, things might get a little crazy. Too late, they already have! All the activity is a surprise to us, but check out these guys – a white women and a white photographer in a car driving through their main street is as weird to them, as the day is to us. In the end, a good time is had by all. The crowds turn our travel into a crawl, but make for considerable excitement, and something more than your usual sightseeing. Then, by late afternoon, it becomes clear to the populace we are passing through, the Janata Party has, shockingly, won the election! Then it is joyous bedlam EVERYWHERE, and we are in the middle of it. Our poor cab driver must think we are the customers from hell (but he is also happy the Janata have won).
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Friday, September 28, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #23:
Fish Farms #23: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #23: With a weekend approaching, we know our “hosts” will not be back with our plans until Monday, and Elisabeth does not want to sit around the hotel for two days, so she has a plan. She and I will go visit the Taj Mahal , located in Agra , several hours away by car. Our first obstacle is finding a Mumbai cab driver that knows how to get to Agra. Apparently it is not as simple as just getting on a connecting highway, because in 1977, there is, as yet, no such thing. We must get there by connecting rural streets and country roads through numerous villages. Our hotel helps us find someone who “thinks” they can do it, and so we are off. This ride provides me with a unique learning curve about managing my cameras and film. The taxi is not air-conditioned, and the day is blazing hot. Inevitably, in the heat of the long drive, Elisabeth and I both fall asleep every once in awhile. I, however, begin to sense even the subtlest change in car direction, that might shift the direct sun onto my cameras and film, and I awake in a heat haze, adjust their position to get them out of the direct sun, and then drop back into my snooze. About an hour into the drive, we are at the far outskirts of Mumbai’s “known” roads, and our driver must now start piecing together all the connections to complete our route. During one of my more conscious moments, I take this shot because I am struck by what I see. What do you see? I am at the edge of one of the largest and most populated cities in the world, and I am looking down a well maintained (and paved) road that, as far as the eye can see, does not have a single car on it. There are hundreds bicycling, and many driving oxen-pulled carts, but there NO cars. This drive is about to get interesting.
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Friday, September 21, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #22:
Fish Farms #22: India is a large continent, and one of the most populated. To provide sufficient protein to many millions, India has been engaged in aquaculture practices for hundreds of years. In fact, India has some of the most diverse forms of fishfarming of any of the countries we will visit, so Elisabeth wants to see as many different forms of it’s practice as possible, and that takes a lot of organizing. Unlike Russia, where the government did not care to show us what they were doing, India wants us to see it all, and that means nearly two weeks of extensive travel to very differing parts of the country. Organizing this requires some time, so we wait in Mumbai , while our trip is being organized. We actually do visit an amazing facility in Mumbai, whose practices I find shocking, slightly disgusting, and yet, TRULY BRILLIANT. If Mumbai has anything, it has a lot of sewage, so this aquaculture adaptation uses that material. Not far outside of the central city, Elisabeth and I are taken to a more rural area where there is an extensive array of ponds, each separated from the other by a walkable dike. All of the ponds have multiple industrial aerators, furiously sucking up pond water and then spraying it back into the ponds again. This is liquified sewage. Surprisingly, the ponds TEEM with fish! These are carp, and there are A LOT of them. This is an experimental project that appears to be working. In each pond there are 6 different species of carp , and each “feeds” at a different level of the pond. No additional feed is given to the fish, other than the aerated sewage. The project has been going for some years, and the fish are rigorously tested for cancer, toxins, and dangerous microbes, but NOTHING has been found to date. The considerable “white-meat” bodies of the carp, test and re-test as clean, pure, and edible, despite what they are being fed. The Indians believe the carp is a “gift from god,” that might well be significant in recycling sewage into edible protein. Simply AMAZING!. Aside from this visit, we have time to kill while plans are made, so as I mentioned in previous posts, Elisabeth likes to taxi-bicycle about the city to “relax” and enjoy watching the “street-life.” Most foreign visitors, do exactly the opposite, hiring taxis with curtains on their windows, which they close, so as NOT to see or be seen. It is all very amusing to me, as I watch (and photograph) the often shocked reaction of those encountering us, very startled to see foreign visitors using this decidedly local form of transportation.
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Friday, September 14, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #21:
Fish Farms #21: As Elisabeth and I “sight-see” about Mumbai in bicycle taxis, we encounter many interesting things. I will remind you that this is one of the largest cities in India at the time, but amazingly, the airport runway is grass, and very few of the streets are actually paved. Paving must be a brutal job in this heat, but that is what the two guys in this picture are doing. Paving consists of spreading gravel over an area, then pouring a hot tar slurry on top of it, and tamping it smooth as it cools down. ALL the work is done by hand. There is no industrial equipment involved. Needless to say, that greatly limits the amount of work that can be accomplished in any one day, so the process just creeps along, one gravel patch to the next. We are here just before the start of the monsoon season, and I wonder how any of these cities survive and maintain their infrastructure in the face of that kind of weather. I do NOT want to be here to find out.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, September 7, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #20:
Fish Farms #20: Mumbai is very hot, and there are only a few, relatively brief meetings needed to set up our proposed aqauculture tour around the country, so part of the downtime Elizabeth spends writing and refining her notes, and then she wants to go “see” things, traveling about the city using bicycle-taxis. For me, it is a continuing opportunity to observe and photograph people, which I feel I do not do all that well. It is also an opportunity to see a world that is VERY different from mine. Our hotel is at the rural edge of the city, so around us are tree-lined residential neighborhoods with some very nice homes. The sharply dressed riders and decorated horses (above) are the local police on patrol. Elsewhere, in the heart of the city, the world is quite insane. The streets are choked with cars and people. Untold numbers of whom literally live (and cook) on the sidewalks. Beggars are everywhere. Most amazing to me, both men and women choose to defecate “in nature” eschewing toilets for nearby bushes. In this heat, and with such crowded conditions, this just seems to me like a health disaster waiting to happen.
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Friday, August 31, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #19:
Fish Farms #19: Elisabeth and I have come to Mumbai to meet with administrators that have been planning our visit. There is no aquaculture here, so we will soon go to the southern state of Kerala , where many forms of it are practiced. For the time being, however, we have a very nice hotel, an occasional meeting during the day, and a good bit of time on our hands with nothing to do. Our first evening, we are on our own, and I did promise Elisabeth that I would eat whatever Indian food she ordered for me, so we head off for what proves to be a fantastic restaurant. It is elegant and air-conditioned. People are beautifully dressed, and the servers are formal. There is a large band of drummers, sitars, and wind instruments playing great music, and every once in awhile a dancer performs. I do not even look at the menu, and just let Elisabeth order everything. The first plates are pan (bread), some fruit, and some salad-like veggies. No problem. Then, when the main plate comes out, I am relieved to see that she has ordered a simple dish for me of rice and large prawns, and there is little other garnish. Wanting to seem “fearless” about the food, I dive in. Half way through the first prawn, I begin sweating in places I did not even know could sweat. My ears burn. My eyes water. I take in some plain white rice to try and cool down, and the rice is even more spicey. Neither water nor beer seem to make any difference. My mouth is on fire. Trying to appear to be taking it in stride, I pick up the second prawn and glance at Elisabeth who has been watching my reactions. She is laughing hysterically. She also assures me, I will survive, AND she says that I will never be that affected by spices again as this would innoculate me. I do cool down as the meal progresses, and I eat the entire plate. Dinner ends early in the evening, and Elisabeth introduces me to another part of her personality, restlessness. She does not want to go back and sit at the hotel, so we hire a bicycle-taxi and go for a ride about the city. In the days to follow, we would do this several times, and see some interesting sights. The above, being one of many. I am not sure what they are doing, or why, they were just simple all punching each other rather randomly.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, August 24, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #18:
Fish Farms #18: I take a few more shots around the front lawn and property of our Mumbai hotel, and then Elisabeth and I go to breakfast. Russian food seemed familiar to me, but I know nothing about Indian food, and have never eaten it. Elisabeth dives right in, ordering a very “Indian” breakfast. I am relieved to see a very “British” item on the menu, scrambled eggs on toast, which I order. When the meal arrives and we start to eat, Elisabeth scoffs at me for not eating “native.” She says as we travel, in many circumstances we will have to eat what we are served, or go hungry, so I need to “get on board” with local cuisine. I tell her that I will do that, and if she would like to start with the dinner this coming evening, I would allow her to order for me and I will eat all of whatever she orders. She smiles broadly when I say these words, and we return to our breakfast.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, August 17, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #17:
Fish Farms #17: The lawn in front of our Mumbai hotel hosts 3 elephants and a camel, so many people come to play, picnic, and watch them. This is perfect for me to practice taking pictures of people, which I have always been uncomfortable doing. I see my self as a landscape photographer in the tradition of Ansel Adams and Eliot Porter , and I seldom think much about motion and film speed. Now, those elements are paramount, and I do not have the luxury of taking my time, or setting up a tripod. At the beginning of this project, I explained this to everyone involved, and I was assured that they did not need “people” pictures. The editors felt they already had those images, sent from contributing scientists. I was expected to take pictures of the “landscape” of aquaculture. After several days in Russia, however, I was pretty sure my pictures were going to involve people, so now that I am in India and surrounded by them, I keep saying to myself, “what would Salgado do?,” and I shoot what sits before me on the lawn. Elisabeth joins me after a short while, and takes in the view as well, but eventually suggests we should get breakfast, and then go explore. Her associates will take us to dinner this evening and explain our tour plans.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, August 10, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #16:
Fish Farms #16: It is VERY hot, but still early in the morning, when Elisabeth and I arrive in Mumbai . Our ride to our hotel is eye-opening to me, because I have never seen a city like this. It is FILLED with people and the streets are crowded with cars, buses, bikes, and motor-scooters. When we get to our hotel, an elephant handles our luggage, and both she and I, involuntarily employ two young boys that will attend to our every need, when we are on property. After my new friend takes me to my room, I show him my equipment, explaining why I am here, and he blows up with pride to be carrying, and guarding, my gear. As I would learn, anytime I leave my cameras in the room, he sits outside the door to assure no one can enter. Once settled, I wander out onto the hotel grounds to have a look around. As it is a famous hotel, has elephants on a big lawn in front, and other attractions as well, many people come to sit on the lawn, or play. All of this is done under the watchful eye of both the military and the police, who are sartorially resplendent and fully dressed in uniform, even in this stunning, RISING heat.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, August 3, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #15:
Fish Farms #15: Relieved to be through Russian airport customs, once on our plane to India, I sleep to recover from my anxiety, and the terrible hangover acquired at our departure banquet. We fly through the night, and when the flight crew awakens me for a morning snack, we are over India and the sun has risen. It is cloudy, but when I can see anything, it is lush and green. Then Mumbai . I am using the current name for what was, at the time, called Bombay. Mumbai is one of India’s largest cities, but it is surprisingly lacking things you might expect,..like an airport with a runway. Well, there is an airport, and there is a runway, but it is grass, and as we land, we awaken a sleeping camel who runs off. This is going to be VERY different! No one greets us at the airport, so we take a taxi and head for one of the finest hotels in town, the Ashoka. It is quite palatial as we drive up, and it looks like a VERY nice place to stay, but I am startled to have our luggage carried around by elephants, and within minutes of stepping out of the car, I have apparently employed a very young boy, who will carry my cameras, take me to my room, draw my bath, bring me tea, and remove my laundry to be washed. I would discover that this boy would sleep on the floor outside my door throughout my entire stay, waiting to serve me.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, July 27, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #14:
Fish Farms #14: Our last day in Moscow is spent packing to travel and recovering from the banquet the evening before. Tonight we depart for India , and when the time arrives, our Russian associates appear with their car to take us to the airport. En route, I ask about customs, and whether I should be concerned, as I have too many cameras, too many lenses, and WAY too much film. I presume our official friends can help us if there are any problems. Instead, they all reply that “we will just have to see what happens,” noting that they have no control over airport security and regulations. That makes me VERY uncomfortable! Once at the airport, they say simple good-byes, and then just leave us to fend for ourselves. Elisabeth is shocked,..and concerned for me. It is late, so the airport is pretty quite, which works to our advantage. When we approach carry-on bag check and they see all the cameras and film, they DO freak-out, at which point Elisabeth makes a genius move. As we are early for our flight, and there are few people besides us to deal with, she opens one of her bags, and takes out her most recent Abrams book , Drama Of The Oceans. Speaking little Russian, she politely engages the customs officers concerned about all my cameras and film, explaining that she is an author, and I am her photographer, and we are doing a book about fishfarming. She tells thems we have come to Russia, at Russia’s invitation, because their sturgeon/caviar farming is some of the world’s most sophisticated. She also tells them about the unique aquaculture store, suggesting that we have pictures of all those things (we do not). The book is beautiful, and as the pages are turned, the officials make loud exclamations about shots they like, which attracts more people. By the time Elisabeth is finished showing off the book, there are 30 people standing around looking. The officials have now warmed to us, so they return her book, stamp our passports, and usher us into the waiting room, never once returning to inspect my bags further. I chose the picture above to mark our transition from Moscow to Mumbai – on the left, Stalin’s tomb in Red Square ; on the right, Ghandi’s tomb in Mumbai.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, July 20, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #13:
Fish Farms #13: Fearing some kind of bureaucratic backlash, Elisabeth , her colleagues, and I are left in the dark in market devoid of shoppers, because the owner of the store believes my pictures of his place will be misused, so he has sent everyone home, and turned out the lights. We stand around for a few moments laughing about the weirdness of it all, and I can see that our Russian associates, although joking with her, are embarrassed that this has happened. With no actual shoppers to photograph, I fake a few stupid pictures with Elisabeth, and then we leave as there is nothing further that we can accomplish. It is very unfortunate this has happened because it is a great store, and it was quite busy when we arrived. Shots of that would have been perfect for the book. Apparently, it is just part of a bad day. When we return to our hotel, we are informed that we have NOT been given permission to go to the Volga to see sturgeon/caviar farming , and that is the final straw for Elisabeth. She immediately makes plane reservations for India, and we will leave tomorrow evening, flying all night, and arriving in Bombay (Mumbai) early in the morning. Disappointed that we are not going to stay any longer, our Russian friends plan a huge banquet and invite many others that know her, but with whom we have not yet visited. The location is spectacular – a grand ballroom in a magnificent hotel. The table is gigantic, seating more than 20 of us. The food is excellent, and I have my first experience with Russian alcoholism. These are people that like to drink, and they expect you to as well, and we did. Thank god nothing was planned for us the next day, because I was pretty wounded.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, July 13, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #12:
Fish Farms #12: Elisabeth , I, our Russian colleagues, and some fishery administrators take a drive through the streets of Moscow to visit the popular, exclusively aquaculture product market where I will finally get a chance to make some pictures relevant to our proposed book about fishfarming. When we arrive, the market is, as promised, crowded and doing good business. This will make for some great pictures. At the entrance to the market, there is a statue of Poseidon that “talks,” and is silly-cute, so Elisabeth wants a picture. With my trusty Nikon and a big Vivitar flash in-hand, I shoot a few frames, which cause us to immediately be approached by employees that want to know what we are doing. The administrators with us explain everything, which send the staff running for the manager. The manager appears, again the administrators explain our purpose, and then something amazing happens. In a loud voice, he tells ALL the customers to leave the store, he sends the staff home, and he turns out the lights. He says I will take pictures to make it look like Russians are fighting over food, and he will be blamed. So now that everyone is gone, it is okay, and we can stay and take pictures. Our administrative colleagues are in disbelief, and Elisabeth thinks the whole thing is hysterical.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, July 6, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #11:
Fish Farms #11: On our way to photograph a popular Moscow market that sells ONLY aquaculture products, I am photographing discreetly from our host’s chauffeured car. Driving through the city, I notice a constant military presence, and ponder how Elisabeth and I are being “managed.” Surely our hotel has constant surveillance on us, and we are jumping through bureaucratic hoops trying to do some inter-Russia travel. Are there others who track us also, even though we are accompanied? Were we followed on our walk around Red Square on the previous day? I was carrying a camera and taking pictures in a very public place. Then, this happened. Moscow is a BIG city. We have driven around it coming in from the airport, to get to hosted dinners, and now to visit the aquaculture market, so is it just serendipity that a similar-looking blue van (post #7), joined us in the traffic flow as we were driving in from the airport? In the course of the day, I see several more as our drive continues, so I finally ask our hosts if they know the purpose of these vehicles, and the only response I receive is that they are for “public service.”
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, June 29, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #10:
Fish Farms #10: Today we are still in Moscow , hoping to be allowed to travel to the Volga to photograph sturgeon/caviar farming. While we await permission, our Russian colleagues are going to take us to see a market, unique in the world, because it only sells aquaculture products, and it is very popular. Once again, we have a cold, grey day, but the car has a heater, and the drive through the city offers me new views. Much of the city seems very industrial, and construction is going on everywhere. I also see a surprising presence of the military. Elisabeth and I have been so pleasantly “managed” that it is easy to forget, this is Cold War Russia in 1977. Although our hosts are comfortable with me taking “discreet” pictures, I assume that, even though they are our hosts, they are still “watching” Elisabeth and me, and they would object if they thought we were doing something inappropriate. I also felt pretty sure we are being thoroughly watched at our hotel, and it causes me to ponder if there were others tracking our activities.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, June 22, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #9:
Fish Farms #9: Our second day in Moscow is spent walking about in the cold with Elisabeth’s friends while we visit some national monuments, such as Red Square , and another nearby location that displays historic Russian armament (above). While Elisabeth is gleaning information and taking notes in her talking walk, she and I are both disappointed that we have no fishfarm subjects to photograph, as yet. This day is a sightseeing distraction for us while we await permission to go the Volga to see sturgeon farming, and it does seem that there is not much else for us to photograph related to our project, other than an exclusively aquaculture market we will see tomorrow. We are all cold after some hours out and about, so we return to the hotel early, and rest, because a special evening has been planned. We are going to the historic Russian opera house, to have dinner with our associates, and view a performance of Rigoletto . Dinner is champagne and pastries. Rigoletto is weird, especially drunk on champagne, and later, back at the hotel, I find myself beginning to wonder about the results of this trip, as it does not seem to be particularly productive at the moment.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, June 15, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #8:
Fish Farms #8: Being food poisoned is not fun, especially when the bathroom is one that is shared, AND down the hall from your room. Nonetheless, I survive my evening ordeal AND learn something that serves me well throughout my entire life – ALWAYS carry Pepto-Bismol chewable tabs. The next morning I am functional, but their is no word about permission to go to the Volga river farming, and the Moscow aquaculture market is closed, so our group of friends takes Elisabeth and me, sightseeing. Red Square is first on the list of locations to which we all walk. It is one of those days where “the sullen Russian skies go on forever,” so Red Square seems pretty grey, AND it is cold. I do not revisit being sick after breakfast, so by lunch, I am ready to eat again, and also grateful to go inside for awhile where it is warmer. Lunch is great. Very “European,” with no unknown ingredients, and no after effects, either. I remain hopeful being sick was a brief event. As the day wears on, Elisabeth tells me she is concerned that we are not really getting anything accomplished, and that if the Russians do not show us something soon, we would leave for India.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, June 8, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #7:
Fish Farms #7: My first view of Red Square is fleeting as we pass by rather quickly in the private car that is taking us to our hotel. We will return here as part of a tour tomorrow, but for right now, I am going to tell you what I could NOT photograph. Our hotel was huge, and a bit worn about the edges, but comfortable enough. Men and women were placed on different floors, and there was a “housekeeper” sitting at a desk in front of the elevators on every floor to assure the “rules” were enforced. There were no rooms with toilets. Each floor had a number of “water closets” that all shared. After checking in, our first day is spent at casual meals with Elisabeth’s administrative friends, as plans are made for what we will see. Elisabeth wants to go to the Volga to see sturgeon farming, one of Russia’s most financially successful forms of aquaculture because of the value of caviar – sturgeon eggs. That requests seems to carry complications and a need for permits, so in the meantime our hosts will keep us distracted with some sightseeing. They also want us to visit the largest, and only, exclusively aquaculture product supermarket in the world, here in Moscow. In the meantime, Elisabeth’s “smaller” circle of friends wants to have a quiet banquet with us this evening. Thus, ten or so of us meet in a nice restaurant away from our hotel, and have a decent meal that does not seem too strange to me, mostly meat and potatoes, a few veggies, and an AWESOME amount of alcohol, both Vodka and champagne. Later, back at the hotel, I am both REALLY drunk AND I have terrible food poisoning. The “water closet thing” is not a fun trek, and this seems like a tough way to start a trip around-the-world.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, June 1, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #6:
Fish Farms #6: As the official car in which Elisabeth Mann Borgese and I are being driven into Moscow gets closer to city center, the “neighborhoods” where people live, give way to the dramatic architecture at the heart of the capitol. Many buildings built during the Stalin era, were designed to be ornately impressive, AND of notable scale. Our hotel is to be such a place, and we are informed that the location above is similar. It has a great ballroom where we will be hosted at a huge dinner, a few evenings from now. Against the morning sky it all seems a little like Gotham to me, but our new “friends” speak good English, know Elisabeth well, and seem very congenial, so I continue to shoot “discreetly,” and we motor on, soon to pass-by Red Square .
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, May 25, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #5:
Fish Farms #5: Having arrived, and survived, Moscow airport in the pre-dawn hours of the day, Elisabeth and I are now in a car with various friends and officials headed to our hotel. I am surreptitiously taking pictures from the car as we drive along because I have been advised to be “discreet.” It is early spring of 1977 and Moscow still has snow. It is the Cold War Soviet Union , and it is cold. As we draw closer to the city, housing density increases and seems familiarly “European” to me, EXCEPT for the dramatic wall murals that appear with some regularity. Although I cannot read them, it is clear that most promote the Russian worker, and the work ethic. I think “ Orwell ”. Good graphics though, and I am a big fan of red as a dramatic color. Things begin to change, however, while our ride continues ever deeper into the heart of Moscow, particularly the scale of the architecture.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, May 18, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #4:
Fish Farms #4: I spend 2-days at the Thomas Mann home in Zurich recovering from my time-zone travel changes, and preparing for an around-the-world journey with Elisabeth Mann Borgese , his distinguished daughter. She and I have packed impressively light, considering we will be on the road for two months, so our journey to the airport for our first flight seems well prepared and very manageable. All proceeds without incident, until we have to pass carry-on luggage through x-ray and I ask for a hand check to protect my film from exposure. I am refused, and when I suggest my “legal” rights, police with automatic weapons step up behind me, and tell me to x-ray the film or be taken out of the airport. On the plane bound for Moscow, Elisabeth and I are filling out “declaration” forms, and I read “no more than 100 rolls of film allowed” and “no more than 2 camera bodies allowed,” and I begin to sense I have a problem. I have 150 rolls of film, and 3 camera bodies. I am headed to the capitol of the Soviet Union at the height of the Cold War and my “journalist’s” appearance, and amount of equipment looks like it is going to a problem. Fortunately, upon a dawn arrival, the airport is quiet, and we are greeted by a gaggle of dignitaries. As a consequence there is little customs inspection of my gear. We are treated to an official car with our hosts, and are off to a hotel. They know I have come to take pictures, so when I ask if I can do so from the car, I am told I can, IF I am “discreet.” It is winter. It is dawn. It is weird. It is cold. This going to be an “interesting” trip.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, May 11, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #3:
Fish Farms #3: Elisabeth Mann Borgese is a friend of mine, and respected author, who is working on a new book about fishfarming for Abrams Books . She is going to go around-the-world collecting research, and she wants me to travel with her to take pictures. England and France are the extent of my foreign travel experience, and If I go with her, my journey would start in Switzerland, then Russia, India, Thailand, the Philippines, Indonesia, Hong Kong/China, Japan, and lastly back in the US, Hawaii. My family is concerned for my health and safety. My photography community friends think I am making a bad career choice because it is “commercial” work. Companies, however, recognize my opportunity and fully support me. Nikon and Olympus give me state of the art cameras and lenses; Vivitar provides a great strobe system; and, Pelican gives me a beautiful, waterproof, locking aluminum case. Along with that gear, I pack 150 rolls of film, get a bunch of visa’s, take A LOT of inoculations, and I am off. I fly LA to NY, change planes, then on to Zurich overnight, arriving there at dawn. Elisabeth has instructed me to have a cab bring me to her father’s family home, on a beautiful peninsula that extends into Lake Zurich . This was the home of Thomas Mann . I will recover here for two days, and then she and I will head for Moscow to begin our work. So far, so good!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, May 4, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #2:
Fish Farms #2: Elisabeth Mann Borgese , is the daughter of Thomas Mann . She is also a Senior Fellow at the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions in Santa Barbara, and Director of the International Ocean Institute in Malta , in which role she has authored a proposed Law of the Sea Treaty. My high school friend, and surfing companion, Sam Scranton, manages her SB home and her 4 dogs, when she travels, and I get to know her very well. Our relationship begins when I attend Brooks Institute in 1971, and I am around her house on a regular basis to see Sam and ride waves. In 1972, I enter the M.F.A. program at the newly opened California Institute of the Arts, so I move back to LA, but I visit SB often to see Sam, surf, and stay in touch with Elisabeth, who is quite fun to be around. After graduating CalArts, I travel a good bit, working on images for what will become my first published portfolio of prints, “ WINTERS: 1970-1980 ”, and shooting stories about backcountry skiing for POWDER magazine . I am also working with the Los Angeles Center for Photographic Studies, curating a number of exhibits and small publications. Elisabeth has “followed” my career, and now she has proposed a new book for Abrams around the subject of aquaculture. She is going to travel around the world to 8 countries, collecting research, and doing interviews with scientists. She has received a lot of images from various scientists, so the technical photographs already exist, but Abrams loves a “beautiful picture” book, and they are concerned that photographs of the fishfarm settings are underwhelming. They suggest to Elisabeth that she take a photographer with her on her journey, and she says she knows just the person. Thus, in late 1976, Sam calls to tell me Elisabeth wants to talk with me about a commission, and I should come to Santa Barbara.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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Friday, April 27, 2018
FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #1:
Fish Farms #1: I graduated from UCLA in 1970, and in 1971, spent a year attending the Brooks Institute in Santa Barbara, learning to shoot with large format cameras, and print color. My longtime friend from high school and summers in Hawaii, Sam Scranton , ( posts #7, #12, #33-#38 ) went to UCSB , and began working as a property manager for Elisabeth Mann Borgese , a internationally known and respected author, philosopher, and politician. Elisabeth had a sprawling home on the beach in Montecito , and she had four dogs (who could play the piano). She also traveled a great deal, spending time writing at her family home in Switzerland, and in Malta, where she directed the International Ocean Institute. Sam took care of the CA home and the dogs, and as we were old surfing buddies, and there was a great break right in front of the house, many days after classes at Brooks, I would come down to the beach and we would go surfing. At some point in those visits, I met Elisabeth, and she liked me right away because I was a dog-lover. When she was around, there were many daily walks on the beach with the “pack,” and I often joined. Elisabeth grew comfortable with my presence, so I was always welcome at her house. I also joined in many dinners. She served as a Fellow at the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions when she was in Santa Barbara, and mealtime conversations ranged from political world views, to sexual politics, conservation, and, her favorite, in particular, the OCEAN – ocean law, ocean management, oceans as a resource, oceans as habitat. They were always interesting evenings.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
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London’s secret hotspot: Brockley

What’s on London’s secret hotspot: Brockley
Brockley brings a village feel to London living and it’s a quiet favourite amongst the city’s creatives Ben West 05 Apr 2019
Unlike many of London’s neighbourhoods, with their seemingly overnight gentrification and rampant property development, Brockley has quietly evolved, retaining its creative vibe and community-driven, village-like atmosphere.
Leafy and overlooked, property prices shot up in Brockley the moment London Overground arrived in 2012, triggering an influx of quirky cafés, bars and restaurants, artisan bakeries and independent stores.
These include independent coffee shop and yummy mummy magnet Arlo and Moe, craft beer hangout the London Beer Dispensary, micro-brewery The Brockley Brewery, and delicatessens such as the popular Brockley Deli with its extensive range of swanky foods and drinks and menus covering breakfast to evening with bar snacks and cocktails.
Sandwiched between New Cross, Lewisham, Catford and East Dulwich, this corner of south London boasts lovely open green spaces, such as Hilly Fields, which has a peerless view of the city, and Brockley and Ladywell Cemeteries.
For nightlife, in its historic heart, Crofton Park, there’s the splendid, pristine Grade II listed Rivoli Ballroom, originally a cinema dating from 1913 and remodelled as a 1950s art deco dance hall, which has been used in numerous films, fashion shoots and music videos. For culture there’s the Brockley Jack Theatre, frequently voted one of London’s best fringe theatres. Rivoli Ballroom, Brockley
Artistic flair is also demonstrated by the striking graffiti art emblazoned on a number of buildings and walls in the area. The high quota of creatives here has spawned the Brockley Max Festival, which celebrates local talent with live music, theatre and art each June.
On Saturdays there’s Brockley Market, which has great street food, and Brockley’s burgeoning food scene plays host to an eclectic mix of restaurants and cafes, the best of which are below: The Orchard
Tucked down a side road, I’ve passed The Orchard during the day numerous times and assumed, with its groups of mums and toddlers, workers on laptops and friends catching up over a coffee, that it was just another modern cafe with an unremarkable menu. But the moment I walked in during one evening and glimpsed the menu it was obvious that The Orchard is far more than that.
Seated by a wall of exposed brick and bookshelves mounted around a large fish tank, and other walls decked out with an eclectic mix of artworks, jazz and reggae posters, flasks, bottles – and a blue watering can of all things – I had the onerous task of choosing from a selection of 16 tempting cocktails (ranging from £7.50 to £8.95). I plumped for a Hedgerow Fizz, consisting of house-infused blackberry Beefeater London Dry Gin, rosehip, lemon and prosecco, and it proved to be a gleaming red sweet, sour and refreshing beacon of light..
With delights such as braised pork shoulder and seared yellowfin tuna loin with wasabi croquettes on the menu, the Orchard really is a highlight of the Brockley food scene.
The Orchard, 5 Harefield Road, SE4 1LW; 020 8692 4756; thebrockleyorchard.com Masala Wala
When I arrived here at 7.30pm and no-one else was in the restaurant, I wondered whether I’d been misinformed at how good Masala Wala is. But I wasn’t to worry: half an hour later this unpretentious little cafe restaurant was completely full.
It serves traditional Pakistani cuisine, which is subtlety different from Indian food. If you want popadoms and a chicken tikka masala, this isn’t the place to come, as Masala Wala offers down-to-earth home cooking that is generally less rich and oily than typical Indian fare.
The menu is very small, changing every month, with two vegan and two meat main dishes (£9-12), and mung daal (£4), roti flatbreads (£4), katchumber (£4), a simple salad with cumin and condiments on the side.
Being a small, family-run affair, they decided to focus on a small menu done well rather than a large one done not so successfully. I tried the Baingan Gosht, which featured deliciously crumbly and delicately spiced lamb with aubergine, followed by excellent homemade pistachio kulfi ice cream (£5).
Masala Wala, 5 Brockley Cross, SE4 2AB; 020 3659 4055; masalawalacafe.co.uk Brickfields
Essentially Brickfields is a cocktail bar rather than a restaurant, although it does have a menu of small plates, burgers and bar snacks.
Rather more upmarket than its surroundings, it’s cosy and dark, busy yet laid back, with its various plants giving it a slightly tropical feel. There’s a front bar and a quieter back room, and the clientele are generally young. Whilst the plates we sampled were quite generous – for example Padron peppers (£4.50), char-grilled asparagus and baby gem (£6.00), and crispy calamari, teriyaki and plum sauce (£8.20) – the food is an afterthought and you essentially come here for the relaxing vibe and the swish drinks.
The Brick Spritz (£8.50), with Beefeater gin, strawberry, limoncello, prosecco, elderflower, mint and lime, was pleasant indeed, as was the Bloody Tommy (£8.50), with Olmeca Reposado Tequila, blood oreange, blue Agave nectar and lime.
Brickfields, 293 Brockley Road, SE4 2SA; 020 8691 1617; brickfieldsbar.com Meze Mangal
This large, very popular Turkish restaurant doesn’t look so much from the street but step inside and you’re almost transported to Istanbul with the Turkish music playing in the background and shish kebabs sizzling on the charcoal grill.
Though it won’t win any interior design awards the place was buzzing. The restaurant gets through 100-150 shoulders of lamb alone each week – each marinated for 48 hours – and it was easy to see how, with every table taken and people patiently waiting by the door for a seat.
After a selection of tasty starters (£2.50-5.00) including Imam Bayildi (aubergine stuffed with onions and tomato), Acili Ezme (tomato, peppers, onions and parsley in lemon juice, tomato puree and herbs) and lahmacum (Turkish pizza topped with minced meat), the mains, Adana Kofte (spicy minced lamb kebab, £14.50) and Bildircin (grilled quails, £11.50) had a special and distinct flavour, courtesy of the big wood oven in the corner.
Meze Mangal, 245 Lewisham Way, SE4 1XF; 020 8694 8099; mezemangal.co.uk The Babur
This is perhaps Brockley’s most outstanding restaurant and I should think one of the best Indian restaurants in the country. Established in 1985, it continually strives to be innovative. The menu features curries using ostrich, buffalo, quail, Balmoral Estate red deer and Grassingham duck. It is screaming to be different.
Every dish is a completely new take on Indian cooking: crispy tapioca coated beetroot cutlet; char-grilled cottage cheese, Rajasthani masala, green beans, dal makhani; Kasundi king prawn, green papaya murabba: my companion and I tried both the vegetarian and non-vegetarian tasting menus (£56.95 and £58.95 respectively), each being five delicious courses paired perfectly with old and new world wines that were ideal companions. Not one dish disappointed.
The restaurant itself is delightful: at the entrance there’s a kitch and colourful lifesize Indian tiger statue and when you step inside you set eyes on both smart decor and a huge vase of fabulous flowers. The attention to detail continues, from the striking specially commissioned artworks on the walls, the curvy American plywood panels that despite looking like something out of a 1960s airport completely work, the elegant table covers and dishes perfectly presented on earthenware, slate, wood, ink black plates and more.
The Babur, 119 Brockley Rise, SE23 1JP; 020 8291 2400; babur.info See also

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This place is wonderful, the owner created a very tasteful, beautiful place restoring a historical building with only high quality items and love for every detail. We really liked the small garden and the roof terrace, where you can have a glass of Indian wine. It is a family run hotel with everyone contributing to the nice atmosphere, also the hired staff is polite and friendly. Food is traditional indian cuisine, sofisticate and comes in great amount. It is an island of peace in Jaipur’s constant buzz.
Stayed in April 2019

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What To Do: April means Cherry Blossom time

Home Uncategorized What To Do: April means Cherry Blossom time What To Do: April means Cherry Blossom time Apr 5th, 2019 · 0 Comment
By Denny Dyroff , Entertainment Editor, The Times Sakura Week at Shofuso
If you want to see hundreds of lovely trees showing off their pink blossoms, you can find what you want at the Subaru Cherry Blossom Festival ( http://subarucherryblossom.org ), which is known in Japanese as Sakura Matsuri. The event is running April 6-14 at a variety of locations around the Philadelphia area.
For centuries, Japan has been celebrating the beauty of the elegant pink cherry blossom with picnics under the trees and traditional music and dance performances.
The Subaru Cherry Blossom Festival offers visitors the opportunity to explore the best of Japanese culture including delicious cuisine, delicate craft displays, intriguing performances and demonstrations of traditional customs.
Sakura Week at Shofuso will be held from April 6-13 at Shofuso (Horticultural and Lansdowne Drives, Philadelphia). Visitors will be able to take in the splendor of the cherry blossoms at one of the top-ranked Japanese gardens in North America. In addition to the spectacular scenery and 17th-century-style Japanese house, Sakura Week will feature daily demonstrations, highlighting a different element of Japanese culture each day — tea, taiko, gardening, kimono dressing, and more.
Shofuso will be open daily until 8:30 PM during the festival.
All Sakura Week events free with regular admission to Shofuso : $12 general admission, $8 students with ID, seniors, youth 6-17.
The centerpiece event is Sakura Sunday, a day-long outdoor celebration of all things Japanese. It will be held on April 14 from 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. at Fairmount Park’s Horticulture Center (100 North Horticulture Drive, Philadelphia). Tickets are $15 for adults with children (12 and under) admitted free.
Sakura Sunday features live music and dance performances, martial arts, cultural demonstrations, arts & crafts, karaoke, and much more. Some of the featured attractions are Little Akiba Anime & Cosplay Area, Subaru Sushi Samurai of the Year, Prettiest Pet in Pink Parade, Harajuku Fashion Show and Shofuso Tours.
The Sake Garden at Shofuso will be held from April 6-13.
The Sake Garden, a pop-up beer garden, is Philadelphia’s take on the Japanese tradition of cherry blossom picnics. Visitors can enjoy beer, cocktails, and Asian fusion fare beneath the trees in Fairmount Park. The Sake Garden is located along the walking path towards the gazebo and sundial.
Longwood Gardens (Route 1, Kennett Square, 610-388-1000, www.longwoodgardens.org ) is presenting a special celebration of spring.
At “Spring Blooms,” which is running through May 5, visitors can enjoy hundreds of lush acres featuring burgeoning gardens of daffodils, tulips, magnolias, azaleas, flowering cherries and more than 240,000 flowering bulbs.
This a great time to explore all of Longwood’s 1,100 acres. As colorful spring blooms make their entrance, Longwood radiates with renewal and growth.
Early spring bulbs like glory-of-the-snow, winter-aconite, and crocus first herald the season’s arrival, with gorgeous tulips, wisteria, and flowering trees deepening our lush spring tapestry of color, fragrance, and warmth.
In the indoor part of “Spring Blooms,” lilies, delphiniums, hydrangeas and other spring blossoms fill the conservatory with color. Also featured are Longwood’s grand treehouses, whimsical Topiary Garden, and colorful Idea Garden.
Knowledge also blooms this spring as Longwood focuses on the many learning opportunities the site offers. No matter your age, interest, or skill, Longwood has exciting education programs, as well as walks and talks with our horticulturists, educators, and students.
Admission to Longwood Gardens is $23 for adults, $20 for seniors and $12 for students.
The Brandywine Valley has established a reputation for being horse country. It is an area with many horse farms and an annual calendar filled with equestrian events.
The local schedule of annual equestrian events features a variety of top-flight horse shows, dressage events, Grand Prix events and point-to-point races. Brandywine Hills Point-To-Point Races
The 2019 season will shift into gear this weekend with the 77th Annual Brandywine Hills Point-To-Point Races, which will be held April 7 on the grounds of the Brandywine Valley Association’s 318-acre Myrick Conservation Center (1760 Unionville-Wawaset Road, Unionville, 610-793-1090, www.brandywinewatershed.org ).
The Brandywine Valley Association’s popular annual early-spring event is a family-oriented event which also features an array of activities for youngsters, including crafts activities.
Gates will open at 11 a.m. with children’s activities such as “Pennies in the Hay” (kids are invited to scour a stack of hay for coins), face painting and stick pony races.
The steeplechase racing event features a challenging three-mile course with 17 timber jumps. The Brandywine Hills Point-to-Point races are sponsored by the Radnor Hunt.
The races begin at noon with the Field Master Chase. It is followed by the children’s races, with the adult Ladies Race resuming at 1:45 after the parade of hounds. The Heavyweight race is at 2:15 p.m.; the Novice Race is at 2:45 p.m.; the Open Race is at 3:15 p.m.; and the Owner-Rider Foxhunter’s Race closing out the day at 3:45.
There will also be a vendor area featuring dealers with a wide variety of horse and racing items as well as vendors with hot and cold food items and beverages. Another special attraction this year will be a raffle with an array of impressive prizes.
Tickets for the well-attended annual event are $20 per car. Kennett Square’s First Friday Art Stroll
On April 5, it will be time for another installment of Kennett Square’s First Friday Art Stroll in downtown Kennett Square ( http://historickennettsquare.com/recreation-culture/art-stroll/ ).
Kennett Square’s Art Stroll is a monthly celebration of the local art scene as it is showcased in the galleries, shops and restaurants throughout town. Residents and visitors alike are encouraged to stroll the tree-lined streets and browse the many businesses that stay open late.
There will be a musical reception at Square Par Gallery — “Poetry of the Body” with music by the Al Moretti Trio. Moretti is a painting jazz musician, trumpeter, and composer.
The Art Stroll runs from 6-9 p.m. on the first Friday of each month. After 5 p.m. on Friday, visitors can take advantage of free parking anywhere in the Parking Garage and at any street meter.
First Friday in West Chester will take place on April 5 starting at 5 p.m.
Shops and boutiques are open late on the First Friday of each month to show off their newest seasonal fashions and giftware items.
Visitors will have the opportunity to browse the in-store specials and enjoy complimentary refreshments while they explore the variety of unique items each shop has to offer.
There is free parking after 5 p.m. on all First Fridays at street meters and in metered surface lots. All garages are still pay-to-park. However, the Justice Center Garage is free after 5 p.m. on Friday and remains free through Sunday.
There will also be First Friday happenings in Lancaster tonight.
Lancaster’s popular First Friday ( http://www.visitlancastercity.com/first-friday/ ) is an arts extravaganza that runs from 5-9 p.m. on April 5. Visitors to downtown Lancaster will have the opportunity to discover innovative exhibitions, performances and perhaps a few surprises as they walk the streets lined with trees and distinctive architecture.
Unique boutiques and excellent restaurants complement the art galleries, artisan studios, museums, performing groups, professional theater, symphony orchestra and art college that form Lancaster’s arts community. First Friday, Old City Philadelphia
Another First Friday event this weekend will take place in Old City Philadelphia (230 Vine Street and locations throughout Old City Philadelphia, 215- 625-9200, www.oldcitydistrict.org ).
On the first Friday of each month — year-round — Old City’s galleries, studios, shops and restaurants open their doors for First Friday, in an epic exhibition of the neighborhood’s vibrant arts scene.
Old City Arts Association launched First Friday in 1991 to introduce Philadelphia to the improving neighborhood and the artists and designers who were bringing it back to life.
Two decades later, Old City is a nationally recognized arts destination, named in 2013 as one of the country’s top ArtPlaces by the ArtPlace Foundation. On the first Friday evening of every month, the streets of Old City fill with art lovers of all kinds who wander among the neighborhood’s 40-plus galleries, most of which are open from 5-9 p.m.
Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library (Route 52 just south of the Pennsylvania state line, Wilmington, Delaware, 800-448-3883, http://www.winterthur.org ) has just opened another blockbuster exhibit.
After the unprecedented success of its Downton Abbey exhibit a few years ago, Winterthur has again turned its focus to a popular television series set in the past in England.
Now through January 5, 2020, Winterthur is presenting “Costuming THE CROWN.” The exhibition is the first global comprehensive exhibition of costumes from the first two seasons of the hit Netflix show.
From the dazzling gold of Queen Elizabeth’s coronation robe to the simple sophistication of Princess Margaret’s wedding dress, “Costuming THE CROWN” features 40 iconic costumes from the beloved Emmy® and Golden Globe award-winning drama “The Crown.” The Netflix Original series, produced by Left Bank Pictures in association with Sony Pictures Television, is a dramatized history of Queen Elizabeth II’s early reign – an era when the fragile social order established after the Second World War broke apart.
Beginning with spectacle and pageantry, “Costuming THE CROWN,” reveals everything from the majesty of royal crowns and tiaras to the private outfits worn by the royal family behind the palace doors.
This intriguing exhibition provides a behind-the-scenes look at how costume design is used to complement riveting drama, re-create history, and define characters from the footmen to the queen. Visitors can see how Emmy®- and BAFTA-winning designers Michele Clapton and Jane Petrie worked painstakingly to be authentic in the detailing of everything from King George’s medals and military ribbons to Queen Elizabeth’s iconic dresses for royal tours.
“Costuming THE CROWN” explains the significance and importance of costume design to the story. Visitors will move through four sections in the exhibition, beginning with “Establishing Roles,” which explores the transformative nature of costume, looking at the ensembles worn for the coronation of Elizabeth II in 1953. With these impressive garments, steeped in history, the young Princess Elizabeth takes on her new role and becomes the queen in much the same way the actors are transformed into their roles through costume.
“Dressing the Part” explores the replica costumes, based on extensive photographic and video archive research, and considers how clothing signifies status. By looking at a variety of costumes―from a schoolboy uniform and official military uniforms to the exquisite outfits worn to attend a royal wedding―we see the role of clothing in indicating one’s place in society.
“Creating Character” investigates scenes in which the costume designers were allowed to interpret the characters’ looks with their own designs and explores private moments in their daily lives.
“Capturing the Image,” the final section of the exhibition, looks at clothing worn by the queen and others in actual photographs and on television, highlighting the imagery the royal family chose to assert its status and to cultivate its public persona.
Winterthur, which is known for its impressive collection of American decorative arts, naturalistic gardens, and research library for the study of American art and material culture, offers a variety of tours, exhibitions, programs, and activities throughout the year.
General admission includes a tour of some of the most notable spaces in the 175-room house as well as access to the Winterthur Garden and Galleries, special exhibitions, a narrated tram tour (weather permitting), the Campbell Collection of Soup Tureens, and the Enchanted Woods children’s garden.
Admission fees are $20 for adults, $18 for students and seniors, and $6 for ages 2–11. Museum hours are 10 a.m-5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Legos at the Philadelphia Zoo
(3400 West Girard Avenue, Philadelphia, www.philadelphiazoo.org ) is one of America’s premier zoological attractions. Last year, the Philadelphia Zoo, which is accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, welcomed more than 1.25 million visitors.
As great as the Zoo is, it is never content to just rest on its laurels. On April 6, the Zoo will kick-off spring of 2019 with an exciting new exhibit, the return of a Philadelphia tradition, and a new food destination.
Beginning this weekend, visitors to the Zoo will be able to experience “Creatures of Habitat” and take a fantastic adventure visiting 12 amazing life-size LEGO® brick vignettes situated throughout the Zoo. This gazillion piece journey shares the issues animals are facing around the world and spotlights the heroes working to save them. Each life-sized LEGO® brick scene is intricately fashioned from thousands of LEGO® bricks and is on exhibit only at Philadelphia Zoo through September 30th.
““Creatures of Habitat” has been in the works for 10 years,” said Philadelphia Zoo Chief Marketing Officer Amy Shearer, during a phone interview last week. “The fragility of habitats is always a big part of this mission of the zoo. Humans occupy a big part of the earth’s surface and really affect wildlife. For this exhibit, we decided to use the medium of LEGOs.
“This is a special way we wanted to show animals and their habitats. We have 12 life-sized and/or bigger scenes that take place around the zoo. We have a really big polar bear and a big lion. We also have bigger-than-life-sized creations like a brilliantly colored chameleon that is five-and-a-half feet tall. Sean’s work is really stunning.”
“Creatures of Habitat” highlights the zoo community’s role in protecting wildlife. Crafted by Sean Kenney, one of only seven American LEGO® certified professional artisans in the world, “Creatures of Habitat” features more than 30 life-size animal sculptures built from hundreds of thousands of tiny LEGO® bricks. Fragile in the wild, some on the brink of extinction, the species represented in these vignettes range from Borneo to Brazil and the Arctic Circle to Africa, and in size from a 500-pound polar bear to the delicate golden lion tamarin.
According to Vikram H. Dewan, President and CEO of the Philadelphia Zoo, “Every child – and adult– can relate to the universal desire to protect our planet, this place we all call home. And there is no better time to bring back the famous Zoo Key, one of the most nostalgic and memorable items for the millions of children and adults that visit the Zoo and build deep connections with wildlife from around the globe.”. While visiting” Creatures of Habitat,” guests can use the Zoo Key at audio books located at each LEGO® brick sculpture as well as other areas throughout the Zoo. Visitors can unlock insider secrets and stories about the magnificent creatures living at Philadelphia Zoo, told by animal keepers who care for them.
The “Zoo Key” is a Philadelphia tradition that began many, many years ago.
“People who now are parents tell us how they came here as kids and had their Zoo Keys back then,” said Shearer. “So, we’re excited to bring it back. It was discontinued in the early 2000s. Before that, it ran for decades. Many people still have and hold their original keys as a keepsake to cherish. The.
Also opening on the same day as “Creatures of Habitat” is The Urban Green, a new open-air food marketplace and chill zone designed in partnership with Groundswell Design Group. The Urban Green offers an array of delicious options from fresh, delicious sandwiches and custom fries to frequently changing craft beers and vibrant wines.
There are a lot of attractions that bring people back to the Philadelphia Zoo year-after-year.
Animals are on the move like never before at Philadelphia Zoo with Zoo360, a first-in-the-world system of see-through trails passing through treetops, crossing over pathways and connecting habitats, giving animals like amazing big cats, majestic primates and marvelous meerkats the opportunities to travel and explore.
Visitors can check out the Zoo’s new baby western lowland gorillas, baby giraffe, hippos, white rhino, zebras, red pandas, Amur tigers and explore the site’s 42-acre Victorian garden. Other popular attractions are KeyBank Big Cat Falls, PECO Primate Reserve, McNeil Avian Center and KidZooU, a wildlife academy that offers dynamic displays, rare breeds and hands-on experiences.
Philadelphia Zoo is the second highest ticketed attraction in Philadelphia, one of the region’s foremost conservation organizations and home to nearly 1,300 animals, many rare and endangered.
Admission to the Philadelphia Zoo is $24 for adults and $19 for children (ages 2-11).
On April 6, there will be a “Star Party at Hoopes Park” (700 Hoopes Park Lane, West Chester, www.west-chester.com/139/Parks-Recreation ). Guests can join West Chester Recreation and the Chester County Astronomical Society from 8-9:30 p.m. at Hoopes Park for the celestial event.
Members of the Chester County Astronomical Society, a group of amateur astronomers, will bring telescopes and expertise to Hoopes Park to share the wonders of the night sky. As the glow of the Sun fades, participants will see the red planet Mars near a beautiful star cluster called the Pleiades, which is also known as The Seven Sisters.
The winter constellations will be setting in the west and stargazes can look at the Orion Nebula in Orion the Hunter. The Beehive Cluster will be high in the sky and Leo the Lion will be in center stage in the south.
It’s time for National Unicorn Day and Brandywine Ace Pet & Farm (1150 Pocopson Road, West Chester, https://www.facebook.com/events/404863323420508/?active_tab=about ) is ready to help you celebrate.
On April 7 from noon-2 p.m., Brandywine Ace is hosting its Second Annual National Unicorn Day celebration.
Visitors are encouraged to bring their cameras because the event’s organizers will be offering a free photo opportunity with a “REAL UNICORN!”
In addition to the appearance by the horse with a horn, the event will feature face printing, cotton candy, and a make-and-take craft.
Chaddsford Winery (632 Baltimore Pike, Chadds Ford, 610-388-6221, www.chaddsford.com ) is hosting an event called “Friday Night Wine Down” Every Friday Night now through October 25 from 5-9 p.m. each night.
Happy Hour specials will run from 5-7 p.m. and feature “half off” on glasses of selected wines and specialty wine cocktails. The evenings will also feature food truck fare, live music, board games, and popular local wine, beer, and cocktails.
The following are the weekly specials for this month — April 5: Sunset Blush specials, Rosie Blush Coolers and Sangria Cocktails, Food Truck fare from Madi’s on a Roll; April 12: Chaddsford White specials, The Black Lab and The Regal Beagle cocktails, Food Truck fare from Ka’Chai; and April 19: Release of Dry Rosé, Dry Rosé specials, Blushing Sweetheart and Sunset Cosmo cocktails, Live Music by Joshua Howard and Food Truck fare from The Plum Pit.
May’s schedule includes — May 3: Live Music by Joshua Howard and Food Truck fare from Dump-N-Roll and Gemelli Gelato; May 10: Food Truck fare from Phyllodelphia and Gemelli Gelato; May 17: Food Truck fare from Dump-N-Roll and Gemelli Gelato; May 24: Live Music by Marielle Kraft and Food Truck fare from Mama Mia and Gemelli Gelato; and May 31: Food Truck fare from Dos Gringos and Gemelli Gelato.
No outside alcohol permitted. Children are permitted and welcome on Winery grounds only when accompanied and supervised by an adult (over 21).
On April 6, the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania (300 Gap Road, Strasburg, 717-687-8628, www.rrmuseumpa.org ) is presenting a special event called “Rails &Ales,” a craft beer tasting event that will take place among the museum’s amazing historic trains.
Participants are invited to enjoy an evening of responsible adult fun, featuring breweries, food trucks and live music.
Some of the participating breweries at this year’s fourth annual staging of “Rails & Ales” are Moo Duck Brewery, Seven Sirens Brewing Company, Saucony Creek Craft Brewery, Howling Henry’s Brewery, Bald Birds Brewing Company and Stoudt’s Brewing Company.
“Rails & Ales” will run from 6:30-10 p.m. Tickets are $40 and designated driver tickets are available for $15. The Historic Grange Estate
The Historic Grange Estate (143 Myrtle Ave., Haverford Township, https://thegrangeestate.org ) will celebrate its 44th season with the “Spring Opening of Grange Estate” on April 6 and 7.
Tours of the mansion are 1-4 p.m., most Saturdays and Sundays, through October 27, with the last tour beginning at 3:30 p.m. Tours are conducted by volunteers, and admission is $5 for adults, $1 for children 5-10 and free for those under the age of 5.
The Grange Estate’s Gift Shoppe will also be open during tour hours and is brimming with hand-crafted “Made-in-America” gifts.
On April 6 and 7, there will be an “Attic Treasures Sale.” Hours are 8 a.m.-noon on Saturday and 9 a.m.-noon on Sunday.
Hope Lodge (553 South Bethlehem Pike, Fort Washington, 215-343-0965, http://www.ushistory.org/hope/ ) will be presenting “Guided Mansion Tours” on three Sundays this month – April 7, 14 and 28.
Hope Lodge was built between 1743 and 1748 by Samuel Morris, a prosperous Quaker entrepreneur. Morris acted as a farmer, shipowner, miller, iron master, shop owner, and owner of the mill now known as Mather Mill. Hope Lodge is an excellent example of early Georgian architecture, and it is possible that Edmund Woolley, architect of Independence Hall, offered advice in building. Samuel Morris owned the estate until his death in 1770.
Visitors can participate by watching a short film and then taking a tour. Guided tours of the mansion will depart at 1 and 2:30 p.m. all three days.
Tour admission is $8 for adults, $5 for seniors (age 65+) and for youth age 6-17, and fee for children under 5. Hope Lodge is a Blue Star Museum which means that active duty military personnel, including National Guard and Reserve and their families, are admitted free for regular tours from Memorial Day through Labor Day.
The Easter Bunny is known for hopping around but not always. Sometimes, he opts for a different form of locomotion – with real locomotives.
Sometimes, instead of bouncing along the ground, the big happy rabbit rides a train. This weekend, the holiday bunny will start his three-weekend stint of riding trains all around the area.
The New Hope and Ivyland Railroad (32 West Bridge Street, New Hope, 215-862-2332, www.newhoperailroad.com ) is running its annual Easter Bunny Express on April 6 and 7 and again from April 13-21 with departures at starting at 11 a.m.
The Easter Bunny is going to ride onboard the train where he will visit with each child, hand out special treats and pose for pictures. Coach tickets are $34.99 for adults, $32.99 for children (ages 12-plus) and $9.99 for toddlers (under 2).
The train ride departs from and returns to the New Hope Train Station. Riders can take in the sights of early spring as the Easter Bunny visits with all of the children handing out special candy treats and posing for photos taken by the railroad staff.
On April 7 and 14, the Delaware Museum of Natural History (4840 Kennett Pike, Wilmington, Delaware, 302-658-9111, www.delmnh.org ) is hosting its annual “EGGstravaganza Breakfast & Egg Hunt.”
The museum offers this invitation — Enjoy a morning at the Museum and we’ll fix a pancake breakfast for the whole family. After a wonderful meal, watch your children delight as they hunt for treat-filled eggs in our egg hunt through our gardens. Participants are advised to dress accordingly for an outdoor egg hunt. In the event of inclement weather, the egg hunt will be moved inside.
Visitors to the museum can explore the Museum’s exhibits including the current traveling exhibit “Design Zone,” visit the site’s Nature Nook, and make a themed craft.
Tickets are $14 and pre-registration is required.
On April 5, Upper Schuylkill Valley Park (1600 Blackrock Road, Royersford, 610-948-5170) is hosting a special event called “Hippity Hop” starting at 10 a.m.
Participants will have the opportunity to visit the park to meet the site’s adorable resident rabbits. Park guides will talk about wild rabbits as well as their domesticated relatives. A craft will be included to make and take home.
All activities will be outdoors – weather permitting. The event is geared for kids ages 3-7 and the suggested donation is $4 per child
Norristown Farm Park (West Germantown Pike and Barley Sheaf Drive, 2500 Upper Farm Road, Norristown, 610-270-0215, http://www.montcopa.org/874/Norristown-Farm-Park ) is hosting an “Eco-Egg Hunt” on April 7.
The educational egg hunt will be held in two sessions – 2 p.m. for ages 3-5 years and 2:15 p.m. for ages 6-8 years.
Children ages 6–8 will be challenged to find eggs by following a series of ecological clues hidden in eggs that are in the woods and fields. The treasure trove will be found at the end of the hunt.
Younger children (ages 3–5) will simply hunt for eggs. Children ages 3-5 should bring a small basket for collecting. The fee for either event is $1 per child.
On April 6 and 7 and again from April 13-20, there will be a special event called “Hayrides to Bunnyland” at Linvilla Orchards (137 West Knowlton Road, Media, 610-876-7116, www.linvilla.com ).
The hayride to Bunny’s House features a ride in a hay-filled trailer that travels around Linvilla’s grounds and eventually arrives at the house of Linvilla’s Easter Bunny.
Upon arrival, the big, happy rabbit emerges from his house to pose for pictures with his guests. There is a storytelling session, tours of the bunny’s home and seasonal treats for all visitors. Other special activities include pony rides, train rides and face painting
“Hayrides to Bunnyland” run every 15 minutes from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tickets, which are $9 per person, can be purchased in the Garden Center.
The Bucks & Montgomery County Home Show will be held from April 5-7 at the SMG SportsPlex (654 York Road, Warminster, 888-560-3976, www.acshomeshow.com ).
The well-received annual springtime event is geared for homeowners who are interested in remodeling, landscaping and decorating their homes. It features hundreds of exhibits with merchandise, product demonstrations and sample interior and exterior vignettes.
Visitors to the show will be able to check out new products and receive expert advice from professionals. The event is a prime source of information to help people enhance the comfort, functionality, aesthetic appeal and overall value of their homes
The list of exhibitors includes contractors, landscapers, architects and interior designers. There will also be manufacturers’ representatives who will be presenting samples of products and offering ideas to spark inspiration.
Exhibitor categories include kitchens, bathrooms, windows, roofing, siding, general contractors, landscaping, gutters, solar decks, dormers, sunrooms, awnings. basement systems, countertops, doors, flooring, and pavers.
The expansive list also includes waterproofing, generators, HVC, outdoor lighting, plumbing, garage doors, painting, tile and marble, security systems, appliances, electrical services, energy conservation, fireplaces, insulation, and hot tubs.
The show, which features free admission and free parking, will be open from 11 a.m-8 p.m. on Friday, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m.-6 p.m., on Sunday.
Historians have discovered beads that date back almost 40,000 years. The name “bead” is derived from “bede”, which meant “prayer” in Middle English. Beads have been made from a variety of materials and have been used as prayer items, ornamentation, money, decoration and amulets.
Now through April 7, you can get a bead on the subject by attending an event that is all about beads – the Innovative Bead Expo at the Greater Philadelphia Expo Center (100 Station Avenue, Oaks, 610-232-5718, www.phillyexpocenter.com ). This is an event that claims to be the largest bead and jewelry show on the East Coast.
Billed as a “bead and jewelry extravaganza”, the huge annual event will feature hands-on jewelry making classes, informative seminars, beading competitions and a large vendor’ area where visitors can purchase everything from beading supplies to hand-crafted jewelry.
Bead Fest will have close to 180 booths and over 70 workshops which will be presented by experts in the bead and jewelry fields. A number of special techniques will be demonstrated, including, wire weaving, bead stitching, lampworking, metal clay, chain maille, wire and metal, kiln fusing, wire knitting, design, wire and beads, bead crocheting, metal smithing, bead stringing and wire wrapping.
The hours for Bead Fest Spring are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets are $10 and are good for the entire weekend.
The Expo Center is also hosting the 5th Indo American Shopping and Food Fest on April 5 and 6.
Th event, which will run from 4-9 p.m. on Friday and 10 a.m.-9 p.m. on Saturday, will feature “All Things Indian.”
The “Fifth Desi Mela” will feature a large number of vendors with a wide array of items relating to the Indian sub-continent.
There will be attractions and entertainment for all ages including kids’ activities, henna, cooking demonstrations, real estate information, mouth-watering food and Bollywood music with its irrepressible dance numbers.
Admission is $3 payable at the entrance on Saturday and free on Friday. Send article as PDF

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Next Generation Indian Food

((NATS)) ((Rahul Vinod, Co-founder, RASA)) Rasa is a venture that was started by myself and my friend Sahil, and we both have known each other since birth. So, our story actually began with our fathers who both attended catering college in India, and studied there, and worked for some of the top hotels there, before they actually both separately came to the U.S. in the D.C. area 1985. ((NATS)) ((Sahil Rahman, Co-founder, RASA)) When we thought about what we wanted to create, we wanted to bring that authenticity and excitement of Indian culture and Indian cuisine but do it in the way that feels welcoming to people as well. ((NATS)) ((Rahul Vinod, Co-founder, RASA)) In the North, they have the traditional Chicken Tikka Masala, Saag Paneer, Aloo Chole – all those, kind of, more of those popular curries that you’ve tried with the breads. There’s a lot of abundance of rice and coconut and wheat and different things like that in the South, and they are close to the water as well. So, that’s where the seafood component comes in. ((NATS)) ((Sahil Rahman, Co-founder, RASA)) What we’ve done here is, Tandoor is difficult to operate. It’s a little bit dangerous as well. So, we’ve created a custom-built 1,000 degree oven, which we actually slap the naan into. Our shrimp is a traditional South Indian style shrimp, and we marinate it with turmeric, ginger, shallots and green chilies. ((NATS)) ((Rahul Vinod , Co-founder, RASA)) There’s common misconception that no one in India eats beef, but in the south, they do eat beef because there’s a huge Christian population. There are Indian Christians. So, we’ve actually taken that and put that as one of the proteins on our menu here at Rasa. ((NATS)) ((Sahil Rahman, Co-founder, RASA))
In the early 90s, Indian food, Korean food, a lot of these different foods were put into this ethnic category, and a lot of people were scared to try them. And it’s been incredible to see today how far we’ve come, where people are really excited to try something new. ((NATS)) ((Rahul Vinod, Co-founder, RASA)) For us, we really feel that food is the gateway to culture and we hope that by creating really good food in an inviting atmosphere, we can bring people together. People from different backgrounds, different cultures, different races, they can all agree to a good meal. ((NATS))

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Halal-elujah! Eat St. Kabab Factory Is Fresh With Flavor

Halal-elujah! Eat St. Kabab Factory Is Fresh With Flavor
by Steven Doyle
In the Dallas suburbs you will find many, many options for Indian cuisine. Some of that cuisine is in actuality Pakistani or even Nepalese food, and to the neophyte you may not be able to discern the difference. Then we have another subset in the cuisine from Bangladesh.
Dating far in the past, the Bangladeshi cuisine emphasizes fish, vegetables and lentils served with rice. Because of differences in history and Bangladeshi geography, the cuisine is rich in regional variations. While having unique traits, Bangladeshi cuisine is closely related to that of surrounding Bengali and North-East Indian, with rice and fish traditional favorites.
Masala Wings
Masala Lamb Chops
Paya (Beef Feet)
This week we visit a Bangladesh Punjabi restaurant located in Carrollton, in an area that is filled with a variety of Asian cuisine including Chinese, Japanese, Korean and one restaurant which identifies most with Bangaldesh — Eat St. Kabab Factory . You will need to search the location out, but your GPS will toss you directly to the front door with ease.
The restaurant is located on Old Denton just off George Bush. The restaurant itself has an inviting appeal in its decor, one that the owner told us as to make Westerners more comfortable. It actually looks like they might serve cheeseburgers at the restaurant, and in fact they do. An excellent cheeseburger in fact which makes sense if drawing in the crowd they hope to. Someone in your group or family will invariably not enjoy the spices or flavorings of the restaurant, so usher in the cheeseburger that has been deliciously grilled over flames for an impact of flavor.
But for serious diners you will enjoy the vast array of dishes offered at Eat St., all lovingly and masterfully created. A host of appetizers will make everyone smile, from chicken wings, samosas and even a tandoori oven cooked crab cake.
The star of the show are the kababs and you will have plenty of choices from boti (small pieces of meat cooked and marinated with ghee), seekh kababs (spiced and blended meats cooked on a skewer), and tandoori meats and vegetables. All made from a large variety of meat and fish. You will even find charga on the menu which is a whole fried chicken that has been long marinated with a yogurt spice mix.
Karahi Gosht (Goat Curry)
Goat Yakhni Pulao
Most of the entrees will look familiar to the avid Indian cuisine enthusiast, with favorites such as Chicken Tikka Masala, various kormas (creamy yogurt-based sauce), and gosht made with your favorite meat. The word gosht translates into “meat” and is typically goat since Hindus do not eat beef and Islams do not eat pork, but you may enjoy this curry dish with any number of halal meats. There are plenty of vegetarian options as well.
Other selections include an Indian taco and a supply of those aforementioned cheeseburgers including the Hot Mess which is a beef patty topped with cheddar cheese, mayo, jalapeno, spicy sauce a runny fried egg.
Mushroom Burger
The restaurant has no bar but you may BYOB your favorite beer or wine (or the hard stuff if so inclined). But please do try a mango lassi as it will cut through the spices nicely to cool your palate. There are many other fresh fruit flavored lassis to enjoy such as strawberry and watermelon.
There is a fresh buffet for lunches to get you back to work quickly, and plenty of vegetarian choices to enjoy. But you will find a good selection of grilled meats on the buffet.
This is a restaurant that we will frequent often in the future and is now considered our favorite Indian in Dallas. The fresh flavors, seriously wonderful recipes made right every time and a staff that is easy to understand makes Eat St. Kabab Factory a joy.
Eat St. Kabab Factory | 2640 Old Denton, Carrollton | 469.284.5664 Rate this:

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8x Vegan Indian restaurants in Amsterdam

8x Vegan Indian restaurants in Amsterdam
There are many religious movements in India where no animal products are eaten. Most Indian restaurants are therefore familiar with the vegan phenomenon, although they will not call it that themselves. It is therefore rarely a problem to get a dish without animal products in an Indian restaurant. Vegan Indian Restaurants Amsterdam
As a vegan it is wise to pay attention. Paneer, for example, is sometimes confused with tofu, but is actually a type of cheese. In addition, Indian cuisine uses a lot of ghee (clarified butter). There is also vegetable ghee, but there is little chance that it will be used. Naan bread contains yogurt or milk. It is often the case that a curry is topped with a scoop of yogurt or curd. So indicate in advance that you do not eat dairy. 8x Vegan Indian restaurants in Amsterdam Golden Temple restaurant In the atmospheric Utrechtsestraat you will find the oldest vegetarian restaurant in the Netherlands, which has been open almost daily for more than 40 years. You eat here colorful, tasty and healthy dishes without meat or fish. No less than 70% of the dishes are “vegan” and a large part is gluten-free, which is easy to find on the menu with “V” and “GV”. Location: Utrechtsestraat 126, 1017 VT Amsterdam Mayur Indian Restaurant At some restaurants you like to come because you are always surprised with new dishes. In other cases you like to come because you know exactly what to expect, and your favorite dish is always there. At mayur you know what to expect, real northern Indian food. Location: Rijksmuseum and, Korte Leidsedwarsstraat 203 between, Leidseplein, 1017 RB Amsterdam Saravanaa Bhavan An international chain with a huge branch on the Stadhouderskade. They serve traditional South Indian vegan and vegetarian dishes. Stadhouderskade 123-124, 1074 AV Amsterdam Balraj Indian Restaurant Balraj is the oldest Indian restaurant in Amsterdam. Just like most Indian restauarants, they also specialize in curries. They have a wide range of vegan and vegetarian dishes. The kitchen is based on the way people eat at home in India, less spicy than in many other restaurants. Location: Haarlemmerdijk 28, 1013JD Amsterdam Mount Everst Tandori Looking for authentic food with a friendly staff? Then you have to be here. Here they have great Indian vegan dishes Location: Spreeuwenpark 3D, 1021 GS Amsterdam Sherpa restaurant Looking for a nice restaurant where every dish is delicious? Go to the Sherpa restaurant, especially their curries are heavenly. The restaurant is very nicely decorated. In addition, the staff is happy to help you make the right combinations, they have vegan and gluten-free options Location: Korte Leidsedwarsstraat 58, 1017 RD Amsterdam Ashoka Restaurant In the center of Amsterdam you eat heart-warming vegan dishes from the Indian kitchen. Authentic flavors, many traditions with a balanced blend of herbs and spices in the lead. The service is very friendly and you will receive with open arms. Location: Spuistraat 54D, 1012 TV Amsterdam Kohinoor Since 1981 they serve authentic Indian vegan and vegetarian dishes. They have two locations right in the center where you can always go for a delicious meal. The service is also super friendly here. Location 1: Westermarkt 29, 1016 DJ Amsterdam Location 2: Rokin 18, 1012 KR Amsterdam April 6, 2019 Share this entry https://i0.wp.com/veganfoodamsterdam.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/food-3337621_1280.jpg?fit=1280%2C853&ssl=1 853 1280 Des2018 https://veganfoodamsterdam.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Vegan-food-logo-png.png Des2018 2019-04-06 11:13:48 2019-04-06 11:16:01 8x Vegan Indian restaurants in Amsterdam 0 replies Want to join the discussion? Feel free to contribute!

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Inside Amman’s Islamic Chinese Restaurant

Inside Amman’s Islamic Chinese Restaurant
Miriam Berger
April 6, 2019
Hui cuisine is particularly famous for dishes that use laghman, hand-pulled noodles.
It’s early Thursday evening in Amman and Ali Noureldin’s open-air restaurant on the third floor of Majdi Mall by Jordan University is bustling. It’s a diverse crowd, with everyone from students to office workers, all gathering to dine in the low-key, self-service eatery.
The Islamic Chinese Restaurant, is, after all, the only place around offering the authentic food of the Hui – Chinese Muslim community – including those luscious, long laghman hand-pulled noodles the cuisine is famous for. As Noureldin, 35, puts it: he serves up the “shaabi”, the popular halal Chinese equivalent of mansaf, maqlouba, hummus and falafel – all those Jordanian homestyle favourites found just about anywhere here.
Eisa Ma, 28, a master of making laghman noodles from scratch.
“It’s Islamic food,” Noureldin tells The National . “Everyone loves it.”
Setting up shop
Noureldin is from Xining, the capital of Qinghai province, in western China. It’s home to many Hui Chinese people, and where Noureldin and his wife lived, before he moved to Jordan in 2010. The Hui people are not to be confused with Uyghurs, another population of Chinese Muslims based in nearby Xinjiang province, but the two communities share similar cuisines.
It was a master’s degree in Arabic that originally took the father-of-three to Amman, but he liked the city so much that he stayed to open his shop in 2014. He noticed a gap in the hospitality market, as students like him were craving a taste of home. It was an important move, he says, as it meant he could introduce the local community to China’s rich and diverse cuisine rooted in Islamic culinary traditions.
An authentic taste of China
All of his spices are imported from his homeland, and the menu – made up of numbered pictures in a book and splashed across the walls of the mall – is extensive.
The Islamic Chinese Restaurant’s menu is also splashed across the walls.
In particular, Xining is renowned for its mouthwatering Hui street-food scene, which is especially heavy on the halal meat and peppery spices such as cumin. It’s most famous for those laghman, also called lamian, hand-pulled noodles, the making of which stems from a culinary art honed over thousands of years. For the last year, Eisa Ma, 28, also from the Qinghai province, has been kneading and stretching simple white dough into freshly simmering noodles.
“Not every person can make laghman,” Noureldin says. When an order comes, Ma pulls out a chunk of dough, tops it with a little brine and oil and kneads it over and over again as he works to create the right elasticity. In a rhythm of his own, he tenderly twirls and beats the dough, repeating this dance for a few minutes until he’s satisfied with how stretchy it is.
Eisa Ma has been pulling and kneading noodles for the past year at the Islamic Chinese Restaurant in Amman, Jordan.
Then the real fun begins: Ma pulls the softened dough into thinner and thinner rounds as it expands into one wonderfully long noodle, which he expertly wraps around his fingers. With a final flourish, he cuts one end free and drops them into a vat of boiling water. They take just a few minutes to cook.
The noodles are served in all kinds of combinations, with a variety of different sauces. There’s sautéed vegetables with slices of tender meat (one of Noureldin’s favourites), more meat with chilli peppers in the Sichuan tradition, Uyghur-style with fried meat spiced with cumin and onions, Guangzhou-style with shrimps and vegetables, and vegetarian-friendly takes with tomatoes and fried eggs. Among the Hui community, the noodles are especially beloved simmering in beef broth, perhaps mixed with some more tender beef slices and signature chilli oil.
The menu also features noodle soups.
Although Hui cuisine can be heavy on the meat, there are also delicious vegetarian dishes, like richly flavoured black mushrooms and spicy fried cabbage with chilli pepper. Noureldin’s favourite dishes on his menu are the shish barak dumplings, served in soup or on their own, and cumin-flavoured dapanji – a big plate of chicken. He sometimes eats this twice a day.
Something for everyone
The Islamic Chinese Restaurant also serves a range of rice dishes with a spread of traditional Chinese cooking styles that take influence from across the country.
For eaters hesitant to try new foods, Noureldin’s thought of that, too – he has less-adventurous fare, such as chopped hot dogs with vegetables.
There are, however, some very labour-intensive Hui dishes you won’t find on the menu, like tender slices of mutton cooked for hours in spices and lamb broth, or liangpi starch-based noodles, the beloved street-food lamb kebabs and Uyghur nang (or naan) – sesame-topped bread.
Nonetheless, Noureldin is filling a gap in the market. In 2015, he opened another branch in Irbid at Yarmouk University, where there are also many Chinese and Asian-Muslim students. Now he has his sights set on opening a branch in Oman, where a friend of his lives, and, eventually, in America, where he’s heard Muslim Chinese food isn’t very well known.
For now, this hole-in-the-wall is feeding a niche in Amman’s foodie market, which caters to an increasingly diverse population. Among the Filipino restaurants, Indian eateries and Levantine cafes, Noureldin is making sure his fellow Asian-Muslims are well-fed.
“People love the food,” he says, proudly. And that’s all that matters.
https://www.thenational.ae/lifestyle/food/inside-amman-s-islamic-chinese-restaurant-1.845700

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Qatar- LuLu celebrates ‘Jackfruit Fest’

(MENAFN – Gulf Times) LuLu, the largest hypermarket chain in the region, has launched its annual ‘Jackfruit Fest: A Celebration of Taste’.
The festival was inaugurated by Indian ambassador P Kumaran at LuLu Hypermarket, Barwa City.
The four-day promotion which is being held at all LuLu stores across Qatar, “features good offers on a freshly imported selection of jackfruits”, LuLu has said in a statement.
LuLu has flown in more than seven varieties of the tropical fruit for the festival from India, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Indonesia, Uganda and Vietnam.
Besides the fresh range, jackfruit-infused dishes inspired from cuisines from around the world are also available on shelves in the hot food section with healthy options such as vegetarian kebab, quinoa salad, pizza, pudding, milk shakes and more.
“This food festival is a special event that not only highlights the flavours of this fruit, but also promotes the rich agricultural heritage of those countries. LuLu’s global sourcing offices and food processing units have helped them to be successful in guaranteeing the uninterrupted supply at the most competitive prices all year round,” the statement notes.
Further, LuLu stressed that it “has continuously been exerting its greatest efforts to provide and sustain the supply of global products at the best rates. With the excellent combination of high-quality offerings and an organised logistics system, LuLu remains the favourite shopping destination in Qatar when it comes to a broader selection of international products”.
MENAFN0604201900670000ID1098354452

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