15+ Ways to Treat Your Papa this Father’s Day 2019

15+ Ways to Treat Your Papa this Father’s Day 2019

15+ Ways to Treat Your Papa this Father’s Day 2019 June 11, 2019 Daddy. Pops. Papa. Old Man. That geezer who does my washing. There’s lots of names for him but only one day where he can get free stuff.
WIN a Porsche Driving Experience at Silverstone @ The Counter House You are in a predicament: Either you a) take Dad out to eat or b) get him a gift. But what if you could do both? Join The Counter House this Sunday for delicious food, drinks and a generally chilled atmosphere and all dads will be entered into a competition to win an amazing half-day driving experience in a Porsche at Silverstone. See – two birds one stone!
The Counter House, 35 Blossom St, Manchester M4 6AJ 0161 414 0065
FREE Beer at Don Giovanni Treat your dad to the oldest Italian and award-winning restaurant in Manchester, Don Giovanni’s. You can expect fresh pizza, pasta and bread made freshly in house with local suppliers and producers. To wash down your delicious slice of Italy, your dad can enjoy a free Peroni! Bookings aren’t necessary but are recommended.
Don Giovanni, Peter House, 1-2 Oxford St, Manchester M1 5AN 0161 228 2482
Father’s Day Afternoon Tea + Roasts @ The Lowry Hotel We all know that if you really want to splash out for a celebration, the best place is The Lowry Hotel. This time around you get the choice of treating Dad with a slap-up three-course roast dinner for £22.50 per head OR a specially designed afternoon tea. Before you say that Afternoon Tea is something for Mother’s Day – let me tell you that The Lowry has kept dad in mind with treats like Stout Cake, Jack Daniels Trifle and lamb and mint sausage rolls as well as cheese scones with beer and bacon chutney. Book yourself in now!
The Lowry Hotel, 50 Dearmans Pl, Salford M3 5LH 0161 827 4000
Father’s Day Bites and Booze at Dive NQ Personally my favourite thing to do on a Friday evening, Dive NQ’s brilliant Bites and Booze deal means that you can bag yourself 3 hours of bottomless prosecco or beer for only £20 (or £15 with the beer). Well, this Father’s Day you can treat your pops to much of the same but on a Sunday instead with 3 hours of bottomless beers for just £15. Oh and dad gets it for FREE! If you’re not all smashed by 6pm I won’t be angry – just disappointed.
Dive NQ, 12 Tib St, Manchester M4 1SH 0161 826 3080
The Sunday Roast at Harvey Nichols The perfect place to sit back, relax and enjoy a belting roast dinner, the Second Floor Bar & Brasserie at Harvey Nichols is sure to knock your dads socks off and really show him that you love him. Even if secretly you don’t. Pop down and you can get yourselves your choice of meat and all the trimmings for £15 per person and I must admit – it’s absolutely mega. Have the beef.
Harvey Nichols, 21 New Cathedral Street, Manchester M1 1AD 0161 828 8888
T-Bone Steak & Beer for £25 at Alston Bar & Beef Alston Bar and Beef are pretty well known in the city for their steaks and there is no greater ‘Dad Meal’ than a steak so why not put two and two together and get your old man down for this decent T-bone steak and pint deal. Book in for a meal this Father’s Day and you can get a mouth-watering T-bone and a pint for just £25. There’s also a Soul All-Dayer taking place – banging out some of the best 60’s and 70’s soul anthems throughout the day.
Alston Bar & Beef, Cathedral St, Manchester M4 3TR 0161 804 5555
FREE Bowling & Pint for Dads at Dog Bowl Dad’s always want an excuse to show how good at things they are – so why not take them bowling so they can show off, get aggressive and start throwing their weight about? Down at Dog Bowl they’ll get a game for FREE if you pre-book, so they’ll be able to get it all out of their system without your wallet taking too much of a battering. Oh and the crew from Camden Town Brewery will be down there – offering a FREE pint to all dads. Lovely stuff.
Dog Bowl, Whitworth St W, Manchester M1 5WW 0161 228 2888
FREE dessert for Dads at Zouk Manchester’s authentic Indian and Pakistani cuisine restaurant is offering free dessert for dad’s this Father’s Day. Indulge in delicious food in a relaxing environment with an open kitchen. The lively restaurant promises to pack a punch of flavour and atmosphere. Desserts include a range of cheesecake flavours, profiterole tower, cakes and raspberry trifle.
Zouk, 5, The Quadrangle, Chester Street, Manchester M1 5QS 0161 233 1090
FREE Roast Dinner for Dads at Foodwell Since arriving just over the river at New Bailey Street Foodwell have been smashing it – offering a mix of wellness activities, a deli, some brilliant cocktails and some fantastic dishes – many of which are actually really good for you. This Father’s Day they’ll be really good to you again by offering to pay for your dad’s roast dinner – saving you a few pennies on the way. Just get yourselves booked in and daddy can tuck into a brilliant FREE roast.
Foodwell, Suite 2, Ground Floor, One New Bailey, Stanley St, Salford M3 5JL 0161 989 4040
WIN a FREE game at Breakout Manchester We all know that dads enjoy a healthy bit of competition and so there’s nowhere better to take him than Breakout – where you’ll all get locked in a room and get given 1 hour to get out. There may possibly be some serious arguments, tantrums and maybe even some fisticuffs but you’ll all be closer as a family afterwards. Probably. To be in with a chance of winning a FREE game, head over to Breakout’s Facebook page and get involved in their competition.
Breakout Manchester, 36 High St, Manchester M4 1QB 0161 839 8012
Bangin’ Beer Brunch @ Mash Tun Whoever said that brunch was for girls is chatting bubbles and just in case you need convincing you need to try the Bangin’ Beer Brunch at Mash Tun this weekend. They’ll be serving bottomless craft beer and a hearty serving of bangers and mash between 12 pm – 4 pm for 90 minutes this Sunday for just £35 per person. What better way to treat Daddy-dearest than beer and bangers?
Mash Tun, 55 King St, Manchester M2 4LQ 0161 696 9700
Father’s Day Meat Feast at Lunya With one of the biggest Spanish delis in the country, and a unique Spanish gin and wine bar, Lunya is the perfect place for artisan produce and cuisine direct from Spain. This Father’s Day they are serving up their famous Father’s Day Meat Feast, Parrillada de Carnem. The giant mixed grilled meat platter includes Iberico ribs, lamb chops, chicken, pincho moruno, chorizo, butifarra and morcilla served with salad and Patata Bravas. For all dad’s dining there is a FREE beer, wine or soft drink. Booking is recommended and £10 deposit is required. Plenty of vegetarian options are also available.
Lunya, Barton Arcade, Deansgate, Manchester M3 2BB 0161 413 3317
Free Breakfast for Dad @ Lawn Coffee Tucked away in the bows of The Princess Street Hotel is a tiny coffee shop which is widely considered to be one of Manchester’s best hidden gems. Lawn Coffee is home to a delicious selection of cakes, brews and most importantly brunch which dad can bag for FREE this father’s day. All you have to do is book ahead or just turn up – just make sure to quote ‘DONTFORGETDADS’ when you do to avoid disappointment.
Lawn Coffee, Princess St. Hotel, 18-24 Princess St, Manchester M1 4LG 0161 236 8999
Special Menu & FREE Peroni for dad at Mr Cooper’s Spoil your dad this Father’s day at the British Brasserie in the Midland Hotel, Mr Cooper’s, with a special menu for Father’s day on offer including a free Peroni for any dad’s dining at the restaurant. 2 courses are available for £28 or 3 courses for £30. With plenty of accolades to it’s name, Mr Cooper’s Father’s Day menu includes the likes of a slow-cooked pork belly starter, homemade steak and kidney pie served with peas and roasted potatoes and a vanilla brûlée with shortbread biscuits for dessert. The offer is also available for granddads and great grandads too!
Mr Cooper’s House & Garden, 16 Peter St, Manchester M60 2DS 0161 235 4781
Sunday Lunch with Rémy Martin XO @ 20 Stories Manchester’s most iconic restaurant – 20 Stories – will be celebrating Father’s Day in style with a very special lunch dedicated to dads everywhere. On Sunday 16th June, the acclaimed Spinningfields-based restaurant will be serving its Signature Sunday Roasts plus a few new-to-the-menu Father’s Day Specials to celebrate. Guests are invited to treat their dads to the gift of a 20 Stories meal, whilst listening to the soulful sounds of its live band. Teaming up Rémy Martin XO, every father who dines on the day will enjoy a complimentary Cognac with homemade truffles to end their meal on a high.
20 Stories, No. 1 Spinningfields 1 Hardman Square, Manchester M3 3EB 0161 204 3333
Fine Gin Tasting Evening at Selfridges Trafford Treat your dad to an evening of fine gin tasting in Selfridges Trafford. The event will include tastings of worldwide gins and offer help in understanding how they are made and how to properly taste gin lead by Selfridges’ very own gin connoisseur. Tickets are £20 and they are redeemable against any purchases made on the night in the Wine Shop – an even better present for your dad!
Selfridges, The Trafford Centre, Stretford, Manchester M17 8DA 0800 123400
Barber Barber Pop-Up @ Albert’s Schloss To celebrate Father’s Day this year, the Bavarian bier palace is the perfect place to treat your papa. Deansgate’s very own Barber Barber will be situated in The Study at Albert’s Schloss from 1pm-5pm for gentlemen’s haircuts, beard trims, clipper cuts and hair & beard taming. If the old man isn’t one for the old man-icure, fear not! Albert’s Schloss know good feed often shows him just how much you care in equal measure. Father’s Day specials include lemon & thyme chicken with a summer potato salad and proper gravy. To finish, treat your papa to a triple chocolate cheesecake, served with a decadent scoop of white chocolate ice cream.
Albert’s Schloss, 27 Peter St, Manchester M2 5QR 0161 833 4040

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TRA Marketplace Speakers

TRA Marketplace Speakers Anita Jaisinghani & Chris Shepherd to Speak in July
We are thrilled to announce this year’s TRA Marketplace Keynote Conversation: Anita Jaisinghani & Chris Shepherd, on Monday, July 15 at 1:00 pm on the Big Bend Big Ideas Stage presented by Texas Mutual. The Marketplace is July 14-15 at George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston.
Join two well-renowned Texas chefs for an in-depth conversation on the cultural and culinary landscape of the Houston food scene. Chefs Anita and Chris will discuss how they both contribute to the culinary scene and what they value the most in their businesses and restaurants. We’ll also hear about their accomplishments and how they are contributing to communities outside of Texas. You don’t want to miss out on this unique conversation!
Anita Jaisinghani, the chef & co-owner of Pondicheri, was born and raised in India and is of Sindhi descent. She began her culinary career with an out-of-home catering business & selling chutneys through Whole Foods.
Her first restaurant job was at the famous Café Annie, where she worked in the pastry department for 2 years. Following her time at Café Annie, Anita opened Indika in 2001 serving deeply personal dishes that illustrated her desire to portray Indian food in a new light. Pondicheri, followed in 2011, expanding with the opening of the Bake Lab + Shop in 2014 & it’s first out-of-state outpost in New York City in the summer of 2016. With all of her kaleidoscopic menus, Anita combines the complexities of Indian cuisine with leanings toward the ancient body of wisdom of Ayurveda, the magic of spices & the goodness of fresh, local ingredients.
Chef Chris Shepherd has helped change the landscape of the Houston culinary scene. After opening his first restaurant Underbelly, Chris was named one of the 10 Best New Chefs in America by Food & Wine in 2013 and the 2014 James Beard Award for Best Chef: Southwest.
He owns and operates Georgia James, UB Preserv, One Fifth, Hay Merchant and is a partner in Blacksmith. In 2019, Georgia James, UB Preserv and One Fifth were No. 1 on Texas Monthly’s list of the Best New Restaurants in Texas. Georgia James was on GQ’s list of the best new restaurants in America. He was a James Beard Award semifinalist for Outstanding Chef in 2019. Chris’ first cookbook, Cook Like a Local, will be published in September 2019.
Chris’ foundation Southern Smoke has donated $1.3 million to the National MS Society and to those in the food and beverage industry in crisis.
Excited? So are we! To register, go to www.tramarketplace.com .

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11 Different Types of Cucumbers

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Unless you are a dedicated home gardener or horticulturist, the odds are pretty good that you don’t think a great deal about cucumbers. You see them pretty much year round in the produce section of the market, slice them for use in salads or maybe eat them raw as a snack or with dips, and somewhere in the back of your mind you know that they are what pickles are made of. However, for most people, cucumbers aren’t a particularly thought-provoking vegetable.
In fact, cucumbers aren’t a vegetable at all, although they are most often used as one. The cucumber is the berry of a vine in the gourd family of plants and is actually a fruit. Botanically classified Cucurbitacaea cucunis sativus, the cucumber plant is a creeping vine that in the wild grows by wrapping itself around another supporting plant. In home gardening and commercial cultivation, support poles or trellises are needed for the plant to thrive; while it will crawl along the ground if no support is available, the fruit will normally be eaten by animals or destroyed by rot or powdery mildew if it is not elevated.
The cucumber plant is believed to have originated in India (where some types still grow wild) and was probably eaten there before the dawn of recorded history. The first human cultivation is believed to date back over 4,000 years in India, and the plant eventually made its way to China, the rest of Asia, and Northern Africa. The Egyptians grew cucumbers, and it is mentioned in the Bible as one of the foods the Israelite slaves ate. The Ancient Romans were very fond of the plant and through them it spread to the rest of Europe. The cucumber reached the New World with Columbus – who brought it to Haiti in 1494 – and by the mid-17 th century it was being cultivated by both settlers and the indigenous peoples across South and North America.
Today, about 80 million tons of cucumbers are commercially cultivated throughout the world with China (as is so often the case in agricultural production) the largest grower, accounting for over 75% of annual production. Turkey, Iran, Russia, Ukraine, Spain, the United States, and Mexico are among the world’s other leading producers. In the US – which ranks 7 th and produces around a million tons a year – California, North Carolina, Texas, Georgia, Michigan and Wisconsin are among the major cucumber producing states.
The cucumber is a quite durable and hardy plant that will grow pretty much anywhere and is cultivated on every continent with the exception of Antarctica. Comprised of almost 95 percent water, cucumbers are not a particularly nutritious vegetable (we know, it’s a fruit!), although they do provide some dietary fiber and a good amount of vitamin K. Because of both their adaptability and their ease of growth, cucumbers are widely grown in home gardens throughout the world and particularly the United States, where they can be grown in all 50 states.
There are two basic types of cucumbers: slicing and pickling. Slicing cucumbers are those that are eaten fresh, while pickling cucumbers are specifically grown and used for pickling. There are some cultivars that are ‘crossovers’ and can be both eaten fresh and pickled. Both of these types have hundreds of cultivars within them, many of them relatively recent improvements on a few basic varieties.
So what are some of the most common types of cucumbers you are likely to run across? Slicing Cucumbers
Slicing cucumbers are what you will most often find in the produce section at the grocery store, at your local farmers market, and in the salads you are served in restaurants. Also called fresh market cucumbers, they are most often eaten fresh as a vegetable – although some will stand up to pickling and even cooking. Generally speaking, if the cucumber you are eating isn’t a pickle, it is probably a ‘slicer’.
Several varieties of slicing cucumbers belong to a sub-group known as ‘burpless’ cucumbers. These varieties will usually have thinner skins and fewer seeds – the two parts of the cucumber that cause excess gas in some people – and are believed by some to be easier to digest. Garden
Also sometimes called common or North American cucumbers (at least in the United States and Canada), the garden cucumber is a catch-all name for over two dozen cultivars of cucumbers that all look and taste pretty much the same. Unless you are shopping at a specialty market, these are the cucumbers you will most often find at grocery stores in the United States, Canada, and parts of the European Union marked simply: CUCUMBERS. They are usually the least expensive type of cucumber.
In the United States these cucumbers might have minor differences in size and shape depending on your location – particularly in the summer and fall months – as many markets will buy their produce from local farmers during harvest season, and different cultivars grow better in different parts of the country. The various varieties of the garden cucumber are the most widely cultivated type in the United States – both commercially and by home gardeners – and are also very popular in other parts of the world.
Most of the garden cucumbers you find at the store will be between 8 and 10 inches in length, and about 2 inches in circumference, giving them a torpedo-like shape. They will have a thick dark green skin which is usually smooth (but will sometimes have small bumps throughout the surface) and will often be lightly waxed prior to shipment to help increase their shelf life and retain moisture. The flesh will normally be a lighter green or greenish white, with numerous edible (though slightly bitter) seeds throughout the center.
All parts of the garden cucumber are edible, although most people find the skins to be bitter and so peel the fruit before using it; in many applications, the seeds will also often be removed. As the flesh is not particularly flavorful on its own, garden cucumbers are usually used in either green or heartier (Caesar, etc) salads to provide extra body and crunch, as well as served with other vegetables and a variety of dips in fresh vegetable platters or crudités. Normally consumed fresh, most garden cucumbers will not stand up to pickling and are not widely used in cooked dishes – although in some areas they will be used in certain soups and stir fry dishes.
Popular varieties of garden cucumbers include the Straight 8, Tendergreen, Marketmore 76, and Ashley. English Source: Burpee
Depending on what part of the world you happen to be in, you might also find the English cucumber referred to as the European, hothouse, gourmet, or seedless cucumber. Widely cultivated throughout most of the world today, the English cucumber first showed up in Europe sometime in the 14 th century and became extremely popular in England in the 17 th and 18 th centuries, where it was often grown in hothouses (hence one of its nicknames) during the winter months so as to ensure a year-round supply for the nobility and upper classes.
The English cucumber is longer and thinner than the garden variety, and can grow up to almost two feet in length, although the ones you will most commonly find in the market will usually be between 14 and 18 inches long. Normally growing quite straight, they have a very thin dark green, slightly ridged skin, a lighter green flesh, and very small almost translucent seeds running through the center. Due to the thinness of the skin and the tiny seeds, the English is considered to be a burpless cucumber.
The English cucumber has a very crisp texture and a mild, slightly sweet flavor with almost none of the bitterness found in the garden variety. It will almost never need to be peeled. Widely used in salads and crudités, it is also the quintessential ingredient in cucumber tea sandwiches and widely utilized in many sushi dishes and spring rolls. The English cucumber is generally not used for pickling, but will stand up to cooking quite well and is grilled or lightly cooked and included in vegetable medleys in some cuisines. It is also sometimes pureed and used as an ingredient in soups, and to make cucumber water.
Throughout the Western world, the English cucumbers found in most markets are usually shrink-wrapped in plastic wrap to increase their shelf life and help keep them moist. Popular varieties of English cucumbers include the Chelsea Pride, Sweet Success, Tyria and English Telegraph. Persian Buy on Amazon
The Persian cucumber was developed in 1939 at the Biet Alpha kibbutz (and is also often referred to as the Biet Alpha cucumber) in the northern part of what is currently the State of Israel. The result of the crossbreeding of several types of cucumber including the English and the Japanese (discussed below), it is widely grown throughout the Middle East, Asia, and parts of Southern Europe. In the last 30 years or so, Persian cucumbers have dramatically increased in popularity in Western Europe and North America both with farmers and home growers, and can be widely found in specialty markets throughout the United States and Canada.
The Persian is a short, squat cucumber that is generally harvested at 4 to 6 inches in length, when it is at its most flavorful. Another burpless variety, the Persian has a thin, dark green skin with shallow ridges, a firm and crisp lighter green flesh, and relatively few seeds – most of which are underdeveloped. A very crunchy cucumber, the Persian has a sweet, fairly mild flavor with very little if any bitterness.
Usually used without peeling or removing the seeds, the Persian cucumber is a very popular addition to all types of salads and fresh vegetable platters, sometimes used in salsa recipes, and incorporated into dips and dressings. It stands up well to cooking, and is often used in curries, some stir fries, and other spicier dishes to add extra sweetness and ‘cooling’. Some cultivars are also used for pickling.
Popular Persian cucumber cultivars include the Diva, Rambo, Figaro, Cordito, and Sarig. Japanese Source: Bonnieplants
Japanese cucumbers (also called Kyuri) were first developed in Japan centuries ago by crossbreeding cultivars from China and India. Improved upon over the years, they are currently cultivated throughout Asia and the Middle East, and have recently been increasing in popularity in Europe and North America.
The Japanese cucumber resembles the English cucumber; most are long (usually 12 to 14 inches) with a thin, forest green, lightly grooved skin, a light green flesh, and few seeds. Some cultivars will have a slightly prickly skin, which will need to be scraped before use. Japanese cucumbers have a crisp texture and a sweet, succulent, melon-like flavor. One notable fact about these cucumbers is that their flesh will often be up to 20 degrees colder than their skin.
Japanese cucumbers are usually eaten fresh alone, in salads, or with other vegetables and are widely used in sushi and sashimi dishes, ceviche, bento, and gazpacho. Although classified as a slicing cucumber, the Japanese is also often pickled in its native Japan and in this form is an essential ingredient in many traditional Japanese dishes, and enjoyed as a snack. Pickling Cucumbers
Cucumbers have been pickled in some way almost since they were first cultivated by man; the first documented pickling of cucumbers occurred around 2,000 BC in the Tigris Valley in Mesopotamia, probably using cucumbers from India. Today a number of different cucumber types are specifically cultivated for industrial and home pickling. Generally speaking, pickling cucumbers will be shorter than slicers and have a somewhat drier flesh which allows them to absorb more of what is used to pickle them. Gherkin Buy on Amazon
Gherkins are one of the most (if not the most) widely pickled cucumber varieties in the world today. Believed to have originated in Central Africa and cultivated throughout the world for centuries, many different cultivars of the Gherkins are currently grown in Asia, North and South America (particularly Brazil), Europe and parts of Africa.
Most Gherkins are picked when they are 2 to 3 inches long. The skin is usually a pale green, with lighter green stripes and small bumps running the entire length. The flesh is a lighter green, drier than most slicing cucumbers, and contains many small seeds. Gherkins will usually have a firm, crunchy texture and a mild, slightly sour flavor. In some parts of the world, Gherkins are eaten raw as snacks and used in cooking applications, but they are most commonly used for pickling, often in vinegar flavored with other ingredients such as dill (for dill pickles) or sugar (for sweet pickles). National Pickling Source: Parkseed
Very popular with commercial and home growers alike, the National Pickling cucumber was developed at Michigan State University in 1924 at the request of the National Pickle Packers Association. Designed to resist common cucumber diseases as well as to stand up to pickling at various stages of its grow so as to produce both small and large pickles, the National Pickling cucumber is a very high yielding plant and is today commercially cultivated throughout the US and Canada, particularly in the states of Michigan and Wisconsin. The cucumbers have a medium green often striped thin skin and white flesh with few seeds. Normally uniform in shape, they will grow to up to 6 inches, but are usually picked prior to reaching full maturity when they are 2 to 4 inches. Although primarily used for pickles, mature National Pickling cucumbers can be consumed raw, and used in most garden slicing cucumber applications. Kirby
At one time the Kirby cucumber was the most popular pickling cucumber in the United States. First released by a Philadelphia seed merchant named Norval E. Kirby in 1920, Kirby cucumbers were short and squat, usually growing to about 4 inches in length. Supplanted by the National Pickling cucumber in the mid-1930s, Kirby cucumbers are no longer commercially cultivated, and it is almost impossible to even find seeds for the variety. However, you will still often see “Kirby” pickling cucumbers sold at grocery stores and farmer’s markets. Since the 1950s, the term “Kirby cucumber” has been a catch-all phrase used in the produce industry to describe small – usually between 3 and 5 inches – cucumbers with an irregular shape and usually bumpy skin from a variety of cultivars. They will range from dark to yellowish green in color, and most varieties can also be used as slicers. Cornichon Source: Walmart
Very popular throughout Europe and particularly in France, the Cornichon (also sometimes called the Cornichon de Paris) is a very small variety of Gherkin pickling cucumber that is widely used in many French and European cuisines, and is also quite popular in Asia and North America. The Cornichon can grow up to 4 or 5 inches in length, but is normally picked when it just an inch or two long. The cucumbers are usually quite bumpy, with a medium green skin and a very light green flesh containing underdeveloped seeds. Slightly tart, fully developed Cornichons can be used as a slicing cucumber, but they are most often pickled in a mixture of vinegar and tarragon and served with pates, cold cuts or smoked meats, and a variety of cheeses. Other Source: Burpee
Lemon cucumbers are believed to have originated in the Middle East or India, and have been around since the mid-16 th century. They made their way to the United States in the early 1900s, and have been very popular with home gardeners ever since. Mostly commercially cultivated in Asia, Europe and South America, the Lemon is a round cucumber about the size of a tennis ball and has a thin yellowish-gold skin with some striping, a crisp pale green and yellow flesh, and edible seeds. Also known as the Garden Lemon and Apple cucumber, the Lemon is considered a burpless variety, and has a mild, slightly sweet flavor. It is mostly used fresh and often added to salads, although in India it is used in soups, some curry dishes, and in daal – a type of Indian stew made from red lentils. This cucumber is also sometimes pickled. Salt and Pepper Source: Johnnyseeds
A recent addition to the cucumber family, the Salt and Pepper cucumber was developed by horticulturalists at Cornell University and released to the market in 2011. Normally growing to between 3 and 5 inches, the Salt and Pepper is a short, squat cucumber with a thin white skin that turns light yellow as it matures; the skin contains many black spines – leading to the name Salt and Pepper. It has a pale green flesh and a large number of almost translucent seeds. Not commercially cultivated (as yet), they have caught on with home growers and some small farmers, and can be found in some specialty and farmers markets, particularly on the West Coast of the US. They can be used either as a slicer or for pickling. Armenian Source: Burpee
Originating in (not surprisingly) Armenia in the 15 th century and today widely cultivated throughout Eastern and Western Europe, the Middle East and North America (particularly California), the Armenian cucumber isn’t really a cucumber at all: it is actually a type of muskmelon that is used as – and named – a cucumber. Also called the Yard-Long, Snake and Painted Serpent, the Armenian can grow up to 36 inches in length, but will usually be picked at between 12 and 16 inches, when it is at its most flavorful. A thin, curving vegetable with a usually light to mid-green furrowed skin and a light green flesh, it has a sweet mild flavor and a firm, crisp texture. The Armenian is very versatile and is used in raw and cooked applications, and is also quite good for pickling.

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Adelaide things to do: Events, shows and festivals in June 2019

The Adelaide Cabaret Festival is in full swing — don’t miss a huge range of local, national and international artists performing. Artistic Director Julia Zemiro with performers (from left) Paul Capsis, Alma Zygier, Meow Meow, Reuben Kaye and Nkechi Anele. Picture MATT TURNER. Source:News Corp Australia
From festivals and fashion to art, play and family fun — we have your essential guide to all the events happening across Adelaide
Thursday, June 13
NORTH
NAIDOC Week: Art Exhibition
The City of Salisbury’s annual exhibition celebrates the proud Aboriginal heritage of our community. John Harvey Gallery, 12 James St, Salisbury, 9am. Until Friday, July 12. Details here
SOUTH
Hallett Cove School presents Ready, Steady, Arts — 2019
A dance, drama, music and visual arts extravaganza. A series of arts showcasing the talent of Hallett Cove School students. Hopgood Theatre, Ramsay Pl, Noarlunga Centre, 7pm. Tickets: adults $12, under 17 years $6. Details here
WEST
SCALA Live at the Wheaty
Immerse in the musical talents as SCALA showcases a line-up of Aboriginal artists live.
The event will feature local artists, Nathan May and Kuko, Robert K Champion soloist from Victoria plus SA’s own Jessica Wishart as the headline act. The Wheatsheaf Hotel, 39 George St, Thebarton, 8pm- late. Tickets: $15. Details here
Snow Play at the Ice Arena
Savour some special memories with your child and show them a real snow experience, the arena is decked out in small ice with piles of real snow, obstacles, games and props. Ice Arena, 23 James Congdon Drive, Thebarton, 10am-noon. Various times until Sunday, September, 29. Tickets: children $15, free for accompanying adults. Details here
CITY
The 11 O’clock Number — Bronya’s Variety Hour
After giving her heart and soul to Eurovision, Bronya was called to a higher cause for Europe … Singing for Brexit. She tried, they failed. As in Eurovision, and now life, the United Kingdom continues to disappoint year after year. The Famous Spiegeltent, Elder Park, city, 10pm. Also on Friday, June 14, 11pm and Saturday, June 15, 11pm. Tickets: adults $44.90, concession $40.90. Details here
St Paul’s College Musical — Wolfstock
Set in the late 50s, Wolfstock will transport you back to a time when the world recognised one king only — the legend himself, Elvis. Audience members will delve into the era of leather jackets, swinging skirts, jukeboxes and motorbikes. The Odeon, corner of Queen St and The Parade, Norwood, 7pm. Tickets: adults $17, students and children $13. Details: 8266 0622 or here
Dami Im — My Life In Songs
You may think you know Dami Im well — she walked off the stage the winner of X Factor in 2013 which led to sold out shows and a string of hits, but here she tells story of life as an immigrant through songs. Adelaide Festival Centre, Dunstan Playhouse, King William Rd, city, Thursday, June 13, 7.30pm and Friday, June 14, 9pm. Tickets: Premium $79.90, A Reserve $69.90. Details here
Dami Im performs as part of the Cabaret Festival this week. Picture: Supplied. Source:Supplied
Forest Flicks — Free Pop Up Outdoor Cinema
Grab a bucket of popcorn, and snuggle in amongst the twinkling lights and greenery to enjoy a free screening of Strictly Ballroom. There’ll be food and drinks available to purchase. City Library, Francis St, city, 6.40pm. Free. Details here
Friday, June 14
NORTH
Men’s Health Week Event
In Australia, Men’s Health Week provides a platform for challenging and debating key issues in men’s health and to raise the profile of men, their health outcomes and health needs around the country each June. Men aged over 50 are invited to this Men’s Health Week Event for health checks, guest speakers, light lunch and entertainment. Para Hills Community Club, Wilkinson Rd, Para Hills, 10.30am. Cost: $10. Details: 8406 8525
Cuore Verde Album Launch
Loretta De Palma from Angelic Music presents her first enchanting album Cuore Verde. Amitola, 1a/89 Stanbel Rd, Salisbury Plain, 4pm. Free. Details here
EAST
Fizzy Pop Live at The Norwood
Fizze Pop returns to present its Decades Show bringing you songs from different decades. Norwood Hotel-Finn Mac Cool’s, 97 The Parade, Norwood, 9pm. Cost: $5. Details here
Elder Conservatorium Chamber Orchestra
Join students from the Elder Conservatorium Chamber Orchestra as they perform classical masterpieces from Telemann to Elgar. Burnside Ballroom, 401 Greenhill Rd, Tusmore, 11am. Free. Details here
SOUTH
The Celtic Tenors — The Irish Songbook Tour
While each of The Celtic Tenors have been influenced by the musical traditions from their own individual parts of Ireland, Daryl Simpson, James Nelson and Matthew Gilsenan show great flexibility in melding their voices to suit the appropriate genres. Hopgood Theatre, Ramsay Pl, Noarlunga Centre, 7.30pm. Tickets: $69. Details here
Hear the powerful voices of The Celtic Tenors as they perform at the Hopgood Theatre on Friday. Source:Supplied
CITY
Australia’s Biggest Morning Tea
You are invited to an Australia’s Biggest Morning Tea at the North Adelaide Community Centre. Get together, enjoy some tasty treats, and together we can support those affected by cancer. Local resident Penelope is hosting this fundraiser and hopes to welcome more people and raise more funds than last year. Food & raffles provided. Donations at the event to Cancer Council SA. North Adelaide Community Centre, 176 Tynte St, North Adelaide. Free.
Details: 8203 7811
The Maes
Melbourne’s The Maes have unveiled their brand new, self-titled album which features production from top roots music producers from around the world. Join them and special guests Monique Clare and Alana Wilkinson. Jive Bar, 181 Hindley St, city, 8pm. Tickets: $17.34. Details here
Melbourne singers, The Maes, will be live at Jive Bar on Friday. Picture: Supplied Source:Supplied
Kaurna Cronin
Unwind to Australian folk-rock music while welcoming home Kaurna Cronin & Band after a global tour. Join the celebration of the launch of their new single, Gotta Get Outta This Place at their national single launch tour. Chateau Apollo, 74 Frome St, city, 7.30pm-11pm. Tickets: $16.91. Details here
Jack River — The Sugar Mountain Ball
Theatres will be transformed into a prom night fantasy in honour of the Sugar Mountain dream as the album plays as if a grand and sparkly ballroom. Pour your whole heart out onto the dancefloor. The Gov, 59 Port Rd, Hindmarsh, 8pm-11pm. Tickets: $56.65. Details here
Blind Coyote, Pillarbox, Letrasets Live
Sway along to their life affirming singles, including Changes and Let’s Make A Deal.
Fresh out of Adelaide, Blind Coyote has spent the last year honing melodic riffs and is ready to perform another packed out venue. The Stag Public House, 299 Rundle St, city, 8.30pm- 11.45pm. Tickets: $5. Details here
Abdul Nanou and Manadi Lopa and The Lion Hearts
Abdul Nanou is a Syrian violin player with over 25 years of performance experience in famous theatres in the Middle East, playing a multitude of Arabic, Hebrew, Indian, Persian, Turkish, other oriental, European, and Western styles. Renowned Ghanaian singer-songwriter Manadi Lopa speaks from the heart, performing music with messages of peace, love and harmony. Born into a family rich in cultural traditions, Manadi’s carefully nurtured knowledge and wisdom is conveyed through his soulful music. Nexus Arts, North Tce, city, 7.30pm. Tickets: $15-$20. Details here
Saturday, June 15
NORTH
An Afternoon of Entertainment Fundraiser
Come and join us for three hours of musical entertainment, featuring the well-known Bikie Busker with some very talented supporting local acts. St Mark’s Anglican Church, 160 Wynn Vale Drive, Wynn Vale. Cost: $15 (includes afternoon tea). Details: 0407 616 809
EAST
Adelaide Multicultural EID Festival
Adelaide’s greatest Eid Festival is back bigger and better than ever. Bring along your family and friends to celebrate Eid-Al-Fitr with rides, stage shows and live entertainment, multicultural food stalls, animals rides, clothing stalls, henna and face painting and for the first time ever, fireworks. Adelaide Showground, Goodwood Road, Wayville, 11am-7pm. Various times until Sunday, June 16. Tickets: $5. Details here
Burnside Antiques Fair
The fair is here so come and check out dozens of specialty stores and one of a kind antiques. Burnside Ballroom, 401 Greenhill Rd, Tusmore, 10am. Also on Sunday, June 16. Details: adults $10, pensioners $8. Details here
SOUTH
Southern Deadly Sounds
This year’s NAIDOC week has the theme “Voice, Treaty & Truth: Let’s work together for a shared future”. So come down and join the indigenous hip hop program to make some fresh tracks. Base 10 Youth Centre, 10 Main South Rd, Reynella, 10am-5pm. Free. Suitable for ages 15-25 year olds. Details here
Bearded Gypsy Band
Be surrounded with the eclectic mix of tearaway original tunes with Celtic, jazz, blues, roots and gypsy influences. Witness an exhibit of masterful performance and original composition skills as this up and coming young band command the rooms’ attention. Marion Cultural Centre, 287 Diagonal Rd, Oaklands Park, 7pm-8.30pm. Ticket: $25. Details here
Head to the Marion Cultural Centre to see The Bearded Gypsy Band perform. Picture: Supplied Source:Supplied
WEST
Makers and Shakers Market
An indoor event that focuses on homewares and interiors, delicious gourmet foods and stunning lifestyle products. The market curates the very best makers of quality items from locally-made goods from some of Adelaide’s best makers. Woodville Town Hall, 74 Woodville Rd, Woodville, on Saturday June 15, 10am-3pm Entry: $2 (kids under 12 free). Details: 0433 131 864 or emma@themakersandshakers.com
Choirboys — The Hits Live
The lads have embarked on a new venture to bring us the 6-pack of classic hits. The Gov, 59 Port Rd, Hindmarsh, 7.30pm. Tickets: $35.20. Details here
Elvis and Roy Orbison — One Night Only
A special night with multi vocalist entertainer Geir and the amazing voice of Rick O, giving tribute to some of the worlds best entertainers. The British Working Men’s Club, 11/9-15 Davis St, Wingfield, 7.30pm. Tickets: $15. Details here
CITY
Chocolate Walking Tour
This tour is a chance to discover some of Adelaide’s best chocolatiers and their unique products and flavours. You’ll be able to sample chocolates as you go, and enjoy special insights from a boutique chocolatier at one of the most popular stops on this tour. Starting from Rundle Park, Rundle Rd and East Terrace, 10am. Cost: $59. Details here
Adelaide Roller Derby
Catch all the action, thrills and spills of the fast-paced sport of roller derby. This round sees Mile Die Club take on Salty Dolls. Adelaide Showground, Wayville Pavilion, Goodwood Rd, Wayville, doors open 6pm. Tickets: $12-$40. Details here
Regional Orchid Council Fair
Enjoy a relaxing day amongst spectacular exhibits of orchids from SA’s orchid clubs. Free advice available from growers. Orchids for sale from top orchid nurseries. Refreshments available. Torrens Parade Ground, King William Rd, Adelaide, 9am to 5pm. Also on Sunday June 16, 10am to 4pm Entry: $5 (includes cup of tea/coffee). Details here
A beautiful display of orchids will take over Torrens Parade Ground this weekend. Picture: iStock Source:Supplied
Old Adelaide Gaol Paranormal Lockin
One for fans of the spooky and unexplained — get locked in after hours and investigate the Old Adelaide Gaol. You will be provided with the paranormal equipment and shown how it works and the rest is up to you! Are you brave enough? Old Adelaide Gaol, 18 Gaol Rd, Adelaide, 10.30pm-2.30am. Tickets $65. Details here
CLAZ, ‘Before I Forget’ Launch
Unwind while listening as an Adelaide local returns to showcase his brand new album. Dance along with friends to the chilled out hip hop tracks followed by some of Adelaide and Melbourne’s finest acts. Rocket Bar & Rooftop, 142 Hindley St, 9pm-12am. Tickets: $10-$15. Details here
Sunday, June 16
EAST
60th Anniversary Music Concert “A Journey From Home “
The Parish’s 60th Anniversary will be celebrated with a music concert featuring the St Ioannis Damascas Byzantine Choir singing a collection of Ecclesiastical Hymns as well as Tsambika DeGeorge, Con Dalagiorgis, Jim Giannou, Fr Michael Psaromatis and Andrew Psaromatis singing songs by Mikis Theodorakis, Dionysis Savvopoulos and Yannis Markopoulos.
Greek Orthodox Community and Parish of Prophet Elias, 87 Beulah Rd, Norwood, 5pm. Details here
13th Annual Ark Beer & Cider Fest
Taste more than 80 beers and ciders, dig into delicious street food, win some great prizes and partake in one of our crafty masterclasses. Arkaba Hotel, 150 Glen Osmond Rd, Fullarton, noon-4pm. Tickets: $35-$50. Details here
In The Round — Family Concert
Adelaide Youth Orchestra presents its youth strings, sinfonia, and wind orchestra with more than 150 musicians in concert. With orchestral favourites for the whole family including Grainger’s Children’s March, Handel’s Water Music and Strauss’s famous Radetzky March. Concordia College Chapel, 45 Cheltenham Rd, Highgate, 3pm. Tickets: adult $20, concession and student $10. Details here
SOUTH
Unlimited Feet Performing Arts presents Mid-Year Display 2019
Featuring the students from the Morphett Vale branch in an informal display showcasing their progress through the first half of the year in a variety of performing arts genres — drama, singing, acrobatics, classical ballet, jazz, tap, hip hop and contemporary dance. Hopgood Theatre, Ramsay Pl, Noarlunga Centre, 12.30pm. Tickets: adults $15, concession $12. Details here
CITY
Illumina Voices present United We Share
Head on a journey of unity through diversity, where music is the universal language. An amazing concert honouring the United Nations Year of indigenous Languages in 2019, guest artists singer/songwriter Nancy Bates with a voice described as pure soul, and Jacob Wilson is a pianist who has been playing since the age of six. 193 Brougham Place, North Adelaide, 2.30pm. Cost: adults $24 adults, concession $20. Details here
Peter Goers: Smart Arts
Co-hosted by the festival’s artistic director Julia Zemiro, don’t miss Peter’s unique ‘audio vaudeville’ with a range of interviews and live performances from Adelaide Cabaret Festival artists. The Blue Room, Adelaide Festival Centre, King William Rd, city, 10am. Free. Details here
Join Peter Goers and Adelaide Cabaret Festival performers on your Sunday morning. Picture: Adelaide Fringe Media Source:Supplied
Tuesday, June 18
WEST
Launch of a Butterfly Garden
Free craft activities including make your own butterfly greeting card, butterfly ‘flappers’ and paint a Plaster of Paris bug. Kilburn Community Centre, 59 Gladstone Ave, Kilburn, 10.30am. Free. Details here
Wednesday, June 19
NORTH
Tasting Asia
Do you love China Town, Oz Asia Festival, the night markets? Combine them all and you get this special event for a great night of food and entertainment featuring a live teppanyaki chef, sushi train, bubble tea and Asian cuisine plus live performances in a lantern lit scene. 57 Darley Rd, Paradise, 7pm. Cost: Gold coin donation. Details here
CITY
Jazz Night At The Oak With Greg Meyers And Band
Greg Meyers and his band will take the stage and play all your jazz favourites live at The Oak. This jazzy night out will give music fans the opportunity to enjoy all of their favourite hits and classic jazz tunes. Royal Oak North Adelaide, 123 O’Connell Street, North Adelaide, 7pm. Free. Details here
Bookings may be required for events. Please check all details before attending. Know of an event coming up? Email messengerevents@news.com.au
What’s on in Adelaide: Events, shows and festivals in June 2019

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Wine and dine at Vigneto gastro-bar

The open carpark within the commercial area in Taman Sutera Utama is a convenient spot to park my car before I walk the short distance to meet my friends for an introduction to the recently rebranded Vigneto Wine & Dine. Cheers to Vigneto with our Apricot Jello Shots! It’s easy to spot Vigneto in the corner unit, designed with a welcoming arched doorway. Coming in from the evening sun, I pause a few moments to let my eyes adjust to the subtle lighting within. From the doorway, I can see the end of the short corridor just as our host, Edward Ng, is able to see me and he steps forward to warmly welcome me to his new venture here. The corridor opens to the dining area with just a few tables, arranged in such a way to offer discreet privacy for a charming dining experience. Arched doorway with a cool corridorbordered by a wine cellar on its Left and lounge seating area on its Right But my eyes are riveted to an entire wall, dedicated to a long bar set up against a backdrop decorated with a dramatic display of bottles, while a bartender is mixing cocktails for guests who are trickling in to enjoy Happy Hours from 5pm to 7pm. The cosy vibe within is enhanced by the throb of cool music and behind long, dark drapes, there are private alcoves furnished with lounge seats for guests to chill-out over drinks and snacks. Opposite the bar, through the tinted floor-to-ceiling glass wall, I see more tables outside for the option to enjoy alfresco dining. While Vigneto started in 2014 as a wine bar, Edward and his team aim to take this experience to the next level by introducing the gastro-bar concept where diners may enjoy pairing good wines with good food. To achieve this, Vigneto is working in partnership with the culinary creativity of Chef Justin Christopher Yap, a young chef who is adding his personal touch to the Global Cuisine featured in their new menu. The long bar designed along an entire wall in Vigneto Chef Justin, a Malaysian who is one half of a pair of twins, tells me that his culinary interest was sparked while he worked part-time in his uncle’s Japanese restaurant in Bangsar. This interest led him to New York where he pursued a Degree in Food Science and continued his culinary journey through travelling and working in Europe and South East Asia, particularly in Japan and Korea. A closer look at Vigneto’s versatile menu has proof that his Malaysian-Chinese roots is a strong influence in his amazing creations among the exciting fusion of recipes that hint of Indian, Japanese, Korean and Italian inspirations. I’m more than ready to sample a taste of Chef Justin’s cuisine when he serves us not one, but two Appetizers. Testina is made with finely sliced rolled whole piglet served with sundried tomatoes and chili-lime dressing, while Yuba Parma is a salad that combines beancurd skin flakes with pickles, radish, mature aged Prosciutto di Parma with citrus-chili soy dressing. The taste of sundried tomatoes (my favourite!) is a perfect foil for the slices of rolled piglet presented in Testina. As for the Yuba Parma – I must admit that this is my first experience of tasting beancurd skin with Parma in a salad – is a rather chewy but tasty combination. Mussel & Clam Brodo is kept warm at our table With our appetites whet for more, our next experience are three Hot Tapas items. A serving staff arranges a pot stand complete with a tea-light on the table, ready to light up (to keep the pot warm) when a copper pot of Mussel & Clam Brodo is served on it. According to the menu, this dish of Asari Brown Clams and Black Lip Mussels tossed in rice wine and chili, will be served with Buttered Sourdough bread. However, Chef Justin gives us a treat with a choice of three bread rolls – Sourdough, Kaiser and Focaccia – with a side of Nori Butter (for more oomph!), to soak up the natural goodness of the rich gravy while we savour the clams and mussels! A serving of Masala Lamb Skewers “Eat it while it’s still warm,” Chef Justin gently urges us but it’s quite impossible when the next item reaches our table: Masala Lamb Skewers. We split the two loaded (with Masala Lamb) skewers among the four of us to enjoy the delightful taste of minced and marinated New Zealand lamb, charcoal grilled to perfection and served with side of yoghurt mint aioli. As its name describes, the taste of this Masala Lamb just takes me back to India… I ask a passing staff for a top-up of drinking water to clear my palate before I can do justice in properly tasting the next item presented at our table: Wagyu Sando. My Wagyu Sando sandwich (just before I devoured it!) Touted as the holy grail of steak sandwiches, Wagyu Sando has earned its place as Japan’s favourite comfort food and is now served at Vigneto. Our Wagyu Sando is created with medium-cooked Premium A4 grade Wagyu Sirloin steak, sandwiched between buttered white toast which is spread with caramelized onion and burnt pepper aioli. Quite unconsciously, I shut my eyes as I bite through the airy slices of bread to slowly savour every bit of the juicy meat within. Mmm…a sigh of pleasure escapes as I lick my lips. Parmigiana Guanciale Carbonara wasprepared and served beside our table I open my eyes to the sight of a live-cooking station being set up beside our table. A staff is assembling ingredients, complete with a whole wheel of 14-month aged Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese from Modena Italy, to prepare and serve our pasta dish: Parmigiana Guanciale Carbonara. We watch as the staff tosses and twirls robust strands of traditional egg yolk pasta fettuccini within the cheese wheel with rendered bacon, sundried tomatoes, aged yolk and hollandaise sauce, before adding a splash of brandy and shredded cheese toppings. I thoroughly enjoy the rich taste of this Pasta Carbonara and when my portion has been happily eaten, I must confess that I feel like Oliver – with a deep longing for “More!” Aware that we are only halfway through our tasting, I keep this thought to myself as I prepare to taste the first of our Main course items: Butterfish Sanzai. For non-meat eaters, Chef Justin recommends this fish dish created with a fillet of Miso Butterfish resting on a bed of Pomme (potato) puree with lots of roasted root vegetables and drizzled with clam and mussel Pomodoro. A generous serving of Butterfish Sanzai Every spoonful of the tender fillet of fish, drenched in the rich clam and mussel gravy, can be described as simply satisfying. Finally, we are ready for the Ultimate Pork Chop. This signature sous vide grilled pork chop is served in its bone, on a bed of Pomme puree with a side of bacon sauerkraut and a small jar of Tonkatsu Reduction sauce. As I slowly savour the tender texture of a slice of pork chop drizzled in rich Tonkatsu sauce, I know that it is named Ultimate for good reason. Chef Justin carving the UltimatePork Chop for us at our table Chef Justin is all smiles when he sees how the portions are being polished off the platter. He then explains that the 500 grams of pork chop (without its bone) was marinated in brine for 24 hours and sous vide grilled for an hour before being served. Happy that all the plates and bowls are leaving our table empty, Chef Justin goes to prepare his classic dessert for us – silky smooth Crème Caramel infused with tea fog. With our stomachs satisfied, Edward invites us over to the bar to meet the friendly bartender and sample some of Vigneto’s signature cocktails. With each sip of the delightful drinks, we can agree that the ideas and ingredients that go into the making of cocktails here like Elderflower Mist, Sweet Talk, Rumming Man and Apricot Jello Shot, are rather unique. Over the agreeable taste of smooth and silky Crème Caramel, we raise our glasses of Apricot Jello Shots, to toast Edward and his team with warm appreciation for all that they are doing to pair good quality food with good wines in this gastro-bar. Classic silky smooth Creme Caramel infused with tea fog The experienced team behind Vigneto Wine & Dine belongs to The Merk Group which also operates established brands like the Faculty of Caffeine, Replacement Lodge & Kitchen, Shakespeare Milkshakes and Tropique. Vigneto Wine & Dine [Non-Halal] is 106, Jalan Sutera Tanjung 8/3, Taman Sutera Utama, 81300 Skudai, Johor. Open every day from 5pm to 1am. For reservations, Tel: + 607 – 562 4488 or +6017 – 657 9235. For promotions and updates, check out Facebook: @vigneto.jb

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Delight Dad On Father’s Day With A Modern Indian Barbecue At Mango Pickle

Delight Dad on Father’s Day with a Modern Indian Barbecue at Mango Pickle × Delight Dad on Father’s Day with a Modern Indian Barbecue at Mango Pickle Gallery Close Things to do near Chicago, IL » Food » Restaurants
This Father’s Day give Dad a break from the grill by letting Michelin-praised restaurant Mango Pickle serve him something exciting and different—a Modern Indian Barbecue. Located in Chicago’s Edgewater neighborhood (5842 N Broadway, Chicago, IL 60660; 773-944-5555), Mango Pickle’s kitchen is led by Chef/Owner Marisa Paolillo, who will surprise and delight Dad with her creative take on smoked and charcoal grilled Indian specialties. She blends some of the world’s greatest spices with the highest quality, locally sourced and sustainably raised ingredients to express her modern approach to Indian cuisine. Dinner service begins at 5 p.m.
Mango Pickle’s Father’s Day dinner menu offers delicious meat, poultry, seafood and vegetarian options so there is something for everyone. Among the starters are House Made Goan Sausage Thali ($18) a spicy dish from India’s west coast, served with paneer, turnip pickle, leaf greens, fresh turmeric and roti; and The Keema Lamb Burger ($16), a northwest Indian version that’s wonderfully spiced and augmented with micro greens and Mint-Yogurt Chutney. Other choices include Chicken Kabab Bun ($18) with hung yogurt, tikka masala and micro greens; and Barbeque Chicken Wings ($14) prepared with tikka marinade and served with fried flatbread and mint-yogurt.
Entrées include Live Main Lobster Malai Curry ($36) an east Indian preparation with coconut, green chili and red rice; and Lamb Biriyani ($26) a dish with Indian Muslim origins, prepared with market vegetables and basmati rice. Vegetarian choices include Red Rice Salad ($18) with mixed greens, Indian pickles and sliced coconut; and Pao Bhaji of Market Vegetables ($24) served with potato, green beans, heirloom tomatoes, spring onions and green garlic.
Enhance your meal with slow-rise Garlic Naan bread ($5) or Whole Wheat Thepla flatbread ($5).
Complete your celebration by pleasing Dad’s sweet tooth with the southern Indian Mango Kulfi ($9), served with strawberry jam, whipped cream, ginger and ghee; or the eastern Indian Mishti Doi ($9) with yogurt, chocolate and nougatine.
To make reservations, visit mangopicklechicago.com or call 773-944-5555.
About Mango Pickle
Mango Pickle , located at 5842 N. Broadway St., Chicago, IL 60660, is a modern Indian restaurant inspired by the diversity and dynamism of India’s rich culinary landscape, which goes far beyond the popular tandoori oven preparations of its northern frontiers to the distinctly exciting fare of its coasts and avant garde urban homes, streets and eateries. The restaurant’s approach is influenced by its location in the Midwest, with attention to seasonality, sustainability, and quality.
Heading the kitchen is chef/owner Marisa Paolillo and partnering on the creative direction is Gregory Bazire. Paolillo is a Chicago native whose journey as a chef began in Bombay (Mumbai), India, a melting pot of locals, expats, cultures and cuisines from every part of India. Bazire, a French native, is a chef and restaurateur who has been residing and working in India since 2005. Their collaboration was first sparked by a month-long catering project in 2012 for a yoga retreat in Goa, India.
Launched in December 2016, Mango Pickle was awarded the Michelin Bib Gourmand designation in 2018 and 2019. Dinner is served from 5 to 9 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday; from 5 to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and from 3 to 9 p.m. Sunday. The restaurant is closed Monday and Tuesday. All major cards are accepted. For more information, please visit mangopicklechicago.com or telephone 773-944-5555.
Follow Mango Pickle on Facebook , Instagram , and Twitter . http://www.eventsnearhere.com/find-events/IL/CHICAGO/Food/Restaurants/addetail/137073/Delight-Dad-on-Father’s-Day-with-a-Modern-Indian-Barbecue-at-Mango-Pickle

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10 Best Travel Destinations in Africa

Sri Lanka Fiji
A single entry visa costs $150. For more information on visa requirements, visit the Lesotho embassy in your country. Lesotho uses Loti as its currency. The value of the Loti is the same value as the South African Rand. ATMs are only available in Maseru.
Travelers from the SADC region can take a flight to Maseru. The costs range from $530 to $759. If you’re in South Africa and want to travel by road, you can drive to the Maputsoe or Ficksburg Border Posts. These are open 24 hours a day. evisa Lesotho
Morocco
Travelers describe Morocco as a country that has an African and European feel to it. It has a mixture of North African and European culture because of its proximity to Europe.
To experience authentic Moroccan culture, you must visit the Djemma el Fna market. Its location is in Marrakesh’s Medina quarter. Djemma el Fna is a shopper’s paradise where you can purchase anything from fashion to artworks. You can also enjoy authentic Moroccan cuisine sold at the food stalls.
You can learn about Berber culture and history from the variety of available tours. The Berber tour is a camel and desert tour that you can do to learn about Morocco’s nomadic populations. You can choose from single day trips to 16-day excursions.
You’ll love learning about traditional pre-Saharan life when visiting Ait Benhaddou. It is a fortified village located along a former caravan route close to Marrakech. You’ll be able to see how ancient architects constructed houses within defensive walls. The village is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
If you’re a music lover, you’ll enjoy the Fes Festival of World Sacred Music. Artists from around the world gather to celebrate Africa’s cultural beauty and diversity. The festival is a 10-day celebration that takes place between May and June. Artists such as Bjork and Ben Harper have previously graced the stage.
You can stay at the Jnane Tamsna hotel in Marrakech, with prices starting at $162. The Riad Madani is another option, with the start price at $112.
Visitors excluded from needing a visa are those from the European Union. Other nationals will need a visa before entering the country. For more information on visa requirements, visit the Moroccan embassy in your country.
Zanzibar
Zanzibar is one of Africa’s island paradises. You’ll enjoy crystal clear waters and great food on the island. There are tons of other islands around the archipelago that you can explore.
You’ll need a visa to enter Tanzania, either from the Tanzanian consulate or on arrival, at the cost of $50.
The Zanzibar Ocean Panorama Hotel is a popular accommodation option on the island. Prices range from $35 to $50, with dormitory rooms costing $20.
Pemba Island is Tanzania’s hidden gem located about 100 kilometers from Zanzibar. It receives fewer visitors than Zanzibar, which makes it an excellent option for a relaxing getaway.
Pemba is still a major spice producer on the Zanzibar archipelago. It depends on agriculture for income more than tourism. You can chat with locals to learn more about the island’s agriculture sector. They can also tell you more about the abundant fruit and spice trees.
A holiday on the island will not be complete without a dive in its waters. You’ll enjoy the sights of healthy coral reefs and diverse species of marine life. For a relaxed afternoon, you can talk a walk on white sandy shores and enjoy a swim in the warm Indian Ocean. The island has earned the nickname “The Green Island” because of its lush beauty.
Pemba has a population of about 350,000 people. You can explore the culture and heritage of the island by visiting the main town, Chake Chake. People are friendly and more than happy to interact. You can strike up a conversation with locals to learn more about their culture and heritage. Make sure to learn some Swahili as that’s the primary language of the island. When you walk around, you’ll see the unique architecture of houses. The island consists of square mud houses with thatch roofs. You’ll also enjoy the tastes of the island as villagers sell a variety of fruits from ox-drawn carts.
Reunion Island
Nestled in the warm Indian Ocean, Reunion Island is a beautiful African paradise. The first thing to know is that the island has an active volcano called the Piton de la Fournaise. The activity of the volcano has created lush vegetation that attracts unique wildlife. Hiking is a great way to explore the island, and there are tons of trails available. If you’re a diver, you’ll enjoy exploring the diversity of marine life in the island’s waters.
Reunion is rich in culture. You’ll experience a fusion of Creole, African, Indian, Chinese, and French heritage. From languages, festivals, and food, you’ll be spoilt for choice on the island.
You can stay at the boutique guesthouse, Rougail Mangue. Prices start from $44. Another option for accommodation is Le gîte La Mandoze, with prices starting from $20 per person per night.
Nationals from the European Union, the U.S., Canada, Britain, Australia, South Africa, and India do not need a visa. Visitors from other countries will need one, which will cost $67. You can fly with Air Austral and Air Mauritius to the island.
Rwanda
Rwanda has earned the nickname “Land of a Thousand Hills” for its stunning scenery. Its mountainous landscape is breathtaking, and it’s home to six active volcanoes.
A visit to the East African nation isn’t complete without exploring the Volcanoes National Park. Here, you’ll see the park’s famous attraction, mountain gorillas and golden monkeys. You’ll also enjoy a variety of flora.
You can enjoy great water activities at Lake Kivu. It is Rwanda’s largest lake and the sixth largest lake in Africa. Boat tours, kayaking, and fishing are available at the lake.
If you’re a tea or coffee lover, Rwanda is the place to enjoy these hot beverages. Explore tea farms and learn more about this industry by going on a tea plantation tour. You can book these tours through travel agents or Rwanda Tourism.
You can stay at Mountain Gorilla View Lodge, which is close to the Volcanoes National Park. Prices start from $227 per night. Another option for accommodation is the Gorillas Lake Kivu Hotel in Gisenyi. The hotel overlooks Lake Kivu, and prices start from $92.
Visas cost $30, and you can apply for one at the Rwandan consulate in your country.
São Tomé e Principe
São Tomé e Principe is Africa’s smallest state situated in the Gulf of Guinea in western Africa. If you’re looking for a quiet retreat, this island is the perfect destination.
You’ll enjoy beautiful beaches and excellent diving spots. On a dive, you’ll see the island’s diverse marine life. The best sites for diving are Ilheu das Rolas, located in the south of the island, and Ilha da Santana. You can book diving trips with the island’s leading diving agency, Club Maxel.
Whale watching is a favorite activity to do on the island between July and September. You can see these majestic creatures at Ilha das Cabras and Lagoa Azul.
If you love hiking, you can trek through the island’s exotic jungle to reach the top of Pico de São Tomé. It is the island’s highest point above sea level at 2,024 meters and is the island’s oldest volcano.
The popular choice of accommodation is the Miramar Hotel. Prices start at $134 per night. Another option is the Cocoa Hotel Residence, with prices starting at $40.
You’ll need a visa from the São Toméan embassy before entering the country. You’ll also need to produce yellow fever and malaria certificates upon arrival. Airlines that fly to São Tomé e Principe include TAP Portugal and Air Angola. To start planning your trip, visit the São Tomé e Principe website.
South Africa
South Africa accommodates all types of travelers. From city getaways to safaris and beach holidays, the country is an ideal destination.
You can enjoy the natural beauty of the iSimangaliso Wetlands Park in KwaZulu-Natal. An interesting fact is that the park is home to Africa’s most extensive estuarine system. You’ll walk on old coastal dunes and beaches that stretch to the Kosi Bay on the Mozambican border. The park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
The uKhahlamba Drakensberg Park in the Wild Coast is home to South Africa’s highest mountain range. It is also a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
The Western Cape has an array of activities to do. You can enjoy the beautiful Garden Route that boasts a variety of vegetation. You can discover many other gems in the route, including authentic South African culture and cuisine. Cape Town is an excellent cosmopolitan destination if you feel like immersing yourself in city life. You can enjoy the sights of Cape Town with the Red Bus Tour. You can also visit Robben Island to learn more about South Africa’s political history.
There’s an array of accommodation available, from luxury hotels to backpacker accommodation. When in the Wild Coast in KwaZulu-Natal, the Wild Coast Sun is a popular choice among visitors. Rooms start at $158 per person per night. When in the Western Cape on the Garden Route tour, it is best to stay in George. Enjoy your stay at the Garden Villa Bed and Breakfast from $49.
You’ll need a visa from the South Africa consulate before arrival. For updated visa information, visit the South African Department of Home Affairs.
Seychelles
If you’re planning a romantic getaway or a wellness retreat, be sure to head to Seychelles. The island-nation consists of 115 islands located in the Indian Ocean. The outer islands of Seychelles offer beautiful beaches and an array of wildlife. The main ones are Alphonse and Desroches.
If you want to immerse yourself in nature and total relaxation, the island is a must-visit. You can dive and explore untouched coral reefs, and see a diversity of marine life. You can enjoy fishing and sailing activities. Best of all, you can swim in the island’s crystal blue waters.
Seychelles has a rich culture consisting of a diverse population. The Seychellois came from Africa, Asia, and Europe. They brought with them unique traditions, languages, and cuisines. Creole, French, and English are the dominant languages spoken on the island. Local cuisine is delicious, consisting of fish, spices, and tropical fruit.
You don’t need a visa to enter Seychelles, only a passport. You’ll also need return or onward tickets, proof of accommodation and enough funds for the duration of your stay. Immigration will process your paperwork at the Seychelles International Airport.
You can travel to the main island via Air Seychelles, and get to the outer islands via Zil Air. Alphonse Island has a beachfront resort that will cost you between $3,689 and $9,497 per night per person. Another beautiful resort is the Desroches Island Resort on Desroches Island. The prices range from $1,101 to $2,202 per double room per night.
You can stay at the Hilton Seychelles Northolme Hotel & Spa in Mahé. It’s a 5-star resort that offers stunning views of the Indian Ocean. Prices range between $557 and $807.

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Online directory is the right avenue to find the Best food places in Singapore

Finding best restaurants in Singapore for other country culinary items could be like searching needle in a haystack. Singapore is a thriving metropolis where all wakes of people live and enjoy life and practice customs that are their own. If you are trying to find the best food places among the melee the task could be daunting because of the above reasons. But you have a bright hope in the form of websites that propagate restaurants located in the various areas of Singapore. That could help if you are searching Indian, Chinese or Japanese.
Singapore is divided in to ethnic cultural zones
Singapore is divided into several districts and top places where the expats live are Holland Village, Tanglin, River Valley, Orchard Road, Woodlands, Bukit Timah in Central Region and Serangoon and Braddell. Some of the most famous places you can search for restaurants of different ethnic cuisine would be orchard, Little India, Arab-Street, China Town, Marina Bay, Clarke Quay, Geylang and East coast. You can visit any of these localities to eat your favorite bread and curry, snacks and beverages. Here is where you will find the best restaurants in Singapore and can expect high standards of waiter service to clients.
It takes just 45 minutes to find best food places in Singapore
For an example if you visit Little India, you will find several restaurants famous for serving exotic native food that are tasty to the palette and easy on the stomach. In spite of the city being cosmopolitan Singapore has many neighborhoods that easily fuse with each other. So it should not be a hard task to travel from one neighborhood to another. However it is necessary that you know all the restaurants that are situated in a particular locality. If you travel by car you can fathom the distance of Singapore in 45 to 60 minutes but it may not be possible if you don’t know the address or route. There is a comprehensive transport system operating in Singapore which could take you to the place where you want to go but you should know the address first.
Consult online directory to find your restaurant
To know the best food places in Singapore and their addresses you could consult an online website that will provide details of them. In fact there are comprehensive websites that provide detailed information on the various restaurants located in the above mentioned localities. These sites also provide you with the convenience of searching restaurants according to localities or category of cuisine they serve. This makes life easy for you especially when you are grappling with a decision on where to eat and what to order. You can expect the site to provide you with every restaurant of note present in the city and in extensive details. The site is also the best place to advertise restaurant business in Singapore. You can either freelist your menu or publish a paid advertisement prominently. Both way customers will know what you are offering and that will give you the opportunity to increase clientele for your restaurant.

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Thousands to observe International Yoga Day at Washington Monument: Indian envoy

Indian Ambassador to the US, Harsh Vardhan Shringla. (Photo: ANI) Washington DC: More than 3000 yoga enthusiasts are expected to observe the International Day of Yoga, for the fifth consecutive year, at the Washington Monument here on Sunday.
“People are getting to know about the benefits of yoga. Yoga is already popular in the United States. It is considered to be a very trendy thing. In other words, it is something that people see as a holistic way of life. They associate with all the positives in terms of meditation, Ayurveda and all the natural ways of living,” the Indian Ambassador to the US, Harsh Vardhan Shringla, told ANI .
“Prime Minister Narendra Modi says Yoga is India’s gift to humanity. We have received more than 3000 registrations this year. So, I believe the monument will be covered up with a lot of yoga enthusiasts,” the ambassador noted.
On December 11, 2014, 193 members of the United Nations General Assembly approved the proposal by consensus, with a record of 177 countries, thereby marking June 21, the day of the summer solstice, as International Day of Yoga. Since then, Yoga Day has been commemorated annually by the member countries of the UN with great enthusiasm.
The event is being organised by the Indian Embassy here along with ‘Friends of Yoga’. A 35 minutes guided yoga session based on ‘Common Yoga Protocol’ created by the Government of India will be conducted with the help of yoga demonstrators.
But what makes the 2019 celebrations different is the Indian Vegetarian Food Festival, hosted in association with Freer Sackler gallery, adjacent to the Washington Memorial, which will be rolled out post the yoga event.
“The food programme is related to yoga. Vegetarian cuisine in India is a very refined cuisine and not enough is known about it. Therefore, we have arranged for five different stalls representing cuisines from five different parts of India – North, South, East, West and a specialised one,” Shringala said.
“We want to introduce a finer vegetarian cuisine for the people here. This food festival will also commemorate the 150th birth anniversary celebrations of Mahatma Gandhi,” he added.
Representatives from various wings of the Trump administration are invited but official confirmations are yet to be received by the embassy.
For over a month, as a run-up to the Yoga Day event, the Indian Embassy has been organising curtain raiser events, in collaboration with yoga clubs and yoga studios across the country.
The mission in Washington has further launched an active promotion campaign through its social media platform that has been successful in getting a record-breaking registration number for the yoga day celebrations.

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From a one-room set up to a 7,000 sq ft factory, this startup is keeping tradition alive with its ready-to-eat Sankethi cuisine

Women Entrepreneur From a one-room set up to a 7,000 sq ft factory, this startup is keeping tradition alive with its ready-to-eat Sankethi cuisine Meet Nagaratna Ravindra and Malathi Sharma, co-founders of Adukale, a brand that offers blended spices, namkeens, and instant foods based on the traditions of Sankethi cuisine. Share on
Malati Sharma and Nagarathna Ravindra – co-founders of Adukale
Anyone conversant with any aspect of South Indian cuisine will know that sambar is not just an important food item, but an intrinsic part of the region’s lifestyle. But here is where the similarity ends. Sambar in Tamil Nadu is made with sambar powder that includes freshly ground spices and coconut in Kerala, with a chunk of jaggery in Karnataka, while many other places add their own special ingredients to the mix.
The Sankethi community make sambar differently – by adding cinnamon in the mix of spices.
The cuisine, like the community, has its antecedents in Karnataka, Kerala, and Tamil Nadu, which makes it unique when it comes to food. Legend says that the Sankethis form a community that moved out of Sengottai (on the Kerala-Tamil Nadu border), following a woman called Nacharamma and settled in Kaushika near Hassan, Karnataka, and Bettadapura in Mysuru district. From the Sankethi kitchens to the shelves
Gojuavalakki and Groundnut Chutney Powder – part of the range at Adukale
Popular brand Adukale (meaning kitchen in Sankethi) brings this unique cuisine to the discerning palate. A range comprising ready-to-eat foods (pohas, upmas, gojuavalakki), blended spices (chutney powders, etc) and namkeens (savouries), Adukale products are free of preservatives and artificial colours, and are available in more than 100 outlets in Bengaluru alone. These include upmas, varieties of pohas, kodubale (a savoury), sambar and rasam powder, and all kinds of chutney powder.
“And that’s not all,” says Malathi Sharma, Co-founder of Adukale. She adds, “The blend of different cultures makes our food unique. When we talk of sambar powder or rasam powder, we are not just talking of the spices that go in to make them, but also the temperature at which they are roasted and the consistency in which they are blended.”
The other co-founders of Adukale are Malathi’s brother Ravindra and his wife Nagaratna. From a small room to a big factory
The family’s “Adukale” did not spring up any new surprises. It revived traditional Sankethi recipes to suit the needs of modern times – a dash of asafoetida, an addition of methi in dosa batter – the little things that affect the taste big-time.
Adukale had its humble beginnings in a small 10×10 room in Malathi’s house in Bengaluru. At that time, Ravindra had quit his job at General Mills and had taken up agriculture as a full-time occupation. “It was a chance conversation between the three of us that led to the setting up of Adukale. My husband had travelled all over India but Sankethi cuisine was ‘taste of home’ for him. And he was passionate about taking it forward. Both Malathi and I were working full-time then, but warmed up to the idea. We started off with a small kadai and a stove and made our first batch of rasam powder,” recalls Nagaratna.
This was in 2009 and the first batch of rasam powder was packaged and distributed to family and friends. Soon, through word-of-mouth, the powder became popular and enquiries started coming in from stores.
“We were guided by my mother-in-law’s principles when it came to cooking. The ingredients would be freshly ground and powdered without the addition of any preservatives. This kept the traditional taste intact and people started appreciating our products,” she adds.
From the small one-room, Adukale moved to a 3,000 sq ft facility with a capacity of 30 tonnes. Last year, it shifted to an even bigger premise in South Bengaluru, with an area covering 7,000 sq ft with a capacity of 100 tonnes.
“Even though our capacity has increased multi-fold, our processes remain the same. One of the partners supervise each stage, and also tests the product so that quality is maintained at every level,” says Malathi. High on tradition and taste
Founding team of Adukale – Ravindra, Malati Sharma and Nagarathna Ravindra
Apart from 100 outlets in Bengaluru stocking Adukale, the brand also opened an ‘Experience Centre’ in Malleshwaram in the city for customers to get a taste and feel of the products before they buy them. The company also plans to open more experience centres in the future.
What started as a simple family venture of foodies has now grown into a huge food brand, popular all over India and abroad. “When we began, it was self-funded. When we realised the acceptance rate of the products was high, we decided to expand. We received assistance from nationalised banks, and closed a funding round last year with 72 Degrees Consultancy Services and also received investment from an investor who was formerly with Sequoia,” informs Malathi.
The founders claim that Adukale has been profitable right from the start and the company hopes to clock Rs 7-8 crore at the end of FY20. At present, it ships to the US and UK markets and plans to launch in these countries soon.
“With the comeback of millets as a superfood, we are planning to launch a range that is millet-based, which will have pongal , bise bele bath , etc,” says Nagaratna.
The women agree that while competition from big brands like Maiya’s and MTR will always be there, Adukale’s focus is on the traditional taste. “The consumer has accepted us and our commitment is to maintain the quality without compromising on the Sankethi taste,” she adds.

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