15 most anticipated restaurants coming to metro Detroit before fall

15 most anticipated restaurants coming to metro Detroit before fall

It was a quiet first quarter on the dining beat in metro Detroit — typical of the cold months following the busy holiday season but more pronounced this year thanks to a tepid Auto Show. Things started to heat up in March with the unveiling of NoHo Hospitality’s more casual ventures at Detroit’s Shinola Hotel, the Brakeman beer hall and adjoining fried chicken joint Penny Red’s. Sticking with the casual theme, the Detroit Optimist Society debuted its Corktown pizza slinger Grandma Bob’s across from its flagship Sugar House bar. I was really impressed with my first couple of pies from Bob’s, particularly the simple pepperoni, which features salty pepperoni discs crisped around the edges and made by DOS’ own Gratiot Avenue Provisions charcutier. (Meanwhile, DOS’ planned Gratiot Avenue Provisions restaurant near Eastern Market is on halt indefinitely after suffering a flood this winter.) Over in New Center, Godwin Ihentuge’s popular YumVillage food truck dropped anchor in the old Atomic Chicken space and is now softly open with limited hours midweek. Those hours will grow to 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday beginning April 16 ahead of a full-scale launch in May. The juicy, all-thigh jerk chicken bowl with jollof rice and perfectly fried plantains is an early favorite from the Afro-Caribbean menu. Despite a local staffing shortage and worries of an impending economic slowdown, a diverse cast of more than a dozen high-profile new restaurants are eyeing openings in the next few months. Here’s the rundown on 15 of the buzziest restaurants slated to debut in metro Detroit before summer’s end. When: Early Spring Where: Hubbard-Richard, Detroit Who: The team behind planned Corktown tequila and mezcal bar Toma What: “The concept is going to be three things,” explains Peso co-owner and Vertical Detroit/El Barzon alum Eddie Vargas. “Whatever protein you want you can get in a California-style burrito, a torta or a dish.” The California style in Peso’s case includes a choice between the bulging, foil-wrapped Mission-style burritos and the Southern Californian style that includes french fries as filling. The bar side promises a deep list of margaritas, cantaritos and palomas. That is, plenty of tequila. More: Opening any day now in the former Fist of Curry/Huron Room space. Peso: 2547 Bagley, Detroit; facebook.com/pesobardetroit . When: Easter Where: 7 Mile & Livernois, Detroit Who: Native Detroiters and twin brothers Omar & Shimar Mitchell What: Chef Omar Mitchell describes Table No. 2 as somewhat of a throwback white-tablecloth fine-dining restaurant on Detroit’s “Avenue of Fashion,” touting tableside preparations of Caesar salad and bananas Foster — the type of dining that harkens back to the long-gone Golden Mushroom, where Mitchell got his culinary start. But Table No. 2 also promises a riff on the table dessert made famous by Chicago chef Grant Achatz at the Michelin three-star restaurant Alinea. ( Table No. 2’s online menu even uses a photo of the well-recognized Alinea dish.) This modern molecular gastronomy masterwork is notably a very far cry from tableside Caesars, so expect some major twists on the overall premise. More: Now accepting reservations for Easter. Will begin regular dinner service Tuesday, April 23. No liquor license. Table No. 2: 18925 Livernois, Detroit; (313)-340-9550 and tablenumber2.com . When: Early Spring Where: Downtown Royal Oak Who: Howell restaurateur Adam Merkel What: One of two forthcoming rooftop lounges, the old Red Fox English Pub space will soon be revived in trendier style as Pinky’s, a cocktail and small plates lounge with a vintage feel and a garden theme. Think: Miami Beach in the ’50s, with lots of pink and live palms, plus oysters and other snacks. Expected to debut late April/early May. Pinky’s: 100 S. Main, Royal Oak; pinkysroyaloak.com . When: Spring Where: Cass Corridor, Detroit (inside the Detroit Shipping Company) Who: Nepalese chef Anjani Lama What : The Detroit Shipping Company food hall debuted last year with two of its vendor slots unfilled thanks to a hiccup at the border for the Canadian brands it had originally signed. Soon, one of those spaces will be filled by a vendor slinging Nepalese snacks and South Asian dumplings called momos, which are similar to gyoza or mandu but flavored with spices more closely associated with the cooking of the Indian subcontinent. Momo Cha’s chef was previously at the well-regarded Indian restaurant Cardamom in Ann Arbor. Momo Cha: 474 Peterboro, Detroit; momochadetroit.com . When: May 1 Where: Downtown Detroit (atop the Element Detroit at the Metropolitan) Who: Former “Hell’s Kitchen” contestant Jared Bobkin is executive chef What: Few details are known about this rooftop lounge crowning the old Metropolitan Building, recently reborn as the Element Detroit hotel after nearly 40 years of vacancy. Repeat “Hell’s Kitchen” contestant Jared Bobkin is heading up a menu of small plates that accompany the cocktails and promised “big views” of the downtown cityscape. The Monarch Club: 33 John R, Detroit; marriott.com/hotels/hotel-information/restaurant/dtwel-element-detroit-at-the-metropolitan . When: May 1 Where: Bloomfield Twp. Who: The team behind Birmingham Japanese hotspot Adachi What: The biggest update on the previously announced pan-Asian concept Zao Jun is that Boston-based celebrity chef Michael Schlow is no longer attached to the project and has split from sister restaurant Adachi. Instead, partners Clint Mansour and Kenny Koza have tapped Adachi Executive Chef Lloyd Roberts, who boasts a deep pedigree working in some of the world’s best Japanese kitchens, to take the lead on the project that promises “greatest hits” from the vast and varied Asian continent. Mansour said the split with Schlow was amicable. The partners had signed with him before finding Roberts, who proved himself more than capable of running the show himself. Expect a family friendly vibe in the strip-mall restaurant, where Thai-inspired papaya salad will share room on the menu with Mandarin-style bang bang chicken and more. Zao Jun: 6608 Telegraph, Bloomfield; zaojunnewasian.com. When: May Where: Ferndale Who: Peas & Carrots Hospitality What: Peas & Carrots Executive Chef Zack Sklar concedes that it might seem a little crazy to keep the Como’s name despite all the bad press the iconic Ferndale pizzeria received in its last few years. “I’m taking over the great 50 years that Como’s had before the bad 5, 6, or 7 years in the end where it wasn’t so good,” he said. “I didn’t want to rip its soul out.” The name, the lit sign out front and the floor in the dining room are about all that’s left of the old Como’s, which was completely gutted inside and given a brick-tipped facelift. The interior features a custom cane-webbed ceiling, an Art Deco bar and tubular vintage-style fluorescent lighting that’s a mashup of midcentury Brooklyn pizzeria and Palm Beach bar. Como’s once-beloved round pizzas have also been reimagined in the form of the chef’s take on Detroit-style square, with dough fermented for three days and topped with hand-sliced pepperoni. Como’s famous patio, too, will live again, but will likely re-open shortly after the indoor dining room. More: The separate bar area on the north side of the building will be operated by Traverse City Whiskey Co. Como’s: 22812 Woodward, Ferndale. When: Spring/Summer Where: Grixdale Farms, Detroit Who: Guerrilla Kitchen & Pink Flamingo Chef Meiko Krishok and partner Khalee What: The old Bread Basket Deli across from Palmer Park has found the perfect tenant for its pink-roofed space. The popular North Corktown food truck Pink FlaminGo will offer a carryout version of its chef’s “food as medicine” concept. “We’re more interested in how can we do really healthy, good quality grassroots-related food,” said co-owner Meiko Krishok. “And we like the idea of being in a neighborhood and not so much just in a concentrated commercial district.” The outpost will offer prepared grab-and-go options, a smoothie bar and a small rotating menu of nutrient-dense hot foods in the $7 to $12 range. Think: rice bowls, salads and quarts of soup for $10. Pink FlaminGo To Go: 17740 Woodward, Detroit; guerrillafooddetroit.com . When: June Where: Birmingham Who: Legendary Detroit-area chefs Takashi Yagihashi and Luciano DelSignore What: What happens when two of the most revered local chefs of the last two decades come together for a late-career moonshot of a restaurant that aims to raise the bar for fine dining in the area? We’ll find out early this summer when DelSignore and Yagihashi consummate their long friendship with their first culinary project together, the most ambitious yet for either chef. Work is underway to transform the former Cafe Via space into a luxury yacht of a restaurant that will become a showcase for the world’s best ingredients minimally manipulated via Italian, Japanese and French cooking techniques. The bar will focus on absinthe, French champagne and Japanese whisky. The chef duo plan to offer previews of the fare at a few pop-ups in the coming months. Pernoi: 310 E. Maple, Birmingham; pernoibirmingham.com . When: Summer Where: Downtown Detroit (inside the Siren Hotel) Who: Lady of the House Chef Kate Williams and ASH NYC What: 2018 Food & Wine Best New Chef Kate Williams is offering another piece of her family history in restaurant form. “The idea was that it would be this small space based off of Karl’s, named after my great-great-grandparents’ bakery that was on Kercheval on the east side in the Depression era,” Williams previously told the Free Press . The all-day restaurant promises re-imagined American diner classics in a “not-so-greasy-spoon” environment. One potential menu highlight: sandwiches made from house-baked bread and William’s celebrated Parisian ham . Karl’s: 1509 Broadway (in The Siren Hotel), Detroit; thesirenhotel.com . When: Summer Where: Core City, Detroit Who: Chef Brad Greenhill, chef de cuisine Mike Conrad and the team behind Takoi What: Work has finally begun on the old Magnet Radiator Works building, the future home of the delayed followup to Corktown Thai hospot Takoi. Led by longtime Takoi sous Mike Conrad, the conceit at Magnet is cooking with live wood fire without any geographic limitations as inspirational sources. The menu also promises to double-down on the vegetable-centric approach found at its sister restaurant. The new restaurant is just one piece of co-owner Philip Kafka’s growing Core City developments, which also include the forthcoming Ochre Bakery, a new roasting facility for Astro Coffee, an outdoor park and an award-winning quonset hut development across the street. Magnet: 4848 Grand River, Detroit; facebook.com/magnetdetroit . When: Summer Where: West Village, Detroit Who: Rose’s Fine Foods proprietor Molly Mitchell and head baker Eggy Ding What: Despite some fears that the follow-up to popular eastside diner Rose’s Fine Foods was off, proprietor Molly Mitchell said the Polish restaurant and bakery Poppies is on track for a summer debut. The new spot will act as the commissary bakery for both restaurants, with head baker Eggy Ding producing various breads, donuts and pastries. On the savory side, expect pierogi, sandwiches and modern riffs on Polish classics, served in a fast-casual environment with counter service. Poppies: 1400 Van Dyke, Detroit. When: Summer Where: Clawson Who: Veteran restaurateur Matt Prentice and the owners of Leon & Lulu What: With a forced five-year restaurant hiatus behind him , veteran restaurateur Matt Prentice has partnered with Leon & Lulu owners Mary Liz Curtin and Stephen Scannell for his first re-entry into a dining scene that’s changed tremendously in his absence. Located in the historic Clawson Theatre building, Three Cats and a Cook will blend hyper-American shared plates and beverages with an interactive retail component. Prentice is expecting a mid-June debut. Three Cats and a Cook: 116 W. Fourteen Mile, Clawson. When: Summer Where: New Center, Detroit Who: Burundian refugees Hamissi Mamba and Nadia Nijimbere What: The long-delayed East African restaurant from husband-and-wife Burundian refugees is still on for the corner of Woodward and East Grand Boulevard, despite little activity in the bare space over the last few months. When it opens, the all-day cafe and market will be the only East African restaurant in Detroit and will be staffed in part by alums of Freedom House, the local non-profit that helped the husband-wife duo who run Baobab Fare receive asylum. Baobab Fare: 6568 Woodward, Detroit; 313-266-5199 and baobabfare.com . When: Late Summer Where: Capitol Park, Detroit Who: The Eid family, owners of Phoenicia and Forest in Birmingham What: Phoenicia owner Sameer Eid often jokes about the mistress he keeps at home, because he’s been married to the popular Lebanese restaurant for longer . Come August, he may finally make a lady of his mistress, as his new venture in Capitol Park will be named Leila for her . Eid’s son, Samy, is handling much of the opening and has tasked Nick Janutol, executive chef of the Eid family’s Forest restaurant in Birmingham, with overseeing the mezze-heavy Lebanese menu at Leila. Described as a more casual version of Phoenicia’s white-tablecloth fare, one of the biggest differentiators for the new spot is an on-site pita oven and a deep focus on kebabs. And yes, Phoenicia’s famous pork ribs will be making the trip downtown. Leila: 1249 Griswold, Detroit. Send your dining tips to Free Press Restaurant Critic Mark Kurlyandchik at 313-222-5026 or mkurlyandc@freepress.com . Follow him on Twitter @MKurlyandchik and Instagram @curlyhandshake . Read more restaurant news and reviews and sign up for our Food and Dining newsletter .

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Ajax Juventus ends in 1 -1 and 137(!) arrests were made in Amsterdam on Wednesday (vid inside!)

19 apr All Day 21 Paaspop/Easter Doll Festival Event Details
Paaspop/Easter Doll, has been going since 1974 and has grown year on year. It went from a friendly regional festival to an internationally recognisable three-day event. Last year 83,000 people more Event Details
Paaspop/Easter Doll, has been going since 1974 and has grown year on year. It went from a friendly regional festival to an internationally recognisable three-day event. Last year 83,000 people attended Passpop to see 230 different acts, on 14 different stages. They also got to try 42 different food trucks, offering a variety of different cuisines from all over the world.
Paaspop has seen acts such as Iggy Pop, Bastille, Nothing But Thieves, The Prodigy, Underworld, Kaiser Chiefs, The Kooks, Fatboy Slim, The Wombats and many more. So, who is going to be there this year?
25 Years Charly Lownoise & Mental Theo • 2manydjs DJ Set • 4shobangers • 80’s Verantwoord • Aap uit de Mouw • Abba Fever • Alex Agnew • The All Star Gary Moore Tribute Band • All Them Witches • Amartey • Amyl And The Sniffers • Arie & Silvester • Atmozfears • Baby Blue • Bizzey • Black Water County • Blood Red Shoes • Brennan Heart • Camo & Krooked • Circus Brothers • Claw Boys Claw • Clean Bandit • Comeback Kid • D-Block & S-te-Fan • D-Sturb • Daddy Long Legs • DAISY • Daniel Caldèras & the Shrunken Big Band ft. Benjamin Herman • Davina Michelle • De Hofnar • De Jeugd van Tegenwoordig • De Lievelings DJ’s van je Zusje • De Staat • The Devil Makes Three • DeWolff • The Dirty Daddies • Donnie & Joost • Dopebwoy • Douwe Bob • Dr Phunk • Dropkick Murphys • Drunken Dolly • EAUXMAR • Ellen Ten Damme • Famke Louise • FATA BOOM • Fiesta Macumba Soundsystem • Flonti Stacks • For I Am King • Freddy Moreira • Frenna • The Gaslamp Killer • GENTA • Handrick • Hannah Williams & The Affirmations • Heavy Hoempa plays Iron Maiden • Hef • Heideroosjes • HENGE • Herrie met Gerrie • Ho99o9 • Idaly • IDLES • Ilse DeLange • Indian Askin • Jailhouse Jimmy • Jameszoo • Jarreau Vandal • Jeangu Macrooy • Jett Rebel • Jiri11 • JoeyAK • Johnny 500 • Jordymone9 • Kovacs • Kraantje Pappie • Kris Kross Amsterdam • La Fuente • LNY TNZ • Louder Than Love • Louder Than Love (Soundgarden tribute) • Lukas Graham • MADUK hosted by Ben Verse • Mash-Up Jack • Mate Power • Merol • Mia More • Michelle David & The Gospel Sessions • Mike Krol • Mike Williams • Mr. Belt & Wezol • Mula B • NAFTHALY RAMONA • Navarone • Nervana • Nicole Atkins • Nielson • Noisia DJ Set • NOMA$ • Nona • Novastar • Ooostblok • Oscar and the Wolf • Passenger • Pendulum DJ Set • Phuture Noize • Ploegendienst • Plunder • Poke • Prime • Puinhoop Kollektiv – The Final Weekend Tour • Puri • Que Pasa! • Ran-D • Rondé • Ronnie Flex & Deuxperience • Rowwen Hèze • Russkaja • S10 • Sam Feldt LIVE • Scooter • Sevn Alias • Singlefeestje • Sir Reg • Sjaak • Sjannies • SMP • Snelle • Son Mieux • Stahlzeit • The Stand-Up Club • The Stand-Up Club • Steel Panther • T & Sugah b2b NCT • Tabanka • TAPE TOY • Ten Times A Million • Terry Alderton • Thijs Boontjes Dans- en Showorkest • Tim Akkerman Sings The Boss • Tim Knol & The Blue Grass Boogiemen • Trobi • Tusky • The Vintage Caravan • Vinylfeestje • Waxfiend • The Wetnecks • White Lies • Winne • Within Temptation • Yonaka • Young Ellens • Yung Felix • Yungblud • Zer00’s Heroes Tickets

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A quarter of young people between the ages of 18 and 25 are overweight

19 apr All Day 21 Paaspop/Easter Doll Festival Event Details
Paaspop/Easter Doll, has been going since 1974 and has grown year on year. It went from a friendly regional festival to an internationally recognisable three-day event. Last year 83,000 people more Event Details
Paaspop/Easter Doll, has been going since 1974 and has grown year on year. It went from a friendly regional festival to an internationally recognisable three-day event. Last year 83,000 people attended Passpop to see 230 different acts, on 14 different stages. They also got to try 42 different food trucks, offering a variety of different cuisines from all over the world.
Paaspop has seen acts such as Iggy Pop, Bastille, Nothing But Thieves, The Prodigy, Underworld, Kaiser Chiefs, The Kooks, Fatboy Slim, The Wombats and many more. So, who is going to be there this year?
25 Years Charly Lownoise & Mental Theo • 2manydjs DJ Set • 4shobangers • 80’s Verantwoord • Aap uit de Mouw • Abba Fever • Alex Agnew • The All Star Gary Moore Tribute Band • All Them Witches • Amartey • Amyl And The Sniffers • Arie & Silvester • Atmozfears • Baby Blue • Bizzey • Black Water County • Blood Red Shoes • Brennan Heart • Camo & Krooked • Circus Brothers • Claw Boys Claw • Clean Bandit • Comeback Kid • D-Block & S-te-Fan • D-Sturb • Daddy Long Legs • DAISY • Daniel Caldèras & the Shrunken Big Band ft. Benjamin Herman • Davina Michelle • De Hofnar • De Jeugd van Tegenwoordig • De Lievelings DJ’s van je Zusje • De Staat • The Devil Makes Three • DeWolff • The Dirty Daddies • Donnie & Joost • Dopebwoy • Douwe Bob • Dr Phunk • Dropkick Murphys • Drunken Dolly • EAUXMAR • Ellen Ten Damme • Famke Louise • FATA BOOM • Fiesta Macumba Soundsystem • Flonti Stacks • For I Am King • Freddy Moreira • Frenna • The Gaslamp Killer • GENTA • Handrick • Hannah Williams & The Affirmations • Heavy Hoempa plays Iron Maiden • Hef • Heideroosjes • HENGE • Herrie met Gerrie • Ho99o9 • Idaly • IDLES • Ilse DeLange • Indian Askin • Jailhouse Jimmy • Jameszoo • Jarreau Vandal • Jeangu Macrooy • Jett Rebel • Jiri11 • JoeyAK • Johnny 500 • Jordymone9 • Kovacs • Kraantje Pappie • Kris Kross Amsterdam • La Fuente • LNY TNZ • Louder Than Love • Louder Than Love (Soundgarden tribute) • Lukas Graham • MADUK hosted by Ben Verse • Mash-Up Jack • Mate Power • Merol • Mia More • Michelle David & The Gospel Sessions • Mike Krol • Mike Williams • Mr. Belt & Wezol • Mula B • NAFTHALY RAMONA • Navarone • Nervana • Nicole Atkins • Nielson • Noisia DJ Set • NOMA$ • Nona • Novastar • Ooostblok • Oscar and the Wolf • Passenger • Pendulum DJ Set • Phuture Noize • Ploegendienst • Plunder • Poke • Prime • Puinhoop Kollektiv – The Final Weekend Tour • Puri • Que Pasa! • Ran-D • Rondé • Ronnie Flex & Deuxperience • Rowwen Hèze • Russkaja • S10 • Sam Feldt LIVE • Scooter • Sevn Alias • Singlefeestje • Sir Reg • Sjaak • Sjannies • SMP • Snelle • Son Mieux • Stahlzeit • The Stand-Up Club • The Stand-Up Club • Steel Panther • T & Sugah b2b NCT • Tabanka • TAPE TOY • Ten Times A Million • Terry Alderton • Thijs Boontjes Dans- en Showorkest • Tim Akkerman Sings The Boss • Tim Knol & The Blue Grass Boogiemen • Trobi • Tusky • The Vintage Caravan • Vinylfeestje • Waxfiend • The Wetnecks • White Lies • Winne • Within Temptation • Yonaka • Young Ellens • Yung Felix • Yungblud • Zer00’s Heroes Tickets

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New Horizon Mall finds second anchor tenant – Calgary’s Business

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The Asian-themed New Horizon Mall just north of Calgary, which has struggled to find vendors, has landed a second anchor tenant.
Prairie Horizon Fresh Market will be a 23,000-square-foot retailer, employing more than 150 people. It is to open this summer at the troubled mall, located in Balzac just south of CrossIron Mills Shopping Centre.
Ken and Tracy Aylesworth will be running Prairie Horizon, through their company, Shindigz Ventures. The couple has more than 15 years of farmers’ market experience, including managing the Avenida Food Hall & Fresh Market and owning the Symons Valley Ranch Farmers Market. Ken was previously the general manager of the Calgary Farmers Market and oversaw its relocation to its current home on Blackfoot Trail.
“Prairie Horizon Fresh Market will focus on various farmers market style vendors. Vendors will range from fresh locally sourced vegetables and fruits; to ethnic specialties such as perogies, Mexican, Asian and Indian cuisine; bakeries, sweets, fresh proteins, coffee, sweet and savoury pies, ramen noodles and so much more,” said Ken Aylesworth.
As of February, about 65 of the 517 retail spaces have opened for business. Mall investors hope this anchor tenant will mark a turn in fortunes.
“Coming hot on the heels of the announcement two weeks ago of Best Shop as a major anchor tenant at New Horizon Mall, the Prairie Horizon Fresh Market is another huge milestone for the mall,” said Ross Cannata, chief investment officer, The Torgan Group, co-developer of New Horizon Mall with its partner, MPI Property Group, said in a statement. “(It) fills the void in the market for a unique source where food-curious Calgarians can discover a different kind of grocery shopping experience.”
The New Horizon Mall is modelled on The Torgan Group’s Pacific Mall in the Toronto area that opened about 20 years ago.
Unlike most shopping centres in Canada, about 70 per cent of New Horizon Mall’s retail space has been sold to individual investors who have the option of leasing to others or operating the space themselves.
The $200-million development broke ground in June 2016. – Mario Toneguzzi John Stewart contributed to this story
New Horizon Mall finds second anchor tenant added by Calgary’s Business on April 11, 2019

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Cultural Influences on Eating Out Habits in the Uk Essay Example for Free

Wednesday, April 10, 2019 Cultural Influences on Eating Out Habits in the Uk Essay Example for Free Cultural Influences on Eating Out Habits in the Uk EssaySociety at present has become ac made-to-ordered to eat egress. It has become a large fear office of British finish consort to a survey carried aside by Mintel entitled Evening Eating Habits in the UK (2005). Dining out at ethnic in ally themed restaurants and take externals has growthd in recent years ascribable to many an(prenominal) disparate economic, social, and pagan armys. These forces vary from the presence of a more affluent golf-club with melloweder(prenominal) expendable incomes to the increased powerfulness to travel to exotic far a flair entrusts around the creation cralimentation a consumer want for recreation in the UK of their holiday experiences which include dining out. The report alike highlighted the fact that 75% of the eating out grocery is dominated by those eating out in the evening which equates to ? 20. 7 billion a year. This trade is one that wad not be ignored by those in doors the hospitality indus interpret and those businesses that already experiment with exotic victualss entrust gain the opport whiz to experiment further with their menus, using higher termsd ingredients to increase profit margins. Although on that point atomic number 18 many possibilities available as the trend widens it is suggested by the generator that a trend alone wadnot allow for increased business.Higher profit margins for more expensive ingredients leave symbolise that the consumer forget start to expect more from the restaurant or takeaway in question. Such qualities as ambience, military service, food standards, variety of menu, and recreation of an experience the consumer whitethorn turn in had whilst on holiday whitethorn overly come into the equation. Large snitchs untold(prenominal) as YOsushi argon cashing in on the market trends by inspection and repair a variety of sushi diskes in a fun and friendly way. Japanese food such(prenominal)(preno minal) as sushi is often deemed as a much wholesome option to over take in popularity separate ethnically themed culinary art such as indian and chinese dishes (Martin, 2007).Sushi is base primarily around altogether fish, rice, and vegetables (YOsushi 2007) and thusly the former suggests that due to a more multi ethnic society in the UK this has lead to unalike ideals being set for healthier eating however it is noted by the seed that although the ingredients used to get up the western ideal of sushi atomic number 18 deemed as healthy the preparation and preparation methods may not leave in an end product that is altogether free of those things larnn as unhealthy due to the in legitimacy of production.Although large companies such as YOsushiargon succeeding in a very competitive business environment, how will such a shift in eating habits affect the smaller local businesses? According to Mintel (2002) one of the main reasons smaller businesses deep down the ethnical ly themed cuisine market are suffering lower profit margins is due to the lack of branded outlets, only when the author suggests that this could be due to separate issues such as the recent healthy eating trend which has caused many consumers to re-evaluate the content of the takeaway food that they consume so choosing healthier options instead.This essay will attempt to identify the reasons why a consumer will contract to dine out over eating at home, and then their reasons for choosing one hospitality venue over some(prenominal) otherwise. This should help to assure the growing market for ethnically themed restaurants and takeaways. The contri scarcelying economical, social, and ethnic factors of increased custom of ethnic cuisine will be explored further do suggestions to the hospitality manager on how to understand their target market thus aiding a more profitable business.It is important for any business to understand a consumers motivation to deprave or use a ser vice A motive is an internal energy giving force that directs a persons activities towards satisfying a need or achieving a goal Dibb et al (2001, pg. 121). Before a consumer enters any hospitality venue there may be many different factors that have bear upon their motivation to choose that particular restaurant or takeaway over another.It may be such base factors as location, price, and the service they are declare oneselfd with once inside the establishment, choosing on this basis is known as patronage motives. For an ethnically themed restaurant or takeaway to make the most of these motives they should be aware they are around them and attempt to emphasize said factors inside their ainized marketing mix. It is suggested by the author that this can be achieved with simple marketing ploys such as 2 course lunch menus, or a drink and a main course at a set price.By strategically placing the offers where the consumer will see them is more likely to attract them to try the service that is provided, and possibly provide return custom when the special offers are not available and they will choose from the full price menu instead. It is suggested by the author that this form of marketing can be applied anthropologically as the consumer will not sole(prenominal) judge the food outlet based on the price but also on how that price fits in with the image of the food product and its connection to the time and culture it represents.A good mannequin of strategic marketing for ethnic food is that of China town in London, many of the restaurants offer all you can eat buffets at low prices, and set menus that will attract many types of customers from those plenty absent a quick lunch away from the office to tourists who have been attracted by the hearsay and theme of such a postal service (Anon, 2007).60,000 Chinese lot of diverse origins live in London there is a large ne 2rk of Chinese schools and charity based community centres that offer support so that a bra in of cultural separateity can be passed down from one generation to the adjoining. This sense of cultural identity may be passed down for several reasons, Auge (1995) suggests that there is some sense of fantasy where as the environment they live in was founded a long time ago expressing a group identity that they feel should at all times be defended from external and internal threats and not forgotten by dint of the generations.Although China Town is now seen by the local council as a tourist attraction (Anon, 2007), it was primarily a safe haven for the many migrants coming to the UK in the 1960s, many of the british soldiers that returned from war in the Far East having enjoyed Chinese cuisine founded a refreshing loyal customer base for the cuisine in the UK and this is how that particular area of London became known as China Town (BBC. 2007) Although China Town is now a tourist attraction it should be noted that it is also a meeting place for many Chinese people who feel a sense of community and cultural identity.Unfortunately since Westminster council started a multi million pound re-development of the area this has seen the closure of many of the smaller authentic chinese restaurants in privilege of more chinese themed restaurants that will appeal to the average tourist (Anon, 2007). It is suggested by the author that this could cause many negative issues for the cultural identity and sense of community that exists in spite of appearance China Town where as the authenticity and history behind such an area of London are forgotten in favor of providing the tourists with an unreal representation in hopes of higher profits and visitor statistics.However it is noted by the author that there has always been an element of staged authenticity in China Town because the original cultural dry land was replicated in the first place.Although patronage motives play a aboriginal part in the consumer decision making process there are many other motives to c onsider such as the suggestion that food pickings are actually part of a persons identity for casing a consumer who chooses to dine at restaurants that only use local stick is likely to be seen by other consumers as someone who is not only concerned with the food that they eat, but also where it has come from and whether it benefits their local communities economy and local identity.Local produce has over the past decade been linked to geographical, historical, political, legal, economical, social and cultural issues therefore allowing the consumer to view it as a multi faceted cultural entity. Those consumers who are concerned with choosing only local produce relates to the idea of territory, and the limitation of space while respecting the environment around them.(Auge, 1995) There are two key theorists in relation to consumer motivation Abraham Maslow and Frederick Herzberg. Maslow believed that a persons needs are based on a hierarchy arranged with the least important facto rs at the bottom and the most important at the top. This arrangement starts with physiologic needs followed by safety needs, social needs, esteem needs, and finally self actualization.Once part of the triplicity (see appendix I) is satisfied then the consumer will move onto a bring throughment of the next level for example a man enters a chinese restaurant and eats because he is hungry then the physiological need is fulfilled, he may then go on to have a drink with friends to fulfill his esteem needs. When that important need is satisfied, it will stop becoming a motivator, and the person will try to satisfy the next most important need Kotler et al (2003, pg. 354).Frederick Herzberg developed Maslows theory and set-apart a persons motivators in to potential satisfiers and dissatisfiers. In Terms of Maslow and Herzbergs theories being applied in an anthropological sense the author suggests that this refers to culture, identity and symbolism of food spending as part of the needs snarl by the consumer, furthermore esteem needs, social needs and even self-actualisation are all part of what the consumer deems part of their individual or cultural identity.For this to work a person must have enough factors that are going to satisfy them into choosing one ethnically themed restaurant over another. For a hospitality operation to practice this theory to use they would need to avoid as many potential dissatisfiers as possible and squeeze on what the major satisfiers of their target market are, this may safe cause the difference between a consumer choosing one restaurant over another that is just around the corner.Therefore it is suggested by the author that disposed(p) the large number of decisions a consumer has to make when choosing an ethnically themed restaurant or takeaway, and the impacts that a multicultural society has on the consumer as an individual it is necessary to explore how and why consumers might influence one another to make a purchase decisio n based on food consumption. Firstly religious aspects of an individual within a group will play a key part in as original what food type they can consume. A child born into a family with strong religious beliefs will often take these beliefs as part of their individual identity, A good example of this is that of the consumption of proper meat products by many muslim families throughout the UK.According to the Halal Food Authority (2007) the devotion of Zibah means that animals have to be alive and healthy at the time that they are to be slaughtered, as little pain as possible must be endured by the animal during slaughter therefore a single cut is made with a sharp knife to the jugular vein. The Islamic Shariah organized religion also forbids the consumption of pork, and Halal meat must be prepared only in a situation where no pork products have been. Although there are many ethnic takeaways and smaller businesses providing halal or kosher food, there are not many big brand name s within the industry.Nandos restaurant, a Portuguese themed food outlet, provides halal chicken in what they have branded world famous peri peri sauce. Nandos have eased themselves into the local communities in which they reside by using the guideword we believe in trying to make life better for all (Nandos, 2007). Offering local sponsorships of sports teams and supporting(a) local charities has included the brand in a sense of community and cultural identity, it is noted by the author that the sense of community and cultural identity is referred to in a general sense quite an than that of a particular local community.To continue the idea that consumers can influence one another the purpose of traditional family mealtimes should be explored. Family mealtimes in the past decade would have been a time for the family to sit down, free and enjoy all(prenominal) others company with a home cooked meal. In society today mealtimes are ever-changing to meet new priorities and work pat terns, and flexible eating patterns are becoming more popular as people base when they eat around their lifestyle rather than a structured day to day meal time for the whole family to adhere too.(Wright et al, 2001) It is suggested by the author that due to this shift in family unity at mealtimes slight influence is being had over family group identity and a more determinative individualistic consumer will emerge instead with their own food choice preferences. However it is suggested by the author that the idea of a more individualistic consumer is more relevant to British culture and many other cultures residing within the UK may still enjoy unified meal times together as a family.In many ways it is a move forward in terms of identity and consumption of the consumer, one that the hospitality needs to be aware of to maintain a successful business. Friends and social groups can also influence one another in the food choices that they make, for example a group of friends who firm ly meet up at cocoa houses such as Starbucks will adopt a coffee culture the same as that represented on popular television shows such as friends. This happens because of the regular use and social identity that is created (Food Institute, 2005).It is noted by the author that social groups that contain consumers of different cultures and backgrounds, may influence one another to desire the need to experience each others cultural identity. There are many reasons why a consumer may choose to eat out in the first place according to Cousins et al (2002, pg. 251) If people have decided to eat out then it follows that there has been a conscious choice to do this in preference to some other course of action, in other words the food service operator has attracted a customer to buy their product as against some other product for example theatre, cinema, or simply staying at home.Often the convenience of eating out over cooking at home will help make the decision for a consumer. Eating out m eans more time for relaxation, quality time with family or friends, or just a change from the norm of returning from work and cooking dinner. The increase in the number of consumers choosing to dine out follows changes that have happened over the last decade where as family identity and roles have changed, with most households having two incomes and often the women will be the primary earner whereas before the women would stay at home and set the role of housewife.According to a recent survey (eating out and the consumer, 2007) only 8% of women see their main role as family care compared to 15% just a decade ago, the survey also highlighted the fact that women are more concerned with healthy eating when dining out, with 76% of women agreeing compared to 41% of men.This could have an effect on the number of consumers choosing to dine at ethnically themed restaurants and takeaways as it is suggested by the author that as women are more concerned with healthy lifestyles for their fami lies and will aim to choose an operation that can provide healthy nutrition, value for money, and good service as well as a sense of culture that is relevant to that particular family according to Mintel (2007) this will continue to be a growing factor in the choice of dining out establishments as more women seek full-time employment over the next five years.The change of roles in family lifestyles follows onto that of demographics. According to the Office for National statistics (2006) London consumers spend an average 60% more on dining out than consumers from other parts of the country such as in the North East of England.This can be seen in London with the success of ethnically themed restaurants and takeaways such as Belle Italia, Cafe Rouge, Pizza Express, and Franky and Bennys (Tragus, 2007). Many of these franchisees can be seen throughout the country but the survey carried out by the Office for National statistics (2006) also showed that those companies who left high profit areas such as London to nationalise their brands got their fingers burned.The author suggests that this inability to mobilise a new brand into an area of the country may stem back to the areas cultural identity based on the general perception of that culture, where as the consumer does not feel that the new brand is part of their personal identity and therefore is not part of the communities identity either. Identity can be associated with the repeat consumption of a particular restaurant or takeaway, for example a consumer who constantly eats at Chinese, Indian, and Grecian takeaways may eventually adopt a fast food culture.The fact that so many people are choosing to dine out comes back to the notion that todays society is more affluent, higher expendable incomes and more leisure time leading to a consumer that enjoys dining out on a regular basis. It is however noted that by the author that the trend for increased dining out may also relate to a new culture of malaise whereas p eople are just too lazy to cook at home and therefore choose to dine out.According to Martin (2007, pg.3) people will pay more for what they think is important, but the question for the eating-out market is what is going to be classed as in truth discretionary and what virtually essential? There is no sign that people will start cooking at home again, they will however most likely want better value. The author suggests that better value can mean numerous factors such as better quality and service rather than just providing a less expensive dining experience.Therefore those ethnically themed restaurants using high quality ingredients and experimenting with menu changes towards the more exotic may find an increased custom due to the perceive value in the consumers ideals. Many people want variety within their lifestyle, there are so many venues within the hospitality industry that offer something that a consumer may never have seek before or only experienced on holiday in a far awa y exotic place, this relates directly to the increased consumption of ethnically themed foods and plays a key part in attracting new customers and maintaining a loyal customer base.As mentioned earlier YOsushi is one of the worlds most famous conveyor rap music restaurants, the food is all freshly made to order and is prepared in full view of the customers. It is raise to note that the conveyor smasher restaurants in Japan are nothing more than a basic food outlet where customers can get a quick bite to eat on their way to do something else as stated by owner of London sushi bar Itsu Mr Metcalfe (2007) also stating that the conveyor smash-up is a great way to get food to customers whilst saving money on staffing costs.It is suggested by the author that this shows the cultural changes that have taken place in providing the same concept in two different countries so that they both remain profitable. Japan on one hand prefer the sushi conveyor belt restaurants to be quick no fuss f ood where as in the UK they are somewhat staged, legal transfer a little piece of what the British believe to be how Japan prepare, and eat their food just about ritualistically (Metcalfe, 2007).Since opening in 1996 YOsushihas become extremely popular, their no fuss attitude to service and the customers freedom of choice within the venue has produced a world(a) brand Since the first year of business (1996) YOsushi has received or so 300 applications per year from potential franchisees from Australia to Zurich. We realized we were on to a winning formula and that we could replicate the owing(p) YOsushi success story around the world.Vickers (2005). It is suggested by the author that the success of ethnic brands such as YOsushiis the effective use of consumer motivation combined with the provision of a market trend that integrates both healthy yet exotic ethnic food types. Although brands such as YOsushi have become globalised many of the dishes that are recreated from one countr y to another tend to have a very different end solution to its original form. This will happen for several reasons starting from simple facts as seasonality of produce to the availability of certain ingredients.for example a lop had in India is likely to look, taste, and even smell different to that of a curry in the UK such as the Balti which is believed to have been invented in Birmingham. (Anon, 2007). Birmingham is renowned for the production of curries with around 500 venues to choose from (Anon, 2005) and has provided a steady economy for the ethnic food industry, the word Balti when translated actually means bucket which in earlier days would have meant an earthen dish with handles on.The Balti will identify culturally with a special(prenominal) set of migrants, even though it is not an authentic Indian dish, and residents of Birmingham and the surrounding region, therefore the author suggests that the dish has been redefined from a traditional dish to one that combines no t only the ethnic roots of the inventor but also the environment that is now lived in within western society.Although the cultural identity of foods such as the Balti appear to create an economical advantage for Birmingham it has been noted that many Balti-house owners and managers spend their time constantly undercutting each other in a price war (Ram et al, 2000) making it difficult for each individual business to survive.The cultural identity of Birmingham is very much tied to the popularity of dishes such as the curry the author suggests that this may be because of the stereotypical cultural image of the traditional British friday night out, but according to Stewart (1989) less well known is that of the fish and chip shops that are Greek-Cypriot owned and add up to over 25% of Birminghams fish and chip shops therefore showing that Birmingham is a good example of a multicultural environment within the UK, even though it is often not perceived to be a global city its economy is ev olving in many ways through the ethnic food industry that is cerebrate to its multiculturalism, post colonialism and the transnationalism of many of its residents (McEwan et al, 2005) , as suggested by Bryson et al (1996) it is a workshop of the world that through its migratory and post colonial past is by all means a multicultural city within the UK.It is noted by the author that although Birmingham is a good example of a multicultural city within the UK there are many other cities that also benefit from a multicultural society such as Manchester and Nottingham.In conclusion there are many different factors that affect the way consumers are motivated to choose where to dine out, these have varied from patronage motives to those of cultural identity and a sense of community. Religion, Income, increased leisure time, and demographics have all played a key part in influencing consumers on their food choices, leading to a society that is more informed about what is available to them and what they want from their dining out experience.The changing roles of family life, eating patterns and the increased number of women working full time has also contributed to a society that want to enjoy their leisure time with friends and family rather than adhering to the role of women in the home that may have been present a decade ago.Ethnically themed restaurants and takeaways have enjoyed the trends that have increased the number of people dining out in the UK dramatically in the last decade, with consumers including their food choices as part of their cultural identity and also wanting to experience other cultures that are residing alongside one another within many cities in the UK.Ethnic cuisine is influencing the consumer more and more, with choices available from world wide destinations that remind the consumer of holiday experiences, alongside the perception of a healthier food option within the rise of a much more multi-cultural society, the service of ethnically the med cuisine should continue to remain profitable to both large brands and smaller businesses within the industry as long as the hospitality managers understand their target markets motivation for buying and consumer demand remains constant. 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Chinese food ranked Britain’s favorite takeaway – China & World

Yesterday 14:21 (69.2 KB)
Sweet and sour chicken, beef and black bean source, and chow mein — these are some of the most common Chinese foods you could see in Britain, and they have been voted as the favorite takeaway cuisine of the British people according to a television documentary.’
A Channel 5 documentary show called ‘Britain’s Favorite Takeaway’ has ranked 20 of the most beloved dishes in the country, and Chinese food was crowned top by nabbing nearly a quarter of the overall vote.
Indian food ranked second, and British classic fish and chips came in third. Pizza and burgers were voted as the fourth and fifth respectively.
Digging into the origins of the cuisines, the documentary revealed that the first Chinese restaurant opened in Britain in 1908, while immigration from Hong Kong in the 1950s and 1960s made the food even more popular after. (China Plus)

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Native Peoples of North America – Doridro.com

Native Peoples of North America
MP4 | Video: AVC 1280 x 720 | Audio: AAC 48 KHz 2ch | Duration: 12:47:35 | 8.93 GB
Genre: eLearning | Language: English
History, for all its facts and figures, names and dates, is ultimately subjective. You learn the points of view your teachers provide, the perspectives that books offer, and the conclusions you draw yourself based on the facts you were given. Hearing different angles on historical events gives you a more insightful, more accurate, and more rewarding understanding of events – especially when a new viewpoint challenges the story you thought you knew.
Now, The Great Courses has partnered with Smithsonian to bring you a course that will greatly expand your understanding of American history. This course, Native Peoples of North America, pairs the unmatched resources and expertise of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian with the unparalleled knowledge of Professor Daniel M. Cobb of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to provide a multidisciplinary view of American history, revealing new perspectives on the historical and contemporary experiences of Indigenous peoples, and their significant impact on the history of our country. Professor Cobb brings his experience as an author and teacher to recount an absolutely fascinating, larger-than-life story across a timespan of more than 500 years.
This insightful and unique 24-lecture course is filled with images and rare artifacts from Smithsonian’s famed collections, and informed by fascinating insights from Smithsonian historians. The National Museum of the American Indian, headquartered on the National Mall and visited by millions of Americans every year, is dedicated to the life, languages, literature, history, and arts of the Native Americans of the Western Hemisphere. Museum input into this course-both in helping to shape the riveting curriculum as allowing use of their spectacular collections-has allowed us create a truly engaging course that will thoroughly change your understanding of American history.
Unlearn What You Thought You Knew
One of the first myths Professor Cobb dispels is the Eurocentric view of the “Old World” and the “New World.” Noting that this terminology is the root of many narrow views, he proceeds to challenge stereotypical representations of American Indian history in each lecture. Many of the topics he shares will initially appear familiar until he presents the components and perspectives you were likely not taught.
Showcasing rare, historic artifacts and images from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, National Anthropological Archives, National Portrait Gallery, American Art Museum and Smithsonian Institution Archives, every lecture of this fascinating course helps disprove myths and stereotypes that many people take as fact. Narrating along with these dazzling visuals, you’ll hear Professor Cobb present a different account-or some new perspectives on-the Seven Years’ War, the American Revolution, the War of 1812, Cherokee removal, the Civil War, and the Indian Wars. You’ll delve into the seemingly familiar story of Westward Expansion-the pioneer trails, the Gold Rush, the Transcontinental Railroad-to discover the stories of the American Indian people who fought and negotiated to preserve their ancestral lands. Professor Cobb debunks many of the myths that you’ve taken as fact by providing the alternative side of the story:
You’ll learn that the impression many of us were given about European “discoverers” conquering and controlling the Native Americans was grossly exaggerated. Native Americans remained in positions of power from the beginning and through succeeding centuries.
You’ll hear the truth behind the many-times misinterpreted story of Pocahontas. She did not save John Smith’s life, nor did she and John Smith fall in love (and it is unclear whether she fell in love with her colonial husband John Rolfe). Professor Cobb dismisses these fairy tale versions and provides the (much more interesting) true story behind this supposedly well-known Native American heroine.
You’ll explore how Native Americans viewed, participated in, and used the Revolutionary War to form strategic alliances. Thought to be simply a clash between colonists and the British, Native American nations pushed back against a peace treaty that didn’t involve them in order to have a seat at the table.
The Impact of Colonization
The early colonial period introduced the Columbian Exchange, which created “new worlds for all” by transforming the lives of Indigenous peoples and Europeans alike. The Columbian Exchange refers to the transference of plants, animals, and diseases between the Americas and Eurasia and Africa that began with Christopher Columbus. It is quite an understatement to say the Columbian Exchange changed everything. In fact, the processes and consequences of this convergence are overwhelming in their complexity and their ramifications can still be felt today. Consider the following:
Coffee, pears, bananas, flour, queso, pilsners, peaches, apples, and cream are just a few of the staples we take for granted that wouldn’t become part of the modern American diet until they were introduced from abroad as a result of the Columbian Exchange.
On the flip side, Native Americans introduced colonials (and thus the world) to maize or corn, white potatoes, sweet potatoes, and manioc or cassava, as well as peanuts, tomatoes, cocoa, squash and pumpkins, pineapples, papaya, and avocados. These commodities then helped define the cuisines of other countries. As Professor Cobb asks, can you imagine Italian food without tomatoes?
Dandelions, sow thistle, shepherd’s purse, clover, and turf grass wouldn’t exist in North America unless the colonials had brought them. Without turf grass, football, soccer, and baseball and America’s lawns would be quite different.
When Columbus returned to the new world in 1493, he brought a host of animals that Indigenous people had never seen before, including donkeys, goats, sheep, chickens, pigs, cattle, and horses – none of which would exist in America otherwise. It may be surprising to discover that “Horse Nations,” such as the Lakota, Comanche, and Apache-portrayed as the stereotypical horse-riding Indians of the Plains-were a product of the Columbian Exchange.
This period of exchange was responsible for much of what we consider staple foods of America, as well as introducing the rest of the world to commodities they would never have accessed otherwise. As you journey through this course, you’ll be introduced to the many ramifications-both positive and negative-of a myriad of historical events that have long been told from only one side.
Discover the Unsung Heroes
There are countless stories of Native Americans whose achievements, sacrifices, or contributions have long been unacknowledged. With Professor Cobb’s knowledge and gift for storytelling, and aided by the hundreds of historical artworks and artifacts provided by the Smithsonian, you’ll get to know dozens of names and stories that previously went unrecognized. You’ll see that one of the marines in the iconic image of the American flag being lifted over Iwo Jima was Native American. The Carlisle Indian Industrial School was a dominant football team by the early 20th century, routinely crushing such big-school opponents as Army, Navy, Penn, Harvard, Chicago, and Yale. The Choctaws used their language to great effect during the final campaign of World War I, creating an unbreakable code for military communications. Twenty-nine Navajo men were recruited to devise a way to send and receive coded messages, creating an unbreakable codebook of 200 Navajo words used during combat in World War II.
Throughout this course, your eyes will be opened to legendary historical figures such as Pontiac, Tecumseh, John Ross, Black Kettle, Sitting Bull, and Geronimo-individuals you may already be familiar with, but may be surprised to find out what you didn’t know as Professor Cobb delivers their detailed biographies. You’ll also hear about lesser-known Native Americans who made significant contributions to the America we know today, such as Tecumseh and Tenskwatawa, or artists such as Wohaw and Fritz Scholder. And explore the role of women throughout Native American history, looking at the contributions of Laura Cornelius Kellogg, Sarah Winnemucca, Wilma Mankiller, Lili’uokalani, Alberta Schenck, and Zitkala-Ša.
Going Beyond Wounded Knee
Native American history is often treated as though it ended in the late 19th century. Professor Cobb remedies this misconception by dedicating a full third of the course to the challenges and achievements of Native Americans in the late 19th and 20th centuries, as well as current events. Together, with evocative items and information straight from the collections and archives of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, you’ll hear the story of modern Native Americans, the people, challenges, and diverse cultures that came out of the 20th century and beyond. Professor Cobb unpacks well-known events and practices such as Wounded Knee and the Ghost Dance while also delving into the implications of lesser known incidents. For example, you’ll investigate the impact of World War I and World War II, reform movements such as the New Deal, and also many persistent issues including repatriation, gaming, religious rights, tribal jurisdiction, and more.
You’ll discover how in the 1960s and 1970s, Native American activism mirrored the mainstream protest movements of the era, first finding expression in literature, music, art, and higher education, and eventually making real change through legislative and judicial reform. Calling again on the Smithsonian’s exclusive archive of art, portraits, and artifacts, you’ll see key examples of how the counterculture both reflected and influenced the struggle for Native American recognition and rights.
Through these dazzling visuals, and Professor Cobb’s narration, you will come to understand that we are still in the midst of an era of Indigenous recovery and revitalization-one that has tested the limits of individual rights and tribal sovereignty. He’ll outline a few of the critical sites of contemporary struggle, including gaming, which has been the single most successful means of promoting economic development in reservation communities since it took off in the late 1980s. The first Native American operated casino opened in 1979 and shortly thereafter more than 120 tribes had followed suit. Although state governments reacted defensively, the concept of tribal sovereignty emerged victorious, which has not only helped the infrastructure of the Native American communities to grow and thrive, but has helped to revitalize depressed economies by providing jobs, business opportunities, and development.
Native Peoples of North America recounts an epic story of resistance and accommodation, persistence and adaption, extraordinary hardship and survival across more than 500 years of colonial encounter. As the Smithsonian curators stated, “The past never changes. But the way we understand it, learn about it, and know about it changes all the time.” Be prepared – this course is going to change how you understand American history. And no matter how much you know about this subject, at the conclusion, you will be surprised at how much you’ve learned.
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Best and worst airline food

Best and worst airline food
I don’t know about you, but I look forward to meal times during flights. Not only does it pass the time, but I am always excited to receive the little trays and finding out what is in each of the compartments. If you’re like me, airline food can really determine the whole flight experience, so today I am breaking down what I think are three of the best and worst airline meals.
One of the worst airlines in the world, according to Skytrax, is the North Korea-based Air Koryo. Its overall quality has given its label as a ‘1-star airline’, which certainly applies to their food too. In fact, their food is notoriously terrible that LA Times coins the term ‘legendary Koryo burger’. Yes, the only thing they’re known to serve passengers are burgers, and these are not juicy, decent-tasting burgers, but a slab of dry meat and a tiny piece of lettuce in between two buns.
Next up on the list is Ukraine International Airline, whose in-flight meals are not included in the ticket fees, which means that you must pay to get the standard tray of food. The meal itself isn’t that much appealing either, despite Ukraine’s well-loved culinary heritage, and a lot of passengers have complaints about them being unappetizing and inedible. An example includes a strange chicken burger drowned in orangey sauce, low-quality dessert and a small side of salad. Talk about a bad flight indeed…
Air China is also quite reputable for its not-so-tasty meals. While they still provide a variety of international options in addition to traditional Chinese food, many passengers have complained about the poor quality. Deemed mediocre at its best, at least Air China does offer salad, fresh fruits and bread in addition to the main course.
Moving on to the best airline food, the economy class meals of Thai Airways have won multiple awards for a reason. Although delicious international options are also offered, most of their meals are inspired by Thai cuisine, including pad thai noodles, various Asian rice dishes and curries for their main course. In addition to the main selection, there is always some kind of salad, bread with butter and either fresh fruits or dessert. What is even greater, they make sure to support local farmers by using seasonal ingredients and fresh produce. Vegetarian and allergen-free options are also available upon request when booking.
Another award-winning airline meal is provided by Turkish Airlines. On shorter flights, the meals usually include Mediterranean sandwiches, starters and desserts, while on long-haul flights there are an array of dishes from across the globe cooked from fresh, seasonal ingredients. The range goes from international and continental breakfasts, Greek coffees to more local dishes like kebabs, kuru fasulye beans and sweet baklavas – the sort of street food you would find in Turkish cities like Istanbul and Ankara!
Finally, we have Qatar Airways. This luxurious airline provides in-flight meals that are tailored according to the destinations, so that passengers can taste authentic local cuisine even before landing. What’s unique about Qatar is that they serve their meals in 99 percent recyclable trays, cups and boxes. There is always an option from three main courses and a lighter choice, as well as a fresh salad or hummus dip for starter. Their specialties include meat or vegetables with rice, Malaysian curry and Indian pakora. Passengers can also request for meals for vegetarians and gluten-free alternatives.
So, how have your in-flight meal experiences been? Which airlines do you think have the best and worst food?

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Holi celebrates color, community

Back to Article Holi celebrates color, community People celebrating Holi at the FAR fields on April 21. The event will take place on Saturday, and all students are welcome to attend. Constance Sarantos People celebrating Holi at the FAR fields on April 21. The event will take place on Saturday, and all students are welcome to attend. Constance Sarantos Constance Sarantos People celebrating Holi at the FAR fields on April 21. The event will take place on Saturday, and all students are welcome to attend.
By Nandika Chatterjee , Staff Writer April 11, 2019 Filed under Life & Culture Asha for Education cele brates every year with handfuls of color, all for a good cause. This organization promotes basic education for poor and underprivileged children in India. The chapter on campus hold events throughout the year, and their biggest event is Holi. It will take place Saturday at the Florida and Lincoln playing field from 12 to 5 p.m. Holi is the Indian festival of colors. The entire celebration will be filled with vibrant colors with food, dance and playing with color itself. Various Indian dance groups at the University such as Ghungroo Dance Company, UIUC Fataaka, Zindaa and Colors of Faith will perform. The celebrations every year give any student at the University the opportunity to learn more about Indian culture and share the joys of the festivities. Additionally, Asha as an organization can forward their goals for their nonprofit. Niti Shah, chapter coordinator of Asha for Education UI, said, “Individuals who attend our event can rest assured that they will be able to experience traditional and modern dance performances, taste authentic Indian cuisine and snacks and engage in the color-throwing tradition unique to Holi, all while supporting a global organization that is dedicated to increasing educational accessibility.” Celebrating Holi holds different appeals to different people. Medha Patil, freshman in LAS, will attend the event. “I really look forward to the festival of Holi as playing with colors with friends and family is always fun,” she said. “With great music to dance to and wonderful food to go back to, Holi is the ultimate Indian party.” The festivities invite large groups of students regardless of their ethnic background. Joining in on having a good time increases a sense of community among students. Shah said the most enjoyable part of the celebrations is the opportunity to engage in a unique and large-scale event that invites the entire community to join together and celebrate. She describes the experience as fulfilling to attend and watch. Shah said it doesn’t matter what year in school attendees are. “Whether you are a freshman and this (is) your first chance to attend Holi or a senior who has never attended the event and everyone in between this truly is an event for everyone,” Shah said. Patil said the impact such initiatives have on international students is important. It makes campus feel more like home away from home. Fellow attendees become family, and ev eryone has the opportunity to meet new people, she said. “Being so far from home in India, it’s so great that Asha foundation has an event where I can enjoy the festival of Holi in spite of not being in India,” Patil said. “It’s a great way to spread our Indian culture, especially for a good cause.” Cynthia Damodaran, freshman in Engineering, is an international student who will also be in attendance. She does not regularly celebrate Holi but described her excitement to participate in the celebrations. “I don’t really subscribe to the religious or spiritual aspects of the holiday, but I enjoy the spirit of the occasion, and I certainly appreciate the environment in which everyone is encouraged to let their inner child out” Damodaran said. For anyone who has not participated in Holi, they are encouraged to try something new. “Not only will you have a great time throwing colors around while dancing along to a fusion of Bollywood and Top 50 hits,” she said, “You will also be providing several children in India the opportunity to learn and grow to become the next thinkers and leaders of their generation. It is a win-win for everyone.” Yingan Wang, freshman in LAS, has never celebrated the festival before. She is an international student from China and is excited to celebrate Holi for the first time. “I will celebrate Holi this year because my friends are Indian, and they celebrate this,” she said. “For me, a Chinese (person), it’s very similar (to) celebrating Chinese Lunar New Year with my friends with other backgrounds: a festival, a bunch of friends and a reason to hang out together.”

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We have cruised both Princess and Norwegian. For food and activities I prefer Norwegian. Its casual – no formal nights, but you can if you want. This works well for an Alaskan cruise. The buffet is very good on NCL – and not so good (on our most recent cruise worse than Hometown Bufftet for Princess). I would suggest if price works for you to go with NCL. Also, I don’t know if its important to you or not, Norwegian buffet usually has some good Indian cuisine dishes – and often times there are many staff from India working on the cruise ship.
Edited: 6:20 pm, yesterday

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