Just moved away from Simi Valley, besides the hot weather, bland food was my main complaint! Always had to go to Ventura or the Valley for Asian, Indian, or good Mexican.
Favorite Asian was Bamboo Cafe, great Boba and Vietnamese cuisine. Tio’s cafe is pretty good Mexican-fusion breakfast brunch. Also liked Disgustingly Delicious in Moorpark, cute breakfast cafe. But other than that, we did a lot of cooking at home with ingredients we had to go to the Valley for because Simi grocery stores don’t have much variety.
Sesame Inn in Newbury Park was our favorite Chinese food. Chesters Chinese in Camarillo was good too.
Can’t really recommend many “American” or Italian places since I don’t particularly care for it, but Bartons which was on your list would probably be it for Simi.

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5 Next-Level Spots For Indian Food In New York City

Move over London. New York City may now get the honor of having the world’s best Indian restaurants. While London has long been renowned for its destination-worthy Indian dining, lately, New York has been giving it some serious competition. In the last few years, the city has seen several noteworthy spots open which are run by renowned chefs and have a vibe that will make you want to linger a few hours and come back again and again. Here are five of our top picks that are deserving of the hype. Tamarind Tribeca
99 Hudson Street
212-775-9000
Tamarind’s multilevel dining room. (Courtesy of Tamarind Tribeca)
Daab Chingri from Tamarind Tribeca. (Courtesy of Tamarind Tribeca)
Set in the heart of Tribeca, this posh restaurant has been open for nine years and never fails to please. It’s a mainstay for the glamour set, including celebrities like Robert DeNiro, who come for the superbly executed dishes, refined service and elegant but not stuffy vibe. Although the meats and vegetarian dishes are both noteworthy, the seafood is downright otherworldly. Stars include the buttery Chilean sea bass with green chili, mint, coriander and tomato kokum sauce and the malai halibut with mace, cardamom, coconut and ginger sauce, which was the grand prize winner for the 2004 USA Fish Dish Awards. Tamarind’s wine list is also exceptional and includes choices from around the world, – the talented sommelier team are pros in helping diners find the perfect pick, no matter their budget.
Average Meal: $40-$60 a person with a glass of wine.
GupShup
115 E 18 th Street
212-518-7313
Dining area at GupShup. (Noah Fecks)
Lamb Shank from GupShup. (Noah Fecks)
Open since November, this bi-level Gramercy spot has kitschy, colorful décor complete with vintage Indian posters. With its large, shareable plates and inviting atmosphere, GupShup seeks to invoke its namesake- which roughly translates to fun conversation- in its diners. Executive chef Gurpreet Singh honed his skills as the chef de cuisine at Indian Accent in New Delhi, and his menu is a mix of classics like chicken tikka and saag paneer and the unexpected- think maitake mushrooms with Turkish aleppo chili and tava asparagus or lamb shanks with burrah and rogan josh jus. To imbibe, there’s a killer cocktail including the double-decker tiffin container called the Tiffin Walla, made with gin, basil, lime.
Average Meal: $30-$40 a person with a glass of wine, $30-$50 for shareable plates.
Saar
241 W 51 st Street
646-609-2142
Bar seating at Saar. (Melissa Hom)
Tandoori Shrimp from Saar. (Melissa Hom)
Bang in the middle of the Theater District, Saar is the latest venture from renowned chef Hemant Mathur. The first Indian Michelin-Starred chef in America, Mathur made a name for himself in a number of other Indian eateries in New York, including Devi. Here, he uses his culinary genius for creative dishes including several gluten-free options like the crispy New Zealand lamb ribs with onion and mushroom pilaf and tandoori tiger shrimp with rice, lentil porridge and lemon chutney. Don’t miss the cocktails, especially the Saar Bourbon Sour, made with Bulleit bourbon, homemade lemon chutney and candied lemons. For value seekers, Saar offers a two-course, $35 pre-theatre menu, which includes a glass of wine.
Average Meal: $30-$50 a person with cocktail.
Baar Baar
13 E 1 st street
212-228-1200
Dining area at Baar Baar. (Katie June Burton)
Cocktails from Baar Baar. (Katie June Burton)
A meal at this trendy East Village spot is a fun way to spend any night, whether you’re with friends or on a date. With Chef Sujan Sarkar at the helm, who’s responsible for India’s first artisanal cocktail spot in New Delhi called Ek Bar, the traditional flavors of the subcontinent are modernized with inventive dishes like veal sweetbread koliwada with lemon aioli and pickled onions and vegetable pulao with cashews, currant and avocado raita. The cocktails are just as one-of-a-kind: the Hyderabad Collins, for example, named after the Indian city, uses gin with young turmeric, Chartreuse Jaune, in-house made orange syrup and ice infused with mace.
Average Meal: $20-$40 a person with cocktail.
Adda
31-31 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City
718-433-3888
The dining area and decor at Adda. (Courtesy of Adda)
Butter Chicken from Adda. (Courtesy of Adda)
Restaurateur Roni Mazumdar and acclaimed chef Chintan Pandya, of Rahi in the West Village, have brought homestyle cooking to the Long Island dining scene by serving dishes that the two enjoyed themselves while growing up. Picks include Lucknow dum briyani, made with spicy goat meat, basmati rice, saffron and even more spices sealed with naan bread into a bowl, a creamy prawn curry with coconut and cloves and kale pakoda- crispy chickpeas fritters with kale and chaat masala.
Average Meal: $10-$30 a person.
Interview with Avtar Walia
Avtar Walia’s American dream was to bring his beloved culture to our backyards. (Courtesy of Tamarind Tribeca)
Seasoned restauranteur Avtar Walia is a leader in New York’s Indian finding scene and has had wild success since establishing the Tamarind brand 20 years ago. Here, he tells us why.
India isn’t well known for seafood, but are there any regions that do it very well, and did it influence the halibut recipe that won gold? India has a lot of coastal areas, like Goa or Mumbai. There, you can get the absolute freshest seafood. Both cities have a number of great seafood restaurants. Over here, people tend to believe that India isn’t known for seafood, but we prove them wrong and have so much of it on our menu. We have lobster masala, which is very unique, we have scallops, Chilean sea bass, and we sell it all like hotcakes. We make it in the [tandoor] oven, on the grill and in sauces as well.
New York City has a lot of restaurants that have come and gone, but you’ve been going strong for decades. What’s the secret sauce (no pun intended) for your success? Firstly, it’s the quality of the food, which has to be the best every time. For example, one time one of my chefs came to me and said “Mr. Walia, the cases of tomatoes we get went from $10 to $75! What do you want me to do?” I told him not to waste it, and make the best use of every last bit of it. The preparation of the food is also very important. Three of my main chefs have been working with me for 35+ years, and they know that I don’t allow anything to be pre-cooked. If you do that, it can just be reheated and served again. That dish is gone. Particularly with seafood, which is so sensitive. As soon as you finish the dish, it should go right out to the table.
What inspired you to create a fine dining experience for Indian food when experiences like that are hard to come by? When I looked at other culture’s restaurants like Italian, French, Japanese, all of them Michelin starred, that drove me to create one of my own. I felt that the Indian culture has the knowledge, the rich culture, and the innovation to do it too. When I opened my first restaurant in 1986, I said I wanted to own a place just like any French or Italian restaurant. My competition will be with those people. I want to compete with places like Jean-Georges. We have the know-how, and if they can do it, why can’t we? This is the only Indian restaurant where everything is silver plated. We gathered an extensive wine list to cater to every type of person who comes to us, from the average diner to the high-class. We have reds that can be paired with lamb chops, white wines for the seafood, and we’re always searching for the most top-notch bottles. It’s all about class.
(Vincent Caputo contributed to this article.)

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Bellevue lands a famous, big-name hot pot spot and 42 other new openings around the Seattle area

Bellevue lands a famous, big-name hot-pot spot and 42 other new openings around the Seattle area Originally published February 12, 2019 at 6:00 am Updated February 12, 2019 at 5:20 pm The new Ballard bistro Samara cooks all of its meat and seasonal produce in an applewood-fueled brick oven and hearth. Pictured here is grilled pork belly served with salted fennel, red cabbage and cherry bomb (Courtesy of Danielle Motif). A big name hot pot spot lands in Bellevue, the U District gets more Chinese food and the food explosion continues around SLU. Share story Tan Vinh Seattle Times features reporter
Samara is a 36-seat Ballard bistro from chef Eric Anderson, formerly of Palace Kitchen and Brunswick & Hunt. The New-American cuisine in the Sunset Hill ‘hood focuses on heritage-breed animals and sustainable seafood and uses only an applewood-fueled oven and hearth as its cooking source. Like all the cool kids these days, Samara’s drink program focuses on biodynamic and natural wines including Oregon-based A. D. Beckham wines, which have gained a cult following around Seattle in recent years.
A mile north of Samara sits Lucky Santo with a focus on nondairy and “low grain” dishes for all your keto, paleo and gluten-free needs. Chef Nikki DeGidio has worked at Campagne, the late Marche and Bastille. Lucky Santo has some big-name backings: along with part owner DeGidio, the project is also backed by chef Jason Stoneburner and the couple behind the acclaimed Captive Spirits, Holly Robinson and Ben Capdevielle.
The latest rounds of openings around Amazonland : Jack’s BBQ , which helped introduce Central-Texas style BBQ brisket to Seattleites, has expanded to South Lake Union. There are breakfast tacos for the early birds. Mala & Satay does pho, banh mis, vermicelli bowls and other Vietnamese comfort food on the ground floor of a new mixed-used development along Fairview Avenue North. (Don’t confuse this spot with Malay Satay.) Next door is Urban Gyro . Three blocks north of Urban Gryo is the Indian café Lassi & Spice , which does samosas, chaat, crumpets and chutneys. Bounty Kitchen is now in the Denny Triangle. It’s an expanded version of its upper Queen Anne spot, with a juice-and-espresso bar, grab-and-go sandwiches and happy hour.
The University District has seen an influx of new Chinese restaurants. The latest is BC Zhang, hawking Beijing-style crêpes stuffed with ham, beef and chicken. There’s also Little Duck , which does twice-cooked pork, pickled cabbage and other northeastern Chinese cuisine. Nearby are Koa , a Hawaiian restaurant and Boba Up , a self-serve bubble-tea spot. Most Read Life Stories No tomato paste? No problem: Seek out “Substitutions Bible”
The Chinatown International District welcomes Luosifen , which specializes in its namesake rice-noodle soup from the southern region. Try the hog house special soup with crispy pork skin, barbecue pork, pork feet and a brined egg. Ordering this spicy is the only way to go. The heat works nicely to round out the funky, earthy pork-snail broth. It’s a hearty serving for $10.99. If the thought of eating pig feet is horrifying, swap it out for one of a dozen other options such as the braised beef brisket.
For those less adventurous, hit the nearby bar restaurant Gan Bei, which boasts a 67-item-menu (from chow mein to the decadent lobster-and-crab fried rice). Seattlelites who have been trekking to Tukwila and Lynnwood for the bread and sweets at 85°C Bakery Café , you now have a closer outpost at South Jackson Street and Fifth Avenue South.
Bang Bang Kitchen opened a half block from the high foot-traffic area of the Othello light-rail station, turning the former Mexican restaurant space into a New Mexican cuisine joint. The burger comes with hatch chilies. And its Frito pie is sure to be an Instagram hit. This project comes from the same owners as the breakfast burrito joint Bang Bang Café in Belltown. This 2.0 version is a more ambitious, full-service restaurant with a tequila bar and two televisions to draw the locals on game nights.
On Capitol Hill, Zeeks Pizza opened its 16 th location at the elbow of 19 th Avenue East and East Mercer Street with an impressive craft-beer lineup. Pho Huy opened along East Madison Street, doing all the Vietnamese staples: banh mis, spring rolls, vermicelli noodles and its namesake beef soup.
In lower Queen Anne, or as some call it, “Uptown,” Moontree Asian Sushi and Tapas relocated from Everett. Caffe Limoncello offers espressos and pastries — and soon, pasta and sandwiches.
Around downtown, Mighty-O Donuts has expanded with a fifth location, and Sodo’s Fulcrum Coffee opened Mountaintops Café in the Insignia Towers. The Central District banh-mi spot Mr. Saigon has expanded to downtown and is eyeing a third location in Pioneer Square. And speaking of Pioneer Square, Lady Yum expanded near Occidental Square in a space that’s three times bigger than its other macaron outposts. There are beers, espressos, grab-and-go sandwiches and desserts.
The plant-based, gluten-free bakery Flying Apron has opened in West Seattle, along with Youngstown Coffee Company and Gyro Heroes .
The counter-service Wing Stop comes to Rainier Valley, and there is now bubble tea on wheels as Dreamy Drinks makes the rounds around Seattle and the Eastside. Eastside
The wildly popular international chain Liuyishou Hotpot lands in Bellevue. This mainland China chain has been a big hit around North America, drawing lines up to two hours long for its beef oil spicy broth and other soups. This hot-pot spot should do well on the Eastside considering it’s so popular around Vancouver, B.C.
Crossroads shopping center lands the Japanese hot pot Shabu Do , replacing Crab King. Highland Park strip mall gets The Roll Pod , which dishes Indian food that can be served in a roll or in a rice bowl. Lucky Barbecue & Noodle House specializes in Peking duck (and, ideal for this cold spell, the cooks also serve wonton soups and congee). Other openings around Bellevue: Tem Sib Thai Food Reimagined , Pho Rolls , the Japanese confection chain J.sweets and one of the odd pairings, Swan Beauty and Tea Shop , where bubble tea and desserts meet beauty parlor.
Kirkland gets the Indian restaurant Cafe Bahar , which not only does biryani and goat curry but also Indo-Chinese cuisine such as Hakka noodles and chili-garlic fried rice. Burger Addict in Renton expanded to a strip mall in Kirkland, with plans to open in Auburn this year.
Redmond gets more Chinese cuisine with the arrival of Chengdu noodle house Nine Way and the Hunan restaurant Dong Ting Chun .
Newcastle gets Aji Sushi & Grill and MOD Pizza, and Issaquah gets Shiny Tea . Tan Vinh : 206-515-5656 or ; on Twitter: @tanvinhseattle .

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Kinjal Dave Gujarati Singer Hit Songs, Wiki and Photos

Kinjal Dave (Musical Artist) Biography 1) The Roots
Kinjal is the brightest new star on the horizon of Gujarat. Though a mere 19 years old, she has already made a place for herself in the hearts of the Gujarati’s and is on the road to garnering much name and fame for herself. She was born on 24 th November 1999, in a traditional Brahmin family in Banaskantha in Northern Gujarat, in India.
Her family is like any normal middle-class Indian family. Her father, Lalji Bhai works for a diamond company in Ahmadabad while her younger brother, Akash is still in school. Kinjal herself is still in college. She is a student of Patanjali College. 2) Rise to fame
Her father has had a big role to play in her rise to fame. He has always been into writing songs and that is what piqued Kinjal’s interest. Her Uncle too supported her tremendously during her struggle. She started her journey with Char Char Bangdi Vali Audi Gadi song but the first song that made Kinjal a household name was JONADIYO.
It is a marriage song and was on top of the charts in 2014-15. From there, her singing career took off and there has been no looking back for her. She sings songs of the different genre which include garba, marriage songs, and Santvani songs.
Her voice is very soulful and once you hear her, you are sure to come under her spell. Some of her detractors attribute her success to her good looks but nothing could be farther from the truth. So far, this rising star has to her name more than 100 Gujarati albums.
She has already done more than 200 live programs. Even at such a young age, she commands anywhere between Rs. 1 to 2 lakh per live show. This is just the beginning for her. 3) Her special loves
If you know any Gujarati, then you will know that food occupies a very special place in their heart. Kinjal is no different. Despite touring not just the rest of India with its varied cuisine but even the world, Kinjal is a pucca Gujarati and derives the greatest pleasure in eating Gujarati cuisine. Her favorites include kadhi, khichadi, and bhakhari. 4) Her future dreams
It is Kinjal’s dream to act in Gujarati movies as the main lead. She has not only been blessed with a beautiful voice but also good looks.
Her fans would definitely love to her on the big screen. She is a big fan of Bollywood movies and counts Salman Khan and Deepika Padukone among her favorite Bollywood stars. She aspires to be like them in the world of Gujarati cinema. 5) Personal life of Kinjal Dave
She got engaged to her boyfriend Pawan Joshi on 18 th April 2018. Pawan and Kinjal were childhood friends. When she wants to chill out and relax, she heads to her favorite place Diu. She also owns an Innova Toyota which is apt for a city like Ahmedabad. 6) Kinjal Dave Facts 7) The journey has just begun
For Kinjal, who has proven her talent at such a young age, the journey has just begun. The entire world is a stage and for her to conquer whether it be the world of music or films. Though she has seen much success, Kinjal does not believe in resting on her laurels and believes that she has miles and miles more to travel. 8) Kinjal Dave Photos 9) Kinjal Dave Songs (MP3 / Videos) Kinjal Dave All Songs List Chhote Raja

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As someone with severe nut allergies I don’t find it too difficult to eat out. Generally speaking most places are more then happy enough to accommodate, although they will not be able to guarantee and will say as much, I have never felt unsafe. You begin to learn which places are better and gain confidence in ordering. As a rule I tend to avoid places that cook with a lot of nuts which means I avoid S.E. asian restaurants, 5 guys, vegan restaurants, and for a very long time I also avoided Indian restaurants. For the time being I might avoid Indian as well, unless you can find a good restaurant that takes allergies seriously. While I am always very discerning about which items I choose on the menu, I always take additional precautions. I hope that these tricks will help you:
I typically order dishes where any nuts would be clearly visible – fish and chips, pizza, burgers, tacos, salads, etc. Sauces are always a bit tricky but I make sure to take a good look before I eat anything. I do this even if I have told the server about my allergy. Remember you are your own best defense (or in this case, you are as a parent until your child is old enough to make those decisions). Next I make sure I sample the meal with a very small bite and wait 5 min. If I have no reaction I eat a bit more and wait. It takes more time but its worth the extra step. I avoid any foods with heat. The sensation of heat masks the allergic reaction in its early stages and I have a hard time telling the difference between the two. I avoid eating spicy foods when out. I avoid all and any green sauces – while some pestos are made without nuts I can’t tell by looking at it. I also can’t tell a peso from another type of green sauce. Both of my previous reactions have been from green sauces, I no longer trust them. Make sure you ask what oil the fries (and other items) are deep fried in. Some places, like Clive Burger, use peanut oil. While its supposed to be safe, I don’t trust it and avoid it. I never eat deserts out unless its ice cream from brands I trust. Its sad but deserts are often full of nuts and are usually not made in house. These are things that you will want to teach your child as they get older. Unfortunately they won’t be able to eat everything you can and some establishments will simply be a no-go. If it helps, you don’t miss what you never had. I have never in my life craved S.E. Asian cuisine.
These precautions have served me well. I have only had 2 reactions in 10 years and I eat out quite a bit. I have never needed my epic-pen because those two reactions were minor because of my second point – I taste tested before I ate. I put a single prong of my fork in the salad dressing and put it in my mouth and knew almost immediately that it was going to be bad – mouth starts itching, throat itching, stomach grumbling…the worst but not life threatening. Test before you eat.
My quick fix in those situations where I don’t need an epi-pen but need symptom relief – caffeine. Get your kid a coke or coffee – it really does help with the itching in the mouth and throat. If its non life-threatening coke and coffee do wonders to help with the GI symptoms.
I are worried of just cross-exposure of even possibly other dining guests that may have spilled their food and wasn’t’ fully cleaned-up, etc.
I really wouldn’t worry about that. Contact allergies are really incredible rare in places that observe even the most basic sanitary procedures. I have never come across a place where this has been an issue. If you are really worried, just bring some wet-ones and wipe down the surface before your toddler touches it.

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10 Countries, 10 Cuisines: Here’s the ultimate list of best restaurants in Goa for World Cuisine

/ 10 Countries, 10 Cuisines: Here’s the ultimate list of best restaurants in Goa for World Cuisine 10 Countries, 10 Cuisines: Here’s the ultimate list of best restaurants in Goa for World Cuisine Tripoto https://www.tripoto.com/ By Ginny Bansal The first thing that comes to your mind when you think about Goa is Beer, Beaches, Bars, party and the laid back vibe. It’s necessary that you gulp down something along with that beer. Goa has something for everyone, for seafood lovers, for local goan cuisine or just the regular punjabi food. From the relaxed and laid-back cafes to seaside shacks to cosy restaurants to romantic restaurants, Goa truly has a vibrant dining scene. Here’s my list of all the fabulous places to eat, drink and be happy. Hotels Map Flights Courtesy: La Plage If you love a little bit of everything then you are surely headed to the right place. Their menu is a great mix of French, Italian and the contemporary American dishes. The place is cosy and has a warm familiar feeling with an eclectic mix of funky and elegant furnishings. The restaurant has prompt service,beautiful beach view and to top it all on a secluded beach. The menu does keep changing, but few of the mains remain same. They have different dishes like pumpkin curry along with flavoured rice, fish soufflé and crème brulee . They have something called ” Chocolate Thali ” as well which you have to try. Cuisine: French Must Try: Burgers, Sea Food, Chocolate Thali Cost for Two: Rs. 800( approx.) Where is it: 209, Ashwem Beach, Katte Wada Road, Mandrem, Goa-403527 Hotels Map Flights Courtesy: Gunpowder This eatery is located in the tranquil Assago, Goa. Great food with beautiful surroundings covered with plants and trees gives it all together a nice vibe. You can find everything here from appam,vegetable stew, rugi puttu,mutton pepper fry, malabar paratha and a lot of other dishes that you may never have heard of. If you are in a mood to try something new, try Sol Kadi ,a salted kokum based drink in coconut milk infused with green chillies, garlic and coriander. The place is generally crowded, so it is better to reserve in advance. Cuisine: South Indian Must Try: Sol kadi, Tamarind hingball, Kerala style pomfret dry Cost for Two: Rs. 1000 (approx.) Where is it: No. 6, Anjuna Mapusa Road, Saunto Vaddo, Assagao, Goa-403507 Hotels Map Flights Courtesy: Sakana, Goa This Japanese cuisine restaurant is at its subtle best in terms of décor as well as flavours. This beautiful place in Anjuna serves the best sushi in Goa. Sakana is a place where you have to go for miso soup and rice and some great seafood on the place. There is a wide variety of foods on the menu, you can choose from a variety of sushi rolls and noodles . Authentic Japanese cuisine and a pleasing ambience makes it for a good dining option. Kingfish is a local favourite but their tuna teriyaki is also superb. Cuisine : Japanese Must try: Home-brewed wasabi vodka, Tofu teriyaki, Salmon lover roll Cost for Two: Rs. 1200(approx.) Where is it: Chapora road Anjuna, Goa- 403509 Hotels Map Flights Courtesy: Bomra’s This place in Candolim is known for a small but contemporary Burmese menu highlighted by the interesting cocktails. Vegetarian options are pretty limited; however, wait till you dig into the light and flavourful dishes including a super yummy tea leaf salad and squid ink pad thai followed up with coconut panna cotta . Wrap up your meal with yummy Chocolate fondant cake. The place is open only for dinners (7pm-11pm) and for brunch (12pm-2pm). On some days of the week , they serve the traditional Khow-suey with all sorts of accompaniments to go with. Cuisine: Burmese Must try: Salads, Steamed chilli red snapper, Chocolate fondant cake Cost for Two: Rs. 1500 (approx.) Where is it: 247, Fort Aguada Road, Candolim, Goa- 403515 Hotels Map Flights Courtesy: Anatres This restaurant is located on the Vagator beach. The place has a breathtaking cliff view of the sea and you can get the best sunset views along with some good continental food. The ambience is beautiful with minimalistic efforts on the interiors. The menu has good enough options for both Vegetarian and Non-vegetarian people. You can order bruschetta, Hummus, Barbeque Chicken, and Spaghetti . The food presentation is lovely and makes you finish up the dish. The menu curated by Aussie Masterchef Sarah Todd ensures that you are coming back to this place every time you visit Goa. Cuisine: European, Continental Must try: Cocktails, Long Island Iced Tea, Sea Food, Pizza, Bruschettas, Calamari Cost for Two: Rs. 2000 (approx.) Where is it: Vagator beach, Goa- 403509 Hotels Map Flights Courtesy: Tuscany Garden This Italian restaurant is near sinquerim beach and is a cute romantic place. The contemporary décor, quirky posters, fairy lights, there are enough elements for your Instagram feed. The place opens up in the evening after 4pm, so you can head out for evening snacks or a proper meal. The place has different kinds of pizzas, pasta, salads and the best part is that they can make your meal even without Onion and garlic. You can get extra toppings of your choice in your pasta or pizza. The place has both indoor as well as outdoor seating. Try v eg olive-jalapeno pizza, stuffed mushrooms and lastly panna cotta for a satisfying meal. Cuisine: Italian Must try: Pasta, Mocktails, Spinach risotto, Mojito, Tiramisu, Bruschettas Cost for Two: Rs. 1,000 Where is it: Tuscany Gardens, Fort Aguada road, near Kingfisher villa, Candolim, Goa- 403511 Hotels Map Flights Courtesy: TAO This Chinese restaurant in Panaji has outdoor seating as well as indoor seating. This small family restaurant is right opposite to the river banks where all the casino ships are parked. The service is prompt and the staff has good knowledge of the food they are serving. The ambience of the restaurant is nice and the place has a friendly environment. The food is decently priced and the portions are good enough along with great taste. The crispy water chestnuts and bamboo shoots and prawn momos were one of the highlights of the menu. Cuisine: Chinese Must try: Cocktails, Prawn momos, Crispy noodle, Mocktails, Clear soup, Dumplings, Chicken dimsum Cost for Two: Rs. 1200(approx.) Where is it: Dayanand B Bandodkar Marg, Panjim, Goa-403001 Hotels Map Flights Courtesy: Moroccan Restaurant As the name suggests the place serves an authentic Moroccan cuisine along with the best sheeshas in town. The décor is just perfect along with a great ambience. They have continental dishes and seafood also on the menu to serve the people who are not too friendly with Moroccan cuisine. All the Moroccan dishes here are served along with saffron rice. You can try vegetable couscous, djaj bil zaytoon and tagine al khodar . The place has a lounge-bar feel to it and also arranges candlelight dinners on request. The place is wheelchair accessible which is commendable with not many places giving due attention to this. Live Sports Screening is also there to keep you glued to the screen and live music to make you happy high. Cuisine: Moroccan Must try: Prawn, Fish fries, Cocktails Cost for Two: Rs. 700 Where is it: Opp Victor Exotica, Candolim, Goa- 403515 Hotels Map Flights Courtesy: Wikimedia This Tibetan restaurant in Calangute has a very basic ambience but a lot of options to choose from. You can choose from soups, appetizers, fish and prawns, momos etc. Try vegetarian Thenthuk – a kind of flat Tibetan noodles with veggies, mixed vegetable soup, pork momos to get the real taste of Tibetan food. They serve the most amazing Thukpa and the best part is every time you visit them the food taste remains consistent. The place is budget friendly and the food is super tasty. With Tibetan music in the background and market nearby, I believe one visit to this place is a must. Cuisine: Tibetan Cost for Two: Rs. 650(approx.) Where is it: Main beach road, Umtav vado, Bardez, Calangute, Goa- 403516 Hotels Map Flights Courtesy: Thalassa This place in Mapusa is pretty hit with tourists. The Greek restaurant has been done up beautifully and has great vibes, it is perfect for a Sunday brunch, an afternoon with friends, or just food and beer while watching the sunset. The restaurant is situated by the beach and it’s a very happening place. On certain days, you can see the belly dancers perform and jugglers fiddling the bottles. The place is packed but still, the service is quick and prompt. Try fried calamari, meatballs and tyrokefteri . The place has got a makeover recently and it definitely lives up to the expectations. Cuisine: Greek Must try: Vegetable Moussaka, Baklava Cost for Two : Rs. 1500(approx.) Where is it: Plot No. 301, 1, Vaddy, Siolim, Goa-403517 So, now you have a lot of options to choose from.If you know any of the hidden gem, please share your story here. Looking forward for travel inspiration, check out Tripoto’s Youtube Channel.

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15 Days Coastal Seafood at Four Points by Sheraton

13/02/2019 The Coastal Food Festival at Navi Mumbai’s 5-start property – Four Points by Sheraton to kick start in next two days
Winter brings along with it a host of food festivals and gives us the chance to explore numerous cuisines. One such food festival in Navi Mumbai will kick-start at a popular city hotel. If you are a seafood lover or if you want to taste flavors from coastal India, then you must visit this upcoming coastal food festival in Navi Mumbai, Vashi.
The Coastal Food Festival at Four Points by Sheraton Navi Mumbai, Vashi will be on from February 16th to March 02, 2019. The 15-day food festival will treat epicureans of the city with regional culinary delights and bring forth the spirits of coastal India. The culinary space of the food festival will be a beautiful combination of Malwani, Konkani, Goan and Mangalorean flavors which also includes regular dishes as well as unusual ones. It caters to both our vegetarian and non-vegetarian friends of the city. Some of the signature dishes included in the buffet will be Goan Mutton Saagoti, Kaju Kothambir wadi, Bangda Fry (Mackerel), Chicken Chettinad, Paneer do Payza, Goan Rassa Omelette Pav, 5 kinds of coastal pickle etc.
End your meal on a sweet note with Badam payasam, Kerala Halwa, Phanas Wadi, Dodol and many more. So, come and discover a fabulous dining experience from 7:30 pm onwards. The fusion of flavors awaits you.
WHEN: 16th to 2nd March 2019
WHERE: Asian Kitchen, Four Points by Sheraton, Vashi
TIME: Dinner Buffet only (7:30 pm to 11:30 pm)
PRICE: 1250+ taxes
FOR RESERVATIONS AND QUERIES: 8879788891/92 Related Posts Indians ‘Rich Indian Rasoi’

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How Does A M’sian Social Enterprise Get Robots And AI Onto Its Food Truck Fleet?

2019-02-13 10:29:04 We catch up with Masala Wheels to talk about their growth as a social enterprise, their latest equity partnership with KCOM Group, and the development of social entrepreneurship in Malaysia.
The last time we spoke to Kuhan Pathy of Masala Wheels , his social enterprise project was barely a year old. At the time, Masala Wheels was all about raising funds through the sales of their Indian cuisine through their food trucks—they prepared and sold food at considerably affordable prices and then donated the earnings to underprivileged communities.
But since then, his enterprise has evolved to become more than just an avenue for raising charitable funds. Since late 2016, their main focus has shifted towards helping members of underprivileged and impoverished communities upskill themselves through actual work experience.
Providing them opportunities to work with in the F&B industry, individuals and groups from these communities could earn income while also learning how to run a food business (cooking, catering, overseeing operations, etc).
Within the past couple of years, Masala Wheels have also gone on to receive awards including The Star Golden Hearts Award and the Perdana Young Indian Entrepreneur Award for Social Enterprise Excellence, and have also managed to grow by 100% after concluding their stint with Malaysian Global Innovation & Creativity Centre’s Impact Driven Enterprise Accreditation (IDEA) accelerator last year. Tech-Enabled Goodwill
Now just at the beginning of February 2019, Masala Wheels announced another significant development—an equity partnership with Rubaneswaran, CEO of KCOM Group witnessed by Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamad to help scale up their operations and reach even more underprivileged communities around the country.
For the unaware, KCOM Group is a Malaysian digital solutions provider that places a strong focus on developing for IR 4.0 with an emphasis on corporate social responsibility (CSR). Since their inception in 2014, many of their digital transformation endeavours have been linked with the improvement of underprivileged communities.
Through the partnership with KCOM Group, Masala Wheels will now focus on creating an automated kitchen that will provide technological exposure to these communities in addition to their current constructive endeavours. Image Credit: Masala Wheels
This automated kitchen will also employ a digitised artificial intelligence (AI) platform that will help improve consistency and enhance their deliverables by tailoring offerings according to customer interests.
“This will give our current beneficiaries technology training and further empower them with skills of the future to increase their employability,” Kuhan said. “On another note, they’ll also have more contact time on the front end with customers—this will help improve their interpersonal, customer management, and communication skills.”
“If the adoption and implementation is successful, we look forward to emulating this model across Malaysia with an outreach of our social brand.”
Additionally, Kuhan also revealed that Masala Wheels would also through this agreement venture into providing digital education for underprivileged kids, with meals to be provided for free.
Sharing his view on educating youngsters, Kuhan stated his belief in addressing fundamental values at a young age, especially those from more underprivileged backgrounds.
“Over the years, we’ve focused on upscaling youths at risk through conventional and mobile F&B,” Kuhan explained. “The challenges that we faced were mostly in the form of transforming behaviours, changing attitudes, and providing a conducive environment for them to acquire knowledge despite their socioeconomic backgrounds.”
“There have been successes and failures—a few have turned over a new leaf while others have not,” he added. “We believe that mentors and role models should come from among them—one who’s transformed and is now leading a better life.” Heartening Times For Social Entrepreneurship
This equity partnership comes coinciding at a period where Malaysia is seeing more recognition for social enterprises and causes.
Malaysia’s Ministry of Entrepreneur Development recently set up a Department of Social Entrepreneurship to act as a catalyst for more similar projects and undertakings locally, and the Ministry of Finance also announced specific tax incentives in Budget 2019 for the purpose of driving private entities to invest into social enterprises.
This is in stark contrast to years ago when social entrepreneurship was only recognised in regions such as the United States and the United Kingdom. Kuhan hopes that this partnership will set a precedent for social enterprises and spur on more investors to take an interest in such businesses.
“In the past, social entrepreneurship models were often misconstrued as NGOs and viewed as non-scalable,” he said. “However, recently there have been many progressive government policies through the Ministry of Entrepreneurship Development towards the growth of social enterprises.”
“We’re hopeful that with this acquisition by KCOM Group, businesses will view social impact as an integral part of their business model and support more local enterprises.” To know more about Masala Wheels, visit their official website or Facebook page .

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Sri Lankan restaurant Ministry of Crab opens 6 000sq ft outlet in Khar

Sri Lankan restaurant Ministry of Crab opens 6,000sq ft outlet in Khar 08 : 00 AM [IST] Our Bureau, Mumbai Ministry of Crab – the Sri Lankan restaurant dedicated to serving lagoon crabs and the brainchild of chef Dharshan Munidasa and Sri Lankan cricketers Mahela Jayawardene and Kumar Sangakkara – opened its 6,000 sq ft Mumbai outpost at Zaveri House, Khar, recently.The trio was joined at the launch by Ramit Bharti Mittal and Deepinder Batth, the directors of Gourmet Investments Pvt Ltd (GIPL), which has brought the restaurant to India. While Mittal serves as the chief executive officer of GIPL, Batth is its chief operating officer.Among its highlights are the giant board on which the catch of the day (the signature of the brand’s restaurant in Colombo [which is on the list of Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants]) is displayed (and from which the patrons can take their pick) and the open kitchen.The three-storeyed restaurant, with a private dining room for 24, boasts of a destination bar that has one of the largest collections of wines, as well as an extensive collection of vintages. Cocktails to Whet Your Senses is a list of cocktails, which claims to provide a more sustainable approach to cocktail craftsmanship.It uses fresh ingredients to concoct a number of dishes, including Crab Curry, Clay Clay Pot Prawn Curry, and Chicken Curry Rice, in addition to signature dishes from the menu at the Colombo restaurant, and a nibbles menu for the bar, curated by Munidasa.Mittal said, “We aim to offer an elegant respite from the world outside, where you can feast on the legacy cuisine of Ministry of Crab and sip on fine vintage sparkling.”Batth said, “We wanted to bring some fun and excitement to a luxury dining experience to the city, with the magic mix of a compelling physical environment, and, as always, our unparalleled romance with gourmet food. There was no better brand to achieve this than a restaurant from the list of Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants – Ministry of Crab.”On coming to India, Munidasa said, “We are looking forward to working in the Indian market with Indian crabs and the young Indian chefs. We are happy to have partnered with GIPL, as they share our value system and are committed to bringing the DNA of Ministry of Crab to give our guests an authentic experience.”

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50 Of the world’s best desserts

By Jen Rose Smith, CNN
Imagine the best dessert on Earth. Better yet, turn to a stranger on the street and ask them. Odds are good — dollars to doughnuts — their answer is different from yours.
From childhood treats to a grandparent’s favorite recipes, beloved foods are deeply personal. This seems especially true of desserts, which often take pride of place at celebrations and traditional holidays.
For all the nostalgia of sugary treats, though, some sweets rise above local flavors. Head to any country to find tender slices of Italian tiramis at the bottom of cafe menus or sniff out the creamy scent of Hong Kong’s dan tats in cities around the globe. In the unofficial elections of the stomach, both have been voted to a permanent place in the world’s food hall of fame.
And like dan tats, many of these recipes aren’t desserts at all — the eggy tart is more often eaten as an afternoon snack. The idea of serving a sweet at the end of a coursed meal is relatively recent, and in some destinations , including Africa and Asia, desserts are a foreign import.
But with food, like language or culture, determining what’s “foreign” turns out to be complicated. Tiramisu relies on chocolate, coffee and sugar that arrived in Italy through global trade, while Hong Kong’s most iconic sweet has roots in the Portuguese age of exploration.
Like the best desserts, then, this list blends the personal with something more broadly appealing. It’s the fruit of my nine years in the pastry kitchen, when I traveled to explore new-to-me flavors everywhere from Liguria, Italy, to Yucatan, Mexico, and conversations with chefs whose resumes are as global as the recipes themselves.
Bangkok-born Pichet Ong, a celebrated pastry chef known for blending Asian and European ingredients, told me how sweets from Singapore and Thailand tell the stories of Asian migration and international trade. Baker and illustrator Johanna Kindvall , who divides her time between Brooklyn and Sweden, shared a recipe for cardamom buns.
In emails sent from Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan, Syrian-Lebanese cookbook author Anissa Helou recalled favorite sweets that grace tables in Morocco, Iran and the Levant.
In alphabetical order, here’s a list of some of the greatest sweets on the planet, from humble chocolate chip cookies to the crisp tang of kashata, a beloved brittle that’s enjoyed across East Africa. Bon apptit — or as they’d say in Swahili, karibu chakula!
Alfajores, South America
Step into a neighborhood bakery from Argentina to Peru, and you’re likely to find these tender, filled cookies piled high behind the counter. The crumbly bite of shortbread gives way to a sweet layer of dulce de leche, a caramel-like candy made by gently cooking sweetened milk until it turns into a rich, mellow treat.
The very simplicity of the cookies has proved to be the perfect base for creative cooks across Latin America. Try versions that are dunked in dark chocolate, coated in a sweet layer of white chocolate, rolled in coconut and dressed up with spices, or opt for the classic — it’s among the world’s most comforting snacks.
Apfelstrudel, Austria
For a floury lesson in gluten’s architectural wonders, whip up a batch of traditional strudel dough. The real thing is stretched — not rolled — into an improbably thin sheet; according to legend, it should be transparent enough to read a newspaper through.
Once extended, the delicate dough is wrapped around a sweet, apple filling that’s enriched with buttery fried breadcrumbs, raisins and sometimes walnuts. The delicious result can be found in pastry shops around the world, but for the classic experience, head to Vienna’s Caf Korb for a slice followed by a lush cup of cream-topped Viennese coffee.
Baklava, Turkey
Dozens of delicate layers melt into a single tender bite in this syrupy confection, which is among the sweetest legacies of the Ottoman Empire. While it remains a sought-after treat through the Levant, Balkans, the Caucasus and North Africa — regions that were once ruled from Constantinople — the spiritual home of baklava is surely the modern-day country of Turkey.
There, pastry shops serve great trays sliced into diamonds, filled with ground nuts and dripping with honeyed syrup. This is just the most famous of the Ottoman Empire’s syrup-soaked pastries, but it’s snagged the limelight for good reason. With a simple list of ingredients and endless variations, it easily ranks among the world’s most tempting treats.
Black Forest Cake, Germany
Along with fairy tales and mountain-top castles, Germany’s Black Forest region is known as the namesake — if not the origin — of the country’s most luscious cake. Dark rounds of chocolate cake are doused in a cherry syrup spiked with kirschwasser, a sour cherry brandy, then stacked atop a thin, chocolate base with deep layers of whipped cream and fresh cherries.
If that wasn’t flavor enough, the whole thing is swathed in more cream, dusted with shaved chocolate and studded with cherries. The resulting cake is a frothy dream dessert that’s the star of pastry cases around Germany, where it’s known as a Schwarzwlder Kirschtorte.
Borma, Middle East and Turkey
Threads of crisp, golden knafeh dough wrap around a rich nut filling in this sweet dessert, which is an elegant and aromatic relative of baklava. Unlike baklava, borma is often fried, adding an extra infusion of flavor and a crisp texture that stands up to a sugary bath in flavored syrup.
And while baklava hides its filling inside a modest layer of filo dough, borma is rolled and sliced, showing off a cross-section of colorful pistachios, pale pine nuts or walnuts. That eye-catching presentation makes borma especially popular as a present. Pastry shops across the Middle East and Turkey tempt passers-by with piles of borma stacked high on enormous platters.
Brownies, United States
Fudgy or cakey? Corner piece or slice from the middle? Aficionados of this beloved American sweet are sure to have a take on the best — and worst — way to make a brownie. One of the earliest recipes appeared in Fannie Farmer’s 1906 “Boston Cooking School Cook Book,” using the unsweetened chocolate that lends brownies a fudgy texture.
In more than a century of brownie making, they’ve become a mainstay treat, the base for sundaes and a seriously addictive ice cream flavor.
Even the actress Katharine Hepburn had an opinion on how to bake them, and an old story holds that the glamorous star once dispensed the following advice: “Never quit, be yourself and don’t put too much flour in your brownies.”
Cannoli, Sicily
A shattering-crisp shell gives way to a creamy cheese filling in this Sicilian classic, whose roots reach deep into the island’s diverse culinary history. With origins at the wild Carnival celebrations at Palermo, the traditional cannolo is filled with silky-smooth ricotta cheese made from sheep’s milk.
Taste that rich filling for evidence of the Arab influence that infuses Sicilian cuisine: The candied citrus that often flavors the creamy interior remains beloved throughout the Middle East.
Cardamom Buns, Sweden
October 4 might be Cinnamon Bun Day on the Swedish calendar, but many bun aficionados insist that the aromatic cardamom version outshines cinnamon’s more assertive charms. One of a family of vetebullar, or wheat buns, cardamom buns are best enjoyed as a part of fika, the coffee break that comes twice daily in many Swedish workplaces.
While a freshly baked cardamom bun is a memorable treat, it’s also a simple and comforting one. In a classic recipe from author Johanna Kindvall , crushed cardamom seeds are stirred into lightly enriched, yeasted dough, then rolled up with a sweet layer of sugar and spice.
For the perfect fika, whip up a batch of cardamom buns, brew some strong coffee and call a friend, since the iconic Swedish coffee break is as much about talking as it is about treats.
Cendol, Singapore
On sweltering afternoons in Singapore, locals cool off with this chilled and silky sweet, which is a favorite at seaside restaurants and sidewalk stands. Iced coconut milk is sweetened with a palm sugar syrup, which lends it a lightly smoky, caramelized flavor.
The rich liquid is a lush base for tender threads of green rice-flour jelly, which gets its vivid color from the pandan juice that’s extracted from leaves of the tropical screw pine.
Versions of this blissfully cool dessert can be found throughout southeast Asia, but with the addition of a scoop of sweetened red beans, Singapore’s take on the classic treat remains especially tempting.
Chocolate Chip Cookies, United States
The quintessential American treat is deceptively simple: a basic, creamed-butter cookie recipe turns out to have endless subtle variations that produc dramatically different results.
Whatever your favorite version, a perfect chocolate chip cookie is a delicate balance of textures and flavors. A crispy rim gives way to a tender, melting center, and the buttery sweetness of the dough sets off the slight edge of bittersweet chocolate and brown sugar.
Legend has it that the chocolate chip cookie has its origins in a happy accident, when Massachusetts inn owner Ruth Wakefield stirred chopped chocolate into her cookie dough in an attempt to make uniformly chocolatey cookies. Her brand-new recipe was published in a Boston newspaper, and the rest was pastry history.
Chocolate Mousse, France
An airy confection made with just a handful of ingredients, chocolate mousse is a delicious paradox: the richer it is, the lighter it seems. Gallic chefs have been whipping up chocolate mousse — the word means “foam” in French — for at least a few hundred years, but the quest for foamy chocolate is much older.
Among the Olmec, Maya and Aztec peoples who consumed chocolate long before contact with Europeans, a hefty layer of foam was considered the height of good taste, and ancient codices depict cooks pouring chocolate from several feet in the air to create a froth.
Coconut Cake, Southern United States
Bouncy, buttery rounds of vanilla cake are piled high with shredded coconut and seven-minute frosting for a classic Southern dessert. This is the kind of all-American sweet that stars at potlucks, cake walks and church picnics, and it’s often made with recipes passed down on hand-written recipe cards.
There are dozens of versions, but every single one is cloaked in a frothy layer of shredded coconut … preferably fresh.
Layer cakes weren’t invented in the United States, but the distinctive profile of the coconut cake is pure Americana, and there’s no mistaking the high, round shape of an American layer cake for a slim European torte.
Despite the minimalist, all-white color scheme, the coconut cake is an over-the-top, old-fashioned pleasure. The tooth-achingly sweet meringue frosting is a throwback that’s rarely seen outside of the South, and it’s worth making the original version for a taste of a unique American tradition.
Cornes de Gazelle, Morocco
Even in a crowded field of tempting Moroccan sweets, these filled pastries are perennial favorites, and the labor-intensive dessert appears at celebrations and special meals throughout the year.
In the classic version, a thin layer of dough curves around a filling of ground almonds scented with orange blossom water. Since cornes de gazelle are baked just until they’re lightly golden, the dough retains a tender texture that melts into the center.
While cornes de gazelle are prepared across Morocco — as well as in the nearby countries of Tunisia and Algeria — the most visually elaborate versions come from the Moroccan port city of Tetouan, where bakers use intricate molds to create patterns in the dough before baking.
Crme Brle, France
Shiny, burnt sugar tops this creamy dessert, and the perfect crme brle is a study in contrasts. Each bite should blend a bit of crispy caramel — burned just to the very edge of bitterness — with the aromatic flavor of vanilla custard.
Often made using pure cream, crme brle is among the richest of all the custard desserts, and it must be gently cooked in a water bath to prevent curdling and overbaking.
For pastry chefs, part of the appeal of preparing crme brle is the fiery drama of burning the sugar topping. They execute the job with everything from a blow torch to a traditional salamander, a cast-iron disk that can be heated to blazing temperatures and is said to produce the most even results.
Dan Tats, Hong Kong
Follow the wafting scent of egg custard into a Hong Kong bakery to sample one of the territory’s most iconic treats. Perfectly sized for eating out-of-hand, dan tats are best enjoyed fresh from the oven, when the warm custard meets a perfectly crisp crust. And with a map-spanning backstory, dan tats are among the tastiest symbols of globalization.
Many trace dan tats to the similar pastis de nata of Portugal; those eggy tarts traveled with Portuguese traders and colonists to cities around the world. After establishing a foothold in Hong Kong via nearby Macau, they were re-exported to Chinatowns around the globe, where they tempt passersby from steaming pastry cases and shop windows.
Doughnuts, United States
In the Pantheon of world desserts, fried dough is a mainstay. Everything from French beignets to Greek loukoumades are doughnuts of a kind, and it’s no wonder they’re so beloved; a quick swim in boiling oil transforms simple bread dough into a fast and filling treat. But it’s latter day American doughnuts that earn a place on this list for their creative approach to fillings and flavors.
From Portland, Maine’s The Holy Donut to Voodoo Doughnut in Portland, Oregon, the old-school doughnut has been loaded down under piles of maple frosting, crispy bacon, fresh fruit glazes and boozy toppings that take the sweet into uncharted territory
Eszterhazy Torta, Hungary
In its glory days, the Austro-Hungarian empire stretched across central Europe, and a century after the empire fell its creamy legacy can still be found in pastry shop windows from Vienna to Sarajevo.
For this elegant cake, slim rounds of almond meringue are piled high between stripes of chocolate buttercream, then topped with a marbled spiderweb of chocolate and vanilla fondant.
A melting texture and rich sweetness make this old-fashioned cake a perennial favorite in sweets-loving Budapest, but it’s just as easy to find in Vienna, the grand city that once led the empire. It remains deeply influenced by a shared culinary tradition.
Flan, Latin America
In the sprawling family tree of custard desserts, Latin America’s flan is the coolest cousin, blending perfect simplicity with creamy sophistication.
A whisper-thin layer of dark caramel tops the dessert, melting into syrupy sauce around the base. Flan might have arrived in Latin America from Spain, but it’s since been claimed and reinvented by generations of cooks here.
In Mexico, where the dessert is served everywhere from neighborhood cafes to family celebrations, the silky texture of a classic flan is the perfect foil for a meal with fiery chiles and aromatic spices.
Gteau Fondant au Chocolat, France
Cut into a warm round of gteau fondant au chocolat — that means “melting chocolate cake” in French — to release the slow flood of chocolate from the interior.
This dark and rich cake is a high-wire act of time and temperature: Serve too early and it’s a sticky pool of hot cake batter; serve too late and it’s a brownie. When the balance is perfect, however, the treat blends the tender bite of a chocolate cake with the oozy pleasure of a melted chocolate bar.
In the 1990s, the cake became a menu star as a lava cake or molten chocolate cake. While the heat of the craze has passed, this sensuous dessert remains one of the world’s most sophisticated ways to end a meal.
Gelato, Italy
From shaved ice to sorbet, frozen desserts are melting evidence of one of the world’s great food truths: there’s nothing so welcome as a cold, sugary treat on a summer afternoon.
On the global heat map of frozen desserts, though, gelato’s sweet innovations earn top honors. Lower fat content and a warmer serving temperature help flavors shine brighter than in ice cream, whether you’re savoring a sunny scoop of lemon gelato, a rich hazelnut version or classic chocolate.
In Italy, the year-round treat in an essential food experience, and true aficionados even make the pilgrimage to the Gelato Museum in Bologna , where tours include a guided tasting at the museum cafe.
Gulab Jamun, India
A lush, syrupy distillation of milky flavor, these deep-fried Indian treats are anything but a simple doughnut.
Traditional recipes for gulab jamun dough start with a scoop of khoya, a reduction of cow or buffalo milk that simmers for hours over a low flame, lending the finished product a melting texture.
Frying gulab jamun in ghee provides a second injection of fatty flavor before the dumplings are soaked in an aromatic syrup infused with cardamom seeds and roses.
The rich and labor-intensive sweet is a favorite at Indian celebrations from Eid al-Fitr to Diwali, but the name points to origins in Persia — legend has it that gulab jamun arrived in medieval India with Persian troops.
Japanese Cheesecake
For the cheesecake aficionado who finds the New York version a trifle heavy, this Japanese treat might be a revelation. In the creamy sweet, which blends the flavorful tang of cheesecake with the loft of a sponge cake, the richness of lightly cultured cheese is offset by a light and airy texture.
The secret is an unusual technique of blending beaten egg whites — a meringue — into a warm batter that is rich with cream cheese and vanilla. Versions of this cheesecake are available everywhere from Japanese convenience stores to top-shelf bakeries.
When making your own or shopping for the perfect slice, watch for a characteristic jiggle that hints at the light, tender texture to come.
Kashata, East Africa
Wander through a market in East Africa to find this golden sweet, which blends the satisfying crunch of caramelized sugar with the rich heft of peanuts, fresh coconut or a blend of the two.
Bridging the delicious divide between cookie and confection, kashata gets an aromatic boost from the addition of cardamom, which elevates the brittle-like treat into the realms of world-class sweets.
The traders who once plied the coast of East Africa in dhow sailboats brought new words, flavors and spices from across the water, and the name of this beloved treat is adapted from Arabic — but for many, kashata is among the sweetest and most nostalgic flavors of East Africa.
Kifli, Hungary
While the rest ofthe world eats jam, central Europe enjoys the rich flavor of lekvr, a chunky preserve that retains all the tartness of the region’s ripe apricots and plums. The hearty fruit preserve is the delicious prize inside these crescent pastries.
A soft, flaky dough is shaped into a plump half-moon that barely contains the sweet filling, then topped with a light blanket of powdered sugar. Not that kifli are limited to fruit preserves. The sweets, which are especially beloved at holiday times, are often stuffed with sweetened walnuts or poppy seeds.
Knafeh, Levant
Golden pastry tops sweet cream, nuts or salty cheese in this syrupy dessert, which offers a satisfying contrast of texture and flavor. Like many Middle Eastern desserts, knafeh is soaked in an aromatic sugar syrup that infuses the pastry topping and filling with the flavor of roses or orange blossoms.
While crowds line up for sweet slices of knafeh from Amman to Alexandria, the most iconic place to try the dessert might be in the Palestinian city of Nablus, which claims the title of knafeh’s home town.
In the Nablus version, a tangy filling of goat cheese is covered by threads of fine pastry or a tender blanket of baked semolina. Some knafeh-loving locals even layer the local sweet with a pair of pita rounds for a memorable sandwich.
Kouign Amann, Brittany, France
Once a little-known treat that drew pastry pilgrims to Brittany, the kouign amann has officially made it big. Celebrity pastry chef Dominique Ansel gave it a boost by serving the caramel-crusted rounds in his SoHo bakery, but it’s the kouign amann’s sheer perfection that sent it down the sticky road to fame.
Brittany is known for the high quality of its butter and sea salt, and kouign amann simply means “butter cake” in the Breton language. It earns the name. Like a croissant, the kouign amann is rolled and folded with layers of butter, but fewer folds mean the kouign amann has a toothier, more rustic texture than its sophisticated city cousin.
A roll in sugar, a sprinkle of Breton sea salt and one of the world’s great pastries was born.
Kulfi, India
Among the most voluptuous treats in the ice cream family, this frozen dessert has a temptingly rich texture. Traditional recipes, which can require hours of constant stirring, start by simmering fresh milk over a low flame, a slow reduction that lends a caramel sweetness to the milk’s natural sugars.
While modern-day kulfi appears in dozens of flavors, classic versions are infused with some of India’s most lilting tastes.
In cities across the country, visit a kulfiwallah for a transporting sample of rose, cardamom, saffron or pistachio kulfi; while recipes change with time, the sweet treat you’re tasting is thought to have roots in the Mughal Empire.
Lemon Tart, France
A slender layer of lemon cream fills this classic French tart, whose flavor balances rich butter, the acidity of lemon juice and the bite of lemon zest. The crust, with a texture that’s similar to a shortbread cookie, retains a fatty crunch that’s an ideal contrast to the silky filling.
When perfectly executed the result is dessert heaven, and the simplicity of the tart makes it a fitting icon of the French pastry kitchen. While the old-fashioned version remains a beloved stand-by, some of the best tarts in Paris offer intriguing twists: try Sadaharu Aoki’s yuzu tart, made with an aromatic relative of the lemon, or head to Pierre Herm to taste an extra lemony version topped by bits of candied citrus.
Linzer Torte, Austria
Like its namesake city in Austria, this slender torte is an old-fashioned favorite that’s still a star in the 21st century. A dough enriched with ground nuts, often hazelnuts or walnuts, melts into a jammy filling for a treat that’s somewhere between cake and tart.
Recipes for Linzer tortes have been around since at least 1653, and in the torte’s Linz homeland, families pass variations on the richly spiced confection from generation to generation.
Along with the peek-a-boo lattice crust that hints at the filling at the heart of the torte, spices lend this tender sweet its lasting charm. While the filling is often a simple fruit preserve, Linzer torte dough is aromatic with ground cloves, cinnamon and lemon zest that make the Austrian treat a perennial favorite.
M’hanncha, Morocco
Cut into this golden spiral of pastry to uncover a rich filling of ground nuts, orange blossom water and mastic, a natural resin that perfumes sweets from Tangier to Turkey. Paired with a traditional glass of Moroccan mint tea, it’s a generous and celebratory dessert that invites every guest to serve themselves as much as they’d like, scattering the slivered nuts and ground cinnamon that decorate the top.
Even thinner than filo, the delicate warqa dough that’s used for this Moroccan sweet is prepared by daubing a ball of dough on a hot griddle; it’s an impressive labor of love that takes deft hands and many hours of practice.
Ma’amoul, Middle East
When celebrating some of the year’s most anticipated holidays, many in the Levant reach for the comforting taste of these filled cookies, whose thin, semolina crust wraps around a delicious blend of chopped dates, nuts or both.
The simple cookies are shaped in wooden molds carved with intricate patterns, emerging as finely-wrought rounds or detailed cones.
They’re a memorable treat with an appealingly mild sweetness, and a love of ma’amoul unites the region’s three predominant religious traditions: Jews enjoy ma’amoul as a Purim treat, bakers shape vast piles of the sweets for Easter, and in some areas, ma’amoul are an essential part of Eid feasts.
Bite into one of these traditional sweets and you’ll find out why.
Mandazi, South Sudan
The addition of coconut milk lends a tender bite and subtle aroma to these satisfying fritters, whose light sweetness is especially appealing when paired with a cup of milky coffee or chai tea.
In some versions, a pinch of ground cardamom provides an extra jolt of spice, and the simple doughnuts are an invitation to get creative with flavors, toppings and sides.
While many mandazi lovers trace the origins of these fried treats to South Sudan — where they’re often served with a rich chocolate dipping sauce that lands them firmly in dessert territory — mandazi are also a beloved snack across Tanzania, Kenya, Mozambique and Uganda.
Medovik, Russia
A touch of honey infuses an aromatic lilt into the slender layers of this cake, which is among Russia’s most beloved treats. In between the cake layers, which can be stacked 10 high in the most elaborate versions, is a creamy frosting that melts into the honeyed rounds.
Variations on medovik differ widely, but the most popular takes incorporate one of two very Russian ingredients into the sweet filling.
Some use the rich sour cream that adds flavor to some of Russia’s most comforting foods, from borscht to blini. Others get their flavor from sweetened condensed milk, which became an icon of Russian cooking during the Soviet era, when fresh milk could be hard to come by.
New York Cheesecake, United States
The Big Apple’s most iconic dessert seems to defy pastry physics. A light crumb offsets rich creaminess, a winning combination that elevates a simple list of flavors.
Like the city itself, New York cheesecake draws inspiration from around the globe, and a genetic map of the cheese cake world would likely include the crumbly, dry-curd cheesecakes of eastern Europe, German kasekuchen and the fresh-cheese versions that are beloved in Italy.
Unlike more fanciful recipes, New York’s classic take on cheesecake eschews toppings or pronounced flavors, with just a hint of vanilla extract or lemon zest to lend a lilting aroma to a blend of sugar, eggs, cream and cream cheese, almost always Philadelphia brand. The brand is so associated with American cheesecakes that it’s often called out by name on menus around the globe, where tarta de queso Philadelphia or gteau fromage Philadelphia are rich diplomats for a beloved New York sweet.
Oliebollen, Netherlands
The Netherlands’ sweet contribution to the world of fried dumplings, oliebollen are a deliciously Dutch way to celebrate New Year’s Eve. A crunchy, crispy ball of sweetened batter studded with raisins or currants, then dunked in powdered sugar, oliebollen are best eaten hot from street stands called oliebollenkrams.
It might seem like a simple snack, but oliebollen are serious business in the Netherlands, where an annual contest uses blind testing at the academic Center for Taste Research in Wageningen to choose the country’s very best oliebol.
Pavlova, Australia and New Zealand
Pastry-loving Aussies and Kiwis get riled when dinner conversations turn to Pavlova, a wonderfully messy meringue dessert that’s a long-running sore point between Australia and New Zealand.
Anna Pavlova, the globe-trotting Russian ballerina that the dessert is named for, visited both countries. Each claims the sweet as their own, but that’s where the dispute ends — no one denies the crunchy, creamy pleasures of a perfectly made Pavlova.
Sink a fork into the crisp meringue shell, and you’ll discover a sweetly chewy interior. Piled high atop the meringue are fluffy whipped cream and tart fruits, a lofty topping whose richness and bright flavor offset the sugary base for a world-class dessert.
Polvornes, Latin America, Spain and the Philippines
Tiny, powdered cookies that crumble at the lightest touch, these shortbread treats are beloved from Manila to Mexico City. In the United States, a version of these cookies is often called Mexican wedding cookies, but it would be a shame to leave them for special occasions alone. Polvornes are the kind of simple treat that’s welcome as an afternoon snack or piled onto a dessert tray, where they can hold their own against the world’s greatest cookies.
Recipes vary, and include almonds, walnuts or pecans, but each iteration of the cookies shares the same tender bite and origins in Spain; some speculate that the treats have even older roots in the Middle East.
Qatayef, Middle East
As if hours of fasting weren’t enough to pique the appetite, many Ramadan adherents can look forward to the sweet taste of qatayef when the sun finally does set.
The dessert starts life as a kind of yeasted pancake batter, but qatayef is griddled on just one side, creating a toothy balance between the golden-fried crust and tender interior. Stuffed into the folded base is a sweet mixture of fresh cheese, dried fruits, nuts or cream, often scented with rose water or ground cinnamon.
Some versions of qatayef can be eaten just like that — perhaps with the addition of some aromatic syrup — but classic recipes are fried before serving, adding an additional layer of crunch and flavor before the beloved sweets hit the holiday table.
Rig Jancsi, Hungary
Fluffy chocolate sponge cake is sandwiched with apricot jam and airy chocolate mousse in this classic treat. Topped with a whisper-thin layer of chocolate glaze then cut into tidy cubes of chocolate, the Rig Jancsi stands out even in the notably crowded field of fabulous Hungarian desserts.
Beloved for a silky texture and rich flavor, the seductive cake was named for a love story that caught the world’s attention with racy images and juicy details. Rig Jancsi was a Romani violinist who won the heart of the (married) Princesse de Caraman-Chimay of Belgium, and the two made international headlines when they ran off together in 1896.
Saffron Ice Cream, Iran
Scented with saffron, rosewater and pistachios, it’s no wonder that this Iranian ice cream is a favorite at Nowruz, the Persian New Year.
From a lightly golden color to its distinctive aroma, the creamy treat is the essence of spring. Saffron ice cream, or bastani, is a memorable experience on its own, and its flavor alone easily snags a spot among the world’s greatest frozen desserts.
For the complete bastani experience, though, opt for a traditional Iranian ice cream sandwich of saffron ice cream between two thin wafers. The wafers’ mild flavor and crispy texture are the perfect foil — and conveniently shaped handle — for the rich and aromatic ice cream, which is beloved from Tehran to Tehrangeles.
Sesame Balls, Jian Dui, China
Bite into the crisp shell of a deep-fried jian dui to discover a sweet filling within the golden, sesame-seed-studded exterior. This traditional Chinese treat is often filled with a sweet bean paste or a soft puree made from lotus seeds; both versions offer a deliciously mild counterpoint to the crunchy seeds.
Jian dui are especially popular as a treat at Lunar New Year celebrations, but not just for their delicious flavor. Dessert blogger and author Anita Chu writes that for many Chinese people, jian dui offer a special symbolism during that time: both the spherical shape and golden color are good omens for the year to come, as is the way the jian dui puff up when fried in hot oil.
Snow Ice, Xue Hua Bing, Taiwan
Like snow cones, Hawaiian shaved ice, raspados, granitas and dozens of other local variants, snow ice is Taiwan’s answer to one of the world’s great food truths: Nothing beats a sweet, icy treat when the weather is steamy.
Unusual shaving technique and complex toppings elevate the Taiwanese version above the competition. A creamy base, which can be flavored with everything from green tea to fruit pures, is frozen solid then shaved into a lofty pile of crumbling ice flakes.
To top it all off, blend your own perfect mix of treats. Favorites include adzuki red bean paste, taro, grass jelly, fresh fruit, sweetened condensed milk and mochi, but Taiwanese snow ice is an invitation to get as creative as you’d like.
Snow ice has spread to cities across the globe in recent years, but for the classic experience, head to Taipei’s Shilin Night Market, where locals line up for the xue hua bing sold by dozens of vendors.
Sour Cherry Pie, Midwestern United States
Slice into the crispy top of a sour cherry pie, and the brilliant filling might come as a shock — it’s an electric color that seems more likely to be harvested from a can than a tree. That electric red comes from the tart Montmorency cherries that are the classic filling for this pie. Since the tender fruits are more perishable than their sweeter cousins, if you live outside the Midwest or Northeast United States you might never have seen one.
Sour cherries have plenty of acid to counter-balance the sugar in the filling, and they’re rich in tannins, too. It’s a hint of complexity that put this fruit pie over the top as one of the best in America.
On the search for the perfect slice of sour cherry pie? Head to the National Cherry Festival in Traverse City, Michigan, or to Jacksonport, Wisconsin’s Cherry Fest .
Sticky Rice with Mango, Thailand
Ignore the chalky versions sold in restaurants that are 10 time zones from a mango tree; a ripe, tender dish of sticky rice with mango is among the world’s most perfect desserts. This traditional sweet begins with the glutinous rice that’s grown in paddies across southeast Asia, and the starchy grains combine with rich coconut milk and palm sugar for a treat that retains a chewy bite even when it’s perfectly soft.
The sweet world of mangoes includes hundreds and hundreds of cultivars, but for a truly Thai sticky rice with mango there are just two favored varieties: choose between nam dok mai, a sweet, yellow fruit that’s pertly curvaceous, or aok rong, whose higher acidity offers a pleasant counterpoint to the sweet rice.
Sticky Toffee Pudding, United Kingdom
The ultimate in comforting British desserts, this homey sweet is a warm serving of sticky nostalgia. A base of soft cake is studded with chopped dates, then drowned in a creamy sauce. Much of the distinctive flavor comes from treacle, or molasses.
While treacle has given way to crystallized sugar in most cooks’ pantries, it was once a favored sweetener that was an important part of working-class diets in the UK. It’s worth noting that sticky toffee pudding is not what’s known as a pudding outside of the British Isles, where “pudding” is a generic term for dessert, but it’s proved a popular export.
With versions served from Wales to Wellington, it’s likely that the sun never sets on the world’s sticky toffee puddings.
Tarte Tatin, France
If you’ve never encountered this famed French dessert, then tarte Tatin may arrive as a delicious surprise. A world away from the architectural, lacquered creations that fill Parisian pastry shop windows, the very best of these are a humble mess with heavenly flavor — preferably topped with a generous dollop of tangy crme frache. To bake this caramelized treat, start by layering apples, sugar and butter in a heavy pan, then top it off with a round of dough. The pastry seals the filling into a steamy enclosure, allowing the sugar to caramelize as the apples melt into tender perfection. The crux of the operation is when the tart emerges from the oven and must be flipped onto a plate before the molten sugar turns to sticky glue.
Tiramis, Italy
Creamy layers of whipped mascarpone cradle coffee-soaked ladyfingers in this modern Italian dessert, which has become a sweet mainstay around the globe. It’s no wonder. With a name that translates to “pick me up,” it’s a combination of coffee, chocolate, cream and optional booze that’s sure to pique even the most jaded palates.
Most pastry-loving historians trace the treat’s origins to the Treviso restaurant Le Beccherie, but by the time the world reached peak tiramis in the late 1980s and 1990s, rival claims were hot as a strong-brewed cup of Italian espresso. Whatever the truth behind the creamy dessert, it’s earned well-deserved pride of place on menus from Umbria to Ulaanbaatar.
Tres Leches Cake, Mexico and Central America
A fluffy sponge cake is the perfect vehicle for delivering loads of flavor in this wonderfully creamy dessert. The “three milks” that the sweet is named for are usually sweetened condensed milk, evaporated milk and cream, which combine for a delightful cake so wet it’s almost a drink.
While fresh milk is now widely available, the flavor of sweetened condensed milk is a throwback to a time when the perishable stuff was hard to find, especially in warmer climates.
Even in the days of refrigerated trucks, the gooey, sweet milk retains an appeal all its own, and flavor that infuses beloved treats around the world: it’s stirred into Thai iced tea, drizzled over shaved ice raspados in Latin America and cooked into Brazilian brigadeiros.
Trifle, United Kingdom
Tender layers of sherry-soaked sponge cake alternate with jam, custard and — in a practical British twist — almost anything sweet and delicious the baker has on hand, as long as it’s topped with a lush blanket of whipped cream. And no matter what you tuck between the rounds of cake, a trifle has a sweetly old-fashioned feel.
The name dates back to at least the 16th century and is probably older, though the ingredients of the dessert have evolved over time. Even as the equally-historic syllabub has disappeared from the standard playlist of homemade British desserts, trifle remains pure, creamy nostalgia for many food lovers.
The secret to the longevity of the trifle might be in its forgiving nature. When I was an apprentice baker in an Oakland caf, a pastry chef offered me this reassuring advice: As long as your flavors are good, she said, don’t worry too much about cakes emerging from the oven looking flawless. The worst-case scenario? “Put it in a bowl and call it a trifle.”
Tub Tim Krob, Thailand
With a name that translates to “crispy rubies,” it’s not hard to love this colorful and refreshing Thai dessert. After a fiery meal of Thai cuisine, tub tim krob cools with crushed ice and a sweetened coconut liquid infused with pandan leaves.
While often compared with vanilla, pandan has a lilting aroma all its own, but for tub tim krob lovers the “rubies” are the real treasure. For these, water chestnuts are soaked in vivid grenadine syrup, rolled in tapioca flour, then boiled.
The result is a sweet bite that’s both chewy and slightly crunchy, with a hint of salt from the coconut broth. The verdict? A chilled bowl of tub tim krob is easily worth the flight to Bangkok.

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