One of the most influential and powerful endorsements for plant-based diets by the Lancelot Medical Journal to save the planet and feed the earth’s population. Yes, we’re on the right track!
Seven dietary changes to protect your health – and the planet
Consider a diet that can prolong your life and, at the same time, feed a growing global population without causing further damage to the environment.
That’s just what 37 scientists from 16 countries (the EAT-Lancet Commission) did for two years. Their findings resulted in recommendations for a healthy diet that can feed the world’s population from sustainable food systems and were published on Thursday in the medical journal The Lancet.
They recognize that food production needs to nourish human health and support environmental sustainability; currently, our food systems are threatening both. Strong evidence indicates that livestock farming is one of the biggest drivers of climate change, biodiversity loss, land degradation, water use and chemical pollution.
The “planetary-health diet,” largely plant-based and low in red meat and sugar, is estimated to feed 10 billion people by 2050 from sustainable food systems. The researchers also believe it will prevent 11 million premature deaths a year caused by an unhealthy diet.
WHAT’S IN THE DIET?
Daily protein comes mostly from plants including beans, lentils, soy and nuts. Whole grains, not refined, are included, and fruits and vegetables fill half of your plate at meals.
The recommended 2,500-calorie diet doesn’t completely eliminate animal foods. It can include, each day, one half-ounce of red meat, one ounce each of fish and poultry and one cup of milk or yogurt. One to five eggs can be eaten a week.
Plant-based oils are substituted for animal fats and added sugars are limited to 31 g a day, in line with the WHO recommendation for sweeteners.
IS IT FEASIBLE?
The planetary-health diet is a huge shift from the way we eat. But eating this way isn’t completely foreign.
The traditional Mediterranean diet of the early 1960s was largely plant-based and contained only 35 g of red meat and poultry combined each day. Many traditional diets (e.g., West Africa, India, Mexico and parts of Asia) contain lots of plant protein and little meat or dairy.
Some people, though, feel that achieving this global diet isn’t feasible.
Not today; that’s for sure. Reaching these dietary targets by 2050, the EAT-Lancet Commission points out, will require policies that encourage healthier food choices, agriculture sustainability, stricter rules around governing of land and oceans and reducing food waste.
TRANSITIONING TO A SUSTAINABLE DIET AT HOME
In the meantime, there are small steps you can take on an individual level to move toward the planetary-health diet.
Replace meat with pulses. Substitute cooked brown or green lentils for half of the ground meat in meatloaf, meatballs, burgers, shepherd’s pie, stuffed peppers and marinara sauces.
Replace some of the meat in tacos and burritos with black beans or pinto beans. Reduce the amount of meat in chili and add extra kidney beans or chickpeas. Eventually, replace all of the meat with beans or lentils.
Replace cheese in sandwiches with hummus.
Use nuts to replace meat. Add almonds or cashews to a vegetable stir-fry instead of beef or chicken. For lunch, have a nut-butter sandwich instead of ham or turkey.
Boost plant protein at meals by tossing toasted nuts or pumpkins seeds into greens salads.
Set a target. Determine how many meatless meals you’ll eat each week and then build on that. Vegetarian chili, tofu stir-fry, salad with edamame, bean burgers, chickpea curry and lentil soup are protein- and nutrient-packed lunches and dinners.
Include plant-based breakfasts, too. Try a smoothie made with fruit, greens and soy or pea milk, whole grain toast with almond butter, oatmeal topped with nuts and berries, quinoa or millet porridge or scrambled tofu.
Pack in produce. Eat a mix of fruits and vegetables, at least five servings a day (one serving is one-half cup of cooked or raw vegetables, a half-cup of berries or one medium fruit). One-half of each meal should consist of these foods.
Consider your snacks. Making snacks 100-per-cent plant-based is an easy step to take. Choose fruit and nuts, homemade trail mix, vegetables and hummus, whole grain crackers with nut butter, soy/pea milk smoothies or soy lattes.
Rethink restaurants. You’ll find a variety of plant-based options at restaurants that specialize in ethnic cuisines such as Indian, Middle Eastern, Mexican, Japanese and Chinese.
Or, pick a plant-based restaurant near you and when travelling.
Reduce food waste. Shop for, store and repurpose foods to minimize waste at home. Avoid buying in bulk; purchase only what you need whenever possible.
Buy “ugly produce,” misshapen fruits and vegetables often thrown away by farmers and grocery stores. Use vegetable scraps to make soup stock.
Store leftovers at the front of the fridge so you don’t forget them; eat within three or four days.
sauce https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life…_Ppz3dDaAe3buE F*ck Cancer
Eat your veggies

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Find out where love is in the air in the capital

Home » Features » Find out where love is in the air in the capital Find out where love is in the air in the capital Posted on Wednesday February 6th, 2019 by Colin Armstrong When it comes to Valentine’s Day, some of us want to go all out, others just want dinner by candlelight and some just want to gather with friends – we have you covered for every type of celebration. As The Beatles once said, “All you need is love”, and with that sentiment in mind it’s the perfect time of year to let the people dear to your heart know exactly what they mean to you. You don’t need to buy a dozen red roses or recite a sonnet to show your affection, but making a small gesture or taking the effort to arrange a nice meal can go a long way to making your significant other feel special. Feeling the love? Here’s where you can embrace a little romance in the capital. L is for Lavish
Go all out and take a trip to Emirates Palace where you can take your pick from a variety of restaurants serving up a Valentine’s menu for two. Italian restaurant Mezzaluna serves up dishes with scallops, sea bass, wagyu beef and more, all with bubbly. Or soak up the views from a beachside gazebo at BBQ Al Qasr where couples can enjoy freshly cooked cuts of meat and bubbly. If seafood is your thing then Sayad is the place to be with a four-course menu of fresh fish and shellfish with bubbly. AED 990+ per couple. Corniche West. Times vary. Contact: 02 690 9000, kempinski.com/abudhabi/emirates-palace Spoil your special someone with a nine-course dinner at 99 Sushi Bar and Restaurant where you can feast on a range of Japanese delicacies including fresh seafood, handmade sushi and bubbly. AED 999 per couple. The Galleria, Al Maryah Island. 8pm-midnight. Contact: 02 672 3333, 99sushibar.com Take your pick from three restaurants for your Valentine’s meal at Ritz-Carlton Abu Dhabi, Grand Canal . Southeast Asian restaurant Li Jiang is offering a five-course menu complemented by unrivalled views of Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque for AED 550 per couple. Feast on contemporary Arabian dishes at Mijana with a special menu for the occasion and music from an oud player for AED 450 per couple. Or raise the steaks at The Forge and dine on a five-course menu featuring oysters, bubbly, sweet treats and more for AED 650 per couple. Just want to relax? Then visit ESPAand pamper yourself with a 60-minute inner calm massage, roses and chocolates throughout the month. AED 940. Khor Al Maqtaa. Times vary. Contact: 02 818 8282, abudhabi.restaurants@ritzcarlton.com
Take your Valentine’s experience to new heights, literally, with a sunset supper on the helipad of The St Regis Abu Dhabi . Couples can take in a spectacular view of the capital while enjoying canapés, live saxophone music and bubbly. AED 2,000 per couple. Corniche West. 5pm-7pm. Contact: 02 694 4553, villatoscana-abudhabi.com Make the most of the cooler weather and settle down for a meal under the stars at The St Regis Saadiyat Island Resort where you can dine on a four-course meal in a private cabana by the pool, while a violinist and saxophonist serenade you. AED 1,500 per couple. Saadiyat Island. 8pm. Contact: 02 498 8888, bit.ly/2xbTyNE O is for Overnight Stay Go for a getaway at Sofitel Abu Dhabi Corniche where you can unwind and enjoy a short city staycation. As part of the offer you’ll enjoy a Valentine’s room set-up, Valentine’s platter, breakfast for two in bed and personalised bathrobes. Want to go a step further? Then take advantage of the special offer for a 60-minute couples massage and 30-minute Jacuzzi package. From AED 550+ for luxury room, AED 800 for couples massage. Available 7th-16th Feb. Corniche East. Contact: 02 813 7777, sofitelabudhabicorniche.com
Enjoy a great escape at Anantara Al Sahel Vil la Resort , set among savannah grasses. Couples can unwind in the picturesque surroundings of Sir Bani Yas Island and get some much-need rest and relaxation away from the hustle and bustle of the city. Looking for a special meal during your stay? Dine by candlelight on the beach, where you can enjoy your choice of dishes designed by your personal chef for AED 815 per couple. AED 1,950 for overnight package. Sir Bani Yas Island. Contact: 02 895 8700, sir-baniyasis.anantara.com Nothing says romance like the beautiful beaches of Saadiyat Island. Head to Saadiyat Rotana Resort and Villas where you can enjoy a stress-free stay with beautiful views of the open ocean as well as in-room or buffet breakfast at Sim Sim, late check-out, chocolate-covered strawberries and dinner at Turtle Bay Bar and Grill. From AED 780. Contact: 02 697 0000, bit.ly/2I6Wqi8 V is for Valentine’s Special You’ll be spoilt for choice at Intercontinental Abu Dhabi . At Byblos Sur Mer, you can tuck into a banquet style Lebanese menu while enjoying live entertainment in the form of a belly dancer and singers for AED 599 per couple. Chamas will feature a live Brazilian band to accompany your churrascaria meat cuts, salads and dessert. AED 699 per couple. If you prefer Asian cuisine, head to Cho Gao Marina Walk for a sharing menu that includes dishes such as truffle chicken siew mai and honey glazed duck for AED 599 per couple. Al Bateen. Times vary. Contact: 800 423 463, icad.ae
Couples can enjoy a romantic dinner for two at Roberto’s with the specially-designed Poetry and Love menu by chef Andrea Falcone. Dishes include langoustine carpaccio, wagyu beef tartare, lobster spaghetti, grilled tuna fillet, pigeon with truffle and more. AED 800 per couple, AED 1,000 with bubbly. The Galleria, Al Maryah Island. 7pm. Contact: 02 627 9009, reservationsauh@robertos.ae At steakhouse The Foundry , the Valentine’s-themed meal features a baked brie starter, shared seafood platter or pepper crusted Chateaubriand for the main course and a dessert of chocolate miniatures. AED 649 per couple. Southern Sun Abu Dhabi, Mina Street. 7pm. Contact: 02 818 4888, abudhabi.dine@tsogosun.com
At Marriott Hotel Downtown, Abu Dhabi you can take your pick from a variety of dining options. At JW Steakhouse, couples can settle in for a three-course dinner and a glass of bubbly for AED 299 per person. Looking for a panoramic view of the city? Take your seat at AT 25 where you can take in the scenery of the city while enjoying a sharing platter and house beverages for AED 280 per couple. Sheikh Rashid Bin Saeed Street. Times vary. Contact: 02 304 7779, marriottdown townabudhablife.com Tuck into an Italian meal at Dino’s Bistro Italiano where guests will be served a three-course menu packed with Italian delicacies, treats and beverages for an intimate, romantic meal for two. AED 300 per couple. Pearl Rotana Capital Centre, near Adnec. 6pm-11pm. Contact: 02 307 5591, fb.pearl@rotana.com A romantic meal out doesn’t have the break the bank. Feast on a selection of international dishes including dim sum, sushi, pasta and grilled meat at c.taste from AED 199. Centro Capital Centre, near Adnec. 6pm-11pm. Contact: 02 409 6512, rotanatimes.com Enjoy a romantic evening at Dusit Thani Abu Dhabi with a varied choice of cuisines on offer. Sample contemporary Indian food at Namak by Kunal Kapur with a seven-course menu featuring dishes including pumpkin shorba, malvani cod and chocolate and shrikhand cannoli. AED 320 per couple. Enjoy some classic cooking at D’ Capital Steakhouse with the four-course Valentine’s menu that features green pea soup with parmesan custard, and king prawns and cheese crémeux. AED 380 per couple. Sultan Bin Zayed the First Street. Times vary. Contact: 02 698 8137, reservation.table@dusit.com
Take your partner for a relaxed Valentine’s Day at Café 302 where you can enjoy a three-course menu with your choice of starter, main course and dessert. AED 175 per couple. Al Maha Arjaan by Rotana, Hamdan Street. 7pm-10.30pm. Contact: 02 610 6666, almaha.arjaan@rotana.com Couples have several options at Fairmont Bab Al Bahr . At Frankie’s Italian Restaurant and Bar, a four-course set menu is served alongside live music from the house band. AED 249 per person. Love your meat? Then book in to Marco Pierre White Steakhouse and Grill for a four-course set menu featuring choice cuts of meat for AED 349 per person. Between the bridges. Times vary. Contact: 02 654 3238, fairmont.com/abu-dhabi E is for Easy Does It Take a load off at Bab Al Qasr Hotel and Residences where you can enjoy a relaxing couples spa experience at Ayana Spa. The package includes a Balinese massage, refreshing beverages and a heart-shaped strawberry mousse to be enjoyed in the waiting area or following your treatment. AED 615 per couple. Corniche West. Times vary. Contact: 02 205 3090, ayanaspa@babalqasr.com Embrace your inner Audrey Hepburn and settle in for the Breakfast at Tiffany’s afternoon tea at Jumeirah at Etihad Towers . The 60s-style offer includes a host of treats including macaroons and pastries for an afternoon of pure indulgence. From AED 220. Corniche West. 2pm-6pm. Contact: 02 811 5666, jadrestaurants@jumeirah.com Tick all the boxes at Khalidiyah Palace Rayhaan by Rotana : Enjoy a 60-minute couples massage and then follow up the relaxing experience with a set menu dinner at Kamoon where you can enjoy Middle Eastern dishes in a relaxed atmosphere. AED 699 per couple. Corniche West. Times vary. Contact: 02 657 0188, wellness.khalidiya@rotana.com Take a load off at Heavenly Spa with a massage for two in a couple’s treatment room, including a welcome beverage, a private afternoon tea on the spa terrace and all-day pool access. AED 735 per couple. The Westin Abu Dhabi Golf Resort and Spa, Sas Al Nakhl. Times vary. Contact: 02 616 9999, heavenlyspa.auh@westin.com Love sick? If Valentine’s Day is not for you or you just want to do something different this year, then not to worry: Here are some alternative ways to spend your Valentine’s Day. The annual Anti Valentine’s Day Party at Heroes is back. Also known as the Traffic Light Party, the night will be all about dancing with live music from The International Playboys. 15th Feb. AED 130 for men with three house beverages, free for ladies. Crowne Plaza Abu Dhabi, Hamdan Street. From 8pm. Contact: 02 616 6132, facebook.com/heroesabudhabi Take a trip to Yas Island and see the Grammy Award-nominated musician Yanni as he performs an intimate show in the capital for music fans. From AED 495. du Forum, Yas Island. 7pm. Visit: ticketmaster.ae
Get a dose of culture and check out Louvre Abu Dhabi’s newest exhibition, Rembrandt, Vermeer and the Dutch Golden Age: Masterpieces from the Leiden Collection and the Musée du Louvre , opening on 14th February. AED 60, AED 30 for teachers and children aged between 13 and 22. Cultural District, Saadiyat Island. Sat-Sun and Tue-Wed 10am-8pm, Thu-Fri 10am-10pm. Contact: 600 56 55 66, louvreabudhabi.ae Enjoy live comedy as Yalla Laughs hosts its anti-Valentine’s Day gig with comedians based in the Middle East. Free. Up and Below, Courtyard by Marriott, Hamdan Street. 8pm. Visit: facebook.com/yallalaughs It’s all about big beats and plenty of dancing as four-time Grammy Award-winning jazz musician Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra take to the stage for Mambo . Join the pre-show dance workshop to learn the moves before enjoying the live performance and taking to the dance floor. AED 105, AED 52.50 for youth under 22 years old. NYUAD, Saadiyat Island. 8pm. Visit: nyuad-artscenter.org
WORDS Colin Armstrong

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Global Fruit and Vegetable Juices Industry

NEW YORK , Feb. 5, This report analyzes the worldwide markets for Fruit and Vegetable Juices in Million Liters by the following Types: Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice, and Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p0397828 The report provides separate comprehensive analytics for the US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific , Middle East & Africa , and Latin America . Annual estimates and forecasts are provided for the period 2015 through 2022. Also, a six-year historic analysis is provided for these markets. Market data and analytics are derived from primary and secondary research. Company profiles are primarily based on public domain information including company URLs. The report profiles 175 companies including many key and niche players such as: – Ajeper SA – Beijing Huiyuan Beverage and Food Group Co., Ltd. – Birdseye Dairy, Inc. – Campbell Soup Company – Del Monte Foods, Inc. – Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Inc. Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p0397828 FRUIT AND VEGETABLE JUICES MCP-2 MARKET ANALYSIS, TRENDS, AND FORECASTS, JANUARY 2 CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION, METHODOLOGY & PRODUCT DEFINITIONS 2. INDUSTRY OVERVIEW Fruit & Vegetable Juices: Refreshing, Nutrition-Rich Juices for Health-Conscious Consumers Fruit Juices Segment Dominates Fruit and Vegetable Juices Market Orange Juice Leads Fruit Juice Market, Faces Threat from New Flavor Offerings Table 1: Global Fruit and Vegetable Juices Market by Juice Type (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for Apple Juice, Grapefruit Juice, Grape Juice, Mixtures of Juices, Orange Juice, Citrus Juice, Pineapple Juice, Tomato Juice and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 2: Consumption of Orange Juice Worldwide (in ‘ Metric Tons) by Geographic Region/Country (2015/16 & 2016/17) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Vegetable Juices Market – High Nutrition and Low Calorie Attributes Favor Segment Growth High-Value, Premium Juices: Promising Revival in Mature Developed Markets Developing Regions Emerge as Lucrative Markets for Functional and Flavorful Health Juices Table 3: World Fruit and Vegetable Juices Market – Geographic Regions Ranked by % CAGR (Volume Sales) for 2015-2022: Asia-Pacific (Excluding Japan), Middle East & Africa , Latin America , Japan , Europe , Canada , and US (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 4: World Fruit and Vegetable Juices Market by Region (2018E & 2022P): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for Developed and Developing Regions (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Growing Demand for Organic Juices – A Promising Opportunity Cold-Pressed Juices: A Market on Road to Rapid Growth HPP-Treated Juices Capitalize on Growing Popularity of Cold- Pressed Juices Development of New Juice Varieties to Foster Market Growth Innovative Juices with Added Healthy Ingredients Flood the Market Table 5: Number of New Juice Launches in Select Leading Juice Consuming Countries (2013-2017) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Stable Economic Scenario to Underpin Volume Sales Table 6: World Real GDP Growth Rates in % (2016-2019P): Breakdown by Country/Region (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 3. GROWTH DRIVERS, MARKET TRENDS & ISSUES Megatrends Wielding Positive Influence on Fruit & Vegetable Juices Market Expanding Middle Class Population in Emerging Markets Offer Increased Growth Prospects Table 7: Global Middle Class Population (in Millions) by Geographic Region: 2010, 2020P & 2030P (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 8: Global Middle Class Population by Geographic Region: Percentage Share Breakdown for 2010, 2020P & 2030P (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Rising Disposable Incomes Propel Market Growth Table 9: Global Per Capita Disposable Income (2011-2017) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 10: GDP Per Capita PPP in US$ ‘000 for Select Countries (2018) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Expanding Urban Population Spurs Growth Table 11: Total Population Worldwide by Urban and Rural Population in Thousands: 1950-2050P (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 12: Urban Population as a % of Total Population by Geographic Region for the Years 1990, 2014 & 2050 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 13: Percentage of Urban Population in Select Countries (2010 & 2050) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Fruit and Vegetable Juices Function as Support Structure for Maintaining Good Health Table 14: Select Fruit Juices and their Nutritional Value Heart Health Juices Flourish Fruit and Vegetable Juices for Quitting Smoking Cranberry Juice Helps Cure Intestinal Infections Concord Grape Juice is Rich in Antioxidants Orange Juice Lowers Kidney Stone Recurrence Pomegranates Juice Provides Immense Health Benefits Lemon Juice Helps in Weight Loss Apple Juice for Maintaining Flawless Skin Pink Grapefruit Juice High in Nutrients Beta-Glucan Fruit Juices Lower Bad Cholesterol Acknowledged Role of Fruit & Vegetable Juices in Weight Loss Drives Demand Juice Diets Emerge as an Option for Diet Conscious Consumers Fortified Drinks Continue Finding Favor among Consumers Extraction of Fruit and Vegetable Juices: Juicing Vs Blending Concentrated and Non-Concentrated Juices Safe and Attractive Packaging Lures Consumers New, Innovative Sans Bottle for Preserving Juices and Smoothies Orange Juice Production Losing Share to Smaller Citrus Fruits Table 15: Production of Fresh Oranges in Select Countries (2012/13-2016/17) (In ‘000 Metric Tons) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 16: Production of Orange Juice in Select Countries (2015/16 and 2016/17) (in ‘000 Metric Tons) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 17: Production of Fresh Tangerines/Mandarins in Select Countries (2015/16 and 2016/17) (In ‘000 Metric Tons) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 18: Production of Fresh Grapefruit in Select Countries (2015/16 and 2016/17) (In ‘000 Metric Tons) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Orange Juice Prices on a Roller Coaster Ride Orange Juice Lose Share Owing to Higher Health Benefits of Consuming Raw Oranges Growing Demand for Unconventional Juices by Consumers New Fruit and Vegetable Juices for Addressing Needs of Adult Customers Issues & Challenges Increasing Preference for Whole Fruits and Vegetables Hampers Growth Fruit Vs Fruit Juice: An Ongoing Debate Health Risks of Fruit & Vegetable Juices Unpasteurized Juices Lead to Health Risk Increasing Consumption of Fructose-based Juices Raises Risk of Diabetes and Obesity Concerns over Sugar Content in Kids Juices Table 19: Calorie Content in Select Beverages Are Fruit Juices More Harmful Than Soda and Whole Milk? 4. PRODUCT OVERVIEW Fruit & Vegetable Juices – An Introduction Types of Fruit and Vegetable Juices Fruit Juices Segmentation on the Basis of Concentration 100% Juice 25-99% Juice Segmentation on the Basis of Product Format Frozen Concentrates Chilled Ready-to-Serve Juices Shelf Stable Juices Segmentation on the Basis of Type of Fruit Orange Juice: Most Popular Choice Apple Juice Grape Juice Lemon Juice Segmentation on the Basis of Packaging Other Types of Segmentation Premium Vs Economy Age of the Target Market Ethnic Segmentation Standard Vs Novelty Flavors Breakfast Vs All-day, All Occasion Drinks Type of Storage Calorie Content Natural Vs Artificial Nutritional Role of Fruit Juice in the Diets of Children Table 20: Contribution of Fruit Juices to Nutrients Intake (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Substitutes/Alternatives Nectars Pulp/Puree/Concentrates Banana Puree Vegetable Juices 5. COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE Coca Cola and PepsiCo – Two Distinct Players in the World Fruit and Vegetable Juices Market Table 21: Leading Players in the Global Fruit and Vegetable Juice Market (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Coca Cola Company, PepsiCo Inc. and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Vendors Rely on M&A to Augment Operations Select M&A Deals in the World Fruit and Vegetable Juices Market (2015-2018) 5.1 Focus on Select Global Players Ajeper SA ( Peru ) Beijing Huiyuan Beverage and Food Group Co., Ltd. ( China ) Birdseye Dairy, Inc. ( USA ) Campbell Soup Company ( USA ) Del Monte Foods, Inc. ( USA ) Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Inc. ( USA ) Mott’s LLP ( USA ) Döhler Group ( Germany ) Florida’s Natural Growers ( USA ) Golden Circle ( Australia ) Hangzhou Wahaha Group Co., Ltd. ( China ) Harvest Hill Beverage Company ( USA ) Ito En Ltd. ( Japan ) Kanegrade Limited (UK) Lassonde Industries, Inc. ( Canada ) Old Orchard Brands, LLC ( USA ) Loblaw Companies Limited ( Canada ) Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc. ( USA ) PepsiCo, Inc. ( USA ) Naked Juice Company ( USA ) Tropicana Products, Inc. ( USA ) Schweppes Australia Pty Ltd. ( Australia ) Shaanxi Hengtong Fruit Juice Group ( China ) Tampico Beverages, Inc. ( USA ) The Coca-Cola Company ( USA ) The Minute Maid Company ( USA ) Odwalla, Inc. ( USA ) Welch Foods, Inc. ( USA ) 5.2 Product Introductions/Innovations Tropicana Introduces Tropicana Coco Blends & Tropicana Kids 7-Eleven Unveils New 7-Select GO!Smart Juices Tropicana Introduces Tropicana Essentials Juice Drinks Tesco Launches Waste NOT Cold-Pressed Fruit & Vegetables Juices INVO Rolls Out CoCo Collisions Juices Evolution Fresh Launches Evolution Fresh® Daily Probiotic & Evolution Fresh® Complete Smoothies Groupe Casino Unveils Three New Private Label Fruit Juice SKUs Coca-Cola Launches Vegified Line of Vegetable & Fruit Juice Drinks in Ireland 5.3 Recent Industry Activity SJB Brands Acquires Juice It Up JAB Holding to Acquire Dr Pepper Snapple and Merge with Keurig Green Mountain Lassonde Snaps Up Old Orchard Brands Campbell Soup Company to Close Toronto Manufacturing Facility PepsiCo India Seeks to Widen Tropicana Footprint SDIC Zhonglu Fruit Juice to Acquire Appol Group Malee Group to Acquire Majority Stake in Long Quan Safe Food JSC Hip Cuisine Snaps Up Rawkin’ Juice Edeka Acquires Albi GmbH Symrise to Acquire Cobell MyGreens Acquires JusDivine FitChef Acquires Nurish Juice 6. GLOBAL MARKET PERSPECTIVE Table 22: World Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2 through 2022 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 23: World Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2009 through 2014 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 24: World 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2009, 2018 & 2022 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Fruit & Vegetable Juices Market by Type Table 25: World Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit Juices by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2015 through 2 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 26: World Historic Review for Fruit Juices by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2009 through 2014 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 27: World 14-Year Perspective for Fruit Juices by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2009, 2018 & 2022 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 28: World Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for 100% Juice by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2015 through 2 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 29: World Historic Review for 100% Juice by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2009 through 2014 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 30: World 14-Year Perspective for 100% Juice by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2009, 2018 & 2022 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 31: World Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for 25-99% Juice by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2015 through 2 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 32: World Historic Review for 25-99% Juice by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2009 through 2014 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 33: World 14-Year Perspective for 25-99% Juice by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2009, 2018 & 2022 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 34: World Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 35: World Historic Review for Table 36: World 14-Year Perspective for Table 37: World Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Vegetable Juices by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2015 through 2022 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 38: World Historic Review for Vegetable Juices by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2009 through 2014 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 39: World 14-Year Perspective for Vegetable Juices by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2009, 2018 & 2022 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 7. REGIONAL MARKET PERSPECTIVE 7.1 The United States A.Market Analysis Fruit and Vegetable Juices Market – An Overview Table 40: US Shelf-Stable Juices Market by Juice Category (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Apple Juice, Cranberry Juices, Grape Juice, Lemon/Lime Juice, Lemonade Juice, Orange Juice, Prune/Fig Juice, Sparkling Juice, Tomato/Vegetable Juice and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Concerns over High Sugar Levels in Juices Pull Down Market Growth Declining Trend in Orange Production & Premiumization Strategy Lead to Increase in Juice Prices Table 41: US Fresh Oranges Production in ‘000 Metric Tons for Years 2012/13 through 2016/17 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 42: US Orange Juice Production in ‘000 Metric Tons for Years 2012/13 through 2016/17 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 43: US Orange Juice Consumption in ‘000 Metric Tons for Years 2012/13 through 2016/17 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 100% Fruit Juices – The Largest Segment But Witnessing a Steady Decline Latest 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines Recommend Consumption of 100% Juices Product Innovation Focuses on Healthy Juices and Exotic Flavors Fruit Juices Fast Losing their ‘Healthy’ Tag Frozen Fruit and Juice Market Struggles to Maintain Growth Table 44: US Refrigerated Juice and Juice Drinks Market by Juice Type (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Apple Juice, Blended Juice, Cider, Grapefruit Juice, Juice & Juice Drink Smoothies, Lemonade Juice, Orange Juice, Vegetable Juice and Other Fruit Juices (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 45: Leading Refrigerated Orange Juices Brands in the US (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Florida’s Natural, Minute Maid, Simply Orange, Tropicana Pure, Private Label and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Functional Fruit Juice Beverages Gaining Momentum Table 46: Nutrients Available in Fruit Juices (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Heart Health-Favoring Juices to Flourish Grape Juice Market – Rising Grape Production Bodes Well for Growth Competitive Scenario Table 47: Leading Shelf Stable Bottled Fruit Drink Brands in the US (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Hawaiian Punch, Little Hug Fruit Barrels, Mott’s, Snapple, Tampico, V8 Splash, Welch’s, Private Label, and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 48: Leading Bottled Fruit Juice Brands in the US (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Nestlé Juicy Juice, Ocean Spray, Old Orchard, V8 V Fusion, Welch’s, Private Label and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 49: Leading Juice and Juice Drink Smoothie Brands in the US (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Bolthouse Farms, Naked Juice, Odwalla, and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 50: Leading Vegetable Juice/Cocktail Makers in the US (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Bolthouse Farms, Evolution Juice Harvest Corp., Naked Juice Co., Odwalla, and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 51: US Juice Market by Distribution Channel (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Convenience Stores, Supermarkets/Grocery Stores, Vending Machines, Other Domestic Channels and Exports (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) B.Market Analytics Table 52: US Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 53: US Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 54: US 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 7.2 Canada A.Market Analysis Low-Sugar Juices and Exotic Juices Gaining Momentum amidst Declining Consumption Orange Juice Market Shelf-Stable Fruit Drinks Competitive Scenario Table 55: Leading Players in the Canadian Juices Market (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Lassonde Inc., Minute Maid Co., PepsiCo Beverages Canada, and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Regional Player B.Market Analytics Table 56: Canadian Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 57: Canadian Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 58: Canadian 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 7.3 Japan A.Market Analysis Japan : A Major Consumer of Fruit and Vegetable Juices Vegetable Juices Gain Traction Competitive Scenario B.Market Analytics Table 59: Japanese Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 60: Japanese Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 61: Japanese 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 7.4 Europe A.Market Analysis Market Overview Table 62: EU Production of Oranges, Tangerines/Mandarins, Grapefruit, and Lemons and Limes in ‘000 Metric Tons for Years 2012/13 through 2016/17 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 63: EU Orange Juice Consumption in ‘000 Metric Tons for Years 2012/13 through 2016/17 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 64: European Apple Juice Market (2011-2014): Breakdown of Apple Juice Production in Billion Liters (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 65: Apple Juice Production in Select EU Countries (2014) (in Million Liters) (includes corresponding Graph/ Chart) Vegetable Juices Emerge as Attractive Option for Consumers New Juice Flavors and Versions Foray into the Market Carton – Preferred Packaging for Fruit Juice and Nectar Packaging in Europe Table 66: European Fruit Juice and Fruit Nectar Market by Packaging Type (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Shipments for Carton, Plastic, Glass and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Competitive Scenario B.Market Analytics Table 67: European Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Geographic Region – France , Germany , Italy , UK, Spain , Poland , Russia and Rest of Europe Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2015 through 2 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 68: European Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Geographic Region – France , Germany , Italy , UK, Spain , Poland , Russia and Rest of Europe Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2009 through 2014 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 69: European 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for France , Germany , Italy , UK, Spain , Poland , Russia and Rest of Europe Markets for Years 2009, 2018 & 2022 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 70: European Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 71: European Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 72: European 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 7.4.1 France A.Market Analysis Maturing Market Limits Growth Table 73: French Fruit Juice & Nectars Market by Juice Type (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for Apple, Flavor Mixes, Grape, Orange, Pineapple and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 74: French Fruit Juice & Nectars Market by Juice Type (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for Carton, Glass, Plastic, and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Competitive Scenario B.Market Analytics Table 75: French Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 76: French Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 77: French 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 7.4.2 Germany A.Market Analysis Market Overview Table 78: German Fruit Juice & Nectars Market by Juice Type (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for Apple, Flavor Mixes, Grape, Orange, Vegetable and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 79: German Fruit Juice & Nectars Market by Packaging Type (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for Carton, Glass, Plastic and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 80: Per Capita Consumption (in Liters) of Select Fruit Juice & Fruit Nectars in Germany (2015) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Competitive Scenario Regional Player B.Market Analytics Table 81: German Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 82: German Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 83: German 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 7.4.3 Italy A.Market Analysis Market Overview Table 84: Italian Fruit Juice & Nectars Market by Juice Type (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for Apricot, Flavor Mixes, Orange, Peach, Pear and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 85: Italian Fruit Juice & Nectars Market by Packaging Type (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for Carton, Glass, Plastic and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Competitive Scenario Table 86: Leading Players in the Italian Juice Market (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Off-Trade Value Sales for Conserve Italia, Zuegg SpA and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) B.Market Analytics Table 87: Italian Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 88: Italian Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 89: Italian 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 7.4.4 The United Kingdom A.Market Analysis Market Overview Snapshots Table 90: UK Fruit Juice and Nectars Market by Juice Type (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for Apple, Berries, Flavor Mixes, Orange, Pineapple, and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 91: UK Fruit Juice and Nectars Market by Packaging Type (2017): Percentage Breakdow nof Volume Sales for Carton, Glass, Plastic and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Juice Production to Experience Moderate Gains Adverse Effect of Government’s Health Campaign on Fruit and Juices Market Juice and Smoothie Bars Industry Enjoys Healthy Growth Competitive Scenario Table 92: Leading Players in the UK Juice Market (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Off-trade Value Sales for Tesco, Tropicana UK and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Newcomers Make Strong Gains in Fruit and Juices Market B.Market Analytics Table 93: UK Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 94: UK Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 95: UK 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 7.4.5 Spain A.Market Analysis Market Overview Table 96: Spanish Fruit Juice & Nectars Market by Packaging Type (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for Carton, Glass and Plastic (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 97: Spanish Fruit Juice & Nectars Market by Juice Type (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for Apple, Flavor Mixes, Orange, Peach, Pineapple and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) B.Market Analytics Table 98: Spanish Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 99: Spanish Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 100: Spanish 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 7.4.6 Poland A.Market Analysis Fruit & Vegetable Juices Market Experiences Rapid Growth Table 101: Polish Fruit Juice & Nectars Market by Juice Type (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for Apple, Flavor Mixes, Grapefruit, Orange, Vegetable and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 102: Polish Fruit Juice & Nectars Market by Packaging Type (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for Carton, Glass, Plastic, and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) B.Market Analytics Table 103: Polish Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 104: Polish Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 105: Polish 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 7.4.7 Russia A.Market Analysis A Fast Growing Market in Europe Competitive Scenario Table 106: Leading Players in the Russian Juice Market (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Off-trade Value Sales for Lebedyansky OAO, Multon ZAO, Wimm-Bill-Dann Producty Pitaniya and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) B.Market Analytics Table 107: Russian Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 108: Russian Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 109: Russian 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 7.4.8 Rest of Europe A.Market Analysis Overview of Select Regional Markets Belgium Finland Greece Table 110: Leading Players in the Greek Juice Market (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for Coca Cola Hellenic Bottling Co SA, and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Hungary Ireland Turkey Regional Players B.Market Analytics Table 111: Rest of European Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 112: Rest of European Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 113: Rest of European 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and 7.5 Asia-Pacific A.Market Analysis Asia-Pacific : Fastest Growing Market for Fruit and Vegetable Juices Favorable Demographics Drive Demand B.Market Analytics Table 114: Asia-Pacific Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Geographic Region – China , India and Rest of Asia-Pacific Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2015 through 2022 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 115: Asia-Pacific Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Geographic Region – China , India and Rest of Asia-Pacific Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2 through 2014 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 116: Asia-Pacific 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for China , India and Rest of Asia-Pacific Markets for Years 2009, 2018 & 2022 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 117: Asia-Pacific Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 118: Asia-Pacific Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 119: Asia-Pacific 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and 7.5.1 China A.Market Analysis The Largest Market for Fruit and Vegetable Juices Table 120: China Accounts for about 1/5th Share of the World Fruit and Vegetable Juices Market: Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for China and Rest of World (2018E & 2022P) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Juice Production Continues to Witness Robust Growth China’s Leadership in Apple Juice Production Marketplace Juice Drinks Losing Share to Healthier Beverages Consumer Trends Shorten Product Life Cycles, Innovation Key to Sustaining Share B.Market Analytics Table 121: Chinese Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 122: Chinese Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 123: Chinese 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 7.5.2 India A.Market Analysis India – A Promising Market for Fruit & Vegetable Juices High Sugar Content in Juices – A Emerging Concern for the Juice Market Lack of Profitability in Fruit Cultivation Presents Challenge for India’s Juice Makers Competitive Scenario Table 124: Leading Players in the Indian Packaged Juice Market (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Dabur India, PepsiCo, ITC and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Leading Orange Juice Brands in India B.Market Analytics Table 125: Indian Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 126: Indian Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 127: Indian 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) 7.5.3 Rest of Asia-Pacific A.Market Analysis Focus on Select Markets Australia Health Concerns Continue to Affect Sales in the Juice Market Hong Kong Malaysia New Zealand Thailand Growing Health Concerns Propel Demand for Sugar-Free and Natural Fruit Juices Taiwan Introduction of Innovative Labeling Regulations and Marketing Strategies Propel Demand for Juices B.Market Analytics Table 128: Rest of Asia-Pacific Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 129: Rest of Asia-Pacific Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 130: Rest of Asia-Pacific 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and 7.6 Middle East & Africa A.Market Analysis A Market Laden with Opportunities Focus on Select Regional Markets Kenya Juice Drinks Market Witnesses Healthy Growth South Africa A Promising Juice Market Private Label Juice Records Strong Performance South Africa – A Major Exporter of Juice Products to Africa Kuwait Saudi Arabia B.Market Analytics Table 131: Middle East & African Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 132: Middle East & African Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 133: Middle East & African 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and 7.7 Latin America A.Market Analysis A High Growth Market Juices Production Remains Robust B.Market Analytics Table 134: Latin American Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Geographic Region – Brazil and Rest of Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2015 through 2022 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 135: Latin American Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Geographic Region – Brazil and Rest of Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Million Liters for Years 2009 through 2014 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 136: Latin American 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Brazil and Rest of Latin America Markets for Years 2009, 2018 & 2022 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 137: Latin American Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 138: Latin American Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 139: Latin American 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and 7.7.1 Brazil A.Market Analysis Market Overview Brazil – The Leading Producer of Fresh Oranges and Orange Juice Table 140: Brazil Fresh Oranges Production in ‘000 Metric Tons for Years 2012/13 through 2016/17 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 141: Brazil Orange Juice Production in ‘000 Metric Tons for Years 2012/13 through 2016/17 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Volatile Economy Impacts Market Growth Competitive Scenario B.Market Analytics Table 142: Brazilian Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) Table 143: Brazilian Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 144: Brazilian 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% juice and 7.7.2 Rest of Latin America A.Market Analysis Focus on Select Regional Markets Argentina Mexico Sugar-Free and Low Calorie Juices Exhibit Considerable Growth Competitive Scenario Table 145: Leading Players in the Mexican Juice Market (2017): Percentage Breakdown of Volume Sales for Grupo Jumex, Grupo Lala , Jugos del Valle and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) B.Market Analytics Table 146: Rest of Latin American Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 147: Rest of Latin American Historic Review for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% Juice and Table 148: Rest of Latin American 14-Year Perspective for Fruit & Vegetable Juices by Type – Percentage Breakdown of Volume Consumption for Fruit Juices (100% Juice, 25-99% juice and 8. COMPANY PROFILES Total Companies Profiled: 175 (including Divisions/Subsidiaries – 199) The United States (66) Canada (3) Japan (10) Europe (72) – France (3) – Germany (15) – The United Kingdom (14) – Italy (13) – Spain (3) – Rest of Europe (24) Asia-Pacific (Excluding Japan) (37) Middle East (2) Latin America (7) Africa (2) Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p0397828 About Reportlinker ReportLinker is an award-winning market research solution. Reportlinker finds and organizes the latest industry data so you get all the market research you need – instantly, in one place.

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Discovering hawker food in Singapore, a culture worth preserving — and devouring

Lifestyle Discovering hawker food in Singapore, a culture worth preserving — and devouring
The takeout spread from Fook Kin on Killiney Road in Singapore. The Cantonese-style barbecue restaurant makes a cha siu roast pork (center right) with an unusually generous ratio of char and fat to meat.
TESSA PIERSON, LOS ANGELES TIMES/TNS
By DAVID PIERSON | Los Angeles Times |
SINGAPORE — There’s little that can prepare an outsider for the onslaught of food in Singapore.
Every stroll through this city shrouded in tropical heat is interrupted by open-air food centers, coffee shops and restaurants vying for your stomach’s attention.
Seek sanctuary inside an air-conditioned mall and you’ll be greeted by sprawling subterranean food halls that seem to span the distance between subway stops.
Dining out is a way of life in Singapore. One in four residents say they eat out daily, a recent Nielsen survey found. Many choose food centers, which aren’t your hot dog on a stick-variety mall food courts, but keepers of a proud local cuisine and tradition cobbled by generations of the city’s Chinese, Indian and Malay inhabitants.
The abundance and convenience of food in Singapore can be a shock to the system — particularly for someone like me who has lived in a community of tract homes in Santa Clarita, Calif., where dining out meant choosing between two equidistant McDonald’s.
I admit I have a weakness for Big Macs, but it’s no contest when outside my hotel on a stretch of Killiney Road I can choose between world-class satay, chicken rice, curry laksa, prawn noodles, fish ball soup, dim sum, Indian prata, chicken biryani, beef rendang or Cantonese barbecue – all for about the same price as a six-piece Chicken McNugget meal.
Straying from my neighborhood has been even more rewarding.
There were the piquant chili crab and salted egg yolk prawns at the East Coast Seafood Center that looks out onto the Singapore Strait, where at night, the tankers and cargo ships are anchored so close together they look like a neighboring city.
There was the crunchy fried Hainan chicken wing vendor at the Toa Payoh Lorong Food Center, who commands such a loyal following that customers line up long before opening to beat the crowds.
At Golden Mile Food Center, I took my first bites of Peranakan food, a centuries-old cuisine born out of the intermarrying of Chinese and Malays. The cuisine, which requires meticulous preparation, is slowly fading from fashion along with the few remaining chefs who know the recipes by heart.
“You’ve only scratched the surface,” I was told by K.F. Seetoh, an evangelist of Singaporean food culture, founder of the Makansutra food guide and the subject of profiles by R.W. Apple Jr. and Calvin Trillin.
Over a plate of beet red mee goreng, a local Indian take on stir-fried Chinese noodles, Seetoh spoke about a looming crisis. The storied ranks of Singapore’s food vendors, known here as hawkers, are aging faster than they can be replaced.
Their children, equipped with elite educations and living in one of the most affluent countries in the world, have little interest in working 12-hour shifts in 10-by-10-feet hawker stands in unrelenting heat.
“Thousands of old heritage hawkers – proud, loud, humble, authentic – are marching toward a cliff,” said Seetoh, who has been keeping a running tab on his Facebook page of the latest dining destinations to close. “They’re going to go down and into the sunset. Behind them are perhaps 10 new hawkers to replace them.”
Without them, Singapore wouldn’t have its frenetic dining scene where unpretentious food reigns and the instinct to eat elbow-to-elbow with strangers forms the basis of community.
Hawkers typically specialize in one thing, like a Hainanese chicken rice or bak kut teh, a pork rib soup, and rarely charge more than $4 a portion. Their artisan’s way of cooking set standards high, making it hard to find a bad meal in this island nation.
“We have professors coming from the U.S. and they go to our canteen here and they say, ‘This is restaurant-type food and you pay two U.S. dollars. You guys are spoiled,’” said Malone-Lee Lai Choo, an expert on urban development at the National University of Singapore.
Hawkers are the descendants of itinerant street food vendors who predate Singapore’s founding in 1965. After nationhood, they were licensed and housed in pavilions located in or near public housing, where 80 percent of Singaporeans live today.
That gave the masses access to cheap, clean and abundant food that helped power Singapore’s productivity. By taking away the chore of cooking, it enabled both spouses to work. Government statistics show about 65 percent of Singaporean households with children include two working parents. That’s a rate slightly higher than in the U.S., according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Buying groceries can also cost more than dining out, providing another reason to eschew the kitchen.
The Singaporean government has long played a heavy hand in the way its citizens eat. It has to, it says, for the sake of food security in a country of merely 278 square miles and no room for farms. More than 90 percent of everything Singaporeans consume is imported from countries such as Malaysia, Indonesia, China and Brazil.
After perhaps underselling its appeal, the Singaporean government has jumped on the hawker bandwagon in recent years. It established a hawker incubation program that allowed applicants to lease a stall at half-price for six months to encourage a new generation. And it launched a campaign to include hawker culture into UNESCO’s List of Intangible Cultural Heritage alongside things such as France’s gastronomic dining and Italy’s Neapolitan pizza. Singapore’s submission is due in March.
“You see any restaurant food in ‘Crazy Rich Asians’?” said Seetoh, a proponent of the UNESCO bid. “Nada. It’s all chili crab and satay. Hawker food is a national icon.”
It remains to be seen whether Singapore can retain its hawkers’ artisan roots. It’s easier today to buy staples such as fish balls wholesale than it is to make them from scratch. More food service companies are operating air-conditioned facsimiles of the hawker centers and supplying the vendors there with semi-prepared meals from a central commissary.
There are 114 hawker centers in Singapore, each housing 100 to 200 stalls outfitted with sinks and a few burners. One of the older locations, Golden Mile Food Center on Beach Road, was built in 1975 under public housing that sits on former waterfront property long obscured by reclaimed land.
On a recent weekday, the center’s two-story dining area hummed with the sound of undulating electric fans. Hundreds of diners, mostly workers from nearby office buildings, tucked into orders of clay pot rice, braised duck and lor mee, a popular dish of egg noodles submerged in a thick dark gravy.
To one side of the floor, in stall B1-30, stood Charlie Tan, chef and owner of Charlie’s Peranakan Food. Tan returned to cooking in 2017 after an eight-year hiatus triggered by poor health.
“I was burnt out,” said Tan, 62, whose perpetually furrowed brow is befitting of a man who works from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week. “This isn’t ordinary food. It’s very complex. It takes proper planning.”
Consider one of Tan’s most popular dishes, ayam buah keluak. The recipe relies on buah keluak, a walnut-size seed found in mangrove swamps that has to be soaked for days to remove poisonous toxins.
“Otherwise you get the runs,” Seetoh said.
Tan painstakingly empties the flesh of each seed, blending it with minced pork and shrimp before returning it into its casing. It’s then simmered in a sauce with chicken and served with rice and a Popsicle stick to scoop out the contents of the buah keluak. Sour, inky and earthy, it is like eating a mixture of Mexican mole and Filipino adobo.
Tan is one of only a few cooks with Peranakan bloodlines still preparing this kind of food in Singapore. He’s even more of an anomaly because he has a son who wants to take over the business.
Joshua Chen, 20, recently finished his two-year compulsory national military service. Now he stands at his father’s side, hoping to absorb the elder’s exacting techniques, one dish at a time.
“The passion is there,” Tan said of his son, “but I don’t see the flair yet.” Charlie Tan, left, is one of only a handful of hawkers in Singapore cooking Peranakan food, a meticulous cuisine influenced by centuries of Chinese and Malay intermarriage. K.F. Seetoh, right, a street food guide publisher, has championed hawker culture. DAVID PIERSON, LOS ANGELES TIMES/TNS article continues below

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Value dining is the way to go as 73% customers prefer to order or takeaway food

The Indian eating-out space will see more of value dining – striking a fair balance between fine dining and casual dining, experts discussed on the second day of the India Food Forum 2019.
“The new millennials in India are increasingly setting the agenda towards value dining,” said Anurag Katiar, Executive Director and CEO, deGustibus Hospitality.
Sreyoshi Maitra, Executive Director, IPSOS said that eating out is not really eating out as 37 percent of the customers prefer home delivery, 26 percent opt for takeaway and the remaining 37 percent dine-in. Maitra shared her insights on the basis of her online survey of 1000 customers across six metro cities.
“73 percent of the times, people tend to go in a group; remaining 27 percent times, people go solo – of which 23 percent is at home while 4 percent at a workplace. Within the group consumption of 73 percent, 64 percent is with family and friends at home,” Maitra added
According to the survey, only 21 percent of the times, children influence the choice of restaurant. “What’s on the table, is more important than where the table is, as the choice of food mattered more to 58 percent people while ambiance was of importance to only 15 percent,” Maitra elucidated.
However, building brands in the food service business is not only about service and location, but also about the touch, taste, smell, sight and the sound of the food. In this context, Consulting Nutritionist Aditi Prabhu pointed out that the food served at hospitals lacks any of these senses, adding that it is a huge market that needs re-positioning in terms of wellness.
While the Indian foodservice world has left consumers spoilt for choices, eating-out options are increasing by the day with new entrants and a wider variety of international and local cuisines.

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so, a portuguese, an indian, and an italian walk into a mexican kitchen

It sounds like the first line of a joke designed to set modern sensibilities on edge. But the Mexican kitchen was mine today, and my lunch theme was fusion across three continents.
Because I have reduced my daily eating hours from 2 in the afternoon to 7 in the evening, I want each of my meals to be a culinary adventure. And that has not been difficult.
I read some years back that the majority of any given American family’s meals are limited to only twelve recipes. (At least, that was more than the British average of nine.) When I read that, I thought it had to be wrong. But, after talking with friends and acquaintances, it appears to be accurate.
I need more variety than that to keep from getting bored with my food. That is probably one reason I bought an Instant pot. It was a new tool to induce me to experiment.
And that was exactly what I intended to do today for lunch.
I have seen several Instant Pot recipes for Indian pork dishes. Ground pork vindaloo is a popular choice.
Vindaloo has always intrigued me. Even though it sounds (and tastes) very Indian, it did not originate on the sub-continent. The Portuguese brought the method with them when they were the colonial masters of a good portion of India. The cuisine of the region around Goa (Portugal’s last colonial redoubt in India) still bears a notable Portuguese influence.
In the case of vindaloo, it is vinegar (an important component of Portuguese cooking) that defines the dish’s flavor layering — and origin. But the spices are what make it Indian — cumin, black mustard, paprika, coriander, cinnamon, black pepper, turmeric, and, of course, lots of cayenne. All of that is complemented with onion, ginger, and garlic.
That was the Indian and Portuguese contribution. But mine is a Mexican kitchen. As much as I like spicing up dishes with cayenne, it does not have the same depth of flavor as serranos and habaneros. (For those of you who believe habaneros have no Mexican roots, we will have to talk.)
I looked at those ingredients assembled next to my Instant Pot. By using my wok, I could have my meal in less than 10 minutes — and I could control the layering of the spices. The Instant Pot would reduce my ability to tinker, and would take longer.
One of the lessons I have learned with the Instant Pot is that buying a hammer does not turn everything into a nail. As wonderful as the Instant Pot is, it is not a universal cooker.
So, out came the wok. I decided to add a bit of Siam by cooking everything in sesame oil. It turned out to be a success — something I need to remember for future pork experiments.
And the Italy part of the meal? About a week ago, I bought a package of Italian gemelli pasta (one of my favorites) that would be the perfect shape to capture the subtle layers of the vindaloo. And it did.
The only surprise was inside the package. It does not bear on this tale, but it certainly will be a good topic for a future essay. The squeamish need not inquire further.
The meal was delicious. I do not think I have had a well-engineered Indian dish that I did not like.
My blogger pal Jennifer Rose suggested that I buy Urvashi Pitre’s The Keto Instant Pot Cookbook to get some ideas for my low carbohydrate-high fat food regimen. When I looked at the reviews on Amazon, I was amazed at the number of people who complained that the food was “too foreign” or “real weird” or “my family would never eat any of this stuff.”
I suspect the naysayers (some of whom most likely fall into the 9- or 12-recipe repertoire) were reacting more to the “Korean-style Galbijjim” or “Chicken Shawarma” than to “Corned Beef and Cabbage” or “Chicken Tortilla Soup.” But maybe they had something against Irish and Mexican cuisine along with their Asia-phobia.
Pitre’s Keto cookbook, along with her Indian cookbook, has given me some new leads for my “a-new-dish-every-day” method of cooking.
And it has reminded me that good food should not only please the tongue, it should be as fun to make as it is to eat.
Tomorrow? How about something German, Italian, and Japanese?
Or maybe not. It seems like the last time those forces combined, the dishes were not quite edible.

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Who is Backward? Naga Tribe’s 100% Biodegradable Festival Has Lessons For All of Us

in Environment , Lede , Nagaland , North East India A Good Celebration: Naga Tribe’s 100% Biodegradable Festival Has Lessons For All If the Konyaks can serve a sumptuous feast to hundreds without generating any non-biodegradable waste, then why can’t we? by Rinchen Norbu Wangchuk February 6, 2019, 10:56 am
T he Mon district, which lies in the northernmost reaches of Nagaland bordering Myanmar, is home to the Konyak Nagas.
This is a tribe whose members once adorned distinctive facial tattoos and were feared for their practice of headhunting—decapitating members of rival tribes.
“The Konyak belief was that the skull of a person has all the soul force of that being. This soul force is strongly affiliated with prosperity and fertility and is used for the benefit of the village, personal life, and crops,” explains Phejin Konyak, in a book titled ‘The Konyaks: Last of the Tattooed Headhunters.’
All that began to change in the 1870s with the arrival of British missionaries.
By 1935, the British banned headhunting and began actively discouraging their ancient customs and traditions. Eventually, by the 1960s, even their distinctive tattooing practices began to fade away.
Today, Mon is considered to be one of the most “backward” districts in India with infrastructure in a pitiable state and connectivity concerns galore.
Yes, in the conventional sense of the word, the district is “backward”—poor infrastructure, connectivity and literacy levels below 60%.
However, Vrinda Shukla, the Sub-Divisional Police Officer, stationed in Mon district for the past year, has a rather distinctive story to tell about the Konyak Nagas after witnessing ‘Lao-ong Mo,’ a significant festival celebrated after the completion of harvest.
It is traditionally observed by every Konyak household around late September.
In a recent column for The Indian Express , the IPS officer articulated why the Konyak Nagas have questioned her ideas of ‘modernity’ and ‘progress.’
Typically, all societies, tribal or otherwise, have two festivals a year pertaining to the sowing of the crops and harvesting.
For the Konyak Nagas, Aoling (Aoleang Monyu) is a festival held in the first week of April, when the rice crop is planted. The festival celebrates the arrival of spring, and the people pray for a good outcome of the upcoming harvest.
‘Lao-ong Mo’ is celebrated after the completion of harvest.
“Every family celebrates it on their own scale, but the festival I attended was conducted at the district headquarters by the Women’s Union and Konyak Students’ Union. This was a massive district-wide celebration of the festival,” says Vrinda, in a conversation with The Better India. Lao-ong Mo celebrations at Mon district headquarters which served approximately 200-250 guests including top dignitaries of the state. (Source: Vrinda Shukla)
“At this particular feast, I got to see and taste things I had never seen before. There were at least ten different forms of rice—all of them different in colour and texture. Similarly, I had the chance to partake in various kinds of millets in different shades—red, yellow and greenish,” she adds.
Mon is very famous for its yams. It produces the best yams in all of Nagaland, according to her.
“The organisers there made this absolutely delicious yam curry with an array of different meats in it. This is the speciality that goes with rice and millets. All sorts of fresh leaves are steamed and eaten. You will also find vegetables like pumpkin, squash, and other meat-related items made of beef. It’s a very colourful cuisine,” she says.
Remarkably, Vrinda describes the festivities she partook as 100% biodegradable. Even the extensive decorations set up were 100% plastic free. They only use bamboo and fresh produce for the decoration.
“It was stunning and breathtaking. We eat with the hands there, so there is very little question of cutlery, but they did have these trays that were made of bamboo. So, they were just like shallow plates. They use fresh green leaves extensively for packing and lining the plates. They use fresh green leaves extensively for packing and lining the plates. (Source: Vrinda Shukla)
They were beautifully lined. You barely had to upturn the tray into a large waste bin made of bamboo. The waste fell into the bin as a neat little packet with all the waste food secured inside, without any of it dirtying the tray, and without the cleaner having to touch any leftovers. The trays were being collected for sunning and reuse,” said Vrinda.
She also mentioned that the plates were made of bamboo, and the cups were carved out of bamboo stems. Barely any tissue paper was used because fresh water is freely available.
“Moreover, they have a wonderful mechanism of setting up piped water supply. They create various outlets for washing hands. That entire piped system is also made of bamboo,” she adds.
Speaking to the members of the Women’s Union, Vrinda found out that the attempt is to make their harvest festivals 100% biodegradable in memory of their ancestors who lived off the earth.
With the conclusion of the feast, Vrinda scanned the entire premises, and found that there wasn’t a single trace of any refuse, leaving her to reconfigure her notions of what constituted ‘backwardness.’
What she did witness was a real sensitivity among the Konyaks to their environment marked by a pattern of consumption that generates very little waste.
As per Konyak tradition, an anti-oxidant healthy black tea called Phiku is served after the feast concludes.
“There is some version of this tea served by every tribe, but the difference lies in their intensity. In Western Nagaland, a milder version is consumed, whereas the Konyaks drink a very stiff version of this tea which is quite bitter. The Konyaks call it ‘Phika’ while in some parts it’s called ‘Lalcha.’ There is no concept of dessert among these tribes. Drinking Phika is a huge part of the culture, and they have it after nearly every meal. It is an acquired taste for outsiders. I have come to love it very much. In fact, in my office, I serve Phika to everyone,” chuckles Vrinda.
So, what are the fundamental lessons learnt from witnessing the Konyaks celebrating Lao-ong Mo?
“Formal education and an abundance of resources are not necessary to have the right kind of sensitivity towards the environment. People from mainland India ought to internalise the attitude. If these people have the kind of access to resources, infrastructure and connectivity that the rest of the country does possess, there’s no saying where they would be. Shortage of resources and the lack of connectivity don’t stand in the way of that sensitivity,” she says.
The Konyak Nagas certainly have a thing or two to teach urban communities in India, who are having trouble managing the unnecessary and excess non-biodegradable waste they generate.
Abiding by their traditional practices, the members of this tribal community have shown that festivals can be celebrated without generating any non-biodegradable waste.
Also Read: Mizo Peace Accord: The Intriguing Story Behind India’s Most Enduring Peace Initiative!
Thus, in some ways, they have subverted the notion of “backwardness” often attached to them.
So, the next time you host a party or get together, remember the costs you’re inflicting on the environment and figure out a way to make it a more sustainable affair.
If the Konyaks can do it, why can’t you?
(Edited by Gayatri Mishra) contact@thebetterindia.com, or connect with us on Facebook and Twitter .

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Control the Spice

Spice 8’s Better Than Pizza was served on naan, with a tikka tomato sauce. Photo by Velton Hayworth.
Spice 8 Indian Fusion Grill
5633 N Tarrant Pkwy, FW. 817-849-9004. 11am-9pm Sun-Thu, 11am-10pm Fri-Sat. All major credit cards accepted.
Most restaurants serving Indian food tend to be a little more formal in appearance than Spice 8 Indian Fusion Grill . Inside its small, brightly lit storefront in a Keller strip-mall, there’s no elaborate buffet setup or white tablecloths. The service model could be described as Desi meets Chipotle – order at the counter from a pre-set list of ingredients and build your own bowl or wrap. But Spice 8 diverts from the fast-casual model thanks to an additional entree menu (a choice of protein plus two sides) and a limited selection of beer and wine.
The menu (and the name) derives from the eight traditional Indian spices used in most of the kitchen’s fare: cardamom, cayenne pepper, cinnamon, clove, cumin, fenugreek, star anise, and turmeric. Pizza, rice bowls, wraps, and Himalayan dumplings (known as momo ) aren’t usually featured on an Indian restaurant’s menu, but they’re welcome entry-level dishes for someone new to the cuisine.
Momo immigrated to India when the Dalai Lama and his followers were expelled from Tibet by the Chinese government five decades ago. Spice 8’s version of the pan-fried appetizer tasted cool and a little bitter, like egg rolls without the crunch of cabbage and a dunk in the deep fryer. The slightly damp, gooey wrappers didn’t crisp up much during the pan fry and only became soggier the longer they sat.
The veggie super bowl was a delight. The flavor of the sweet, smoky elixir that enveloped the tofu was reminiscent of a good barbecue sauce. The chunks of soy were cooked so artfully, I might have thought I was eating chicken – even my guest who seems genetically programmed to dislike tofu liked what he tasted. Chickpeas sitting on a bed of lightly spiced jasmine rice rounded out the bowl.
Spice 8’s take on pizza was genius. Called Better than Pizza, naan flatbread and a tikka tomato sauce arrived topped with lamb (or your choice of protein), and the whole thing was covered in mozzarella cheese and sliced like pizza. The bite-sized chunks of lamb were thankfully bereft of any trace of a gamy taste. The tikka sauce was inventive, and the crunchy garlic naan proved to be a sturdy, flavorful base. Be warned: One of my dining companions was disappointed by the sweetness of the tikka. The more cloying qualities of the cinnamon- and cardamom-spiked sauce dominated the flavor of her dish.
Samosas are like empanadas, if the empanadas were stuffed with potatoes, onions, and chickpeas. Spice 8’s piquant, crispy-crusted savory pastries were presented halved, topped with more chickpeas, and served with a cooling mint sauce that beautifully balanced the after-burn of the cayenne. Samosas may be street food, but the presentation here definitely needed a knife, fork, a bunch of napkins –– and frequent helpings of naan bread to cool down the intense spice sting.
On the creamy butter chicken entree, the cayenne was the most assertive seasoning, but a refreshing hit of cinnamon and clove balanced the heat. The poofy naan bread and more jasmine rice helped sop the gravy and further dulled the heat. A chickpea side flavored with tomato, cumin, and cardamom was so inspiring that we all wanted a little more.
Spice cowards take heed: Even when we attempted to order a mild dish for the heat-averse diner, most of the meal was fiery. Vegetarians and vegans will find a lot to enjoy here, and, although there’s no beef on the menu, so will carnivores.
Spice 8’s counter presentation, fusion of traditional Indian cuisine and Western presentation, and modern industrial vibe make it a welcome addition to the neighborhood. There’s no need to stand on formality here.
Spice 8 Indian Fusion Grill
Veggie super bowl $5.25

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10 1-For-1 Dining Deals Including Weekend Hotel Buffets To Treat Bae Like Royalty With Maybank Card

10 1-For-1 Dining Deals Including Weekend Hotel Buffets To Treat Bae Like Royalty With Maybank Card 7th February 2019 SHARES 1-for-1 dining deals for dates with bae
As the adage goes, “A way to a man’s heart is through his stomach.” This rings true for my husband, as our dates are always centred around a hearty meal. While we don’t usually celebrate Valentine’s Day, we do make it a point to eat out at least once a month to simply reconnect. But with Maybank Cards’ 1-for-1 dining deals , we can now pak tor every week, as we save a bomb by paying for just one diner each time! 1. Porta (Park Hotel Clarke Quay)
Porta at Park Hotel Clarke Quay is great for a romantic dinner date with your beau. Specialising in European fare, the dishes here are both hearty and delicious. Melt-in-your-mouth tender is the Iberian Pork Secreto ($26++) , featuring thick slices of pork shoulder blade with Pommery mustard and a tangy mash. A dish that won’t go wrong is the Spring Chicken ($24++) that comes with a scrummy taro puree and roasted vegetables.
From now until 31 March 2019, spend a minimum of $80 in a single receipt to enjoy 1-for-1 on all meat dishes here! There’s a max of five redemptions per table, so it’s best you pair up with other couples to make dining here more worthwhile.
Address: 1 Unity Street, Park Hotel Clarke Quay, Singapore 237983 Opening hours: Daily 11am to 10:30pm Tel: 6593 8855 Website 2. J65 (Hotel Jen Tanglin Singapore)
J65 is where you should be, if you’re looking to celebrate your weekend with a feast. Their Saturday High Tea Buffet ($65++) , which starts during lunchtime, features a selection of local favourites such as bak kut teh, nasi lemak, popiah and satay. There’s even a DIY counter where you can build your own kueh pie tee. Thereafter, wash it all down with a cup of their milky teh tarik .
You don’t have to wait until payday to dine here, as you can enjoy 1-for-1 from now until 31 March 2019! Those coming by for their weekday buffets will get 50% off every second diner, up until 28 February 2019. Do note that blackout dates apply on 4, 5 and 6 February 2019.
Address: 1A Cuscaden Road, Level 1, Hotel Jen Tanglin Singapore, Singapore 249716 Buffet hours: Sat 12pm to 3pm Tel: 6831 4374 Website 3. Fart Tartz
Plan a cafe date with your girlfriend and head over to Fart Tartz . The laidback eatery pushes out tasty eats that will def’ fill you up well. If cheese and pasta are your weakness, then you will love the Pulled Duckie M&C ($15.90) . The bold flavours from the duck help balance out the thick layer of creamy cheese, preventing it from being jelak . On the other hand, the Sambal Sea Catch ($16.90) is a great option for spice lovers, and features linguine tossed in a fiery sambal olive oil blend.
You can rest easy knowing you don’t have to spend a bomb here, as you get 1-for-1 on all main courses . This deal runs all the way until 31 December 2019, so swing by whenever you desire!
Address: 150 South Bridge Road, #01-16, Fook Hai Building, Singapore 058727 Opening hours: Mon-Wed 10am to 9pm, Thur-Fri 10am to 10pm, Sat-Sun 10am to 8pm Tel: 6493 2977 Website | Full list of outlets 4. The Song of India
A one Michelin-starred restaurant for three years, The Song of India pushes out legitimately good Indian food. And the best way to sample them all is at their weekday lunch buffet ($36.90++) . Here, you will find traditional Indian grub such as Paneer Gulnaar Tikka, Lamb Chop Masala, Mint Fish Tikka and Shaam Severa Kofta. Aside from their fragrant biryani, each table is also given a basket of naan to mop up the curries.
Maybank Cardmembers can dine at this award-winning restaurant without busting the bank, thanks to the 1-for-1 weekday lunch buffet . Plus, they will also cinch 10% off any à la carte dishes ordered! The offer is valid until 31 December 2019, and extends up to a maximum of 10 hungry guests.
Address: 33 Scotts Road, Singapore 228226 Buffet hours: Mon-Fri 12pm to 3pm Tel: 6836 0055 Website 5. The Square (Furama RiverFront Singapore)
Fuel up on a healthy spread of international and local dishes at The Square . Their lunch and dinner ($78++) buffets are worth every penny, as there are plenty of premium ingredients gracing the line-up. For instance, their piquant laksa features a whole piece of abalone, while their prawn noodles come with a massive crayfish. For those who love snacking on salted egg chips, you will be pleased to know that they also have a moreish wok-fried crayfish in salted egg!
Bring a friend along when you dine here from now until 31 March 2019, as you get 1-for-1 on their lunch and dinner buffets when you pay with your Maybank Credit or Debit Card. Those born in February and March are also rewarded with a complimentary cake on their birthday month, so long as their dinner party has a total of four diners.
Address: 405 Havelock Road, Level 2, Furama RiverFront, Singapore 169633 Buffet hours: Daily 12pm to 2:30pm, 6pm to 10:30pm Tel: 6739 6468 Website 6. Atrium Restaurant (Holiday Inn Singapore Atrium)
Gather your squad and indulge in a decadent feast at Atrium Restaurant ’s lunch ($58++) and dinner buffets ($88++ for Sun-Thur, $98++ for Fri-Sat) . Pushing out a range of international and local nosh, the buffets will be enjoyed by all types of diners. In February, you can look forward to delicious CNY grub such as bak kwa and yu sheng, alongside their signature chilli crab and roasted lamb leg.
Those settling the bill with their Maybank Credit or Debit Card will receive 1-for-1 on both the lunch and dinner buffet , all year round until 31 December 2019. There’s no limit to how many friends you can bring along, so call along everyone you know!
Address: 317 Outram Road, Holiday Inn Singapore Atrium, Singapore 169075 Buffet hours: Mon-Fri 12pm to 2:30pm, 6:30pm to 10:30pm, Sat-Sun 12pm to 3:30pm, 6:30pm to 10:30pm Tel: 6731 7172 Website 7. Cat & the Fiddle
Serving one of the best cheesecakes in Singapore is Cat & the Fiddle . Initially an online bakery, they now have a brick and mortar store in Clarke Quay, where you are able to order a single slice of their cheesy creations! Our favourite is The Modern Duke’s Pudding ($4.90 for a slice, $38.90 for a whole cake) , which is essentially an Oreo cheesecake. We also liked the Milo Dinosaur ($5.90 for a slice, $35.90 for a whole cake) that’s covered in Milo powder and features a malty centre.
Get 1-for-1 on their sliced cheesecakes when you pay with your Maybank Credit or Debit Card between now and 31 March 2019. There’s no limit to how many cheesecakes you can order, so get all the flavours for your fambam to try!
Address: 6 Eu Tong Sen Street, #01-41, Clarke Quay Central, Singapore 059817 Buffet hours: Daily 11am to 10pm Tel: 9155 7284 Website 8. Cocobolo Poolside Bar + Grill (Park Hotel Clarke Quay)
BBQ under the stars at Cocobolo Poolside Bar + Grill . Held only on Friday and Saturday, their hearty Weekend BBQ Buffet ($72++) presents a line-up of tantalising grilled delights. Some items found sizzling on the grill are New Zealand Angus beef, chicken skewers and grilled sausages. There are also oceanic gems that are char-grilled to perfection, including stingray with spicy shrimp paste and tiger prawns with saffron spices.
Make your date an even better one when you pay with your Maybank Credit or Debit Card, as you get 1-for-1 on the buffet until 31 March 2019. Do note that advanced reservation is required, and you would need to buy $20 worth of drinks in a single receipt to enjoy this sweet deal.
Address: 1 Unity Street, Park Hotel Clarke Quay, Singapore 237983 Buffet hours: Fri-Sat 6:30pm to 10:30pm Tel: 6593 8855 Website 9. Kintamani Indonesian Restaurant (Furama RiverFront Singapore)
Halal-certified Kintamani Indonesian Restaurant ’s lunch and dinner buffet ($65++) presents a bevy of Balinese and Indonesian cuisine that will tease your palate. Start off your meal with the Sop Buntut, which features tender chunks of oxtail in a clear yet robust broth. Thereafter, pile your plates high with dishes such as Tahu Telur Surabaya and Mie Kocok Bandung. The latter is a unique noodle dish comprising thick sweet potato gravy.
Dining here is cheaper than flying to Bali, especially when you get 1-for-1 on the lunch and dinner buffets ! Valid until 31 March 2019, February and March babies can also enjoy a complimentary cake on their birthday month when they dine here with three friends.
Address: 405 Havelock Road, Level 3, Furama RiverFront, Singapore 169633 Buffet hours: Daily 12pm to 2:30pm, 6pm to 10:30pm Tel: 6739 6463 Website 10. Charcoal Thai
For my fambam and I, mookata sessions are always a meat-heavy affair. And a place we love to go for this Thai BBQ is Charcoal Thai . Their Mookata Set ($39.95++) , which can feed two hungry people, comprises a selection of marinated meats and fresh seafood. Our favourites are the tom yum chicken thigh and black pepper pork!
Maybank Cardmembers can feast to their hearts’ content without breaking the bank, thanks to the 1-for-1 deal on every mookata set ordered! Just remember to quote “Maybank Promotion” upon ordering.
Address: 321 Clementi Avenue 3, #02-08, 321 Clementi Cinema Mall, Singapore 129905 Opening hours: Daily 11am to 10:30pm Tel: 6250 9298 Website Plan a date with these 1-for-1 deals
Go on a date without busting the bank when you become a Maybank Cardmember! Both Maybank Credit and Debit Cards offer these great deals, so you will def’ find a card to suit your needs.
Apply now to receive a complimentary gift**!
Alternatively, SMS “MBAPPLY EBA ” to 79898 or visit maybank.sg/applycards for details. Find out more about Maybank Cards’ dining deals*!
If you’re like me and plan your 2019 holiday at the start of the year, then signing up for the Maybank Horizon Visa Signature Card is the way to go. This snazzy card gives you 3.2 air miles (8X TREATS Points) for every dollar spent on dining transactions^.
*Terms and Conditions apply. Visit maybank.sg/dine for full details.
**Terms and Conditions apply. Visit maybank.sg/applycards for details.
^Dining transactions must be charged at participating Eating Places and Restaurants classified under Merchant Category Code (MCC) 5812. Other Terms and Conditions apply. Visit maybank.sg/hvstnc for full details.
Photos taken by Pepita Hope Wauran . This post is brought to you by Maybank Cards. 10

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India Food Forum 2019: Alliance avenues with foreign partners to expand food market in India

RetailEX ASEAN 2018 – The largest annual international trade exhibition and conference in SE Asia
India Food Forum 2019 identified avenues for partnerships in food, beverages and food service industry with Ambassadors, Trade Commissioners and Consul Generals of several countries and highlighted how Embassies and Trade Commissions can play a more pro-active role to facilitate such alliances. Emerging as major market of the world, India offers huge opportunities for manufacturers, producers and providers of products and services from across the globe to sell here or partner with Indian companies to serve this market.
Acceptance of multinational culture, a growing taste for foods from across the globe, increasing inflow of foreign nationals, willingness to experiment new cuisines and more over avenues to market new products further add to the opportunity.
The session was moderated by Amit Lohani, Convener, FIFI. Post Views: 21 Please leave this field empty Name * Check your inbox or spam folder now to confirm your subscription on our Retail News. About us
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