12 Different Types of Beans and Legumes

12 Different Types of Beans and Legumes

12 Different Types of Beans and Legumes 12 Different Types of Beans and Legumes Prev Article – Advertisement –
How often have you come across the terms “legume” and “beans” being used in a single food recipe, leaving you all confused and perplexed? Because according to commonly held beliefs, beans and legumes are the same thing, right?
Well, not exactly.
There is indeed a lot of confusion surrounding the two terms because some people believe them to be the same thing, while others think they are completely different from one another.
In simple words, legumes are plants of the legume family that contain fruit growing in the pods. On the other hand, beans are edible seeds from different varieties of legume plants.
Legume is more like an umbrella term under which you’ll find peas, peanuts, lentils, and beans. While peas have a spherical shape, beans sport a kidney, or an oval shape and lentils are lens or disk-shaped.
In essence, all beans are legumes, but legumes are not really beans. Table of Contents Green Pea Back in the Days
Several fossil records and scientific studies of plant genetics have revealed that the first-ever appearance of the legume species happened some 59 million years ago. These species basically broke off from their flowering-plant ancestors and acquired some distinct genetic traits along the way, making them quite unique.
Over time, the species obtained more and more legume-like characteristics, resulting in about 20,000 different species that we know of today.
While the cultivation of beans began as a basic dietary staple almost 20,000 years back in numerous Eastern cultures, the initial cultivation of beans took place about 5000 years back, initially in Peruvian and Mexican civilizations and then becoming highly popular in Inca and Aztec cultures. Types Pink Bean
Also commonly known as ‘chili beans’, pink beans are pinkish-brown beans that are plump and roundish-oval in shape.
They are particularly popular in the Caribbean countries for their rich, meaty flavor. They are usually a key ingredient in most Old West recipes, Mexican-American cuisine and barbeque-inspired dishes. Pink beans appear to be quite similar to pinto beans, particularly in size, so pinto beans and kidney beans are often used as a substitute for pink beans.
An interesting fact about pink beans is that they are also often called “Santa Maria pinquitos” because they are the star ingredient in most barbeque dishes in California’s Santa Maria Valley.
On average, this bean plant grows up to 14 inches, making it about 36 cm tall and produces pods that are 9 cm long.
They have a very fine and smooth texture that becomes tender and turns into a reddish-brown color when cooked. Black Bean
These are small ovals with grayish-cream flesh and deep black skins. Black beans fall under the category of legumes and are also known as ‘turtle beans’ owing to their super hard and shell-like appearance. They are native to the Americas and popularly used in Latin American Cuisine but can also be found in South Louisiana cuisines.
Black beans have a soft texture with a sweet, earthy and mild flavor. They are commonly valued for their high fiber and protein content which makes them extremely nutritious and healthy. Some of its key benefits include strengthening of bones, reduced blood pressure, prevention of cancer, weight loss, and diabetes control.
soup ingredient and are typically featured in the black bean soup, a traditional dish in Cuba that is often served with white rice. Roman Bean
More commonly known as “cranberry beans” or “speckled sugar beans”, roman beans are oval-shaped with a smooth texture, pretty pinkish color and gorgeous dark-red speckles or streaks. They have a sweet, mild, chestnut-like flavor and are perfect for salads, pasta, soups or simply as an evening snack.
Roman beans originated from Columbia and soon went on to become extremely popular in Italy where they are commonly called “borlotti”.
Interestingly, when these beans are cooked, all of their specks and streaks just vanish, resulting in a darker and a more even color. Navy Bean
These are also known as haricot beans, pea beans, pearl haricot bean, and white pea bean and are mainly native to the Americas where they were also first domesticated.
Navy beans are normally small and dry, and often sport a creamy white color. They have a flattened, oval shape, contain a dense, smooth texture and a mild flavor. They are mostly consumed for their numerous nutritional benefits, some of which decrease the risk of heart-related ailments, stabilized blood sugar levels, improved memory, and a rich source of iron and fiber.
Some interesting ways to include navy beans in your diet are adding them to salads, making a delicious sandwich spread, mixing them in soups, etc. Red Bean
Small, round and red in color, Red Beans have to be the most popular among all types of beans. They are also known as “Adzuki” and have a sweet, nutty taste. Red beans are used in a variety of Creole and Southern dishes, particularly because of their unique taste and numerous health benefits.
Red beans are often used interchangeably with red kidney beans because of the extreme similarity between the two. They are believed to initially have been cultivated in East Asia and the Himalayas. Their popularity soon led them to New Orleans where red beans are now a local favorite and are used in a number of dishes and cuisines such as a red bean curry, soup, stew, and even hummus. Mung Bean
Also known as maash or the green gram, the mung bean is primarily cultivated in Pakistan, Nepal, India, Bangladesh, South Asia, Sri Lanka, and China. They are small and round in shape and have a slightly sweet taste, which makes them ideal for both savory and sweet dishes. They are often sold as dried beans or as fresh sprouts.
The green mung bean is packed with nutrients, making them one of the healthiest food ingredients. It has a variety of health benefits including reduced risk of chronic diseases, prevention of heat strokes, controlled blood pressure, and better digestive health.
Some of the key nutrients found in mung bean are fiber, proteins, potassium, zinc, copper, magnesium, and vitamins B2, B3, B5, and B6.
Mung beans are popularly used in dishes like falafel, mung curries, bean stew, in salads, etc. Split Mung Bean
While whole mung beans have green skin, when this skin comes off during processing, the beans end up splitting, hence the name ‘split mung bean’. Once split, they reveal a yellow color which varies according to the mung variety.
It has quite a similar flavor to mild and sweet peas and is widely consumed as a rich source of protein in most Asian countries.
Split mung beans contain large amounts of dietary fiber, proteins and other essential nutrients that make them quite a healthy choice for vegetarians and vegans. They are largely cultivated in Southeast Asia and India.
They are popularly used to make mung stew, mung hummus, falafel, protein pancakes, and mung soup. Soybean
Also called soya bean or soja bean, soybean is believed to be the most popular of all beans. This importance stems from the fact that soybeans provide the highest amount of vegetable protein and are also used as a core ingredient in a number of chemical products.
Soybeans were first domesticated by Chinese farmers somewhere in 1100 BC, and they initially originated in Southeast Asia. Interestingly, China was the biggest supplier of soybeans till World War II halted their supply, and after that, soybean cultivation started taking off in America.
These beans don’t particularly have an intrinsic taste of their own, simply because of their inability to absorb taste as many other beans do. So you can use them to make a soybean curry or soybean hummus. Fava Bean
These are broad green legumes that are extremely popular in a variety of Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines.
Fava bean is often referred to as the “magic bean” primarily due to its nutritional and health benefits including low blood cholesterol levels and improved digestion. They are also a rich source of proteins, vitamins, dietary fibers, and essential minerals like manganese, iron, and copper.
They are often used in pasta and vegetable soups; however, they are believed to have quite a bitter aftertaste.
In several Latin countries, fava beans are consumed as a popular snack, usually dried and salted. Whereas in Central Mexico, these beans are mashed into a paste and featured in corn-flour based recipes and snacks. Chick Pea
Commonly cultivated in the Middle East and the Mediterranean, chickpeas are known by a variety of other names including garbanzo bean, gram, Egyptian pea, Bengal gram, and garbanzo. They are yellowish in color and round in shape with a buttery texture and a nutty taste.
Like several other types of legumes including beans and lentils, chickpeas are also loaded with a variety of key minerals and vitamins, most notably proteins and fiber. Some of their overriding benefits include enhanced heart health, reduced inflammation, and cholesterol levels, weight management, prevention of cancer, and many more.
Chickpeas are often featured as the key ingredient in dishes like hummus and falafel but are also a great addition to salads, stews, and soups. Split Pea
Split peas occur in two main colors, green and yellow, and are typically known as field peas, which are grown specifically for drying purposes. They are known to be natural sources of the highest amounts of dietary fiber and key proteins.
Split peas come from the Pisum sativum L plant which is popularly cultivated in Russia, India, China, Canada, and the United States. They are also native to Southeast Asia and were commonly cultivated and consumed by Romans, Egyptians, and the ancient Greeks.
Some of the most popular dishes made with split peas are the American split pea ham soup, a vegetarian Indian staple called ‘ dahl’ and a Persian stew called “ khoresht gheimeh ” which is made from the yellow split peas. Green Pea
Also known as garden peas, green peas are super versatile legumes that are grown as commercial crops currently all over semi-tropical regions.
They are believed to have originated from the sub-Himalayan plains of northwest India and have been cultivated since ancient times for their nutritious and delicious green seeds.
They are the healthiest of leguminous vegetables that are super-rich in antioxidants, minerals, phytonutrients, and vitamins. According to commonly held beliefs, green peas are vegetables; however, they are actually a part of the legume family which consists of pod-producing plants with seeds inside.
Some of the key health benefits of green peas include controlled blood sugar; improved digestion and protection against some chronic illnesses such as diabetes and cancer.
Green peas are commonly featured as a side item in most dishes and often as a star ingredient in dishes like pea ravioli, green pea spread, pea curry, etc.
Beans and legumes are some of the healthiest food ingredients that you must include in your daily diet. Combining beans with legumes is an absolutely terrific way to include a ton of nutrition, essential minerals and vitamin to your diet.

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Vegan recipes: savoured for centuries in the Middle East

“Animals are not ingredients” is painted onto the sidewalks of Lille, August 2018 AFP/Philippe Huguen
Going vegan may sound like the latest food fad, but in reality, it’s a diet that has existed for centuries in the Middle East. It means eating entirely plant-based foods. So no dairy, no eggs and definitely no meat.
Many claim going vegan is the healthiest diet around and it’s growing in popularity.
Others follow it for ethical reasons out of concern for animal welfare.
In fact, in a recent report by the Vegan Society the demand for meat-free food increased by 987 percent globally in 2017 alone.
The Vegan trend quadrupled between 2012 and 2017 according to Google searches, and it now gets almost three times more interest than vegetarian and gluten free searches.
Cringe factor
Many people are put-off by the word ‘vegan’, because many of the dishes try to replicate animal-based products, such as texturized soya for meat, or meals full of tofu.
But over in the Middle East, going vegan is nothing new.
People in the region have been knocking back vegan meals and snacks without even knowing they were ahead of their time.
Countless dishes are traditionally vegan.
Falafel , red and brown lentil soup, taro root with swiss chard stew , green mallow , okra stew, bean stew, pea stew, hummus, ground walnut dip, fava bean dip, stuffed cabbage, stuffed grape leaves, or any vegetable for that matter, rice with nuts and raisins. . . and the list goes on.
“Some of my most favourite foods that come out of Egypt are actually the vegan foods” says Brenda Abdelall who runs the culinary blog MidEats that brings the foods of the Middle East to people all over the world.
Many of the vegan foods you know of likely come from the Levant, which refers to Lebanon, Syria, Palestine, Israel, and from Egypt as well.
Prime sources for vegan foods
Unlike the Arabian Peninsula which is entirely desert, these areas are fertile and rich in vegetation. Vegetables native to the area grow in abundance.
As do pulses such as fava beans, lentils, chickpeas, all found across the region.
Lentils originate from the Near East and the Mediterranean regions. They have been around for so long because they are easy to grow, especially in sandy soil and sun.
They are easy to prepare and above all fill you up enormously.
In fact lentils have been found in archaeological digs dating back 8000 years BC and in Pharaohs’ tombs. They’ve also featured in some in Biblical stories.
Stop 1: Egypt
We could write pages and pages on the different vegan dishes from the Middle East, but to make it simple, we’ll look at three countries: Egypt, Lebanon and Yemen.
So let’s start our culinary tour in the land of pharaohs, with a popular meal called Koshary that’s often referred to as the national dish of Egypt. Koshary Rfi / Anne-Marie Bissada
It’s street food. This means it’s primarily found in abundance in urban areas. It’s cheap and it fills the stomachs of the poor.
And it has just four basic ingredients rice, brown lentils, macaroni and onions.
But origins aside, it’s loved by all. Even those who don’t even know they are downing some vegan food.
And it’s not a typical dish across the Middle East says Abdelall. In fact “it’s origins are actually from an Indian dish called Kichiri , and it’s fascinating when you sort of track the evolution of the dish and how it ended up becoming what it is” she says.
In fact most of the ingredients in Koshary are not native to Egypt.
It likely made its way from India up the horn of Africa into Egypt where there was already a broader Mediterranean influence.
So Egyptians began adding marcaroni on top, followed by a sort of spicy tomato sauce that is cooked and simmered in vinegar that gives it a nice tang. People add different spices to it make it more or less hot depending on how much you like it and [its] topped with crunchy onions”.
It also made it way into Egypt through trade and colonization given its not a dish that goes back centuries.
To understand it, we need to think back to the time of British Colonization.
The British army had been living in India since the late 1700s, they then came to Egypt in the late 1800s. As Abdelall mentioned, it is an Indian street food that the British army took a liking to; probably because it is cheap, very filling, and above all safe to eat.
Stop 2: Lebanon
Now over to the Levant, and specifically Lebanon that is the source of many popular dishes both within and outside the region.
During the 15 year civil war , from 1975 to 1990 Lebanese emigrants departing Lebanon took their culture and food with them all over the world.
And with that came a mass appreciation of their cuisine, much of which is vegan.
The Lebanese community turned the world to the wonders of “their very popular falafels and mujadaraas , the taboulis (parsley salad) and the fatoushes, all of that” explains Abdelall.
Taboulah, fatoush, hummus, these all make up the mezze, or salads, the starters.
Falafel is also proudly made across the region in Syria and Israel, but it’s in Lebanon where it developed its famous reputation. Falafel Rfi / Anne-Marie Bissada
It is a fried fritter of crushed chickpeas seasoned with local herbs, such as parsley, dill, or coriander; all native to the region.
The chick pea itself is native to the Levant.
If you cross over to Egypt, you’ll find the same fritter but with fava: the popular indigenous beans. Fava beans accompanied by garlic and herbs Rfi / Anne-Marie Bissada
The falafel is packed with vegan goodness: the chickpea provides flavour and protein, the vegetables that accompany it give flavour and substance topped off with some tahini, crushed sesame sauce, and all of this is wrapped in fresh bread.
Now sesame is one of the oldest crops and likely originates from India and the sub-Sahara. So through trade it has made its way into the Middle East where it remains a staple condiment.
Tahina coupled with falafel makes it a simple street food that you can get readily and cheaply, which is key.
It’s also easy to replicate outside the country making it a favourite amongst people across all cultures.
Stop 3: Yemen
We end our tour of the region’s best vegan foods in Yemen.
At the start we mentioned that there isn’t much vegan food on the peninsula given it’s primarily desert.
But Yemen is different.
Its mountainous landscape provides a large number of microclimates that have created different methods of water conservation and seed adaptation unlike anywhere else in the world.
Its most common crops are cereals such as millet, corn, wheat and barley.
Their most popular dish, Aseed (or Aseeda) is their version of a dumpling, but it’s made with wheat flour, corn flour, and millet flour.
In short, it’s a high carbohydrate packed dumpling that is eaten by hand communal style. It’s eaten savory or sweet.
Once the dough is prepared and cooked, it’s shaped into a giant thick pancake and an indentation is made in the middle where honey or vegetable sauce is poured on top. Aseed with honey http://www.shebayemenifood.com
A side dish of fenugreek sauce is usually prepared as well.
So while Westerners continue to jump onto the vegan bandwagon, it’s the people across the Middle East who have been the dietary trend-setters without even knowing it.

Read More…

Vegan Recipes: Savoured For Centuries In The Middle East

Vegan Recipes: Savoured For Centuries In The Middle East By Anne-Marie Bissada – RFI 2 HOURS AGO MIDDLE EAST
Going vegan may sound like the latest food fad, but in reality, it’s a diet that has existed for centuries in the Middle East. It means eating entirely plant-based foods. So no dairy, no eggs and definitely no meat.
Many claim going vegan is the healthiest diet around and it’s growing in popularity.
Others follow it for ethical reasons out of concern for animal welfare.
In fact, in a recent report by the Vegan Society the demand for meat-free food increased by 987 percent globally in 2017 alone.
The Vegan trend quadrupled between 2012 and 2017 according to Google searches, and it now gets almost three times more interest than vegetarian and gluten free searches.
Cringe factor
Many people are put-off by the word ‘vegan’, because many of the dishes try to replicate animal-based products, such as texturized soya for meat, or meals full of tofu.
But over in the Middle East, going vegan is nothing new.
People in the region have been knocking back vegan meals and snacks without even knowing they were ahead of their time.
Countless dishes are traditionally vegan.
Falafel , red and brown lentil soup, taro root with swiss chard stew , green mallow , okra stew, bean stew, pea stew, hummus, ground walnut dip, fava bean dip, stuffed cabbage, stuffed grape leaves, or any vegetable for that matter, rice with nuts and raisins. . . and the list goes on.
“Some of my most favourite foods that come out of Egypt are actually the vegan foods” says Brenda Abdelall who runs the culinary blog MidEats that brings the foods of the Middle East to people all over the world.
Many of the vegan foods you know of likely come from the Levant, which refers to Lebanon, Syria, Palestine, Israel, and from Egypt as well.
Prime sources for vegan foods
Unlike the Arabian Peninsula which is entirely desert, these areas are fertile and rich in vegetation. Vegetables native to the area grow in abundance.
As do pulses such as fava beans, lentils, chickpeas, all found across the region.
Lentils originate from the Near East and the Mediterranean regions. They have been around for so long because they are easy to grow, especially in sandy soil and sun.
They are easy to prepare and above all fill you up enormously.
In fact lentils have been found in archaeological digs dating back 8000 years BC and in Pharaohs’ tombs. They’ve also featured in some in Biblical stories.
Stop 1: Egypt
We could write pages and pages on the different vegan dishes from the Middle East, but to make it simple, we’ll look at three countries: Egypt, Lebanon and Yemen.
So let’s start our culinary tour in the land of pharaohs, with a popular meal called Koshary that’s often referred to as the national dish of Egypt.
It’s street food. This means it’s primarily found in abundance in urban areas. It’s cheap and it fills the stomachs of the poor.
And it has just four basic ingredients rice, brown lentils, macaroni and onions.
But origins aside, it’s loved by all. Even those who don’t even know they are downing some vegan food.
And it’s not a typical dish across the Middle East says Abdelall. In fact “it’s origins are actually from an Indian dish called Kichiri , and it’s fascinating when you sort of track the evolution of the dish and how it ended up becoming what it is” she says.
In fact most of the ingredients in Koshary are not native to Egypt.
It likely made its way from India up the horn of Africa into Egypt where there was already a broader Mediterranean influence.
So Egyptians began adding marcaroni on top, followed by a sort of spicy tomato sauce that is cooked and simmered in vinegar that gives it a nice tang. People add different spices to it make it more or less hot depending on how much you like it and [its] topped with crunchy onions”.
It also made it way into Egypt through trade and colonization given its not a dish that goes back centuries.
To understand it, we need to think back to the time of British Colonization.
The British army had been living in India since the late 1700s, they then came to Egypt in the late 1800s. As Abdelall mentioned, it is an Indian street food that the British army took a liking to; probably because it is cheap, very filling, and above all safe to eat.
Stop 2: Lebanon
Now over to the Levant, and specifically Lebanon that is the source of many popular dishes both within and outside the region.
During the 15 year civil war , from 1975 to 1990 Lebanese emigrants departing Lebanon took their culture and food with them all over the world.
And with that came a mass appreciation of their cuisine, much of which is vegan.
The Lebanese community turned the world to the wonders of “their very popular falafels and mujadaraas , the taboulis (parsley salad) and the fatoushes, all of that” explains Abdelall.
Taboulah, fatoush, hummus, these all make up the mezze, or salads, the starters.
Falafel is also proudly made across the region in Syria and Israel, but it’s in Lebanon where it developed its famous reputation.
It is a fried fritter of crushed chickpeas seasoned with local herbs, such as parsley, dill, or coriander; all native to the region.
The chick pea itself is native to the Levant.
If you cross over to Egypt, you’ll find the same fritter but with fava: the popular indigenous beans.
The falafel is packed with vegan goodness: the chickpea provides flavour and protein, the vegetables that accompany it give flavour and substance topped off with some tahini, crushed sesame sauce, and all of this is wrapped in fresh bread.
Now sesame is one of the oldest crops and likely originates from India and the sub-Sahara. So through trade it has made its way into the Middle East where it remains a staple condiment.
Tahina coupled with falafel makes it a simple street food that you can get readily and cheaply, which is key.
It’s also easy to replicate outside the country making it a favourite amongst people across all cultures.
Stop 3: Yemen
We end our tour of the region’s best vegan foods in Yemen.
At the start we mentioned that there isn’t much vegan food on the peninsula given it’s primarily desert.
But Yemen is different.
Its mountainous landscape provides a large number of microclimates that have created different methods of water conservation and seed adaptation unlike anywhere else in the world.
Its most common crops are cereals such as millet, corn, wheat and barley.
Their most popular dish, Aseed (or Aseeda) is their version of a dumpling, but it’s made with wheat flour, corn flour, and millet flour.
In short, it’s a high carbohydrate packed dumpling that is eaten by hand communal style. It’s eaten savory or sweet.
Once the dough is prepared and cooked, it’s shaped into a giant thick pancake and an indentation is made in the middle where honey or vegetable sauce is poured on top.
A side dish of fenugreek sauce is usually prepared as well.
So while Westerners continue to jump onto the vegan bandwagon, it’s the people across the Middle East who have been the dietary trend-setters without even knowing it.

Read More…

Sake – Everything You Need To Know About Rice Wine

May 27, 2019 by NancyR Leave a comment
The wine drinking culture has been a special part of the culture of the ancient nations. The ritual of drinking wine has for thousands of years of human history been the joining of the material and the spirit. Today wine still possesses the most important social role in many cultures in the world.
Although the Western and the Eastern world differ greatly from each other, they share the same passion for wine. However, the cultural and geographical differences can also be seen in the practice of wine drinking. While the western drinking culture has the respect and appreciation of the wine itself as a central idea, eastern drinking culture is linked with the humanistic dimension. Moreover, it has an unbreakable bond with art, poetry, literature and social interactions.
Whatever the resources, all people around the globe have found the way to produce and enjoy good liquor. For the western world, grapes are still the origin of every drop of delightful wine and on the opposite side of the world the main source of food and life – the rice, is responsible for the great taste of the oriental wine.
There are many types of rice wines in the world depending on the country of origin, but the most famous one is the Japanese rice wine named Sake. Western people are familiar with the word Sake and its meaning, mainly from its appearance in many movies and in the Japanese restaurants located mostly in North America.
“Copyright: Unsplash/author: Aghate Marty / I License: CC0 Public Domain”
The Process of making the Sake
The complex process of Sake brewing has evaluated and changed with times. The technique advanced overtime while the rice, the staple of the Japanese food, has been and still is the main ingredient of the Sake.
The Rice
In Japan, there are special types of rice that are cultivated only for the process of making Sake and they are not suitable for eating. They have a special name – “ Saka Mai ”. Moreover, there are around 80 different types of rice that have a larger and stronger grain with a low protein and lipid contain suitable for brewing.
The process of making of the Sake starts with polishing off the rice. The core of the rice, the rice starch is the main ingredient that is converted into sugar in the beginning process of brewing. Moreover, the outer layers that contain fats and proteins may change the flavor of the beverage, therefore they are milled away in the polishing process. The high-milled-rice-made sake is considered to be with a better quality and it is usually more expensive than the Sake made by less milled rice. ” Seimai buai ” is the Japanese word for the rice polishing ratio.
The Water
The quality of the water and its mineral content plays a great role in the color and taste of the final product. The iron, manganese, potassium, magnesium and phosphorus, found in the water are nutrients that can be used by the yeast in the process of fermentation, therefore, their presence or absence in the water will affect the color, the flavor and the alcohol content.
Soft water (low in nutrient) is used for producing sweeter-taste Sake, while high-nutrient-content water produces a style of sake known as a dry-style Sake.
The Process of brewing
After the process of polishing, the rice starch is put to rest in order to absorb moisture from the air. This is important for the grains to not crack when they are immersed in the water. The length of resting time depends on the degree of polishing of the rice. After this process is over the rice is soaked in water and then steamed in order to be cooked. The steamed rice is then cooled. After all this is done the rice undergoes a process of multiple fermentations.
After fermentation processes are over, the Sake is carbon filtered and pasteurized. In some types of sake a small amount of distilled alcohol is added to enhance the aromas and flavors. Like many other brewed beverages, Sake benefits greatly from the maturing. Usually it is matured for 9 to 12 months. Before the beverage is finally bottled, water can be added to the Sake to lower the alcohol content for 5-10%. The History of Sake brewing Process
The drinking of Sake and its role in the Japanese culture dates back from the ancient times. The Sake that was once consumed by the ancient people has by time changed due to the advancements in the process of making. Although, the complex process of brewing has evolved, the ingredients have remained the same – rice and pure water.
The present, “ koji kin ” method of Sake brewing, that is discussed previous in this article, was established in the fourth century. Until that time Sake was made by the method known as “ kuchikami-sake ”, by which rice was chewed to promoted fermentation.
During the Heian period, from 8 th to 12 th century, the Imperial Court established an official brewery organization called Miki-no-Tsukasa that was the only producer of Sake, mostly drank during special ceremonies.
During the 15 th century, the Muromachi period, numerous of small Sake breweries and liquor stores were open throughout the country. Moreover, they have become the main producers and leaders in the advancement of the brewing techniques. The development and the quality of the producing process advanced until the middle of the 18 th century, the Edo period. The advanced brewing techniques that were established than are still used today.
The production of Sake requires advanced individual skills. Moreover, in the period of the technical developments of the whole process, special professional group of sake masters have emerged. Toji is the chief Sake brewer and Kurabito a worker at the Sake brewery. Toji is still a highly respected profession in the Japanese society and was usually passed on from father to son. Nowadays, Tojis are mostly trained in universities.
The process of sake-brewing was undertaken only in the cool months of the winter season. Today, modern brewing factories are producing sake throughout the whole year, while the small traditional ones operate only in the winter. How is Sake served and drank
In the Japanese culture the drinking of the Sake is a ritual. The beverage is held in a special bottle called “ Tokkuri” and it is served in a small glass called “ ochoko ”. Sake can be served either cold or hot. However, the taste and the smell change greatly depending on the temperature of the beverage.
The cold style of drinking Sake is called Hiya and requires for the bottle – Tokkuri to be held in the refrigerator along with the serving glass – ochoko. Atsukan is the name of the style of drinking hot Sake. After the Sake is poured in the Tokkuri the bottle is heated in the pan full with hot water. After the Sake gets hot it is served in the ochoko that holds just a little amount of beverage in order to be drank while it is still hot.
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Sake and the traditional Japanese Cuisine
The savory good taste of the Sake, traditionally was paired and consumed only with a simple appetizer called “Sakana ”. However, the variety of traditions that occurred in the different territories along the Japanese country and different Sake flavors resulted in different pairings of sake and food.
Sake and salty food
– Salted sea food is a big part of the traditional Japanese cuisine. “ Shiokara ” – salted fish innards and “ Naresushi ” are both dishes that are served with Sake. Another common combination is Sake with “ Miso ” – a soybean paste. Sake and traditional Japanese seasonings
– Japanese cuisine is famous for the common seasonings used in many dishes. Soya sauce, miso, comesu (vinegar made of rice), mirini (sweet sake for cooking and seasoning). All dishes that include these traditional Japanese delicatessens are paired with Sake. Sake is used for cooking
– Japanese people prefer to eat fish. Every fish dish is paired with Sake. Moreover, when cooked, sake is used to mask the strong odor of the fish, therefore preserving only the good flavors.
Sake pairs greatly with every traditional Japanese dish. Moreover, the good taste of this Japanese beverage is nowadays, appreciated everywhere in the world and paired with international dishes also. Types of Rice Wine
Here is a list with the names of the different types of rice wines that are produced in different eastern countries.
Apung or Apo – is an Indian rice wine that originates from the North East Indian tribe of Nyishi. They drink the wine in a celebration of the Wiyu spirit. Arag or Ara – is a traditional rice wine consumed in Bhutan . It is served hot with additives like butter or an egg white. Brem – a rice wine that comes from Bali has an important use in Hindu ceremonies called Tetabuhan, in order to evoke harmony. The beverage can be either white or red depending on the type of rice used and has a sweet taste. Cheohgju – is a rice wine that is produced in Korea . Cholai – reddish rice wine and Hariya a white rice wine from India . Sonti is another Indian famous wine. Dansul – a low alcohol content rice wine and Gwaha-ju a fortified rice wine from Korea . Makgeoli is a milky rice wine also produces in Korea . Huangiju – literally meaning “yellow wine”, this Chinese rice wine can be aged for as much as 20 years. Shaoxing is the most famous Chinese rice wine. Mijiu is yet another type coming from this country. Lao-Lao – a rice wine produced in Laos . Sato – or often called Thai rice wine comes from Thailand . Sombai – a Cambodian rice wine enriched with sugar cane, spices and fruits that are placed in the bottle.

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Visona Panna Upkari (Spicy King Fish Curry).

“Visona Teekhi Panna Upkari (Spicy King Fish Curry) served with Udidu ani Tandla Khotto (Urad Dal Rice Idly prepared in Jackfruit leaves), Dalitoy (Spiced Tuvar Dal) and Pineapple” … my favorite combo with panna upkari is either khotto/panpolo /shevai or Ukde SheetHa, today made the curry very spicy and relished it with khotto and dalitoy … Spicilicious ….
** Panna Upkari is a very spicy dish from Konkani Saraswat Cuisine that is very famous amongst our community people. This dish is prepared both in Veg and Non-Veg form. I remember during childhood I never ever ate this dish coz it was so spicy that it literally bring water from eyes and nose when you relish it and I never liked that and if at all I ate, I would eat loads of chocolates later on. It was only much later ie after my marriage that I began relishing this dish, though till today it makes me a bit uncomfortable for a few hours as excess spice is something I cannot digest as I prone to acidity. But yes, my hubby loves this dish very much and insists I make it spicy once in a way. I have cut down the spice level in recent years as too much of spice is normally not good for health and it should be cut down. Well, to cut short, I have posted many variations of this dish prepared both in veg and non veg varieties. I will post a common link at the bottom of this recipe so that you can check out on the same.
** The recipe is the same as that posted before, but I am re-posting the same for newbies. I must mention here that this dish is prepared the most with Mackerel (Raja/Bangda/Bangude) Fish, though it can be prepared with other varieties of fishes too. Today small sized King Fish / Visonu was available with my fish vendor which was very fresh. So I bought it, my fish vendor gave slant cut while slicing the pieces as if done horizontally they would be too small in size. When the fish is fresh and fleshy it does add on taste to the curry. Again, I must mention here that this curry taste best after 12 hours of resting period. I remember Mom used to prepare it early in the morning so that by noon while serving it would get a good resting period and taste that much tastier. You can also prepare this in the night and serve it the next day, but do remember to heat it once in the early morning to avoid the curry getting spoilt. Do try this out if you love spicy fish curries and enjoy them with any accompaniment of your choice.
** This fish curry taste best when served with any type of rice though tastes better with Red Boiled Rice (Ukde SheetHa), but for that one must have developed a taste for it. We South Indians are used to this rice and enjoy the same, though there are many who do not like it. The choice of rice is left to individual and family liking for sure. The other best way to serve it is with panpolo ie neer dosa, a thin lacy dosa often prepared in Konkani Saraswat homes. Then the same can be served with Khotto ie Idly prepared in Jackfruit leaves baskets or homemade Shevai / Sevai / String Hoppers. I have also served this with Dosa and Appos many times as this was something I learned from my father. My Mom always cooked food early in the morning and the lunch items were also at times prepared and done before serving of breakfast. My father would always ask her which curry she had prepared and would relish the same with dosa at times if he liked it. I found that interesting and followed suit. But I do so for lunch as somehow, I cannot enjoy a heavy breakfast from childhood.
** Here is my Recipe for “Visona Teekhi Panna Upkari (Spicy King Fish Curry)” … My Style ….
** Wash and clean the Visanu/King fish pieces, rub some salt and keep them ready aside. I had about 10 medium sized pieces of Visonu. Just before preparing the curry wash them in plain water and keep it ready.
** Peel of the outer skin and chop 3-4 large sized Onions finely and keep it ready aside. Wash, wipe dry and chop 1 large or 2 medium sized Ripe Tomatoes and keep them also ready aside.
** Heat about 1/2 cup oil in a thick bottomed kadai. When hot add in the finely chopped onions and fry them till they are evenly browned. Do not let them burn or the dish will turn bitter. Now add in handful of fresh curry leaves, 4-5 tblsp of Kashmiri Red Chilly Powder , 2 tblsp of Coriander Powder and fry for a second or two.
** Now add in the finely chopped Tomatoes, 2 tblsp of Tamarind Paste and about one cup of water and bring to a boiling point on medium flame. Now lower the heat and let simmer well, slightly keep crushing the tomatoes in the kadai with a spatula to make it mushy and thick consistency. Add salt to taste and mix well.
** Now add in the fish pieces in a layer in the kadai and let cook on low to medium heat for 5 minutes. Do stir in once or twice and check the consistency. If need be do add in some more water if need be. This is a semi dry dish with slightly thinner textured gravy, but spicy one.
** “Visona Teekhi Panna Upkari (Spicy King Fish Curry is done and ready to be served. This is a very spicy dish that tastes best when served with rice specially red boiled rice (ukde sheetHa). But also tastes great with dosa specially panpolo as it tastes awesome. Another combo that tastes awesome with this one is homemade rice shevai and Khotto (Idly prepared in Jackfruit leaves baskets).
** Do try out various options with this dish as accompaniment and enjoy them with your family and friends. If simmered well, once cooled you can put this in the fridge and it remains good for almost 3 days and can be reheated and served too. Saves on time and tastes great too, a boon when you are having busy schedule or guest coming over.
** Note : Again, addition of tomatoes are a matter of choice. Traditionally it was not added, in which case you need to increase the amount of tamarind added while grinding by double.
** Note : You can increase the amount of chilly powder depending upon the spice level of your family, I have made this dish spicy, as the dish is supposed to be very spicy but nowadays somehow, we cannot tolerate that much spice so you can cut it down a bit.
** I am sharing a common link for all types of “Panna Upkari” below, where in the same dish is prepared with different types of veggies, you can check out the same too … https://gayathrifoodbytes.blogspot.com/search?q=panna+upkari
** For the “Udidu Tandla Khotto / Urad Dal Rice Idly in Jackfruit leaves” Recipe, Please follow the link given below …. https://gayathrifoodbytes.blogspot.in/2017/07/khotto-idly-served-with-hummana-curry.html#more
** For “Dalitoy (Spiced Tuvar Dal)” Recipe, Please follow the link given below …. https://gayathrifoodbytes.blogspot.in/2017/07/dalitoy-spiced-tuvar-dal-2.html#more
** An Earnest Request : There are many more recipes of different types in the blog. For all my Recipes, use the search option or the label section in the Blog. If you are still not able to find it or have a query, please leave a message in comment section or mail me the same. I will try my best to get back to you as soon as possible. Do try out various types of dishes included in the Blog and Enjoy them with your family and friends and do give me a feedback if possible.
** I am happy to inform you that I have also started a food group for by the name “KONKANI DELICACIES” which is over and year old, with about 19K strong members. It is a pleasure to inform that you will find in the group many more recipes posted by our expert members and you too can share some of your own. The link to the group is posted on the left side of the blog page. Do join us in our culinary journey. I strongly believe in Sharing and always endorse that “Sharing Is Caring” … Thank You ….

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Collaborative Cuisine will Prevail : Chef Tarun Sibal

Travel Collaborative Cuisine will Prevail : Chef Tarun Sibal Sibal hails from the first catering family of Delhi and is almost hardwired to do what he does.
CHEF, MARKETER and an entrepreneur, bagging three tags on his shoulder, Chef Tarun Sibal has an interesting journey to tell in the field of food. Sibal hails from the first catering family of Delhi and is almost hardwired to do what he does. Having, trained with the best and travelled for food and beverage made him well versed with Indian and International cuisine and food cultures. With his recent launch of Café Staywoke, he is all geared up to introduce new interesting cafes in the present year. BW Hotelier spoke to Sibal to know more his future endeavours.
Brief us about your journey into the culinary world
It started with the gene pool as I come for the first catering family of Delhi. Being part of a food family helped but the gene pool was not the only reason for me to be part of this wonderful fraternity. All I wanted to do was to be in the food business, as a chef as a marketer and as an entrepreneur.
I started my culinary journey in the year 2000 at IHM Pusa Delhi. An Industrial trainee at the Oberoi, a Management Trainee with the Habitat World and a Sous chef in 2006 were the three major milestones of the first phase of my professional life. Working and learning with the best chefs at the Habitat World, that period became the core of food sensibilities. Having said that my food dream was bigger than being confined to a kitchen hence in 2006 in pursued my MBA and ventured into Marketing of food and beverage, conceiving brands stories, path to the market for food and beverage brands. During this phase I had the opportunity to work with the top Indian and International brands. I had the opportunity worked with 3 international food boards, Bord Bia (The Irish Food Board), Sopexa, (The French Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries) and MLA (The Meat and livestock association of Australia) and understand who countries take pride in their indigenous produce.
The last leg of the second phase was surrounded by wines and specialised sprits as I took charge of the sales and marketing office at Fratelli wines in 2011 followed by being the country manager at Berenetzen Spirits in 2014.
And then in 2015 lighting struck and I was back where I belong. I left the corporate world to reiterate the family’s catering business and that’s when One Fine Meal saw daylight. A year later I had the opportunity to open my first café and Café Staywoke opened its door for guests in November 2017.
Sidecar and Loft, where you’ll have my food signatures launched in 2018 and 19 respectively to great accolades. 2019 will also see the birth of “TITLIE” my new restaurant in GOA.
What are the trends you are witnessing in the f&b space?
“Gourmet Casual” is going to be the biggest food trend of 2019. Non-pretentious yet gourmet food served in a casual environment will make a big statement. Food will be about great taste again. More and more street food interpretations will come in mainframe restaurant menus. We will also see the rise of restaurants based on the Chef and his food thought instead of cuisine-based restaurants. Dining in (delivery) will also emerge as a dominant heavyweight, in the overall food business ecosystem.
According to you, which cuisine is slowly being dominated in India?
The food ecosystem has transformed drastically and the cuisine barrier is broken, no longer do chefs and restaurants stick to one cuisine or for that matter any cuisine. Local and international produce is available and chefs have started working with these products and make their own food stories that may fit in a particular cuisine or may not. Collaborative cuisine will prevail
How do you plan to experiment more on food?
I am a consumer first, I eat, eat out, and do that fairly often. It’s my way of discovering, rediscovering, getting inspired and collaborating with food. And this sensibility I take back into my kitchen.
Technique and Produce are the two areas I keep working on to evolve and I experiment with both these aspects of my cooking. Going back to an age-old technique or working with a lost ingredient vis vi working with latest kitchen gadgets are all part of the experimental curve
What about the idea of farm to table?
Farm to table is a brilliant concept, but it’s in its nascency in India. We not only work with producers directly but also work with institutions and suppliers who consolidate a group for farmers and get us the freshest seasonal and local produce. I am personally a part of the Young Chef’s Association that works directly with farmers to promote farm to fork and celebrate the indigenous produce of the land.
Should we go back to our indigenous ingredients?
We should not go back but move forward with our indigenous ingredients. Having said that its easier said than done. Do understand the nuances of an ingredient, learn to work with it and then incorporate the same in your food style. Consumers eat out for taste and that should be the primary objective when you work any produce. Share this article: Tags

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Office Space for rent in Madhapur, Hyderabad

PropertyWala.com Office Space for rent in Madhapur, Hyderabad 1 – 1.5 lacs A 2200 sft commercial corporate building, plug and play office space available in madhapur . Madhapur, Madhapur, Hyderabad (Telangana) Rate: 55 per SqFeet +10% Age Of Construction: 5 Years Available: Immediate/Ready to move Description Those who looking for a perfect place for your business, a 2200sft commercial corporate building with server room, car parking and lift. This was ready to occupy in madhapur . For further details please feel free to contact: KPC.
Don’t forget to mention that you saw this ad on PropertyWala.com, when you call. Features Price Trends Madhapur, Hyderabad Office Spaces for rent in Madhapur, Hyderabad This property is priced approximately 5% over the average for an Office Spaces for rent in Madhapur, Hyderabad (Rs.50/SqFeet) * Disclaimer: Data may be approximate. Locality Reviews Madhapur, Hyderabad One of the hot locality in Hyderabad . It’s like cosmopolitan having every culture here. Pros: by Hyderabad Estate (Hyderabad Estate) Madhapur city developed fastly within 10 – 15 years fast growing IT hubs and residential / commercial zones within heart of new city called CYBERABAD with all educated professions settled in this cyberabad city connecting to all major roads and connnecting ORR and entertainments like star hotels, pubs, exhibition centres hitex and marriage halls hifi hospitals schools and colleges any parts of the country can settle here with peaceful and good oxygen here in this area people are healthy, there were no polluted companies, in this area people enjoy like western countries saturday and sunday week holidays people move around inorbit malls, shilpa ramam handicrafts exhibition beside hitec tower food areas like paradis court, kfc, snookers, pubs, star hotels all parts of country people u may find out in future US embassy is going to come near kondapur – gachibowli areas its constliest city in Hyderabad in this area less crime because cctv cameras are more to cover any type of offences so anybody can stay in this zone its free zone and also people can invest their hard earned earnings in this area either to purchase plots,flats independent house row house in gated community all top class people like doctors, lawyers, judges, business men, celebrities are settled in this madhapur area, i love this area very much because within short span of time i have seen this type of city cyberabad has grown fastly other than any other city. Pros: VERY GOOD LOCATION NEARBY ALL FACILITIES SCHOOLS COLLEGES JOBS HOTELS HOSPITALS AND ENTERTAINMENTS Better to be early at home please dont go to lonely areas and new areas developing in some areas no cc tv cameras beware Posted: Jul 7, 2016 by Raj Kumar Madhapur is a part of prime business district of hyderabad . It is a part of the IT Corridor of hitec city. It has a cosmo touch to it with a presence of young IT professionals working here from all parts of India. It is the hub of many startup companies and has rentals ranging from a Rs. 30/- per sqft to Rs. 65./- per sqft for a fully furnished office space. Thus it caters to clients ranging from start up to large mnc’s. The place also has variety of restaurants covering most of the indian cuisine. There are ample options for people looking for residential options in and around madhapur. Pros: IT corridor with cosmo culture Excellent connectivity to all modes of transport Flexible rental options suiting all clients ranging from startup to large MNC Cons: Shortage of A grade space Lack of good hospitals Parking challenges in standalone buildings. Posted:

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COOK ( Indian Tandoor and Curry Cook ) Benalla Area – Benalla | 1219348287

Tandoori Hut Indian Restaurant Benalla is currently looking for an enthusiastic,creative & hardworking person to join our team in a full time role. We are looking for an experienced Co ok who has a passion for food.
Core Skill Requirements
. Ability to work a flexible roster of days,nights & weekends.
. Excellent customer service & interpersonal skills.
. Ability to prepare food,cook & plate dishes to a high standard.
. Experience in cooking Indian cuisine.
. Ability to work both autonomously & as part of team.
. Must have a minimum of 2 years experience in a similar position
. full time position available
Applicant’s please note ONLY apply if you have experience in Indian cuisine .
Satisfactory criminal history check Shortlisted applications will be required to undergo pre-employment and criminal history checks.
TO APPLY PLEASE FORWARD YOUR RESUME AND COVER LETTER TO tan @*

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You can buy dry mustard powder (Colemans) here at www.britshop.ch and there are a large number of Indian and Asian grocery shops all over the country that sell great spices. I cook a lot of Indian food and have no problem getting them. There is even an online shop – www.swissrasoi.ch – they sell TRS spices which are excellent. for the Indian grocery shops go to the main Switzerland forum page and look under Top Questions about Switzerland. In those is a link to an article on Indian and Vegetarian cuisine here and it lists grocery shops too. There is no sense in bringing things that one can get here easily…
The one thing that is hard to get here is Vegemite… but there is a very good (better really!) substitute called Cenovis.
Your homemade tomato chutney should not be a problem provided it is in your checked luggage.

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Malaz West Indian & American Cuisine, Fulton St, Brooklyn, NY,

Malaz West Indian & American Cuisine, Fulton St, Brooklyn, NY, USA Temporary Closure – related to food safety 2 days ago Fulton Street, 11216 New York, 1 0 “Date Closed: May 21, 2019
Reason for Closure:
Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.
Hot food item not held at or above 140º F.
Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.
Facility not vermin proof. Harborage or conditions conducive to attracting vermin to the premises and/or allowing vermin to exist.
Food contact surface not properly maintained.
Source: New York City Environmental Health Department.”

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