10 Deep-seated Secrets About The Indian Culinary

10 Deep-seated Secrets About The Indian Culinary

0
While all of us have quite aware of the rich heritage of Indian foods, there’s a whole lot of ingredients, special culinary tools and unusual cooking styles that creates exquisite Indian delicacies. Called as the land of spices, India is a country where no food is complete with a mix or blend of tangy, organic Indian spices and herbs. Certainly, there are myriad facts and secrets about the traditional Indian kitchen knowing which will help you realize why there are so much essence and novelty in every of the country’s dishes. Here are they. Indian households always prefer using cooking utensils and pans that made of cast iron or just earthenware pans because that retains most of the aromas of the spices in the food. People in India mostly cook items from the scratch and avoid preparing anything out of processed (or ready-to-eat) cereals or other packs. They make flat rotis (a bread item, kind of tortillas) by hand out of wheat flour. Rotis are staple food during lunch, dinner and even breakfasts. Curry powder does not exist at all! It needs to be prepared before using it in cooking. It requires the mixing of different seasoning items and spices like chilli powder, coriander, cumin, garam masalas, ginger masala, and so forth. There’s no as much specific etiquette to enjoy any of the Indian cuisines. It’s in fact most proper to use hands directly to eat. Breakfasts are incomplete without Tea (locally called chai) or coffee. Also, both are by default prepared with milk and sugar, anywhere in any part of the country. So, if you want to have tea without milk or coffee as espresso, then you must have to ask for it separately. Coconut milk and mustard sauce are primary or key ingredients of South Indian cuisines. Do not be surprised ever if any seafood dish is served in mustard sauce, because that’s a usual blend of flavors there. Similarly, every staple dish you have, including curries use coconut milk. Sweets are considered not only as desserts after the meals, but a necessary offering to the Deities in every traditional occasion or festivals. Moreover, people favor preparing them with their own hands for the latter purpose and some worth mentioning are Ladoos, soan papdis, Kaju Barfi, Payasam and Halwa. Any proper cuisine of India is the perfect mix and match of 6 different flavors, namely sweet, bitter, spicy, sour, salty, and astringent. Chutneys, also called as pickles are very common condiment consumed with almost every Indian dish such as rice, rotis, and paranthas. Yogurt or hung curd is used instead of cream in preparation of many exotic dishes like chicken tikka, sahi paneer, sahi korma, kashmiri aloo dum and sahi chicken.
Well, that were all the best-kept secrets brought straight to your from the Indian kitchen. Wherever you are, in whichever part of the world, never miss a chance to gorge on some spicy Indian cuisines and sweet delicacies, for there’s no other as special food as they are in the world. Neal David is a marketing expert at Indian Grocery, a top-rated online seller of all kinds of Indian foods and gourmet items including cereal packs, ready-to-eat oats, biscuits, snacks, different sweet packs and Indian organic spices . If you’re good at cooking and try your hands on some exotic Indian dishes, then order some packs of organic Indian spices from its store and get started. Rate this Article

Read More…

Moscow on the Mohawk

From the Food Vault Dept .: I’ve been researching Russian cuisine for an upcoming dinner, which reminded me of a review visit I made in 1996 to an ambitious Russian entity. That it ceased to exist not long thereafter should come as no surprise. The mayor referenced below was trying to close down the city’s several strip joints at the time, a task that took much longer to accomplish, and even then I think the places simply died of boredom.
LATER, TRYING TO RECONSTRUCT THE EVENING, my wife and I had trouble ascertaining just what it was that pushed us into the realm of no-holds barred absurdity. The big birthday party, to be sure, and the Russian disco band. The mini-skirted, satin-bloused waitresses added an entertaining touch (and the worry that Schenectady’s fleshaphobic mayor might try to close down this place). Then there was the formidable menu, sporting such unusual items as “ schti ,” which our waitress wouldn’t describe because the kitchen was out of it, so why bother?
This photo has nothing to do with the article alongside. Troika – the name refers to the team of three horses that pull a traditional Russian carriage – occupies a building that went through a few incarnations as an Indian restaurant, interrupted by a few years serving Korean food. To put a Russian restaurant there is a delightful idea. The location does seem to be a kiss of death, though.
So my first question would have been about that location. Unfortunately, my follow-up phone calls to manager Ella were unsuccessful – she was too busy with customers to talk one day, which is a good sign; but she couldn’t honor our phone appointment the next day, however, because “she’s having some trouble with the boss,” the phone-answerer whispered, explaining, “I’m just a friend who stopped by to visit today.”
We can only infer that, as with the mother country, the politics at Troika are weird. Already there’s been one putsch during its three months of existence, jettisoning a chef and an owner (I got this info from a recent Schenectady Gazette review, which also told me that for once Peg Churchill Wright and I had very similar experiences).
But I want to hold my next birthday party here. When my wife and I visited, a few evenings ago, we were seated beside a long assembly of tables set for a big party – probably close to 20 people. Even before the party arrived, however, the band set up.
Dinner at Troika means music. I don’t know if this happens every night, but certainly on weekends. The ensemble is from New York, I was told that night, and comprised two instrumentalists and a scantily-clad girl singer. Disco obviously prevails – that throbbing beat accompanied the recorded stuff playing as we entered, and it took over in a big way once the keyboardist kicked his rhythm box into gear. I know absolutely nothing of Russian popular songs, although there seems to be no equivalent to our own “Happy Birthday,” which was sung to the lucky fellow at the big table once that party arrived, trailing an effluvium of perfumes and after-shave.
I was hunkered over a bowl of Ukrainian borscht as this took place, kicking off the surrealist part of the night. “Make sure you put a big spoon of sour cream in the soup,” our waitress instructed, adding that I should dip some of the dark bread, too. A rich, flavorful soup it was, with cabbage and onions to fill out the beet flavor. Susan started with vereniki , a tortellini-like item stuffed with cheese or cherries or potatoes – and she opted for the last-named. Sour cream was advised for that, too, which was served with onions both crisped and raw. Hearty eating!
Hearty drinking at the table next to us, where jugs of Stoli made the rounds. Interesting that the crowd was scented and the liquor was not. That thump-thump-thump by the dance floor was made all the more inviting by colored lights, and the birthday crowd started to dance. “You have to dance, too!” the waitress cried. I mumbled some lame excuse about all the left feet at this table. But she was right. We should have.
What with the party to take care of, service got a little slow – but we needed to recover some appetite before the entrées arrived. I’d ordered Russian tea and was served a glass of plain old orange pekoe, the promised samovar nowhere in sight. The waitress explained she’d misunderstood my order, so my next tea was of the Russian variety. Which only means that it costs a dollar more and you get a side of strawberry jam to spoon into it.
The entrées were massive, served on huge, decorative plates. When I asked for a recommendation of something “really Russian,” I was pointed to the Seafood Combination “Troika,” which also happens to be the costliest item. Which makes it a little difficult to trust the staff’s sincerity. But, “if you don’t like it, you don’t have to pay for it,” she said, and it was delicious. Arrayed on the bottom of the plate were the largest mussels I’ve ever seen, along with a sprinkling of shrimp and slices of salmon. The sauce was rich with garlic and onion, tangy and a great seafood accompaniment.
Susan the traditionalist went for beef stroganoff, a classic preparation in which the meat and mushrooms get a sour cream-based sauce. Although we’re used to seeing it served on egg noodles, here you had a choice of potatoes, rice or kasha, of which Susan chose the last: a wheat grain here served in a sauce obscenely buttery. The meat itself was stringy stew beef.
Needless to say, we couldn’t finish all that food. We chose a single dessert from the proffered tray of cakes, a mocha chocolate cake that suffered from refrigerator flavor. Obviously, food isn’t moving as quickly here as it ought to, and freshness suffers. I can’t imagine that Russian disco is going to be a huge draw, but I would like to try more of the unusual menu items some time.
Troika , 2209 Central Ave., Schenectady, 381-xxxx. Serving lunch Tue-Sun noon-3 PM, dinner Tue-Sun 3-midnight. AE, MC, V.
– Metroland Magazine, 5 September 1996

Read More…

Kuala Lumpur Foodie guide

0 Kuala Lumpur Foodie guide Exploring Kuala Lumpur is like entering a maze of wonderful sights and attractions. The capital city of Malaysia lures hundreds and thousands of tourists every year because of its myriad of natural attractions. The city boasts of gleaming skyscrapers and numerous landmarks like Petronas Twin Towers and Batu Caves. Apart from those iconic attractions, one of the biggest tourist attractions in the city is the food here. It is a must to sample as much of the local cuisine where ever you go and treat your palette to different flavors you come across at every corner. Browse Withlocals tours in Kuala Lumpur for some great holiday package deals, where you can benefit from a well-planned holiday. Everything is taken cared of and all you need to do is sit back and relax. You are introduced to the best foodie spots around the city. Here are some great foods and delicious options to check out while you are in the city. For the best street food There is fantastic food available in those hidden backstreets of the city. You can sample some of the best cuisines at the following spots in this diverse city. Jalan Alor is most famous for street food streets in the city, and you will find some of the most delicious chicken wings and chili crab here. Pudu Wai Sek Kai is best known for authentic local Chinese Malaysian food, and it is a must to try out the legendary chee cheong char kuay teow , rojak , and more. Kampung Baru is a favorite section for the foodies, and here you can get the best local Malay food. You can try out different restaurants and enjoy some fantastic nasi campur and the great ikan bakar . Little India and Chinatown Tour the colorful markets of Little India and Chinatown, and here you will come across several family-run restaurants serving authentic Indian and Chinese food. Try those different types of fragrant Indian curries and snacks. When you wander in the lively main street of Chinatown, you must try those different Chinese noodles and the famous Loh Shu Fan. Most popular restaurants One will come across some impressive restaurants that serve a well-curated menu with a plethora of different cuisines. Botakliquor – Enjoy some drinks in this popular bistro, which is the most popular bar in Kuala Lumpur because of the botanical setting and with lots of greenery around. Medan Ikan Bakar – This is indeed one of the best restaurants in Kuala Lumpur if looking for Malay style seafood and tasty grilled fish Coffee Amo – This is a very popular cafe in Chinatown, and it is easy to locate because of its centralized location. Enjoy great coffee with 3D coffee art with your friends. RA Nasi Lemak – RA Nasi Lemak makes for an excellent choice if looking for the best Nasi lemak , a top dish of the Malaysia food. Enjoy a delicious meal here. Troika Sky Dining complex – now you can dine with a great view and at one of the most popular dining restaurants and bars is the Troika Sky Dining complex. Enjoy epic views over the city as you tickle your taste buds with a vast range of tapas and unique cocktails, shelled crab, ceviche and the churros. Your Local Food Bucket List Before you embark on a food tour, you must know what to try out when you experience the local food culture. Some of the must-try dishes include laksa , the spicy noodle soup with chicken, prawn or fish. Another must eat is the fragrant rice dish of nasi lemak and banana fritters, and pisang goreng . Ice chendol is a popular sweet treat and you can’t leave Malaysia without trying pulled tea or teh tarik . Tweet Do you like this article? Like us on Facebook, too! Thank you for visiting The Pinoy Explorer ! You can also like The Pinoy Explorer on Facebook ! All contents of this blog, or otherwise stated, are copyrighted. For syndication, use of articles and photos, send me an e-mail . Thank you! Readers All contents, otherwise stated, are copyrighted. | © 2009-2019. All Rights Reserved. Powered by Blogger . Trending Now

Read More…

These restaurants and takeaways have been voted the best places for Asian food in Derbyshire

These restaurants and takeaways have been voted the best places for Asian food in Derbyshire Several eateries in the city and county shortlisted for awards Share Several restaurants and takeaways in Derbyshire have been nominated for the English Asian Food Awards (Image: Derby Telegraph) Get the biggest Business
Several restaurants and takeaways from across Derby and Derbyshire have been shortlisted for national awards recognising the best venues for Asian food in England.
The finalists for the first ever English Asian Food Awards have been announced following a public vote – and a number of local eateries have made it through as finalists.
The awards aim to recognise restaurants, takeaways and other food establishments across the country for their hard work and service to the Asian food industry.
This includes promoting Asian cuisine and connecting communities through food and culture.
Among the nominations, Derby and Derbyshire are particularly well represented in the Indian food categories. Anayas in Ashbourne has been shortlisted in the 5-star Indian Restaurant of the Year category (Image: Copyright unknown)
For example, in the 5-star Indian Restaurant of the Year category, Derbyshire has two nominations for the Midlands region title.
They are Maazi Matlock, in Causeway Lane, Matlock and Anayas Premier Indian Dining, in Dig Street, Ashbourne. Read More

Read More…

Simply Singapore

10 Simply Singapore #AsiaNewsNetwork Simply Singapore #AsiaNewsNetwork Features Published 10 February 2019 Khetsirin Pholdhampalit (The Nation/ ANN)-SINGAPORE’S most famous shopping precinct, Orchard Road, has long been lined with the stores and boutiques of the world’s leading brands. Today it is also home to the brightest and best of local creations thanks to the opening last month of the two-and-a-half-storey building known as Design Orchard.
Design Orchard is a new retail showcase of designed-in-Singapore brands and also features a co-working/studio space for designers. (courtesy of Design Orchard)
A retail space dedicated to showcasing local talent through 61 home-grown brands covering fashion, beauty and lifestyle, stationery and souvenirs, the new mall – a joint development of the JTC Corporation, Singapore Tourism Board (STB) and Enterprise Singapore and standing at the junction of Cairnhill and Orchard Roads – will become both a one-stop shopping destination for Singapore products and a workshop centre to groom emerging local designers.
“You can shop for items that you can’t find outside Singapore and indeed several of our brands don’t have physical stores. Tourists today want authenticity and uniqueness and Design Orchard will definitely add to the retail diversity to Orchard Road,” says Ranita Sundra, STB’s director of retail and dining.
The ground floor is a retail space for 61 home-grown brands.
The building, designed by Singapore-based firm WOHA, boasts a minimalist design and a clean and modern look thanks to the predominant use of concrete and glass. The porthole concrete structural walls don’t only soften the hardness but also provide inviting openings of the shop displays and ventilation through the building structure.
The 836-square-metre ground floor is a retail space operated by home-grown retailer Naiise that will also regularly organise events to create more enduring and non-conventional retail experiences for shoppers.
The interactive mirror gives information about the product with a simple touch.
“We offer retail technology with self-checkout stations and interactive mirrors, allowing visitors to enjoy shopping on their own. Visitors can show the products they like to the interactive mirror and it will provide the brand story and product information including choice of colours, sizes, prices and similar products,” says Dennis Tay, chief executive officer of Naiise.
An animal-themed series of products by The Animal Project
Different beasts drawn in black-and-white in a naive-style by autistic artists of The Animal Project (TAP), a social enterprise that celebrates, showcases and supports the abilities of persons with special needs, are featured on a collection of mugs, tumblers, pouches and totes.
TAP is known for its curatorship of artists with special needs who are exceptional in illustrating animals, and their animal-themed products are also available at Singapore Zoo. These artists earn royalties from the sale of products and the TAP Collective is currently made up of five autistic students. Half of the profits go to a charity of TAP’s choosing.
A collection of Peranakan capsule necklaces by Eden+Elie
Eden+Elie, the socially conscious jewellery brand that focuses on developing individuals from communities in need into skilled artisans, offers attractive collections of handmade jewellery inspired by intricate heritage beaded designs.
A selection of products by Onlewo
Home furnishing brand Onlewo – the name means “happy nest” in Mandarin – offers a line of whimsical patterned fabrics used for upholstery, wallpaper and soft furnishings. Founder/designer Mike Tay draws the inspiration from his background in Peranakan culture as well as his interest in Singapore’s cultural diversity.
Peranakan motifs, the vintage elements he found in Little India and Chinatown, cultural buildings as well as Singapore’s iconic landmarks Merlion and Gardens by the Bay are reinterpreted into patterned fabrics and wallpapers, ceramic pieces, accessories and stationery.
Valley Arora, a self-taught photographer, loves to explore her city on foot with a camera in her hand. Her favourite images are old elements and motifs of cultural buildings and heritage row houses that encapsulate the diverse cultures and history of this island-state. The photographs are rendered in highly vivid tones and transferred to cushion covers, laptop sleeves, clutches, scarves, serving trays and coasters.
Products by Valley Arora
The 930sqm second floor slated to open in March will be operated by the Textile and Fashion Federation Singapore (Taff). Called the Cocoon Space, it is set to become an incubation space for fashion designers and will feature co-working spaces and resources such as a Makers Studio equipped with professional sewing equipment and a Fabric Library offering a wide selection of textiles.
Taff will also run an incubation programme focused on sustainability, innovation and technology for fashion start-ups from both Singapore and around the region.
The sloping green rooftop is a public space set against the backdrop of Orchard Road.
“The Cocoon Space provides aspiring Singapore designers with shared facilities under one roof, enabling them to testbed and prototype their ideas, and hone their business skills more quickly. Most importantly, we want to work with them to create products that are aligned to industry trends and consumer needs. This is why Taff’s incubation programme will focus on fashion technology and sustainability,” says Alan Yeo, director of retail and design at Enterprise Singapore.
The building’s sloping rooftop with greenery, timber benches and pebble-shaped seats is designed as a multi-function public space surrounded by trees wand with bustling Orchard Road as the backdrop.
GOING NATIVE
Design Orchard at the junction of Orchard and Cairnhill Roads is open daily from 10.30am to 9.30pm.
Visit www.DesignOrchard.sg .
Related Articles Features , Latest Issues What your Chinese zodiac says about your travel style in 2019 | #AsiaN… Features , Latest Issues Chinese horoscope 2019 forecast: Year of the Pig | #AsiaNewsNetwork Features FEATURE: Hopes on ‘greener’ plastics to turn tide on battle for enviro… Features Government unveils new development vision | #AsiaNewsNetwork Features An old, treasured friend that is part of the family #AsiaNewsNetwo… Features Gyeonggi gov’t to push for listing of DMZ as UNESCO World Heritag… 2 hours 2 2 hours ago Authentic Indian food at Khan’s Indian Cuisine Read #AsiaNewsNetwork 2 hours ago An old, treasured friend that is part of the family #AsiaNewsNetwork 2 hours ago ‘Chocolate is all about love after all’ #AsiaNewsNetwork 2 3 hours ago Vietnam hosts the spring flower festival in March #AsiaNewsNetwork 3 hours ago

Read More…

Haze and air pollution return to Bangkok this week #AsiaNewsNetwork

10 Haze and air pollution return to Bangkok this week #AsiaNewsNetwork Haze and air pollution return to Bangkok this week #AsiaNewsNetwork News Photo/The Nation Published 10 February 2019 Bangkok: The Nation/ #AsiaNewsNetwork – Air pollution around Bangkok is expected to worsen again this week with an increase in the level of PM2.5 dust particles
A high-pressure cell over the Central region is forecast and will degrade the air around Bangkok between February 13 and 15, according to the Meteorological Department. Temperatures will also drop slightly in the Central and North regions this week.
Pollution Control Department chief Phuwiang Prakammin said the current improved air quality around Bangkok is due to better air circulation, causing fine dust particles and smoke to dissipate.
Bangkok’s air pollution readings for Sunday remain “moderate”, while the Northeast has another bad day with smog and smoke pollution settling around the agricultural areas.
Khon Kaen, Chon Buri, Nan and Uttaradit are experiencing a worse haze problem this year compared to previous years due to the burning of sugarcane stalks.
Metropolitan police deputy commissioner Pol Maj-Gen Jirasant Kaewsaeng-aek said almost 8,000 vehicles found to be emitting excessive black exhaust had been seized in the first week of February. He said the number of vehicles found violating pollution rules had dropped from an average of 500-600 a day to about 400.
http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30363848
Related Articles News UNESCO World Heritage site lights up winter nights | #AsiaNewsNetwork Latest Issues , News Thailand ratifies ILO convention on workers in fishing industry | #Asi… Latest Issues , News Cyber Safety in Bangladesh: 32pc children bullied online | #AsiaNewsNe… Latest Issues , News Bangladesh unveils new plan to save 4 rivers | #AsiaNewsNetwork Latest Issues , News New drug-sniffing dogs help in RM60mil bust | #AsiaNewsNetwork Latest Issues , News PM Khan promises depoliticisation of bureaucracy | #AsiaNewsNetwork Malaysia Most Recent China’s Skating Champions… 2 hours ago After success at home, Korea’s fashion Songzio Homme plans to head overseas… 3 hours ago Chinese designers present new collections at New York Fashion Week #AsiaNewsNet… 3 hours ago Authentic Indian food at Khan’s Indian Cuisine Read #AsiaNewsNetwork 3 hours ago An old, treasured friend that is part of the family #AsiaNewsNetwork 3 hours ago ‘Chocolate is all about love after all’ #AsiaNewsNetwork 3 hours ago ‘Music in Pyeong Chang’ begins with bow-breaking performance #Asia News… 4 hours ago Vietnam hosts the spring flower festival in March #AsiaNewsNetwork 4 hours ago

Read More…

WEEKLY MENU PLAN (#187)

Share 1 Shares WEEKLY MENU PLAN (#187) – A delicious collection of dinner, side dish and dessert recipes to help you plan your weekly menu and make life easier for you!
In these menu plans, we will be sharing some of our favorite recipe ideas for you to use as you are planning out your meals for the week. Just click any of the recipe titles or pictures to get the recipe.
A little about how we plan our week and our menu plan:
Mondays are soup and salad. Tuesdays we are bringing you delicious Mexican cuisine. Wednesdays are a taste of Italy. Thursdays are designed around yummy sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, and wraps. Fridays are a no cook day around here. Going out with friends and loved ones is something that we think is important. It’s your night off from cooking- enjoy! Saturdays are an exotic food night, it’s a great night to try something new, from cooking with seafood, to trying Indian or Thai dishes. Sundays are a traditional old fashioned all American family dinner- think meat and potatoes.
There will also always be a couple of delectable desserts to use any day you wish. A new weekly menu plan will be posted every SUNDAY morning so be sure to check back each week! CLICK ON THE LINKED RECIPE TITLES OR PHOTOS TO GET THE FULL RECIPE WEEK #187

Read More…

Muscat’s Top 3 Shawarma Spots – As Chosen By You!

Muscat’s Top 3 Shawarma Spots – As Chosen By You! Any way you wrap it, the humble shawarma is an icon in the annals of Middle East street food, with myriad regional varieties vying for top spot in the bellies of the masses. Here are some of our favourite spots in Muscat to grab a mighty wrap of your own, G reece has its juicy gyros; Turkey, its iconic doner kebab; Canada, it’s spicy-sweet donair. Any way you carve, slice or slather it, the formula for some of the world’s best street food always boils down to the same set of criteria: it must be fast and simple, it must be flavourful, and you’ve got to be able to eat it on the go. And if there’s one ultimate contender at the tasty top, it’s the humble, hand-held shawarma – a rite of passage to the cuisine of a region as vast as it is diverse. The options (and regional rivalries!) are endless when it comes to what constitutes the perfect shawarma. Maybe you’re a lover of the Egyptian version slathered in tahini; or the Lebanese variety topped with fresh tabbouleh, extra garlic mayo and a handful of fries. While preference is down to a matter of taste, the basic shawarma is – at its most elemental – thinly-sliced shavings of succulent chicken, lamb or beef cooked on a vertical rotisserie, smeared with fresh and/or pickled veg, and topped with a finger-licking, chin-dribbling sauce – usually tahini, garlic mayo or the more fiery garlic paste. Its construction is about as simple as it gets yet its flavour profile is one that exudes surprising complexity. Foodies are a fiercely vocal lot. Get wind of a good shawarma joint and you won’t stop hearing about it. Know of a bad shawarma spot and, chances are, you won’t stop hearing about it either. Thankfully, Yummy Oman is here to bring you only the best. Turkish Corner Location: Al Dhayafa St., Al Ghubra North, beside the Indian School Muscat Timings: 9:00 a.m. till 2:00 a.m., daily Contact: (+968) 9972-7599 This shawarma stalwart sprang from humble beginnings to reign supreme on Muscat’s foodie scene. It’s not-so secret secret? Simple, flavoursome fare that’s as cheap as chips. Expect line-ups on the weekend for takeaway and table service as the masses come flooding in for helpings of their roasted chicken and shawarma plates and their falafel. Portions are generous, as are the sides of hummus, baba ghanoush and fattoush; and it’s wee-hours closing time makes it a perfect stop on the way home after a night on the town. Must-try: While chicken – roasted, grilled or shawarma-style – is their most-popular menu item. It’s the fluffy-soft, chewy pitta-style bread that makes the whole experience. Made in-house, it’s the perfect vehicle to sop up all those succulent shawarma juices or daub and dip with a fresh bowl of moutabel. Trust us; you won’t be able to get enough of it. Istanboly Location: Al Khuwair, opposite the Radisson Blu Timings: Open 24 hours daily Contact: (+968) 2448-0900 This round-the-clock rotisserie has been carving up some of Al Khuwair’s best shawarmas at pocket-friendly prices for the past ten years. With ample outdoor seating it’s the perfect spot for grab-and-go goodness – and you’ll be hard-pressed to find a meal for two that runs into more than RO10. And while their shawarmas are the stuff of legend, their shish tawook and mixed grill platters are also stellar, while their lamb chops fall off the bone. Must-try: The hummus shawarma plate and Turkish kebab are comfort foods at their finest. Or, amp it up if you’re feeling like a kick to the palate with a portion of their Sikander Donor shawarma. Al Hawas Location: Madinat Qaboos, next to the Al Maha petrol station Timings: 6:00 a.m. till 2:00 a.m., daily Contact: (+968) 2469-9029 A consistent crowd-pleaser among the capital’s foodie faithful, and known for its spicy brand of shawarma, Al Hawas is a family-run establishment that’s been around since 1983. With time on its side, and countless shawarmas served, it still remains one of Muscat’s top contenders for your rials when it comes to cheap and cheerful fare, served fresh. Service is fast and simple, like any good street food locale should be as you can simply drive in, park, and eat. The chicken served in their shawarmas is perfectly-marinated and grilled to a light golden char. Slathered with lashings of their secret house-made spicy sauce and you’re in hand-held heaven. Must-try: No matter what you order, you’ve got to ask for it spicy. And for the vegetarians among you, their Spicy Falafel Shawarma is absolutely top-drawer! Garlic Mayonaise Some might argue that a shawarma is only as good as its star condiment – and this simple, zesty-zingy garlic mayo ties those flavours all together. Serves: 6

Read More…

Russian Arctic archipelago sounds alarm over aggressive polar bears

10 Russian Arctic archipelago sounds alarm over aggressive polar bears Russian Arctic archipelago sounds alarm over aggressive polar bears News Published 10 February 2019
By Agence France-Presse (Moscow)-A Russian Arctic archipelago on Saturday declared an emergency situation over an “invasion” of dozens of aggressive polar bears that have entered homes and public buildings.
Russia’s northeastern Novaya Zemlya archipelago, which has a population of around 3,000 people, has appealed for help to tackle “a mass invasion of polar bears into inhabited areas,” regional authorities said in a statement.
Russian authorities have so far refused permission to shoot the bears but are sending a commission to investigate the situation and have not ruled out a cull.
Polar bears are affected by global warming with melting Arctic ice forcing them to spend more time on land where they compete for food.
They are recognised as an endangered species in Russia and hunting them is banned.
Russia has air force and air defence troops based on Novaya Zemlya.
Since December, 52 polar bears have regularly visited the archipelago’s main settlement, Belushya Guba, with some displaying “aggressive behaviour,” local official Alexander Minayev said in a report to regional authorities.
This included “attacks on people and entering residential homes and public buildings,” said Minayev, the deputy chief of the local administration.
“There are constantly 6 to 10 bears inside the settlement,” he said.
“People are scared, they are afraid to leave their homes… parents are frightened to let their children go to schools and kindergartens.”
The head of the local administration Zhigansha Musin said that the numbers of polar bears were unprecedented.
“I’ve been on Novaya Zemlya since 1983 and there’s never been such a mass invasion of polar bears,” he told regional officials.
Bears are constantly inside a military garrison and “literally chase people” he said as well as going into the entrances of blocks of flats.
Local officials complained that measures to scare off polar bears such as vehicle and dog patrols have not been effective as polar bears feel secure and no longer react.
The federal environmental resources agency has refused to issue licences to shoot the most aggressive bears.
A working group of regional and federal officials is set to visit the archipelago to assess the situation and the measures taken so far.
The Arkhangelsk regional authorities, which oversee Novaya Zemlya, said that if all else failed “shooting the animals could be the only possible forced measure.”
In January, a defence ministry official said that hundreds of disused military buildings had been demolished on Novaya Zemlya because polar bears were settling inside them.
Related Articles News Bengalis arrested in Mindon Township Latest Issues , News Lucy, Singapore Zoo’s resident female giraffe, dies during childb… Latest Issues , News Malaysian Energy Minister to marry IOI Properties CEO | #AsiaNewsNetw… Tech , News Huawei invests in Kenyan university to boost ICT training | #AsiaNewsN… News NBTC’s move for 5G spectrum bids draws mixed views #AsiaNewsNetwork Latest Issues , News Cambodia receives UN human rights guidance | #AsiaNewsNetwork Malaysia Most Recent China’s Skating Champions… 2 hours ago After success at home, Korea’s fashion Songzio Homme plans to head overseas… 3 hours ago Chinese designers present new collections at New York Fashion Week #AsiaNewsNet… 3 hours ago Authentic Indian food at Khan’s Indian Cuisine Read #AsiaNewsNetwork 3 hours ago An old, treasured friend that is part of the family #AsiaNewsNetwork 3 hours ago ‘Chocolate is all about love after all’ #AsiaNewsNetwork 3 hours ago ‘Music in Pyeong Chang’ begins with bow-breaking performance #Asia News… 4 hours ago Vietnam hosts the spring flower festival in March #AsiaNewsNetwork 4 hours ago

Read More…

Cheese through the ages

Listen Cheese through the ages
History-writing is changing and its scope expanding. A group of historians have shifted their attention from political history to the history of things that reflect the social and cultural norms of society.
Another interesting concern is the history of food. Since food is the basic necessity of all human beings, historians have examined the progress that human civilisations have made from eating raw meat and vegetables to cooking food. Spices were used to add flavour to food and professional cooks were trained to develop new cuisines for aristocratic classes.
At this stage, books on food recipes were written to guide cooks to prepare special food. Royal kitchens across the world became sites where some of the most delicious cuisine was prepared. During special feasts, guests were offered a vast array of dishes to show the host’s generosity and affluence. Abul Fazl (1551-1602) offers some details of the Royal Mughal Kitchen in ‘Aayeen-e-Akbari’, which shows the variety of bread, rice and meat dishes that were cooked with the help of various spices. While describing the culture of Lucknow, Abdul Haleem Sharar (1860-1926), an historian and Indian author, writes about competitions that were held among nobles whereby each of them would serve unique cuisines at banquets and make every attempt to surpass each other.
Although cheese wasn’t widely eaten during the Mughal period, it was quite a popular item in most ancient civilisations and was especially used in pastoral societies. On this topic, Paul Kindstedt’s book titled ‘Cheese and Culture: A History of Cheese and its Place in Western Civilization’, published in 2012, provides useful details on how cheese is made and used.
According to Kindstedt, cheese was a popular ingredient in the Sumerian civilisation and was liked by Goddess Inanna. It was not only prepared in her temple, but was also offered to her as a ritual by her devotees. There was a painting on the wall of Goddess Inanna’s temple that showed the process of milking cattle and preparing yogurt and cheese.
Cheese was also used as an ingredient in other civilisations, except in Vedic culture. This was because it was customary for people to eat freshly-cooked food in Vedic society. Since the Sumerians had strong trade relations with the Egyptians and the Hittites of Anatolia, they were able to introduce cheese to these societies.
Even the Greeks were fond of cheese and offered cheese cakes to Asclepius, the deity of health, to please her and on special occasions when their wishes were fulfilled. It was also a tradition that during symposiums – drinking parties that took place after meals at a banquet – cheese cake was offered to guests at the end of a party.
The tradition of making cheese continued during the Roman period and the Roman nobility, which was involved in agricultural activities, were interested in innovative experiments in cheese-making. Cato the Elder (234BC-149 BC), who was a member of the Roman Senate and possessed agricultural land and cattle, wrote a book on the various recipes on cheese-making. Pliny the Elder (23AD-79 AD), the author of book ‘Natural history’, wrote that the Persian prophet Zoroaster depended on cheese during the 20 years that he lived in a desert.
In Europe, cheese-making was popularised by the priests of monasteries. In addition to spending time in worship, it was their duty to bake bread, milk cattle, and prepare cheese that was consumed by fellow priests. It is said that Charlemagne, the holy Roman emperor, once spent the night in a monastery while he was travelling to some parts of his empire. At that time, he was not in a mood to eat meat. The bishop of the monastery offered him cheese that was made by the priests. The emperor liked the taste of cheese as soon as he put a piece of it in his mouth. He asked the bishop to regularly supply cheese to his palace.
The climate of Europe suits to the process of making cheese. Therefore, it has been favoured by all classes of society. Holland became especially famous for producing dairy products, including cheese. In addition, the peasants of France also took a deep interest in cheese and conducted countless experiments to prepare its different varieties. At present, cheese has become one of the most preferred food items in Europe because it is nourishing, cheap and easily accessible to all sections of society.
In Ancient India, cheese was not accepted as a food item owing to strict religious conditions whereby people were expected to eat freshly-cooked food. But in present-day India, cheese has become quite popular and has even been used an alternative for meat. Different delicious cuisines are cooked with the help of cheese. In Pakistan, where a large segment of the population is addicted to eating meat, there is a pressing need for people to develop a taste for cheese and use it to prepare a whole range of dishes. Cheese is, after all, healthy and affordable.
The writer is a veteran historian and scholar.
History-writing is changing and its scope expanding. A group of historians have shifted their attention from political history to the history of things that reflect the social and cultural norms of society.
Another interesting concern is the history of food. Since food is the basic necessity of all human beings, historians have examined the progress that human civilisations have made from eating raw meat and vegetables to cooking food. Spices were used to add flavour to food and professional cooks were trained to develop new cuisines for aristocratic classes.
At this stage, books on food recipes were written to guide cooks to prepare special food. Royal kitchens across the world became sites where some of the most delicious cuisine was prepared. During special feasts, guests were offered a vast array of dishes to show the host’s generosity and affluence. Abul Fazl (1551-1602) offers some details of the Royal Mughal Kitchen in ‘Aayeen-e-Akbari’, which shows the variety of bread, rice and meat dishes that were cooked with the help of various spices. While describing the culture of Lucknow, Abdul Haleem Sharar (1860-1926), an historian and Indian author, writes about competitions that were held among nobles whereby each of them would serve unique cuisines at banquets and make every attempt to surpass each other.
Although cheese wasn’t widely eaten during the Mughal period, it was quite a popular item in most ancient civilisations and was especially used in pastoral societies. On this topic, Paul Kindstedt’s book titled ‘Cheese and Culture: A History of Cheese and its Place in Western Civilization’, published in 2012, provides useful details on how cheese is made and used.
According to Kindstedt, cheese was a popular ingredient in the Sumerian civilisation and was liked by Goddess Inanna. It was not only prepared in her temple, but was also offered to her as a ritual by her devotees. There was a painting on the wall of Goddess Inanna’s temple that showed the process of milking cattle and preparing yogurt and cheese.
Cheese was also used as an ingredient in other civilisations, except in Vedic culture. This was because it was customary for people to eat freshly-cooked food in Vedic society. Since the Sumerians had strong trade relations with the Egyptians and the Hittites of Anatolia, they were able to introduce cheese to these societies.
Even the Greeks were fond of cheese and offered cheese cakes to Asclepius, the deity of health, to please her and on special occasions when their wishes were fulfilled. It was also a tradition that during symposiums – drinking parties that took place after meals at a banquet – cheese cake was offered to guests at the end of a party.
The tradition of making cheese continued during the Roman period and the Roman nobility, which was involved in agricultural activities, were interested in innovative experiments in cheese-making. Cato the Elder (234BC-149 BC), who was a member of the Roman Senate and possessed agricultural land and cattle, wrote a book on the various recipes on cheese-making. Pliny the Elder (23AD-79 AD), the author of book ‘Natural history’, wrote that the Persian prophet Zoroaster depended on cheese during the 20 years that he lived in a desert.
In Europe, cheese-making was popularised by the priests of monasteries. In addition to spending time in worship, it was their duty to bake bread, milk cattle, and prepare cheese that was consumed by fellow priests. It is said that Charlemagne, the holy Roman emperor, once spent the night in a monastery while he was travelling to some parts of his empire. At that time, he was not in a mood to eat meat. The bishop of the monastery offered him cheese that was made by the priests. The emperor liked the taste of cheese as soon as he put a piece of it in his mouth. He asked the bishop to regularly supply cheese to his palace.
The climate of Europe suits to the process of making cheese. Therefore, it has been favoured by all classes of society. Holland became especially famous for producing dairy products, including cheese. In addition, the peasants of France also took a deep interest in cheese and conducted countless experiments to prepare its different varieties. At present, cheese has become one of the most preferred food items in Europe because it is nourishing, cheap and easily accessible to all sections of society.
In Ancient India, cheese was not accepted as a food item owing to strict religious conditions whereby people were expected to eat freshly-cooked food. But in present-day India, cheese has become quite popular and has even been used an alternative for meat. Different delicious cuisines are cooked with the help of cheese. In Pakistan, where a large segment of the population is addicted to eating meat, there is a pressing need for people to develop a taste for cheese and use it to prepare a whole range of dishes. Cheese is, after all, healthy and affordable.
The writer is a veteran historian and scholar. Latest News

Read More…